Skip to main content

tv   News  Al Jazeera  October 6, 2013 7:00am-9:01am EDT

7:00 am
those numbers of al qaeda and others literally... >> secretary of state john kerry speaking out about the u.s. simultaneous stalth raids in two african nation, one leading to the capture of an al qaeda official wanted for more than a decade. tropical storm karen has been downgraded. for folks along the gulf coast. they are not out of the woods yet. >> if it had a story in history that was offending a sizeable group of people, i'd thing about changing it. >> president obama weighing in on the sports controversy - the
7:01 am
name of washington d.c.'s football team. . >> my legs have fallen. >> some of the world's best story tellers coming together to share the art of the story. >> good morning and welcome to al jazeera, i'm del walters in new york city. twin raids were carried out on saturday, who say special forces launched special attacks in libya and somalia, aimed at al qaeda and al-shabab. while travelling in asia secretary of state kerry said the raids against militants in north africa is a message against terrorism. >> we hope that this makes clear that the united states of
7:02 am
america will never stop in its effort to hold those accountable who conduct acts of terror, with those numbers of al qaeda and other territories. literally you can run, but you can't hide. we will continue to try to bring people to justice in an appropriate way, with hopes that these activities against everybody in the world will stop. >> we begin our coverage in somalia, where a navy seal team launched an offensive against a senior member of al-shabab. >> we don't have a great deal of information beyond the acknowledgment from the pentagon that its troops were involved in the raid at al barawe on saturday warning. and that they missed their intended target. unofficially sources are telling us that it was sooel team 6 responsible for the separation,
7:03 am
the same unit responsible for killing osama bin laden in 2011. we understand that the intended target was the leader of al-shabab, who our sources are telling us was believed to have been in the seaside house at the time of the attack. al-shabab said, for its part, that there was no senior commanders there and only one of its guards was killed in the operation. in the attack. al-shabab says that they were anticipating this operation, and that seems to be confirmed by the fact that it was largely unsuccessful, the fact that al-shabab fought off one of the world's most elite special forces units. >> the other raid happened 4,000 miles away in libya. the target was a suspected member of al-qaeda in tripoli. the suspect was confirmed by pentagon officials to be abu anas al liby, and he is wanted by the u.s. for more than a decade and has a $5 million reward on his head. kenya is giving a clearer picture of the people who
7:04 am
carried out their attack on a mall, releasing security video, showing four men carrying ak 37s. it contradict earlier estimates that 10-15 attackers were involved. kenya say they are able to name all four men. >> nearly all of the workers furloughed during the shutdown are expected to be back on the job this week. >> come back to work. that's the order from the secretary of defence to nearly 400,000 civilian employees worldwide. on saturday chuck hagel announced thanks to a law guaranteeing that u.s. troops will be paid during the shutdown the pentagon can eliminate furloughs for those whose responsibilities relate to the moral of others. some of that relates to the commissaries where military
7:05 am
families stretch their dollars. all commissaries have closed and it ruined thousands of families budgets. >> it's ridiculous that you take that away from the people fighting for your country. >> with the pentagon recall, hundreds of thousands of workers are in limbo. at the johnson spase center in houston, those assigned to mission control are on the job. other nasa employees wonder what will happen to them and their families if congress and the white house don't strike a deal on a new budget soon. >> i think they are playing chicken with our lives. we have been through a pay freeze and now this. i've had enough. >> the president and republicans in congress spent saturday pointing fingers at each other. >> what we can-do is engage in the brinksmanship where a small faction of the republican party ends up forcing them into
7:06 am
brinksmanship. >> it doesn't make sense if the president has an axe to grind with the opposing party, why he would want to put the american people in the middle of that and enforce the pain on them. >> but so far they are no closer to ending the shutdown. it's a political stalemate that is incomprehensible to millions of americans who realise how much they do count on the federal government for their wellbeing. >> the pentagon's budget chief expects a large percentage of those workers to return as soon as monday as the timetable for the full return is unknown. >> at least four u.s. troops have been killed during a joint military operation in the south of afghanistan, according to a report by the associated press. the attack happened in the kandahar province. the soldiers were killed by a roadside bomb. the incident marks the worst attack against u.s. forces in afghanistan since june.
7:07 am
afghan president hamid karzai is now looking to extend his presidential rule for life. he's been in power for more than a decade. hamid karzai is seeking a role as a presidential advisor. hamid karzai is said to be building a european mansion next door to the presidential palace. with six months to go before the april elections, jane ferguson looks at the men who would replace hamid karzai, and the dangers they face. >> when presidential candidates arrived to register a show of force is important. they must prove political and tribal support. ambitious candidates face serious threats from the taliban. most say they know there'll be attacks, but the elections will go ahead. >> i think they cannot do this. they can bother us in the period of the holding election, but they are not able to stop it
7:08 am
completely. >> while politicians and ex-warlords can mobilise private security, ordinary voters don't have that luxury. the taliban said it will target the elections, and as usual in afghanistan, it is likely that civilians will suffer the most. just trying to organise the democratic process and vote in it. as voter registrations continue across the country afghan forces stepped up security checks around registration centres. in areas like ghazni and kandahar, where there's a strong taliban presence, being able to run facilities like this is a challenge. if people in some areas of the country cannot vote on election day because of the security reasons, the result could be declared unconstitutional. foreign forces ending their roles, security will be the responsibility of the afghan security forces. their greatest test yet.
7:09 am
>> in 2009 and 2010 the forces cooperate with this process. this time the initial force, they will support the process not direct. they want to support afghan election only in some - in some indirect area like air support, logistic support, not specific security support. >> as time runs out for presidential candidates to register, afghanistan's would-be future leaders will continue to declare their hopes for peace. this is still a country at war, where democratic processes must involve guns. >> and any candidates for president in afghanistan, as well as the two vice presidents must resign from the government
7:10 am
and parliament by today. >> there is breaking news coming out of syria. u.n. officials say chemical weapons inspectors have begun to destroy the syrian stockpile and machinery. the operation is being carried out by a chemical weapons watchdog group based out of the netherlands. they'll have nine months to complete the mission - finding, dismantling president bashar al-assad's 1,000- tonne arsenal. >> a german magazine goats bashar al-assad as having made mistakes, but no side of the war is free of blame. in an an interview, bashar al-assad says he'd welcome germany to be a mediator, and said russia is a friend of syria. he repeated insistence that government forces was not spog for the chemical weapons attack near damascus. >> taxpayers are up for millions
7:11 am
in the trial of a shooter. $5 million is being spend to trial and convict major hasan. he admitted to killing 13 people in a shooting rampage in 2009. more than a million dollars was spent on transportation, including $20,000 for a helicopter, and $90,000 on lodging. >> a wildfire is burning out of control in san diego county california. the santa ana winds are fuelling the fire that began yesterday. it burnt 1,000 acres and is being fought on the ground and the air. the naval hospital had to be evacuated and housing units. four buildings have been damaged. >> residents of newtown, conneticut voted to accept a referendum to rebuild sandy hook elementary school. it will be built on the same spot as the old one. they have to decide whether to accept $50 million in grant
7:12 am
money. officials voted on a plan to rebuild the school, it's expected to open in late 2015 or early 2016. >> a mandatory evacuation order has been liveded in louisiana as -- lifted in louisiana as tropical storm karen is diminishes. many had spent the night in shelters. jonathan martin is in new orleans. how many were affected by the evacuations there? >> most of those evacuations ordered were voluntary after karen weakened. most of those people decided to go home. people decided it would be safe to go home. there was a shelter in a low-lying areas, pakenham's parish, where at least 50 decided to stay in the shelter, not wanting to take chances, given that a lot of those people
7:13 am
dealt with isaac and katrina in the past. many people decided, again, to go home. at this point it looks like because we had a little rain overnight, a little wind, people at this point feel there's no major threat here with karen continuing to stall and weaken. >> so what is next? what are emergency officials doing now that karen has been downgraded? >> well, despite the storm or the depression at this point weakening, emergency officials say they are on standby, waiting to see what had thing does. many of the state emergency officials are embedded with fima in the war room, looking at the latest information coming in. they have meals ready to eat, bottles of water, search and rescue teams ready. they know here in this part of louisiana, how unpredictable the weather situations can be. they want to make sure just in case they have personnel on standby. really, from what we are hearing for the next 24 hours at least.
7:14 am
they'll watch this thing closely to make sure. >> thank you. better to be safe than sorry. jonathan martin joining us live from pakenham parish. >> although karen is weaker than expected it is expected to cause problems along the gulf. we turn to jalelah ahmed. >> we expect the tropical depression to bring heavy rain. i'll tell you why karen weakened. it's because of a frontal boundary that pushes towards the east. the frontal boundary brought a cost across portions of south dakota, but we had ha blizzard. we have footage of the blizzard that killed three people on the road way, given the fact that they were covered with heavy snow fall. we had 14 tornados reported across nebraska, 20 within the last two days across the midwest. we'll have to deal with the
7:15 am
chance of severe weather today because the frontal boundary will shift to the east. with the strong winds, look at the map behind me. we did see karen weaken a bit. most of the thunder storms are just to the east of the actual center of the storm, and we are going to see the storm fall apart as we track into the afternoon. we have the threat of heavy rainfall, 1-3 inches." new orleans is under a flood advisory as we track into the afternoon. we expect the area of low pressure make its way onshore. we are expecting to see rip currents. anyone along the gulf, we want you to use precautions. take it easy, because the rain fall on the i-10 will be heavy. the south-east received an abundance of rain all summer long. we'll have heavy rainfall into tomorrow, tuesday and wednesday. that rain will travel up the east coast, into the north-east and provide plenty of moisture across pennsylvania, on into new
7:16 am
york state. take a look at atlanta - sunday on into monday - showers and thunder storms. in the forecast by tuesday and wednesday the bulk of the moisture will be across the mid-atlantic and in the north-east. in the north-east the frontal boundary is producing a bit of rain across portions of ohio into pennsylvania. as we track into tomorrow, tuesday and wednesday - that's when the heaviest of the rain will fall into new york. along the coast it will be quiet. as we look towards the south-west, a different story unfolding. high pressure in control especially in nevada. the winds are pushing from offshore. they are pushing down into southern california, and funnelling into the valleys, that's where we have low level humidity. when you have high pressure, it's fuel for the fires to burn. that's what we are going to have to deal with today, into tomorrow. we expect to see the santa ana
7:17 am
winds subside as we track into the next 24 hours of as of now, we have red-flag warnings in effect across los angeles and southern portions of california. we advise folks to use extra precautions, especially if you have fires burning outside. >> thank you. take it easy out there. >> president obama stepping into the controversial debate over the name of the washington redskins. speaking in an interview the president said he'd consider changing the name if he was the team's orn -- owner. >> washington redskins criticised because the name is offensive. >> i have to say if i was the owner of the team, and i knew there was a name of my team, if it had a story in history, if it was offending a sizeable group of people, i would think about changing it. >> despite that, the team's owner says he will not change
7:18 am
the name and members of an indian tribe are expected to protest at an owners' meeting in washington d.c. on monday. >> still ahead - the fight to become u.s. citizens. the movement that sent thousands into the streets. the u.s. is not the only nation dealing with cheap chinese imports. a south american country, where the textile industry is almost extinct.
7:19 am
7:20 am
the remains of some of the migrants killed in the shipwreck off lampedusa are awaiting repatriation. the coffins of 111 african migrants have been placed in an airport hangar. waters are too choppy for rescuers to search for more victims. fishermen ventured on to the water, but just to throw a bow quay of flowers where the ship went down. >> the push for immigration reform was front and center an saturday in 140 cities across
7:21 am
the nation. thousands took to the streets to call for an end of more than 4,000 people described as undocumented. >> reforms that will carve a path to citizenship for 11 million undocumented immigrants, and keep families together. >> families are getting destroyed. families - the children are getting left alone in their homes. they don't know when their parents are coming back home, and once they find out they don't have anywhere to go. >> in new york city demonstrators talked about what life is like without citizenship. this man's family is in mexico city. >> 13 years i haven't seen my mother or family. i can't take my son out. >> he and others say they won't give up the fight. >> thousands of new yorkers are marching in solidarity across
7:22 am
the brooklyn bridge calling for immigration reform. they are not alone. this is happening in more than 100 cities across the country. in arizona 3,000 protesters marched to city hall. >> we are americans. we are here for the same dream. we came here because we are also americans. we've been americanised. we are americans. >> those sentiments echoed in chicago, miami. >> chant chant >> atlanta, national tennessee, philadelphia and in los angeles they call the demonstrations the national day of dignity and respect. one new yorker stood out in the crowd saying immigration reform should mean tightening border security. >> i don't care, they are an innovating army. all i care about is they go to their own country. i don't care how it happens.
7:23 am
>> the rallies were a prelude to a larger protest planned in the national mall in washington on tuesday. >> these protests coming three days after house departments introduced a bill. it would allow undocumented immigrants temporary legal status within six months. >> three americans are dead after a plane crash in columbia. they were on a nar cottics flight. they lost radio contract. a member of the panama national guard was killed and two americans injured. the columbian military ruled out the plane being shot down by rebels, who are active across that country. >> hundreds of textile workers in per u are having to find new
7:24 am
work. peru was the largest clothing manager in america. we have this report. >> this was a successful businessman until a year ago. now a family member helps him sew on the busiest days. he had to fire 10 employees. one of 15 sowing machines are at work. >> translation: the business reduced by 80%. being paralyzed is like being bankrupt. i only keep going because i have a few faithful clients. >> edwin is one of 30,000 clothing manufacturers. for decades this has been one of the most successful industries in the country. chinese clothes flooding the markets are crushing the sale of peruvian goods. >> >> they say it's impossible to compete with chinese prices, costing a third of production costs here.
7:25 am
as a result 2,000 businesses have gone bankrupt and more than 4,000 businessmen are leaving this area to work at home so they can lower costs. >> businessmen sapol sis, including a -- sapol sis, including a free trade agreement in 2010 is tearing their business apart. >> translation: the state is not promoting industrialisation. >> the consumer protection office is investigating whether chinese clothing is being imported at subsidised or below-cost prices. there's no evidence that products break world trade organization agreements. >> there has been chinese clothes, even for the free trade agreement. production costs may have increased because labor is not cheap any more. they are not competitive. people must think of doing something else. >> reshaping his business will
7:26 am
be tough. >> translation: we are in a crisis because the job allowed me to have money, educate my children. i have never been so economicicly tight. >> without preorders he doesn't have money to start another business. he's selling his machines, and is selling sawdust to make ends meet. >> some perspective the textile industry in peru dates back to the days of the pre-columbian ingas. still ahead - tough talk from john kerry. >> the numbers of al qaeda, and other terrorist organizations - you can run but not hide. >> secretary of state sounding off on the ops raid that netted an al-qaeda leader in africa. >> and sport - a big night for the man called big papi. for the first time in his career - i'll tell you what he
7:27 am
did.
7:28 am
7:29 am
welcome back. i'm del walters. here are the top stories - the pentagon ordered most of the civilian workforce back to work after the government shutdown. karen - she has been downgraded to a tropical depression. the storm expected to make landfall bringing rain and flooding to low-lying areas along the gulf. >> u.s. special forces launched raids in two african countries on saturday aimed at members of al qaeda and al-shabab. >> secretary of state john kerry is speaking out against - rather about the raids in africa. speaking to reporters while attending the apec summit in indonesia. john kerry says the capture is a boost to the fight against terrorism. >> we hope that this makes clear that the united states of america will never stop in its
7:30 am
effort to hold those accountable who conduct acts of terror, and those number of al qaeda and other terrorist organizations literally can run, but they can't hide. we will continue to try to bring people to justice in an appropriate way, with hopes that all these activities against everybody in the world will stop. >> and with more now from that apec summit, we turn to scott hydler. >> like 20 other heads of state president obama was supposed to leave home, make his way here for the apec summit. he's not. friday he announced he cancelled his trip because of the shutdown of the government. secretary of state john kerry is here in his place. the indonesians are disappointed that president obama isn't coming, but they understand. security will be as tight here
7:31 am
in bali. the russian government is disappointed. they wanted sideline conversations with the president about the situation in syria. negotiations for the tpp, the transpacific partnership, the world's largest trade agreement. the united states wants the negotiations completed by the end of the year. the president not being here will set that back. monday, when the summit kicks off, the focus will shift away from who is not here, but who is. chinese president xi jinping has been on a charm offensive. it will be interesting if he can use the energy and president obama here to his advantage. the government shutdown is hitting native american communities hard. they depend on the federal government for health care, housing, senior citizen service and magistrate of natural resources. a tribe struggling to survive is in washington state. we have this report.
7:32 am
>> as the federal shutdown bore down on his tribe on the northern shore of washington's olympic penninesuala chairman w ron alan scrambled to leverage assets, lands and a casino, taking out a $750,000 loan at a hefty 6% replacing federal funds. the tribe needs the money for social services, food aid and scholarships. >> it costs us money. we are carrying out federal functions with our money, subsidising the federal government to carry out their legal obligations to the indian community. >> without federal agencies on the job to monitor them, they are not legally allowed to fish. budget cuts were hurting indian health services, head start programs and food aid. the congress of american innedians says: -- indians says.
7:33 am
. >> the jamestown tribe is business savvy, and self-governing. many other tribes are less fortunate, and all rely, to varying degrees, on federal funds for services like foster care, college scholarships, nutrition programs and health services. >> here at the tribal health clinic patients and staff are anxious about the shutdown. >> there's so much misinformation out about the budget, obamacare. we spend an enormous amount of our time trying to calm folks down, creating less stress. there's a lot of stress out there. >> american indian communities are among those that may benefit from obamacare's expansion and coverage. tribal leaders want the process under way and return to their
7:34 am
own businesses and budgets. >> the bureau of indian affairs says some essential services will continue during the shutdown, including law enforcement and firefight, and some health clinics. >> the debt ceeling is fast approaching a deadline. joining us now to talk about that possibility is a finance journalist. that deadline of october 17th, that is not a hard and fast deadline though, is it. >> that's right. it's not hard and fast. it's important. at october 17th, the u.s. government will lose its ability to borrow. they'll have cash. they'll have, you know, estimates are about $30 billion in cash, which will get them through from october 18th until the end of the month. then at november 1st, they won't
7:35 am
have enough money to pay bills. when you have a third less, have you to figure out who am i going to pay. >> rob peter to pay paul. >> exactly. >> some people - we expect to hear this from both sides of the political aisle - who will say doom and gloom will happen after 17 october. what will happen to the world markets if the u.s. defaults? >> what will happen - i don't want to say chaos. a lot of folks predict that because the u.s. is the main economy in the world. they have the reserve currency and special status. if they default they'll lose the status and become another nation, as fragile as the rest of the world. we talk about europe or latin america, and we point fingers at their frajility. united states will be in that category. with 1 november, analyst think - particularly morgan stanley came out with this - they feel the
7:36 am
u.s. government will take drastic measures and maybe stop making social security payments, thereby hoping the public will be called to action. they predict come 1 november, the default, the u.s. government will not allow the default to happen by motivating the public to take action. >> if you don't get money you get kind of mad. >> just a little bit. >> one thing we are watching is the fact that the stock market has not been going up and down. should we watch the stock market. why are we not seeing the volatility we have seen in years past? >> this past week particularly - you're absolutely right - the markets stayed within a certain zone. it's because investors believe the democrats, republicans - they will find a resolution. that the powers that be will not allow the united states to go off the first call cliff. over the next couple of weeks
7:37 am
there may be volatility as folks get cautious and nervous - are they going to make it and come to an agreement. you are seeing a tempered reaction. >> other markets defaulted. why not the u.s. what is different about the u.s. to the other markets. >> in terms of fundamental economic structure in the united states, you know, it's had a great track record. robust gdp growth, transpersons si and financial infrastructure. there has been 70 countries, from the 1800s to the 1900s - even the last 20 years - that had a level of default. a lot of those countries, a financial crisis may have been the precursor leading to a default. we had the financial crisis in the united states, taking us to a decision in 2011, and here we are again, 2013. so there is a comparative or parallel in that regard with the financial crisis here, driving
7:38 am
us or contributing to us being at this point. >> what happens to china. how do they fit into this economic equation? >> well, china is a top two trading partner for the united states. they hold over 1.2 trillion in u.s. debt and bonds. so basically if united states defaults, the value of those will go down. china will be sitting with, from their perspective, assets with no value. they'll think "if the united states can't pay the bills, you won't be able to buy the goods china produces", china was under scrutiny for lowering gdp. what a lot of folks failed to account for that - who would they sell to? europe was in a crisis, united states had low gdp, trying to get to 3% for the past three or four years. if china has output, who can buy their goods. same now.
7:39 am
if united states defaults, they don't have money to pay the bills or small business owners who contract with or employees or social security, much less paying counterparties and the rest of the world. if the u.s. economy catches a cold, the rest of the world gets the flu. >> or maybe a heart attack or something a little more drastic. >> well, we turn to egypt, where thousands of promilitary egyptians are gathering in tahir sqare. they are marking the attack of military during the 1973 war. we look at the three weeks of that war and the divided egypt that is celebrating it. the famous scenes that marked the first and only time egypt's military had the upper hand in four wars with israel. although an-israeli counterattack followed a few days later and the stalemate was settled through a peace
7:40 am
treaty, egyptians considered crossing the suez canal a victory, a moment restoring arab dignity. it raised the status of the egyptian army and was seized by every leader as an opportunity to enhance their rule. sadat was the president during that war. he lacked the charisma of his predecessor, but built his legacy around it. sadat held victory parades and was assassinated during the 1981 ceremony. >> his successor hosni mubarak rode the wave, emphasising the first airstrike of the war and his role as an airfort commander at the time. during his time in power, and with security in mind hosni mubarak held over the top celebrations, which often turned into musical i'd olising him.
7:41 am
including this one in the 1990s, featuring some of egypt's top performers singing, "we chose him and vow allegiance to him." (clapping) >> when the military took over after hosni mubarak was overthrown in 2011, its policies were criticised by young revolutionaries. military ruler, field marshall, invoked people's support to the armed forces. then egypt's first democratically-elected civilian president, mohamed morsi, who sought to capitalise on the ceremonies of 6 october. thousands that attended were brought in by the muslim brotherhood and other religious parties. mohamed morsi used the ceremony to produce a report card - ipp
7:42 am
flating achievements and antagonising critics and the military. today the 40th anniversary of the 1973 war comes as the military plays a major role in running the country. after removing mohamed morsi were power. egypt has since been divided between those who support the military and those against the coup. rival rallies have been called for in tahir sqare for sunday. 6 october once again an opportunity to advance political agendas. . and concerning those rallies egypt's interior ministry sent a warning that they will "firmly confront violent demonstrations taking part in tahir sqare today." >> we turn to the sport as youngstersion in okay land. >> it's rookie night. the as got it done with new bys
7:43 am
like sonny gray, stephen vogt, and they are in the game for the second-straight year. oat land had to man up against the tigers. the former winners dealt. verlander struck out 11 patters. remember, destroyed tried to take a commanding 2-0 lead. sonny gray was up to the challenge. the 23-year-old rookie - his first post-season game - and the kid sparkled, striking out nine batters, shutting down miguel kav aira. bases loaded for stephen vogt. i need a hero. vogt delivering hiking first post-season hit. the as win. stephen vogt is mobbed. the best of the five series tied at one a piece, heading to mow town. >> he was very impressive.
7:44 am
he came at us. that's what the report said - that he'd go to the curveball when he got in trouble. he did. i was impressed with the favt ball. and he located it well. he was impressive. sometimes in a game like this you lose sight of how good vinny verlander was. terrific. this is post-season pitching at its best. >> from the kiddies in okay land to the veterans in boston, david ortiz, the only player left from the world series team, 37 years young ortise amazing and did something for the first time in his career. let's head to bean town. david price and the rays needed a win. david ortiz is digging this. the man big papi unloads a rainbow to right center field. the red sox took a 2-0 lead. in the third boston continued to chip away as ellsbury blitzed
7:45 am
one to left field. david ross, got to love the name, ross, giving red sox a 3-1 lead. bark to ortiz. the big fella has never hit two home season runs. never say never. ortiz spanking the second home in the game, the red sox hammering the rays 7-4 taking a commanding lead. boston looked to close things out on monday in tampa. >> sunday, fun day will be rocketing. rockets and cardinals one apiece. joe scaring up against francisco. later in the night, the braves take their tomahawk to face the dodgers. the best of five series is tied at one game apiece. >> let's go streaking. in college football, number four ohio state won 17.
7:46 am
the longest streak in the country. do i hear 18. upset alert against north-westerb the wildcats with a 17-3 lead. the guys with a special play from their special team - blocking the put and bradley robey jumps on, but north-westerb would answer back, king kolter gets the rock, giving the wildcats a 14-10 lead. this showdown was a roller-coaster of a ball game. ohio state 30-27. carlos hyde, suspended for the first three games of the season scored three touch downs, including the game winner. 40-30 - the winning streak extended to 18. in the nfl there are five undefeated teams. can they keep it that way? the seahawks have a tough test in
7:47 am
indy. the cowboys - against tait um manning. 4-0 with the broncos. >> >> the game is getting off to a late start because the grounds crew needs 24 hours to transform the baseball field into a football field for the raiders. >> thank you very much. between smartphones and tablets a lot of us spend the day connected to the internet. that's why it's hard to believe millions of americans aren't on line or have slow connections because of the cost. a program is being launched aimed at closing the digital divide. >> a funny thing is happening in the aisles of the chicago public library. >> click on this link. >> among the book worms, students and those looking for shelter from the elements are a growing number of cyber nauts
7:48 am
seeking to cross the digital divide. >> most patrons don't know how to use the mouse or key bored. >> it's easy to find in the impoverished southside in chicago. >> the divide was along racial and ethnic lines. when it came to technology, we were a tale of two cities. if there's a divide between the front door of the home and the front door of the school - children fall within the divide. >> when it comes to broadband wealthy neighbourhoods are a wealth of plenty. across the divide the poor struggle to improve their positions and the children. >> the elderly, impoverished and new immigrants struggle to catch up and are at a distinct disadvantage. >> if you want to break the cycle of poverty, you have to make sure all the kids have 21st
7:49 am
century job skills, including computer literacy. how are they looking for job opportunities, doing their homework, applying for a job. >> chicago is leading the way in breaking down the barrier between online have and have not. >> chicago libraries offer free internet and training. >> there's a lot of things that people who are computer literate take for granted. things like opening up an email or putting together a resume. >> the city was partnered with comcast, who connected 14,000 low-end families and 2,000 nationwide. with $150 computers and broadband internet for less than $10 a month, hoping to bridge the digital divide. >> noemi rivera's family has just crossed it. >> the kids use it for homework,
7:50 am
and ordering. >> millions of impoverished families are hoping to move up, but unable to log on. >> karen has weakened to a tropical depression, but the big easy is not breathing easy yet. we turn to jalelah ahmed. >> tropical storm karen is tropical depression karen and will leak in to the north and north-east. the reason the storm weakened is because of the frontal boundary draped browse the portion of the country. it produced a boundary across four states, in wayne indiana 14 were injured. quite a bit of snow was produced across the black hills of dakota. record amounts - 48 inches - in the highest elevations. the snow was over, but the heavy rain a problem, all the way from portions of detroit to flash flooding a o -- occurring on the
7:51 am
roadways. the front and winds associated with the front pushing out of the west are trying out the western portion of karen. so the convection is off to the east and the thunder storms will continue to disorganise as we track into the afternoon. i think we'll have to contend with heavy rain fall across portions of louisiana. definitely on to the southern portions of the miss sippy and alabama as we track into tomorrow and the next 48 hours. the south-east had exceptional amounts of rain fall. throughout the summer into the fall, we'll see heavier pushes. take a look at the forecast in atlanda. grab the umbrella, you'll need it. 83 degrees for the high. cloudy skies with thunder storms on the way. scattered showers and thunder storms as soon as pa, and lingering showers and thunder storms in new york. >> thank you so much.
7:52 am
telling tales... >> i want to be heard. look out my legs are falling. >> laughs laughs >> some of the world's best storytellers gathering in one place to practice the art of the story.
7:53 am
7:54 am
story telling is the story in tennessee. teachers, workers, corporate executives among the participants converge to do what they do best. they've been doing it for 41 years. here is a sample. >> look out, legs are falling. i never thought i would be a story teller in a million years. you never know how your life will change, do you. two legs came down the chimney into the cold ashes. >> it's how we communicate. we sat on the front porch, around the dinner table and tell
7:55 am
stories. then we are able, through the stories, to better understand not only ourselves, but each other. >> he came up to the edge of the stage, sort of straightened out his shirt, tightened up his belt, looked down and said, "now, boys and girls before you meet your teachers, i want to talk to you. >> story telling is the way we move a picture from our head to someone else's head. >> 41 years ago the festival started off with 80 people, around the corner. now we have 12,000 people to come here every year. we have diversity of stories happening in eight tents. people are telling stories in different ways - on cafes, restaurants, on the streets. people tell their own stories. >> when we hear the flut, we hear the oldest song. [ ♪ music ]
7:56 am
>> story telling and music connect us together as the breath turns into song, so too the words we speak. travelling and touching the minds of ours and others. >> we connect with others, we have images, we are transported to a different world, as if there is a ring going all the way around. we are in a different place, we are in a different place, stories, images stay with us, smell, taste, becomes real when they listen to a story. ♪ come again no more #. >> and hard times never came to that door, yeah. (applause) >> i like it. at the end of the first hour, here is what we are following, a senior al-qaeda figure is
7:57 am
captured. >> karen weakens into a tropical depression, but can bring flooding to the gulf coat. >> derek rose, after a nasty knee injury that sidelined him, the chicago bulldogs star made a much-anticipated return. >> karen weakened into a tropical depression, she'll pack a punch, bringing heavy rains pushing to the north-east. and i'll tell you about it. >> i'm del walters - al jazeera conditions in 2.5 minutes more. check us out on the website.
7:58 am
7:59 am
8:00 am
. >> those numbers of al qaeda or other terrorist organizations literally - you can run but you can't hide. >> secretary of state john kerry speaking out about twin raids in two african nations. leading to the capture of an al qaeda member. plus inspectors start to destroy syria's chemical stockpile. >> santa ana winds fuel a wildfire raging. >> welcome to al jazeera, i'm
8:01 am
morgan radford in new york. twine raids were carried out in africa, according to senior officials who say u.s. special forces launched special attacks in libya and somalia. the attacks were aimed at members of al qaeda and al-shabab. secretary of state john kerry said the raids are a direct message against terrorism. >> we hope that this makes clear that the united states of america will never stop in its effort to hold those accountable who conduct acts of terror, with those numbers of al qaeda and other terrorist organizations literally you can run but you can't hide. we will continue to try to bring people to justice in an appropriate way, with hopes that ultimately these kinds of activities against everybody in the world will stop. >> in somalia, a navy seal team
8:02 am
launched an operation in barawe, along the coast. peter greste is in the capital city of mogadishu with the details. >> officially we don't have a great deal of new information beyond the formal acknowledgements from the pentagon that its troops were involved in the raid on barawe on saturday morning. and also that they missed their intended target. >> unofficially sources tell us that it was seal team six that was responsible for the operation. this is the same unit responsible for killing osama bin laden back in 2011. we understand that the intended target was rafael nadal the leader of -- was saleh ali saleh nabhan, the leader who was believed to be in the house. al-shabab said there was no senior commanders there and only a guard was killed in the attack. al-shabab says that they were anticipating the operation, and this seems to be confirmed by
8:03 am
the fact that it was largely unsuccessful, that al-shabab fought off one of the world's elite special forces units. >> the other raid happened 4,000 miles away in libya, targetting an al qaeda member. pentagon officials confirmed that the target was nab abu anas al liby, who has been wanted for years. libya demanded answers on the capture of the al-qaeda suspect in tripoli. >> kenya has offered a clearer pictures of the people that carried out the mall attack last month. four men in a video was shown, carrying ak-47s, contradicting earlier statements that 10-15 were involved. >> four troops have been killed during a joint military operation in southern afghanistan, according to a report by the associated press. military officials say the soldiers were killed in a
8:04 am
roadside bomb, marking the worst attack against u.s. forces since june. >> afghan president hamid karzai is looking to extend his presidential role for life. he is been in power for a decade and is said to be building a european-style mansion next door to the presidential palace, in the hope of becoming a presidential advisor. with six months to go before the election, jane ferguson looks at the men who could replace hamid karzai, and the dangers they face. >> when presidential candidates arrived to register a show of force is important here. they must prove political and tribal support. ambitious candidates face series threats from the taliban. most say they know there'll be attacks, but the elections will go ahead. >> i think they cannot do this. in the period of the holding of the elections, they are not able
8:05 am
to stop it completely. >> while politicians and ex-warlords can mobilise private security, ordinary voters don't have that luxury. the taliban has said it will target the elections, and as usual in afghanistan it is likely that civilians will suffer the most. trying to organise the democratic process and vote in it. as vetter registrations continue across the country afghan forces stepped up security checks around registration centres. in areas like ghazni and kandahar where there's a strong taliban presence, being able to to run facilities like this is a challenge. if people in some areas of the country can't vote on election day because of security reasons, the results could be unconstitutional. and foreign forces ending combat roles - security will be the responsibility of the afghan security forces - their greatest
8:06 am
test yet. >> in 2009 and 2010, they cooperate in this process. this time the international force - they'll support the process, indirectly, not directly. they want to support, at the election, only some indirect and specific area, like air support, like logistic support. not specific security support. >> as time runs out for presidential candidates to register, afghanistan's would-be future leaders will declare their hopes for peace. this is a country at war, where democratic processes must involve guns. >> any candidates for afghan president and the two vice
8:07 am
presidential posts have untilled to to resign from parliament. >> the associated press says that weapons inspectors have begun destroying syria's chemical stockpile. inspectors will have around nine months to complete the mission, including finding, dismantling and eliminating president bashar al-assad's 1,000- tonne arsenal. bashar al-assad tells a german magazine that he made speaks, but both sides are to blame. bashar al-assad is quoted as saying he wants germany to act as a mediator in the german civil war, and president obama has told nothing but lie, but russia is a friend to syria. he insisted that government forces were not responsible for the chemical weapons attack near damascus. >> a wildfire burns out of the control at camp pendleton in california, beginning yesterday afternoon. it's fuelled by the santa ana
8:08 am
winds. 1,000 acres have been burnt. the naval hospital has been evacuated. four buildings have been damaged. >> a mandatory evacuation order was lifted in south-east louisiana as tropical storm karen weakened and downgraded to a tropical depression. many people in low-lying areas evacuated voltairily and spent the night in shelters. >> jonathan martin joins us live in new orleans. what are emergency officials doing now that carr in has been down -- karen has been downgraded? >> emergency officials will remain an standby, wanting to make sure the storm is nothing. they say they'll remain on standby for 24 hours. at the state command center, fima is embedded with a lot of state emergencies folks. they have food and bottles of water, search and rescue teams ready in case. in louisiana the people have
8:09 am
dealt with serious storms in the past - isaac was the most recent, 1.5 years ago. they don't want to take chance, a lot of people decided to stay in shelters. it's a wait and see mode, waiting to see what this will do. at this point it looks like the threat that there was a couple of days ago or yesterday is no longer. >> you mentioned a wait and see mentality. how many people are we talking about? how many people have been affected by the evacuations and when will they be able to go home? >> well, you know, most of the evacuations were voluntary. some were mandatory. when the storm weakened, many people were allowed to go home. there's an area here in louisiana called grand isle, a coastal barrier community, 1300 people live on it, they are under evaluation, because that community sticks into the gulf. it's not safe for the people to be out there - there's only one
8:10 am
road in and out. other than that 50 people stayed at a shelter in pakenham's parish on the coast. for the most part, people decided to go home when they heard that the storm had been downgraded. >> you said people went home. we understand there were mandatory kur if yous put in place in eastern parts of the state. now the storms have been downgraded, are the curfews still in place? >> with the sun coming up this morning, the curfews were officially lifted, if you will, and behind us in new orleans, they have opened this area back up, the mississippi back to ship traffic. it had been closed because of the threat. looks like they'll be meeting in an hour, every morning, to come up with a game plan for each day. the curfew lifted. if they feel a need to impose another curfew, they'll make the decision by midday today.
8:11 am
>> jonathan, thank you for joining us from new orleans. >> since friday up to 20 tornados touched down in nebraska, iowa and indiana. more than a dozen people have been injured. for more on the tornados, and the fire we'll bring in jalelah ahmed. >> the reason why the tropical storm weakened into a tropical depression is because of the cold front. the cold front produced a bit of snow across portions of the black hills and south dakota, as a matter of fact 48 inches. winter time out in the west, that front is still on the move. most of the snowfall really has diminished across portions of the dakotas, we are looking at heavy rain fall as you make your way to the mid west around louisville kentucky, and there's
8:12 am
a flsh flood emergency, folks, you need to use caution and head home as soon as possible. that front will continue to the east. we'll see storms capable of producing winds and isolated tornados from ohio down to northern louisiana here. we'll watch the gulf coast. most of the convection with tropical depression is off to the east and south of the actual central area of low pressure. we are going to look at heavy rainfall. the south-east had to deal with heavy rainfall. not just as of now, but the last couple of months. this heavy rainfall will create problems up the coast on the i-10. 1-3 inches of rain is expected from coastal mississippi and alabama, and will track to the north into georgia, along the i-95 corridor to the north-east. the remnants of karen will bring heavy rainfall from atlanta,
8:13 am
philadelphia, washington d.c. we are looking at showers now, and the heaviest of the rain is the frontal boundary concentrated across louisville, kentucky. it will push into pennsylvania and into new york. grab the umbrella - light rain, heavy rain will be inland. across the south-west a different story. they need the rain. they won't get it because of an area of high pressure. that will bring in the winds offshore, down to the valleys across southern portions of california. that's the reason why the national weather service issued a red-flag warning. we have fires with dry fuels and low relative humidity. temperatures in the 90s. we could see more wildfires burning through the day. we'll have to be on the lookout for that over the next 24-48 hours, back towards denver
8:14 am
and shoamp where the snow was fulling in the last 24 hours. it's beginning to feel warmer. >> thank you so much. it's day six of the government shutdown. washington appears to be no closer to a deal, even though the debt limit deadline is fast approaching. the fight to become legal. u.s. citizen - we'll tell you about the movement that sends thousands of people into the streets
8:15 am
8:16 am
nearly all of the 350,000 civilian employees of the pentagon who were furloughed because of the government shutdown are expected to be back on the job this week. we have more from capitol hill. >> come back to work. that's the order from the secretary of defense to nearly 400,000 civilian employees worldwide. on saturday chuck hagel announced that thanks to a law guaranteeing that u.s. troops are paid during the partial government shutdown, the pentagon can eliminate furloughs for those who responsibilities
8:17 am
contribute to the moral, well being, of servicemen use. some of that lies in the commissary where military families can stretch their dollars. the shutdown forced commissaries to close and ruined thousands of family budgets. >> it's kind of ridiculous that you take it away from the people fighting for your country. you that's ridiculous. hundreds of thousands of workers are in limbo. at the johnson space center in houston, those assigned to mission control on the job - other nasa employees wonder what will happen to them and their families if a deal is not struck soon. >> i think they are playing chicken with our lives. we have been through a pay freeze and now this. >> the president and republicans in congress spent saturday pointing fingers at each other. >> we can't keep engaging in a
8:18 am
brinksmanship, where a small faction of the republican party ends up forcing them into brinksmanship. >> it doesn't make sense. if the president has an axe to grind with the opposing party, why he'd put the american people in the middle of that, and enforce the pain on them. >> but so far they are no closer to ending the shutdown. it's a political stael mate incomprehensible to millions of americans who realise just how much they count on the federal government for their wellbeing. >> the pentagon's budget chief says he expects a large percentage of the workers to return as soon as monday with a timetable for the full return of those to be called back is unknown. it's day six of the shutdown, and congress is no closer to a deal. so shed light on the gridlock,
8:19 am
joining me is richard st. paul, government strat gift. thank you for being here. >> republican congressman said this is an ego issue. i'll show you the quote: >> do you agree? >> absolutely not. 61% of americans do not support obamacare. obamacare has had about several different amendments to it, including allowing businesses a year delay in implementing it. what's wrong with a year delay in asking for a personal exemption from the mandate of obamacare. what's wrong with asking the tax on medical devices being repealed, costing $4 billion. >> you said 60% say they don't want obamacare. 72% don't want a shut down more than they don't want obamacare.
8:20 am
>> the reason they have the shutdown is the president took the same type of stance we use against terrorists saying, "i will not negotiate", how do you not negotiate with the lives of american people. it's the same position you take against terrorists. congress is standing up for the people. 62% said, "we don't like obamacare." people that have been unduly elected by their constituents. they are standing up for the people. the president and congress needs to come to a compromise. >> is it the president's job. the affordable care act has been a law for three years. the president is saying, "look, you reaffirmed this in the 2012 election." is this his job to compromise? >> absolutely. he compromise said on moving the red line - moving the bar on some of the obamacare - for example, allowing business another year, delaying obamacare implementation for business. exact delaying the personal mandate for people for another
8:21 am
year. why is that different. he's moved the bar. unions are saying they need to fix obamacare. this is the opportunity. >> let's talk about moving the bar. is it really about republican gerrymanderi gerrymandering. most republicans who refuse to pass a clean cr bill is from an area where there's no threat of being unseeded by a democrat. is republican gerry mannedering at the heart of this. >> people have been digging in - you talk about tea party, who have conservative districts. if they are not they can face a primary. the 60 members coming from different jurisdictions are representing people's interests. >> that's 80%. the suicide... >> don't blame me for the way the government was set up. it was the founding fathers.
8:22 am
folks are saying, "we want left spending." the government was spending too much. that was the cause of the shutdown in 1995. the government was spending too much on medicade, social program. we have to reign it in. people are saying, "we need to cut spending." >> if it's the same thing, where does the buck stop. who is holding the cards, where do we end it. >> the president is holding the cards. the senate majority leader, john boehner and congress. they need to get together and figure out a solution and get the american people the services they paid for. >> richard st. paul, thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> the push for immigration reform was front and center saturday in 150 cities and 40 states. thousands took to the streets calling for the end of the legal limbo for 11 million people described as undocumented.
8:23 am
>> >> we have some problems with that report. these protests come three days after house democrats introduced a bill overhauling immigration laws, and the plan includes most of the immigration bill passed by the senate in july. it allows undocumented immigrants to get temporary legal status within six months. three americans are dead after a plane crashed in a remote jungle of columbia. they were on a narcotics mission when they lofted radio contact with a task force. a member of the panama national guard were killed in the crash, and two others injured the the plane was ruled out from being shot down by rebels, who are still active in the count rip
8:24 am
>> a monster truck ran over speck tators. the show includes aerobatic, hot air ballooning and monster trucks. the biker smashing his head into the suv's window has been charged with assault and criminal mischief. he be charged for his role in the driver being pulled out of the car and beatsen. it follows a chase after the suv reportedly hit a cyclist and fled. >> residents of newtown conneticut voted to accept a referendum to rebuild the santa hook military school. the vote centred on whether to accepted $50 million in state grant money to rebuild sandy hook. in may officials voted to rebuild the school and it will open late 2015 or early 2016.
8:25 am
>> protesters are marking the anniversary of the egyptian attack. we look back at the three weeks of war that divided egypt. >> the famous scenes that marked the first and only time egypt's military had the upper hand in four wars with israel. although an israeli counterattack followed a few days later and the stalemate was settled through a peace treaty egyptians considered crossing the suez canal a major victory. a heroic moment restoring arab dignity. it not only raised the status of the egyptian army, but was seized by every leader for decades to follow as an opportunity to enhance their rule. >> sadat was the president during that war. he lacked the charisma of his predes cessor, but built his
8:26 am
legacy around it. sadat was as sass nated during the 1981 ceremony. hosni mubarak rode the wave, emphasising the first airstrike of the war, and his role as an air force commander at the time. during his time in power and with security in mind, hosni mubarak held over the top celebrations which turned into musicals idolising him. including this one in the 1990s, featuring some of egypt's top performers singing, "we chose him and vow allegiance to him.". >> (clapping) >> after hosni mubarak was overthrown in 2011, policies were criticised by young lef -- revolutionaries. at the time, the military ruler
8:27 am
evoked people's support for the armed forces in 1973. then came egypt's first democratically elected civilian president, mohamed morsi, who sought to capitalise on the nationalism surrounding 6 october. at last year's ceremony the thousands who attended were mostly brought in by the muslim brotherhood and other religious parties. >> mohamed morsi used the ceremony to produce a report card for his 100 days in office, antagonising the military. today the 40th anniversary of the 1973 act comes as the military plays a major role in running the country, after removing mohamed morsi in july. egypt is divided between those who support the military and those against the coup. rival rallies have been called for in tahir sqare on sunday.
8:28 am
6 october, once again an opportunity to advance political agendas. >> egypt's interior ministry sent a warning saying they will fully confront any violence at the demonstrations in tahir sqare today. now we are joined by ross for sport. >> >> a big night for the man called big papi. david ortiz - for the first time in his brilliant career - we'll tell you what he did in a bit.
8:29 am
david ortiz - for the first time
8:30 am
welcome back, i'm morgan radford. these are the top stories - chemical weapons inspectors are begun to destroy stockpiles and machinery. a statement by u.n. officials say the operation is being carried out by a netherlands based chemical weapons watchdog group.
8:31 am
inspectors will have about nine months to complete the mission. >> a wildfire burning at camp pendle tonne is being fuelled by santa ana winds. >> u.s. special forces launched raids in africa on saturday, and members of al qaeda and al-shabab were targeted. >> secretary of state john kerry is speaking out on the african raids. he told reporters that the capture of the al qaeda suspect is a boost to the fight against terrorism. >> we hope that this makes clear that the united states of america will never stop in its effort to hold those accountable who conduct acts of terror, and those members of al qaeda and other terrorist organisitions literally can run but you can't hide. we will continue to try to bring people to justice in an appropriate way with hopes that ultimately these kinds of activities against everybody in
8:32 am
the world will stop. >> joining us now to talk about the special ops is david rice, professor at nyu center for global affairs. >> last week was the 20th anniversary of the black hawk mission in somalia. is the timing of the raid significant, and (b) were the reasons then similar to timing now. >> i think the timing is significantliment the region is unstable. a lot of reasons that led to the u.s. action 20 years ago are pref lent. the other factor with the time something a raid was conducted in libya at roughly the same time. >> typically in recent years the u.s. went on the mission with drone strikes. the fact that it sent in special forces or navy seals acknowledges that an american life could get lost. is there an indication that the
8:33 am
raids are becoming a serious threat. >> the fact that within two weeks the attack on nairobi took place, means that this was a capture mission. the u.s. special forces hoped to capture the head of al-shabab, probably to interrogate him, dismantle the terrorist network in the horn of africa - similar to libya, where they captured the leader to see if he was a source of additional information. >> how are kenyans reacting to this? is there a greater fear of al-shabab? >> absolutely. kenyans are acting strongly. this was an attack on a soft target. it was intended to kill as many civilians as possible. if you saw the photos from inside the mall, it was a nightmare that took place. because it was conducted in the affluent area of nairobi, this was clearly meant to send a shock wave through the elite within the country. >> you mentioned the affluent area of nairobi. kenya is a major hub for
8:34 am
commerce and tourism in africa. how much do u.s. interests rely on a stable kenya? >> kenya is stable. there's no question about that. despite the fact that the president is having issues with the international criminal court. as a country they are stable. they had legitimate elections and the u.s. commercial interests are strong of the the u.s. embassy is one of the largest in the region, the united nations has its afghan headquarters there. i don't think you'll see the reason destablilize. >> you don't think it will be destablilized. >> no, but what you'll see is an intense reaction to what happened in order to protect the soft targets. there's no telling when this kind of attack could happen again or be attempted again. >> in what way do you think security will be intensified specifically. >> i think the some articly community, the immigrant community lives in east nairobi. i think you'll see a lot more aggressive action on the part of
8:35 am
nairobi security force, and that could breed resentment. security has to be beefed up in other parts of the city. >> speaking of pressure, what does the raid into libya siing niify. >> it's really a police action in a way. it was carried out by u.s. special forces. this was a capture, done without shots being fired. they were probably following abu anas al liby for some time. >> wasn't he living in the open for a year? >> he was. he was in libya and not taking too many precautions to be hidden. the timing sends a symbol that there was probably a communication happening between the al qaeda leader and libya, and the members of al-shabab and somalia. >> professor david rice, thank you for being with us. >> some of the migrants killed in the shipwreck in lampedusa
8:36 am
are awaiting repatriation. conversationins of 111 african migrants have been placed inside an airport hangar. italian fishermen ventured on to the water to throw a bouquet of flowers where the ship went down. >> back to the story on immigration. thousands took to the streets in more than 150 cities and 40 states calling for the end of the legal limbo of 11 million people described as undocumented. >> kimberley dew hart explains. >> reform that will carve a path to citizenship for 11 million undocumented immigrants, and keep families together. >> families are getting destroyed. their children are getting left alone in their homes. they don't know when their parents will come home. once they find out they don't have anywhere to go. >> in new york city
8:37 am
demonstrators talked about what life is like without citizenship. philip's family is in mexico city. >> 13 years i haven't seen my grandmother, my family. i can't take my son out. i can't take a vacation. >> thousands of new yorkers are marching in solidarity across the brooklyn bridge calling for immigration reform. it's happening in 100 cities across the country. >> in arizona 3,000 protesters marched a mile to federal hall. >> we come from the mexican route. but we are americans. we are all here for the same dream. we came here because we are also american. we have been americanised. our roots are here, we are americans. >> those sentiments echoed in chicago, miami...
8:38 am
>> chant chant >>..atlanta. the demonstrations are called the day of dig naty and report. one lone voice stood out. >> i don't care, they are an inviting army. all i care about is they go back to their own country, i don't care how it happens. >> these are are prelude to a national protest planned for the national mall in chicago. >> the prove tests coming three days after a bill was introduced reformulating immigration law. >> president obama is stepping into the controversial debate over the name of the washington redskins. the president said he'd consider changing the name if he was the
8:39 am
tale's owner. the washington redskins say the name is offensive. >> if i were the owner of the team and knew that there was a name of my team, even if it had a story that was offending a sizeable people, i would think about changing it. >> the team's owner says he will not change the name and members of an indian tribe are expected to protest at a meeting in washington dc on monday. >> while the olympic flame began a traditional journey from greece to russia, it was accompanied with controversy. a few dozen gay rights activists held a protest against gay propaganda. ross is here with the sport. and the baseball season is off to a great start. the okay land as are getting things done with the new kids on
8:40 am
the block - i'm not talking about the boy band. >> during the post season, okay land are in the play-offs, they had to man up against justin verlander. he was dealing. verlander struck out 11 batters, and remember detroit was trying to take a commanding 2-0 lead. sonny gray was up to the challenge. the 23-year-old rookie pitching at his first post-season game. the kid dazzled - striking out nine batters and shutting down miguel cabrera and the tigers. scoreless into the bottom of the ninth, bases loaded for stephen vogt - i need a hero. he delivered a post-seen hit. the as went on to win in dramatic fashion. continue stephen vogt was mobbed. it's a best of five series, tied at one game apiece, heading to
8:41 am
mow down. into from okay land to boston. david ortiz the only player left from the 2004 world series team. 37 years young, ortiz amazes and did something for the first time in his career, let's head to dean town, and the rays needed a win to even up the series. david ortiz not having it, the man called big papi, oh, my goodness - the red sox taking a 2-0 lead in the third. boston chipping aways as tabbing oby ellsbury - he is digging this. davis ross - got to love the name ross - red sox with a 3-1 lead. back to ortiz. did you know that the big fellow has never hit two home runs in a post-season game? like mum would tell me, never say never. that is stephen drew, ortiz trust me, hit two home runs. he was talking about the magic
8:42 am
sticks. red sox hammered the raids 7-4 taking a 2-0 lead. boston looking to close things out in tampa on monday. on the sunday fun day it will be rocking in pittsburg - the pirts and cardinal -- pirates and cart nals heading into a match. the braves later about take their game to la la land facing the dodgers in a best of five, tied at one apiece. >> the best college football in my humble opinion, number five stanford hosting number 15 washington. check out the spotlight. our sports producer person ard ritter - fancy editing. montgomery getting the party started. any way you want to say it, you can kiss him goodbye. montgomery 99 yards to the happy place. heath price, love the way they
8:43 am
played. kevin smith, price throwing 250 yards. the huskies putting up majorly against cardinals. stanford with revenge. kevin dies in. stanford holding on for victory. >> time to follow the bouncing ball. in the nba derek rose made a much-anticipated return from a nasty knee injury. he tore his atl in the play-offs and missed last season as he recovered. some chicago fans were not happy, but are happy with the highlights bus the former nbt is as good as ever. he was explosive and lightening quick. it was an exhibition game, but big for chicago. 80-76. the bulls opening their regular season in miami on 29 october against ley bron james and two
8:44 am
tv time defending champsons. >> it doesn't get better than that. >> sunday, fun day. >> speaking of sports, diana ni add, long distance swimmer is ready for another swim, this time to raise money for victims of hurricane sandy. fresh from a swim from cuba to florida, she announced she'd attempt a 48 hour swim raising money for storm victims. she'll dive into the water, in a tank constructed outside macey's in new york square. >> and jalelah ahmed is here to look at the weather. >> we are tracking a cold front pushing across the midwest to the south-east. it is packing a punch. now, if you look at the map, the heaviest of the rain is coming down around louisville kentucky where six inches of rain fell in the last 24 hours. flash flooding. an emergency there.
8:45 am
look at the gulf of mexico. the front is pushing to the east, bringing in strong westerly winds. that is causing problems for what we are looking at is tropical depression karen. that storm is not expected to strengthen as it tracks north, north-east towards florida and louisiana, where it will bring an abundance of rain fall to the north. snow across portions the black hills. 48 inches fell on the south - the black hills of south dakota. most of the snow came to an end and spinning off as drier areas move into the storm. we could see a lingering shower across minnesota, across portions of minneapolis this afternoon into the evening. the bulk of the precipitation and severe weather will be across the ohio valley, from detrite to louisville.
8:46 am
damaging winds, hail and isolated tornadoes. further to the south and east - rain is on the way across northern portionses of louisiana. then tropical depression karen heading north-east. winds are at 30 miles per hour. we could see gusty winds at 45 miles per hour. we have flash flood watches in effect across coastal portions of louisiana, mississippi, and back to georgia. heavy rain will fall across georgia in the nest 24 hours. as you head to work on monday, showers and thunder storms in the forecast. dense, thick, cloud cover - temperatures will be in the 70s, look out for tuesday, it will be beautiful with mostly sunny skies. >> to the north-east. cloudy skies, scattered showers ahead of the boundary.
8:47 am
the heaviest of the rain expected to be across portions of interror pennsylvania. it will be a bit of a lighter to moderate rain fall. in the south-west a different story is taking shape. high pressure is in control. the area of high pressure is ushering in winds offshore. the reason we have a red flag warning is low humidity, temperatures climbing to the 90s, it will be a gusty day. wildfires burning across southern california. >> meantime the residents of a small town in new mexico are convinced that the odours coming from a local chemical warehouse is toxic. they asked the company and government for regulation, but without success. they have taken matters into their own hands. we have this report from new mexico. >> they call it the bucket brigade.
8:48 am
local residents are using a bucket to collect air samples outside the chemical warehouse. i smell it. we are capturing it, what does it mean? we don't know yet. >> it's long been believed that the helena company poses a health risk. it makes fertiliser, but operates without a permit. we took samples to be examined by scientists on the west coast. >> it's our community, it's not helena new mexico. >> some believe the company should relocate outside the town. the lease they -- at least they want to know what they make and how much of it. >> we talk to two company managers on the phone. they have no comment. we called the corporate headquarters but got no answer. when we walked on to the site. they asks us to leave.
8:49 am
>> this man leaves 200 yards from the chemical warehouse. his wife is cooking enchill ardas. >> it's a favourite. >> the family home was built by grandfather. long before the chemical company came to town. pam wants assurances that it's safe to raise her own family here. >> i don't know why the state official don't ask questions, or why people don't care, other than those that live here. >> results from a previous sample arrived from a lab in california. >> this is greek to me. i don't understand this. it confirms suspicions that there are toxins, according to this, floating in the air. it sucks. >> it will take months of sampling in a comprehensive analysis before it can be proved
8:50 am
that the toxins are a serious threat. he will not back down from the challenge. he believes he has the right to know. >> and a community hit hard by the government shutdown. one native american tribe struggles to support its citizens amidst the budget crisis.
8:51 am
8:52 am
some native american communities are hit hard by the shutdown. they depend on the federal government for health care, housing, senior citizen services and managements of natural resources. al jazeera's katherine barrett tells us about a tribe struggling to make ends meet. >> as the federal shutdown bore down on his jamestown tribe on the northern shore of washington's olympic penninesuala, assets were lefaged -- leveraged land, land and a casino.
8:53 am
the tribe needs the money for social services, food aid and scholarships. >> it costs us money, because we are carrying out federal functions with our money and subsidising the federal government to carry out their legal and moral obligations to the indian communities. >> without the federal agents on the job to monitor them, they are not allowed to legally fish. budget cuts were hurting indian health services, head start programs and food aid. the national congress of american indians says: . the james down tribe is business savvy, and self-governing. many other tribes are less fortunate. and all rely to varying degrees
8:54 am
on federal funds for services like foster care, college scholarships, nutrition programs and health services. >> at the tribal health clinic patients and staff are anxious. >> there's so much misinformation out about the budget, obamacare. we spend an enormous amount of time calming folks down and creating less stress. there's a lot of stress out there. >> some american indian communities may benefit from obamacare's expansion of health care. tribalal leaders want the process under way and return to their own businesses and budgets. >> hundreds of textile workers in peru are having to find new work now that cheaper clothing from china is pricing them out of their jobs. we have this report from peru, which was once the largest clothing manufacturer.
8:55 am
>> edward was a successful business until a year ago. now a family member helps him sew on busy days m one of 15 machines is at work. >> the business reduced 80%. i only keep going because i have a few faithful clients. >> edwin is one of over 30,000 clothing manufacturers in a large textile employer. for decades it's been a successful industry. chinese clothes, flooding the market, are crushing sales of peruvian goods. >> the federation of manufacturers say it's impossible to compete with chinese clothing. it costs a third of what they pay here. many businesses are bankrupt and businessmen are leaving this area to work at home to lower
8:56 am
costs. >> businessmen say trade policies, including a free trade agreement with china signed in 2010 are tearing businesses apart. >> the state is not promoting industrialisation, which is needed for jobs. it benefits only large importers. >> the consumer protection office is investigating whether chinese clothing was being imported at subsidised or below cost prices. chinese officials say there's no evidence products break world trade organization agreements. >> there has been chinese clothes before the free trade agreements. production costs may have increased because labour in peru is not cheep. people are thinking of doing something else. >> reshaping his business will be tough for some. >> translation: we are in a crisis because the job allowed me to have money, educate my
8:57 am
children. i have never been so economically tight. >> without any preorders, he doesn't have money to start another business. he's selling his machines and for now is selling sawdust to make ends meet. -- sodas to make ends meet. >> now to a race you may not see anywhere else, it's a stroller dash for toddlers. some slept through the race as mums and dads pushed them along in the bauka rest town. >> i'm morgan paula radcliffe. you can follow us 24 -- i'm morgan radford. you can follow us 24 hours a day.
8:58 am
8:59 am
9:00 am
>> hello, welcome to the news hour. i'm live in doha. coming up: >> those members of al-qaeda and other terrorists organizations literally can run, but they can't hide. >> john kerry says the units will never stop pursuing those responsible for terror. >> tight security in cairo as people mark the 40t 40th anniversary of

120 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on