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tv   News  Al Jazeera  November 7, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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this climb has been balanced, a crime of killing an elected leader. >> the widow of jaser arafat reacting to new proof. the smoking gun? a powerful radioactive poison discovered in his remains. a possible break through as new talks get underway with iran. there are reports the u.s. may be willing to ease crippling sanctions if iran agrees to temporarily halt its nuclear program. thousands are evacuated in the feel peenz as the strongest t
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typhoon of the year bears down. they're fighting a controversial new law that calls on young men and women to live separately in college dorms and even private student homes. good morning, and welcome to "al jazeera america." i'm stephanie sy. we begin with a story first reported exclusively here on al jazeera. new evidence supports the theory that yasser arafat was murdered. they say they found excessive amounts of a radioactive substance called polonium in his body. his body was exhumed one year ago in response to the al jazeera investigation. the report supports years of suspicion that arafat's widow
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thought foul play was involved. >> i'm full of anger. this is a crime. this is an assassination of an elected palestinian leader by his people. it's a political assassination, and you can't imagine how my daughter and myself are in a very sad situation. we are mourning the father and the husband again. >> we have complete coverage of how israelis and palestinians are reacting to this news. mike hanna is in jerusalem. we begin with clayton swisher who explains how scientists reached that startling conclusion. >> reporter: first, they found abnormal high amounts in his clothes. now they discovered a high presence of the radioactive substance inside his bones. swiss scientists produced this 108-page report after an exhume mags of arafat's body last november. the scientists say their data
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favors polonium poisoning. the arafat family received the results from their lawyer along with an analysis the scientist, david barkley. >> if i was a judge or jury, it was stone-cold certain. there's behind any doubt in my opinion that this caused the death of yasser arafat. >> for widow and daughter, it is 100% proof. >> when they came with the results, they told he just died, i will not stop. me and my daughter will go to all courts all over the world to punish who did this crime. >> now that we have proof that he was poisoned, i feel relieved, actually. a final closure for me knowing who killed him and the motive and the ambition behind it.
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>> more than 40 years of research have given scientists knowledge of the average level in radioactive lead in human skeletons. what was found in his ribs and hips was the highest ever published. >> everybody has a tiny amount of palonium in their bones. the level in arafat is about 900 mil millibacres. that's 35 times the average. >> what's more the soil around his body had absorbed his decaying flesh and organs. that soil measured 18 times higher. the report rules out any external contamination, and it confirms through dna testing that the skeleton was definitely arafat's on a scale of confidence 1 to 6, 6 being strongly confident, the scientists say the data supports
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poisoning at level 5. if confirms a theory first put forward last year. then the same swiss scientists found his blood and urine stains were strongly contaminated with palonium 210. they were lifted from the stained clothes the palestinian leader wore in his final days, but this latest test was on arafat's flesh and bones. buried in ra maul since his death in 2004. his body was unearthed last year. three teams took 20 samples each. al jazeera has released the swiss team's results. a russian team carried out tests after a last-minute invite from the palestinian authority. their results have not yet been made public. there was a team in france. the french results remain a secr secret, but as they continue with the murder inquiry, they now have new evidence and the looming question behind all of this is whether the palestinian authority shifting the case to the international criminal
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court. perhaps they will finally see supports brought to try and learn once and for all not just what killed arafat but who. clayton swisher, al jazeera, paris. >> the new findings on arafat are raising caution in israel. officials were quick to repeat on wednesday that their government had nothing to do with arafat's death. mike hanna is in jerusalem with reaction. >> reporter: the israeli government has been largely dismissive of the latest report. a spokesman for the foreign ministry describes it as a soap opera. he says that it is possibly part of the feud between arafat's widow and the palestinian authority. the key issue, though, is that the report has been handed over to the palestinian authority, and an investigative committee will decide what to do next based on the latest round of evidence. important to remember the context in which arafat spent his last day.
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he was cordoned off in his headquarters by israeli forces. the number of people within there in his last months were finite. it was clear who was there and who was not, and certainly the israelis themselves having encircled and cordoned it off would be well aware of exactly who went in and who went out at any given time. the other question, too. whether the palestinian investigative committee is going to ask israel to take part in the investigations into who killed arafat. >> mike hanna in jerusalem. turning now to the west bank. what has been the reaction there to this blockbuster report? al jazeera has more from ra malala where yasser arafat lived. >> reporter: it's not shocking or surprising. many palestinians widely held the belief that arafat did not
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die a natural death and rather was poisoned. the plo is demanding an international independent investigation into the death of arafat. the palestinian authority has yet to make an official statement. we understand that the central committee is meeting in ramallah this morning to discuss the report. we also understand we won't be hearing anything official from the palestinian authority until the head of the palestinian investigation committee announces publicly the results of the swiss report as well as a russian report, a similar one that was submitted to the palestinian authority on november 2nd. now, palestinians await the next step that the palestinian authority would take, whether they would demand an international investigation, and then they say maybe press ahead and move ahead to take the case to the international criminal cou court.
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the palestinian state is a nonmember state of the united nations and does have the right to request membership at the international criminal court. >> al jazeera reporting from ramallah. later this hour we explain how the deadly poison works, we'll look back at arafat's life and controversial image as well. the former leader of pakistan is a free man today, at least in his own country. mu musharraf was freed on bail. musharraf has faced a series of charges since he returned to pakistan in march after years of self-imposed exile of the he was also complicated for his role in the death in bhutto and he was granted bail in those cases. a fresh round of negotiations is set to begin this morning on iran's nuclear program. members of the u.n. security
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council are in geneva to give a proposal to leaders. the international community hopes the talks lead to a positive irs first step with a temporary freeze of the nuclear program. sanctions could be rolled back for six months in return, but hardliners on both side could slow this process. iran's foreign minister has expressed cautious optimism about an agreement. phil joins nows live in geneva. good morning to you. how are both sides approaching these talks? should the u.s. be hopeful that something is achievable relatively soon? >> reporter: stephanie, i think you're absolutely right there whether you mention the iranian form rin minister's cautious optimism. that optimism is felt geneva here. the u.s. delegation has expressed it. there's a press conference going on right now in which the eu
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representative from the delegation appears to be express some of that feeling. it is still very cautious. nobody expects this will happen immediately. nobody expects this will be the end-all be-all in there there's a final solution in the argument over that iranian nuclear program. certainly it does look like this is a -- what the western delegations are saying is a first step implying that there is a second step and perhaps a path leading to ultimately a resolution of this situation. stephanie. >> it seems part of what complicates of negotiations is there's hard liners in both camp as well as israel putting pressure on both sides. how much does that factor into these talks? >> reporter: well, very much so, stephanie. obviously, we heard from the israeli prime minister yesterday saying that he was against any kind of lifting of sanctions. last night at a background briefing by the u.s. -- by a high-ranking u.s.
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representative, there was a concern that there may be further sanctions pushed for in congress, and that senior representative saying that they were hoping that that would not happen. they would at least give them some breathing group to negotiate with the iranians. we see some hard liners in iran, the recent, very large anti-american protests in iran certainly have not gone unnoticed. again, there is still an awful lot of very high-ranking, very powerful players here on the ground in geneva that say despite those hardliners that there is hope that some movement at least will be achieved in the next couple of days. >> phil is reporting from geneva. thanks. authorities in japan are kick-starting the cleanup of the crippled fukushima nuclear plant. it was badly damaged by the earthquake and tsunami. special crews arrived to remove more than 1,000 damaged fuel
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rods. that's more than stored in chernobyl in 1986. they say it's the first step towards decommissioning the plant. the process is expected to take decades and cost billions of dollars. forecasters say the typhoon heading for the philippines is the world's most powerful storm yes. haiyan is packing the punch of a category 5 hurricane. it's expected to bring winds of more than 200 miles per hour friday when it makes landfall. it's on track to hit the central and southern philippines. right now, it is gathering strength in the pacific with sustained winds of 175 miles per hour. authorities in the philippines are bracing for mudslides and up to 8 inches.
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>> you have said america should hold you accountable, which is why i repeat my request for you to resign. >> sell sebelius did not offer
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her resignation. >> some have asked why not just delay implementation of the new law until all of the problems are fixed. there's a pretty straightforward answer. delaying the affordable care act wouldn't delay people's cancer or diabetes or parkinson's. it didn't delay the need for mental health services or cholesterol screenings or prenatal care. delaying the affordable care act doesn't delay the foreclosure notices for families forced into bankruptcy by unpayable medical bills. >> venturing on to an opponent's turf, president obama was on the road wednesday to defend the health care law there. he spoke to volunteers in a dallas synagogue. the texas trip sparked a blunt response from the state's governor. rick perry is a vocal opponent of the affordable care act. the president said perry's stance of denying medical insurance to millions of americans. >> here in just the dallas area
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133,000 people who don't currently have health insurance would immediately get health insurance without even having to go through the website if the state of texas decided to do it. >> perry quickly released a statement to retaliate. he said the president, quote, deceived the american people by promising anyone that liked their health care plan could keep it, but millions of americans are discovering that isn't true. he's coming to texas in a desperate attempt to salvage his ill-conceived and unpopular program, end quote. nearly one-fourth of all texans have no medical insurance. that's the highest rate in the nation. hunting for al qaeda. yemen's best soldiers training to fight terror. why the u.s. is supporting the effort in more ways than one. plus, rebuilding mumbai. how regular people are working together to turn their run-down
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neighborhood into a modern met trop police. you heard video killed the radio star. you're looking at a live picture of our nation's capitol in washington, d.c. where it looks like the sun is just starting to sneak up.
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good morning, and welcome back to "al jazeera america." i'm stephanie sy. straight ahead we show you how a modern city is rising from the ashes of a rundown neighborhood. look at the temperatures across the nation today. nicole mitchell is back. good morning. >> we have a couple places where the temperatures might be surprising as you head out the door. when it's a little on the cold side, it's into the south. the temperatures in the midwest have dipped well southward with skying clearing out and they drop farther. into north parts of texas some temperatures are around freezing this morning. that's why we have all the different freeze advisories up. it's getting to be the time of year where the ground will get a
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little firmer. opposite reaction in the northeast. you go it's warmer than i thought it was going to be because a lot of temperatures have stayed in the 50s and 60s overnight because of two things. the cloud cover kind of insulates that and we have at that ahead of the rain. we have that flow out of the so, so that's been helping. that is a precursor to the rain that is coming in. i'll talk more about that coming up shortly. back to you, stephanie. >> thanks, nicole. shoddy construction and people with no one else to go, it's deadly in mumbai. reports of deaths in building collapses are all too often. more than 60 were killed a few months ago when their apartment building crumbled. a massive redevelopment project is under way. community leaders take matters into their own hands and build safer home. we report on the makeover and why some people still have their doubts. >> reporter: this is crowded,
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congested and aging like many other areas of mumbai. it's home to the city's muslim community that make up the majority of its 25,000 residents. it's this community that's planning to redevelop the area from this to this. a modern neighborhood with wide avenues, high-rises and shopping plazas. unlike other redevelopment projects, this one is planned and funded by local residents. >> all this talk this is something that needs to be done. >> reporter: the head of the project says the prime objective is improvement of the land and buildings but also the people that live there. >> to provide them, you know, good living conditions. so that day develop not only the physical infrastructure but also structurally. >> reporter: the condition of this area is similar to others in the city. delap dated buildings close to collapsing and infrastructure beyond repair.
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unlike the other areas, redevelopment is set to begin largely because it's driven by people in the community. some people have already been moved into these temporary apartments, and shop keepers will be given this temporary market a couple of kilometers away to set up shop while construction take place. not everyone is on board with the plan. other residents in the area say the bora muslim community is favoring its only people and will give them the best locations once the project is complete. >> translator: they haven't given us any legal documents that say what they will do. how can we agree to move? we don't want a new shop in the back of the market. >> reporter: this town planner says those against the project may not have a choice, as the government wants to encourage this kind of development. >> then there is a situation where people themselves participate by putting in their money. they're going to take care more than the government to see whether the things are going wrong or right. >> reporter: with 85% support,
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the project is slated to begin early next year and will be completed in five years. the hope for this project is to be an example for developments in other parts of the city if it proves successful. something the community here has full faith in. al jazeera, mumbai. >> mumbai is india's most densely populated city with 12 million people. a general strike frustrates tourists in fwrees. visitors were turned away wednesday from the ancient ruins the acropolis. they walked off their jobs protesting government budget cuts. many people came a long way for nothing. >> we come all the way up here. we already bought tickets and find that it's closed. a little unfair for the tourism, which is so good for the country and city. >> greece is in a prolonged recession. european lenders imposed awe tear rit as part of the bailout. although the government won't cut wages anymore, union workers
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are worried. the unemployment rate is 27%. this is making business news this morning. the big news on wall street is the public debut of twitter. last night twitter priced shares at $26. that indicates strong demand and values the company at $18 billion. twitter is hoping its stock will perform better than facebook shares which didn't reach the ipo price for more than a year later. despite the buzz, there's plenty of caution on wall street for a company that has yet to make any money. at least one analyst likes the investment long term. >> one thing that a lot of people don't realize is that twitter has not become a mainstream product yet. i mean, still 1 out of 5 americans have ever been on twitter. that's a lot of open opportunity for the company. >> twitter will trade on the new york stock exchange under the symbol twtr.
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a busy economic calendar today. the government provides a slate of gauge of economic growth. analysts think the economy grew the a sluggish pace from july to september. also this morning a snapshot of the job market. the labor department releases the weekly report on jobless claims. that will give us a preview of friday's important monthly report, and retail chains are expected to release the october sales figures today. ahead of the data, stock futures are lower at this hour, and that could signal a weak start to the trading day. the dow trades at another record high this morning. the blue chips rise 128 points yesterday. it stands at 15,746. the s&p 500 sits at 1770. it's just 1 point below its own all-time high. the nasdaq is at 3931. overseas traders playing it safe and they're awaiting a decision
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on rates by the central banks. european stock markets are modestly lower there. same story in asia. stocks also retreating. tokyo, hong kong and shanghai all ending lower. it's official. it's time to say good-bye to blockbuster. dish network is closing the last 300 stores and laying off 2800 workers. it's a dramatic end to a company once valued at $5 billion. dish bought the firm after it went bankrupt in 2011, but the business couldn't compete with online rivals like netflix, apple and amazon. turns out there are deals even too good for walmart. the retailer said a computer glitch caused products to be priced ridiculous low like a computer monitor for $9. walmart says the error is fixed and the website is back to normal this morning. al jazeera uncovers new evidence that yasser arafat was poisoned. we'll take a closer look at the
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deadly radioactive chemical that may have been used to kill him. plus, a small town in chile where children were tortured for decades. why many people knew what was happening and did nothing to stop it. an unusual co-ed controversy in turkey leads to a violent confrontation in the streets. i'm john henry smith. there's an explosion of new developments in the last 24 hours in the miami dolphins hazing scandal. i'll break it down for you ahead in sports. and a sign of twitter's big day. you're looking at a live picture of the twitter bird from wall street.
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i'm stephanie sy and these are the top stories at this hour. in an al jazeera exclusive, scientists in switzerland say they have evidence that palestinian leader yasser arafat was poisoned. the researchers say their test showed unusually high level was a radioactive substance in arafat's remains. thousands of people in the philippines are moved to safety as the massive typhoon haiyan approaches. the superstorm, which is the largest of the year, is expected to hit tomorrow morning with winds topping 200 miles per hour. and iran is meeting with the permanent members of the security council today in geneva to talk about the nuclear program. there are reports the u.s. is willing to roll back sanctions if iran adwrees to a temporary freeze of the nuclear program. as we mentioned, iran and six world powers are set to resume talks today in geneva to discuss the country's nuclear ambitions. joining us now is a freelance iranian journalist from tehran this morning. first of all, good morning, and
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thank you so much for being with us on al jazeera. so the negotiations face many challenges that go really beyond the issues at hand. hardliners in tehran and washington are skeptical about these talks. how much does that domestic pressure in both countries affect these talks? >> well, that's a very interesting question. basically the reason we have the negotiating teams in geneva today is because of the voters who voted for the so-called moderate president, rouhani, in order to get the reformists and the conservatives in the government. make no mistakes, this is a make or bray deal for the government. the conservatives including the leadership have endorsed the iranian charm offensive. they want to prove that the united states condition be trusted and a friend with iran.
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they want to prove this to the iranian people that there will be no friendship between iran and the united states and its allies. the best way to prove that is the new round of talks. if the new government doesn't reach a deal with the west, i don't think they will get another chance or endorsement from the leadership and the conservatives to launch another so-called charm offensive to resolve the dispute. the west has no other option but to cooperate with the new government. they are willing to make some kind of painful compromises, but this is a two-way street. they will take a step, and they expect some steps in return. if the west refuses to deliver on promises and a deal, then i don't think there will be any future for iran and the west. >> obviously, the change in iran's leadership to the more moderate president rouhani seemed key in this. did anything else change the mood in iran and allow both sides to sit together? >> i would be lying if i say that the western sanction regime
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does not have an impact on the performance of the country when it comes to the economy. yes, the sanctions have hurt the economy for the country, and many people are affected, especially the low-income households. that's why they voted for the new president and that's why they endorsed the new iranian drive -- the overture to resolve the nuclear dispute because they blame the economic hardship all because of the sanctions. so they expect at least there will be some kind of ease on the sanctions on the regime. if that happens, i think there will be a very good future when it comes to relations between iran and the united states, and everybody is going to welcome that. >> so i guess from the ianian's point of view then, the success of this talks would mean an end to the sanctions, and in that note is there any outcome that rouhani can't accept under any circumstances? >> well, there are some key
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points that rouhani has no say in this. for instance, when it comes to enrichment of uranium. i know there's speculations they might ask iran to freeze all nuclear program activities. that is not going to happen. if the west insists on that, which is also especially a particular demand from israel, that iran should give up all activities, then i don't see any deal in the geneva talks. i think they should make a compromise and endorse and accept iran has a right to a peaceful nuclear program and uranium enrichment activities. we'll see a deal on the part of the iranian government and a positive response from all political groups and factions. if they stick to their guns and if they insist that iran should stop all enrichment activities, there will be no deal at all. >> all right. a freelance journalist in tehran, it's a pleasure to have you on the show.
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an al jazeera exclusive report this morning. new evidence that yasser arafat may have been fatally poisoned with a highly radioactive substance. swiss scientists that examined the remains say the polonium level in his body was 18 times higher than normal. his body was exhumed a year ago. arafat's widow claimed for years that her husband was murdered. what is polonium, and how hard is it to get this highly radioactive substance? al jazeera science contributor jacob ward explains what makes it so deadly. >> polonium is not dangerous outside of the body. it's only when you somehow ingest it, inhale it or get it inside of an open wound it does damage. the alpha radiation attacks your organs in succession shutting them down until your bone marrow comes apart, your white blood cells drop off and you die an excruciating death. why didn't the doctors detect when he died?
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it's not part of the checklist. food poisoning is what you look at. if you suspect radioactive poisoning a typical geiger counter doesn't pick it up. in the case of yasser arafat's death the question everyone wants to know is who did this? >> most industrialized nations have access to polonium. it's highly unrussian for anyone to get enough polonium to kill someone. it's nearly ten years since nv's death, but the palestinian leader's legacy is still debated. randall pinkston looks back at arafat's life. >> reporter: for four decades yasser arafat embodied the palestinian cause. some saw him as a freedom fighter for palestinians, others as the leader of deadly attacks on israel and its allies. yasser arafat founded fatah, which became the largest faction in the palestine liberation
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organization. the plo and offshoots launched military actions including bombings and shootings. black september staged a 1972 kidnapping and murder of israeli athletes at the munich olympic games. over the last 20 years arafat evolved. his advocacy of military conflict slowly giving way to diplomacy. >> the children of abraham, the descendant of isaac and ishmal have embarked together on a bold journey. >> reporter: in an unforgetal image they shook hands on the white house lawn in 1993. feeling a peace agreement negotiated in secret but promising a new era for their two peoples after decades of conflict. the plan called for israel to remove groups from the west bank and gaza strip and for plo to begin self-government. they won the nobel peace prize for the gambit.
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soon after arafat returned to gaza for the first time in 27 years. he was elected the first president of the palestinian national authority, but it became clear that half a century of war and mistrust would not be easily overcome. each side accused the other of failing to follow-through on the original accord. the relationship between arafat and israel steadily deteriorated. another uprise in palestinian territories, bombings inside israel. israel blaming arafat for the violence laid siege to his ramallah compound severely damaging the building effectively imprisoning him in the west bank. by 2003 israel vowed to remove arafat from power. the next year he fell ill. israel allowed him to be flown to paris for medical treatment. 13 days later the most famous palestinian leader died at the age of 75. randall pinkston, al jazeera, new york. >> the official cause of yasser
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arafat's death is listed as a massive stroke caused by hemorrhaging. a group linked to al qaeda is claiming responsibility for killing two journalists. the french journalists were killed saturday in northern mali. a website said it received the claim from the islamic me greg. it was meant to protest intervention by france. mali is a former french colony. france sent troops there to retake territory from rebels. another al jazeera exclusive. for years america has been fighting al qaeda, and now the u.s. is helping to finance a team of elite soldiers in yemen who will pursue terrorists there. al jazeera joined them as they trained. >> reporter: these are yemen's top military commanders at a training facility outside the capital. you rarely see them together giving the growing threat from al qaeda, and this is the new reformed unit that will lead the fight against the armed group.
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they are the best soldiers in the army. their new commander is major general abdullah and his mission is to defeat al qaeda in yemen. trrp we recently created a force called special operations. they're the best trained soldiers and have the most sfis indicated weapons. they are the elite of the army. >> reporter: some of these fighters are recently been involved in special operations against al qaeda. this is an army that has been weakened by years of instability and political divisions. something yemen's new political leaders want to leave behind and focus on the challenges ahead. >> translator: we need support and cooperation. with all the country in
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fighting al qaeda, we need to develop technology like drones so we can limit u.s. drone strikes. >> reporter: this is a drill to counter an enemy attack. in the coming days this commander is engaged in real military operations, a delicate mission in a country where al qaeda has fighters almost everywhere. they're largely trained and equipped by the americans that would like to see security forces in yemen make progress in the fight against al qaeda. the u.s. government is worried the increased use of drones will alienate yemenis. they want the fight to be led by yemen itself. >> besides supporting yemen soldiers fighting al qaeda, the u.s. is carrying out controversial drone strikes in yemen against suspected terrorist targets. this is the first check of sports this morning. john henry smith has the latest developments on the miami dolphins scandal. good morning.
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>> good morning. the jonathan martin/richie incognito took significant turns. roger goodell appointed new york attorney ted wells to investigate the situation. we learned that martin checked himself into a south florida hospital around the time he left the dolphins to get treated for, quote, emotional distress. espn is reporting that the dolphins organization arranged for martin's parents to travel to south florida and take their son home. that report also says that coach joe philbin visited martin in the hospital. speaking of dolphins coaches, "the sun sentinel" reports that alleged bully incognito may have acted at the request of unnamed dolphin coaches to toughen martin up. pro football talk is reporting when martin's agent called the dolphins nine days ago to tell them about martin's concerns, the team gm suggested that martin punch incognito out. then wednesday in the dolphins locker room many players came to
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incognito's defense instead of martin's. >> my point that i took from it that warned if i'm not mistaken, this is the same guy laughing about the voice mail at one point in time. that's first of all. second of all, if you go through the whole voice mail, there's things you shouldn't say in general, but i know i say things to my friends i wish i never said either. with that being said, i never thought it was a death threat. i never thought he was going to do the things he said. if you can't take validity from one voice mail, how do you from the whole part? you can't pick and choose which parts count and don't count. in my mind i think it was against someone else taking advantage of it. >> i think if you asked john martin a week was richie incognito. he was the first guy to stand up for him on the field. when they wanted to hang out outside of football, who was
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together? richie and jonathan. i'm not in those guys' shoes. i can't explain what's going on. >> when it happened to me, man, i laughed it off. you have to get up and sit back down and everybody have a good time laughing about it. the hoops when talk in the barbershop turns to the best informant nba, there's one team no one is talking about led by a player no one is talking about, and that promises to change sooner than large. paul george and the undefeated pacers host the disappointing chicago bulls. when you mess with george, you get the hurricaorns. the bulls never had control in this game. it was all george, all pacers, all the time. you're going to love this one. george was an astounding plus 28 on the court. if you're not a stat geek, let's say that's a grade of a plus plus. going west, young men and women, tony parkier and the
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spurs hosting the suns. he came up big with the game on the line. the freshman scores 15 of the spurs last 16 to lead them to a win. they're now 4-1. the clippers had rattled off three straight wins before their trip to disneyworld when they ran into the magic's version of the tower of terror. this guy is making you say dwight who? nikola was a monster on both sides of the ball. he had 21 boards with 30 points including six down the strechl to steal the deal. magic won 98-90. from baseball, if martians landed in wrigley field and said take me to the leader, the cubs have someone to take them to. that's rick renteria. the 51-year-old has been a major league coach since 2008. as a younger man he toiled five seasons as a utility infielder in the big leagues.
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stephanie, back to you. for decades a former nazi ran a cult-like colony in the mountains of chile. residents say the town was really a forced labor camp, and many remember sexually assaulted as children. one victim has an unprecedented lawsuit. we follow the story of the dignity colony. >> reporter: this 36-year-old will tell anyone that asks that he grew up in hell. until he was 20 he had never stepped foot outside of a fortified and isolated german onclave in central chile called the dignity colony. behind the facade of a happy german community, children were separated from their parents at birth, beaten, drugged, tortured, forced to work 16 hours a day and sexually abused by a cult leader named paul cheffer. >> translator: this was a regime that existed for 50 years right
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in the 20th century, a criminal regime in full view of chilean and german authorities with an obligation to take action and did nothing. for this they must answer. >> reporter: after establishing the colony in 1962, he built a powerful protection network that kept him free from prosecution. >> translator: former judges, military personnel, distinguished people, parliamentians were regular visitors at the colony. among them members of the police and local judiciary. this was years after chile had returned to democracy. >> reporter: his inner circle came and went as they pleased from this airstrip. no one else was certain when paul left the colony. some say it was 1997. others said it was later. what is certain is by the year 2000, paul shafer had fled this place never to return. very little changed until 2005
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when schiffer was finally caught and died in prison leaving behind hundreds the shattered lives. today winifred is a lawyer and hans convinced 120 victims to sue the german and chilean states for alleged negligence and come police city in their suffering. we accompanied him to germany where had live. he's been diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder. he said the lawsuit represents his last hope for compensation and justice. >> translator: for 43 years i lived under a system like slavery that broke me. instead of helping those who ran away, the german embassy in chile sent them back to the colony and to schiffer. for years they controlled the correspondents and helped shafer. >> he argues that the german constitution obliges the state to protect nationals wherever they maybe. the same is true in the case of
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chile where we also visited victims who are now struggles to survive on their own. >> translator: winning this lawsuit would not only be a great moral satisfaction, but allow those that works all their lives as slaves to have a dignified existence and to die in peace. >> reporter: people like his father, one of the many original settlers who still lives in the colony that became a symbol of impunity. >> the dignity colony was closed years ago, but more than 200 people still live in the town. a student protest turns viole violent. the controversial change in living conditions that made students take to the streets.
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>> tonight on al jazeera america
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welcome back to "al jazeera america." just ahead the change of college dorm policies that led to violent protests. first, look at the potential
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prescription across the u.s. today. nicole mitchell is here. >> we have what i consider an oreo effect, in the middle dry and quiet but on the coastlines more activity. midwest today cooler, of course, after the front went through but pretty dry. it is the northeast you can see. this is a fast-moving area so places like new york city early into this afternoon, most of that rain should be cleared out, but it is going to be wet as that moves through. same thing for the mid-atlantic and places like washington, d.c. it's on its way. the one other area we have starting to pick up, and this could be an inch or two of rain for parts of washington. that next weather system, a lot of wind with that as well. back to you, stephanie. >> some of us could use that rain, nicole. thank you. students in turkey began protesting after the prime minister promised to end co-ed dorms. the minister says he's responding to neighborhood complaints, but critics say the
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conservative government is trying to police people's private lives. al jazeera reports from istanbul on this heated debate. >> reporter: this is the statement that left turks arguing whether turkish society is going forwards or backwards. >> translator: there will no student dorms for boys and girls to be able to share and stay under the same roof. there have been serious complaints about boys and girls sharing the same flats. >> reporter: the prime minister has given the turkish authorities a green light to close mixed sex university campuses and even to segregate private accommodations. the government said the mixed dorms were at odds with the conservative democratic character. some turks agree. >> translator: any turkish family would apose their daughter orson living under the same roof of someone of the opposite sex. >> reporter: others disagree and question why after 11 years in
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prison the government has begun a morality campaign. >> they want to limit our freedom. they want to limit our breathing room, and they want their definitions. >> reporter: students protested against the prime minister's actions in several turkish cities demanding the authorities say out of their personal affairs. this crowd has chanted we will resist with both genders. turkey's liberal student population is still angry at the way the government handled the protests earlier this year. the prime minister was criticized at the time for ordering a heavy crackdown on nationwide anti-government protests. he now says he's involved the security services in closing down the mixed-student dorms. she lives with her fellow male students.
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>> translator: i'm really angry about this ban. i can't accept it. we are not in the relationships that he says. it's about friendship and studying. >> reporter: the reaction from some young turks who previously supported the government may come as a sprys. >> translator: in this issue i believe he went too far into people's private lives. in the future he could intervene in mine. >> reporter: even if some young turks are more religious, that does not mean this conservative government can always count on their endorsement. at the end of the first hour, here's what we're following this morning. swiss forensic experts are expected to hold a news conference in the next hour to talk about their findings that palestinian leader yasser arafat may have been poisoned. iran's foreign minister is cautiously optimistic about nuclear talks in geneva today with the five permanent mentions of the united nations security council. twitter has priced its
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shares at $26 for the initial public offering that starts in just a few hours. i'm john henry smith. nfl hall-of-famer tony dorsett is the latest retired nfl player to make troubling revelations about his life after football. we'll have the sad details next hour in sports. and i'm meteorologist nicole mitchell. we have a warm start this morning in the northeast, but it comes with rain. i'll have the national forecast and the latest on a super typhoon. we have much more for you in the next hour of the al jazeera exclusive, yasser arafat's polonium poisoning. the documentian will join us live. al jazeera continues. i'm back with you in just two and a half minutes.
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determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's
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some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. >> they say they did it because they were trying to protect my children. they didn't protect my children, they traumatized them. >> fault lines examines why so many native american kids are caught in the child welfare system. >> any time they see a social worker its like seeing a police officer. the immediate response is, "they're here to take my kids". >> from the indian perspective who sees this in terms of history, this is as about as adversarial as it gets.
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>> freezing iran's nuclear program. an olive branch to tehran that could ease crippling economic sanctions. >> in my opinion, the death was caused. >> exclusive new evidence that the leader may have been murdered, poison discovered in his remains. his widow speaks with aljazeera this hour. >> it's something to tweet about as wall street and investors prepare for twitter's initial offering. >> i'm 46 years old, and i'm questioning a second chance at a
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new dream. >> changing lives through a small investment helping more people make their business plans a reality. >> good morning, welcome to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. a fresh round of talks is set to beginning this morning and iran's nuclear program. western leaders will propose asking tehran to pause further developments of its you are rain yum program, hoping the talks will lead to a positive first step. >> our goal is an iran that has only a peaceful nuclear program, and indeed, we must make certain, it is incumbent on us, a responsibility of the world to
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know with certainty that it is a peaceful program and there is no capacity to produce a weapon of mass destruction. >> the prospects for meaningful agreement seems closer than ever since iran's new president took office this summer. last week's, iran's foreign minister said the country has been wrong in its previous approach to the west and today's meeting could see eye to eye with western leaders. >> iran should make the objective or at least a stated objective for the western members that iran should never have nuclear weapons as its own objective. >> hardliners on both sides could slow the process at israeli prime minister is warning against any partial deal. >> i believe that as long as they continue their goal to enrich uranium to get nuclear
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weapons, the pressure should be maintained and even increased. >> aljazeera's phil ittner is live in geneva, good morning, phil. how are both sides approaching this negotiation, does the u.s. have hopes that anything will be achieved soon? >> well, stephanie, both sides seem to be coming to the table here in geneva with cautious optimism that something may actually come of these talks. there's an awful lot of talk about concrete steps and a first step that would lead to a further process with the ultimate goal of a verifiable atomic program within iran that does not include a weapons enrichment program. there is hope here in the air in geneva, but a very clear should understanding that this is not going to be easy no matter what. stephanie. >> phil, there are hard-liners in both camps. we heard from netanyahu. how much do these voices affect
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the negotiations? >> very much, we had a background briefing with a senior member of the u.s. delegation last night and that official said that they were hopings the delegation here was hoping congress would not push for further sanctions, thought that would be counter productive. the iranians are here, willing to talk apparently, so the u.s. delegation saying any kind of further pushing right now would perhaps be counter productive, urging congress to hold on for a moment. we've heard from, of course, the israeli prime minister there, so there's a hard line stance coming from israel. there are of course hardliners within iran, although the grand ayatollah has said that he sees this as a good thing. there was of course that recent massive protest within iran, that anti american protest, so as you mentioned, there are hard-liners, but here on the ground in switzerland, there is
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again cautious optimism. >> all right. aljazeera's phil ittner reporting to us from geneva, thanks phil. >> we turn to a a story exclusive here. nine years after the death of yasar arafat, tests show he was poisoned by a deadly radioactive substance. the results were released wednesday in a 108 page report. his body was exhumed one year ago in response to an aljazeera investigation. our clayton swisher has more details. >> they found normally high amounts of poison in arafat's clothes, now found the radioactive substance inside his bones. this 100 page report was released after an exhumation of his body. the data clearly favors
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poisoning. the arafat's received the report from their lawyer. >> if i was a judge and jury, this is absolutely stone-cold certain, and this is beyond any doubt, in my opinion that it was poison that caused the death of yasar arafat. >> when they came with the results, it's like they told me he just died. i will not stop. me and my daughter will go all over the world to punish who did this crime. >> we're going to have proof that he was poisoned. final closure for me will be knowing who killed him and the motive and ambition behind it. >> more than 40 years of research have given scientists knowledge of the average levels
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of radioactive lead in human cell tons. what was found in his ribs and hips was the highest ever published. >> everybody has a very tiny amount in their bones. the level in him is about 900, that is either 18 or 36 times, depending on the literature. >> what's more, the soil around his body had absorbed his deindicating flesh and organs. that soil measured 18 times higher. the report rules out external contamination and that the skeleton was definitely arafat's. on a scale of confidence, one to six, six being confident, the poisoning is level five, confirming a theory of poisoning
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early last year. blood and urine stains from clothes he wore include the poison in its purely made form. they lifted the clothes he wore in his final days. this latest test was on his flesh and bones. buried since his death in 2004, the samples were gathered when his body was unearthed in november last year. three teams took 20 samples each. aljazeera released the swiss team's results. a russian team also carried out tests after a last minute have it by the palestinian authority. their results have not yet been made public. there was a team in france. >> the french results remain a secret, but as three magistrates continue with the murder inquiry, they have new evidence. the looming question beyond all of that is whether the palestinian authority shifts the case to the international criminal court. perhaps misarafat and her daughter will finally see suspects brought to trial and
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learn not just what killed him, but who. >> at 7:45 eastern this morning, the swiss scientists behind the report will hold a news conference from switzerland, their first statement about the tests on the remains. in 20 minutes, i'll speak to the lawyer from arafat's widow about these new developments. the c.i.a. is shelling out big money to at&t for counter terrorism information, paying $10 million a year to access the huge database, including international calls by americans. the contract is voluntary. there are no court orders or subpoenas ordering stnt to cooperate. the c.i.a. is forbidden on spying on the domestic activities of americans. safeguards are in place to keep the c.i.a. from vitalling that rule. meanwhile, the n.s.a. spying scandal could bring changes. the obama administration is
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thinking of naming separate chiefs for the n.s.a. and cyber command. officials say a change would prevent putting too much power in one person's hands. the current chief, general keith alexander is retiring this spring. >> pakistan's former president is a free man today, at least in his own country. officials say he is no longer under arrest. the case involved his alleged role in a cleric's killing during a mosque raid in 2007. he faced a series of charges since returning to pakistan after years of self-imposed compile. he was implicated in the death have prime minister bhutto. he was granted bail in those cases. >> a group linked to al-qaeda is claiming responsibility for killing two journalists, the french journalists were kidnapped and killed in northern
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mali. a website said it received the claim from the islamic group. mali is a former french colony. the french sent troops to retake territory from the rebels. >> health care dot.gov needs hundreds of fixes, but there is no need to delay the medical insurance enrollment process. that is the message kathleen sebelius took to capitol hill yesterday. she had to do more than defend the law. she had to defend herself. >> your main goal should have been to protect americans to lessen their risk and ensure their safety, but in your zeal to implement this law, nothing would implement you from deterring the changes. you said america should hold you accountable, which is why to do, madam secretary, i repeat my request for you to resign. >> sebelius offered no resignation and fought off the
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call for a delay to the rollout of obamacare. >> some have asked why not delay implementation of the new law until all of the problems are fixed, and there's a pretty straight forward answer. delaying the affordable care act wouldn't delay people's cancer or diabetes or parkinson's. it didn't delay the need for mental health services or cholesterol screenings or prenatal care. delaying the affordable care act doesn't delay the foreclosure notices for families forced into bankruptcy by unpayable medical bills. >> the troubled health insurance rollout is putting worry lines on the faces of some democrats. more than a dozen senators met with president obama and vice president joe biden. the senators all up for reelection next year and fear they could lose their jobs if the medical insurance rollout is not fixed. the lawmakers want quick action and accountability for those who are to blame. >> venturing on to an opponent's
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turf president obama was on the road defending the health care law. he spoke to volunteers in a dallas synagog. the texas trip sparked a blunt response from the state's governor. rick perry is an opponent of the law, saying the law is denying medical insurance to millions of texas. >> here in just the dallas area, 133,000 people who don't currently have health insurance would immediately get health insurance without even having to go through the website if the state of texas decided to do it. >> perry quickly released a statement to retaliate, saying the president quote: >> nearly a quarter of all
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texans have no medical insurance, the highest rate in the nation. >> forecasters say the typhoon heading for the philippines is the world's most powerful storm this year, a category five hurricane. expected to bring winds of more than 200 miles an hour when it makes landfall. it is on track to hit the central and southern philippines. now it's gathering strength in the pacific with sustained winds of 175 miles an hour. authorities are bracing more mud slides and up to eight inches of rain. for more, let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchell. >> this could be a devastating storm, the fill teens being an island nation. there's a couple signs that this is an intense storm. when you see the eye, and it's a very clear-cut eye, you have the sign of organization, very symmetrickiccal. that's a sign of organization and intensity.
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this has been strengthening as headed toward the philippines. once again, what we would call our category of intense hurricane out here. this is going to make landfall, probably for us late tonight, so into the day here tomorrow and then eventually moving over toward vietnam. as it does this, the strongest side of the storm is what we call the right front. that is going to be for this storm the north side, where the momentum of the storm combined with a direction is all going to funnel in, so that's going to be just south of places like manila. this is the 12th most populist country in the world. the last couple strong storms that hit in the last couple years caused a loss of life. it's not impossible this would happen as we get into the day tomorrow when it makes landfall. those are the things we're worried about. right now, the hurricane force winds extend out about 200 miles, so that's a large area that you're going to talk about devastating winds as this makes its landfall.
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>> let's hope those folks are prepared. nicole, thank you. >> the bustle in american airports will be interrupted on friday, a moment of silence observed one week after the deadly shooting at the los angeles airport. ♪ >> colleagues and friends of slain t.s.a. agent filled terminal three where he worked. >> he would have been 40 next week. i am truly did he have tated. we are all heartbroken and we will miss him dearly. >> the f.b.i. says shooting suspect remains unresponsive in an l.a. hospital. they found a letter he wrote saying he would shoot t.s.a. officers to in still fear in their minds. >> navy commander sanchez was
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arrested in tampa, florida, accused of accepting prostitutes, $100,000 in cash and other bribes from a singapore defense contractor. he is the third senior navy officer connected to the controversy. authorities say the officers were swapping secrets for bribes that included cash, prostitutes and high-end travel. >> they are worth more than $300 billion combined, but that didn't stop billionaires from getting millions of dollars in government handouts meant for farmers. >> riot police in greece removed dozens of staffers citing wasteful spending. >> twitter set to debut today. investors are bullish, saying the i.p.o. will present challenges for the social networking site. >> you're looking at a live shot of the new york stock exchange in lower manhattan as traders prepare to do business on that twitter i.p.o.
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>> good morning, to aljazeera marrying. many entrepreneurs face a road block getting money from banks to launch their business. a type of lending associated with the developing world is helping make those dreams a reality. >> first let's get a look at what temperatures to expect across the nation today. nicole. >> depends on where you are. we have very cool air that settled all the way to the southern plains, so some temperatures were even around that freezing mark, a lot of them starting to nudge up toward 40, but it's going to be brisker than you've seen recently as we head out the door here. that's why we have some of these different freeze advisories, continuing off into the northeast, it's the opposite yesterday versus today. you're going well, it's almost kind of warm out here. where the front has gone through, temperatures in the 40's, ahead of that, 50's and 60's, we had the cloud cover
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overnight helping trap in those temperatures acting like an inflated blanket, but a flow out of the south around that high means that warm air will be going away once the front comes through. we'll have more with the rain on that coming up. >> greek riot police cleared the headquarters of a former broadcaster, arresting self people. the government said the broadcaster was too expensive to run in a crisis. in june, the station was shut down and more than 2,000 staffers fired. hundreds of former employees occupied the building since then in protest. >> a general strike in greece frustrates tourists. visitors were turned away from the ancient radio ins. workers across the country walked off their jobs protesting government budget cuts. many people came a long way for nothing. >> we came all the way up here, we already bought tickets and find that it's closed, a little unfair for the tourism, which is so good for the countedry and is it i. >> greece is in a prolonged
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recession. european lenders proposed austerity as a bailout. union workers are worried, the unemployment rate hovering around 27%. >> amnesty international says shell manipulated investigations of oil spills in nigeria. it reportedly made false claims about clean up measures. shell insists most of its oil spills are caused by the theft of hundred was thousands of barrels are oil every day. >> a new report shows taxpayer money is being paid to billionaires. the environmental working group says the government paid more than $11 million in farm subsidies to billionaires in the last 17 years. congress might cut about $40 billion from the foot stamp program within the next 10 years. the vice president of the group
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behind the report said it is wrong to pay subsidies to billionaires while cutting money for food stamps that help people in poverty. >> all this week, we bring you a special series, champions of the economy, sharing unique ways americans are dealing with tough times. today, a program that lends people small amounts of money, micro lending. it is growing in popularity here. aljazeera's jennifer london explains. >> a farmer in kenya, a weaver in guatemala and a small business owner in west hollywood california might seem as different as the countries they live in, but they're all connected by big dreams and small financing. >> i was able to get a loan of 15k, which is a lot of money to me, but that helped, because at the time, i thought wow, i had this $15,000 micro loan, i had some of my own money and i felt like i had enough. >> enough for michael elliot, a
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former screen writer to open hammer and nails, a nail shop, don't call it a salon, just for guys. michael knew he had a unique and winning business plan, but when he asked for a small business loan from his bank, the answer was no. >> there are so many people who could be doing big things. >> in fact, seven out of 10 small business loan applications are denied by banks. >> making small loan and recovering those small loans involves like this amount of costs and banks are not set up to minimize those costs in a way that would make this feasible. >> michael elliot found a financial friend at v.e.d.c., a non-profit business development organization specializing in micro financing, loans of $50,000 or less. >> it closes the gap between opportunity and talent. here we believe a talent is universal, but opportunity is not, and that through small
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business financing, people can start their idea today. >> micro lending has been associated with the developing world. a pioneer launched in east africa in 2005 but since spread to 73 countries, including the u.s. loan amounts can be as small as $25. >> last year a partnership was formed to expand micro lending right here in los angeles, home of the largest number of small businesses in the country. so far, they have loaned more than $400,000 to 63 entrepreneurs. >> overall, small business in this role with job creation, as well as just holding on to the entrepreneurial spirit that really gives light to the american dream. >> i'm driving down melrose avenue, and one of those businesses is mine, and i'm 46
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years old, and i'm getting a second chance at a new dream. >> a small business funded by a small loan can mean a big difference for thousands of entrepreneurs around the world. >> life-changing. >> and right here at home. jennifer london, aljazeera, los angeles. >> and a reminder, aljazeera is bringing you champions of the economy all this week. each day we'll show you how communities across the country are using innovative ideas and programs to boost their economy. >> time now for a look at business headlines this morning. what are 140 characters worth? how about $14 billion? that's the evaluation of twitter, which sold 70 million shares last night at a higher than expected price of $26 each. in a couple of hours, it will begin trading on the new york stock exchange entered by ticker
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symbol twtr. it's the hottest since facebook's debut, but it's hoped that it will do better. despite the buzz, there is plenty of caution on wall street, because the company has yet to make any money. >> they're now starting to think about things like quarterly earnings. with that pressure, they're kind of often throws off the balance between deciding to optimize, which you currently have versus building which you could you potentially build for the current material. >> one analyst set twitter's price target a the $50. >> a busy economic calendar today. the government provides its latest gaming on economic growth. analysts think the economy grew at a sluggish pace july through september. the labor department releases its weekly report on jobless claims that will give us a preview of tomorrow's month report. retail changes are expected to
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release october sales physician today. ahead of that data, stock futures lower at this hour, do you futures down 10. that comes as the dow closed at another record high yesterday, the blue chips rising 128 points to 15476, beating the record it set last week. the s&p 501-point blow its all time high, the nasdaq at 3931. overseas, playing it safe ahead of the data, awaiting a decision on interest rates. european stock markets are modestly lower at this hour. >> same story in asia, stocks retreating, all ending in the red. >> the government wants companies to make their safety records public. the labor department is proposing all workplace injury and illness reports be filed on line for anyone to see. under current rules, employers are required to post their reports where they can be seen by employees. business groups oppose the rule,
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saying the information can be misleading. >> an aljazeera exclusive, new evidence that yasser arafat may have been poisoned. the reaction, and arafat's with it dough speaks to us. >> putting an end to the violence in mexico. the government and religious leaders try to stop the blood shed. >> after highjacking a plane and flying to cuba, an american citizen returns to the u.s. to face justice. >> there's been a flurry are activity with rewards to the miami dolphins hazing scandal in the last 24 hours. i'll break them down for you ahead in sports. in american journalism - >> introduces america tonight. >> in egypt, police fired teargas at supporters of the ... >> a fresh take on the stories that connect to you. [[voiceover]] they risk never returning to the united states. >> grounded.
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>> real. >> unconventional. [[voiceover]] we spent time with some members of the gangster disciples. >> an escape from the expected. >> i'm a cancer survivor. not only cancer, but brain cancer. america tonight 9 eastern ":
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[[voiceover]] every day, events sweep across our country. and with them, a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you've heard angles you hadn't considered? antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. >> welcome back, i'm stephanie
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sy and these are our top stairs. thousands of filipinos moved to safety as a massive typhoon professionals. the super storm is the largest of the year and expected to hit tomorrow morning with winds topping 200 miles an hour. >> iran is meeting with the permanent members of the security council today in geneva. there are reports the u.s. is willing to roll back sanctions if iran agrees to a temporary freeze of its nuclear program. >> scientists in switzerland have evidence that palestinian leader yasser arafat was poisoned. >> meanwhile, the new findings about arafat are prompting israeli reaction. officials were quick to repeat wednesday that their government had nothing to do with arafat's death. we have more. >> the israeli government has been largely dismissive of the latest report, a spokesman for
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the foreign ministry describes it as a soap opera. he says that it is possibly part of the feud between arafat's widow and the palestinian authority. the report has been handed over to the palestinian authority and investigative committee will be deciding as to what to do next based on this latest round of evidence. important, too, to remember the context in which yasser arafat spent his last days, cordoned off by israeli forces. the number of people within the building in those last months he spent there was finite. it is very clear who was there and who was not. certainly the israeli's themselves having circled and cordoned off the area would be well aware of exactly who went in and who went out at any given time. the other question, too, whether the palestinian investigative committee is going to ask israel
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to take part in the investigations into who killed arafat. >> aljazeera's mike hanna in germ turning to the west bank now and the blockbuster report is sparking reaction in the west bank. we have more from rimala where yasser arafat lived. >> for many palestinians, the findings in the swiss report are not very shocking or surprising. many palestinians have widely held the belief that arafat did not die a natural death and rather was poisoned. so far, we've heard that the p.l.o. is demanding an international, independent and credible investigation into the deaths of arafat. the palestinian authority has yet to make an official staple. we understand that the central committee is meeting this morning to discuss this report, however we also understand that we won't be hearing anything official from the palestinian authority until the heads of the
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pal tinian investigation committee announces publicly the results of the swiss report, as well as a russian report submitted to the palestinian authority. the next step they would take, whether they would demand an international investigation, then they say maybe press ahead and move ahead to take the case to the international criminal court. the palestinian state is a non-member state at the united nations and does have the right to request membership at the international criminal courts. >> reporting from the west bank. despite the new findings, arafat's family members say they are no closer to answering has may have killed the leader, but the report confirms suspicion that foul play was involved. >> i'm full of anger. this is a crime, this is an
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assassination of an elected palestinian leader by his people. it's a political assassination, and you can't imagine how my daughter and myself are in a very sad situation. we are mourning the father and husband again. >> she said it would be hard to figure out who killed her husband, because he had a long list of enemies, including the israeli government. >> witnesses who were in benghazi during the deadly consulate attack will meet next week with washington lawmakers. 3c.i.a. employees will appear in a closed door meeting. they want to learn more about the role of u.s. intelligence there. a u.s. ambassador and three other americans were killed on the 9/11 anniversary last year where the libyan post was attacked. >> mexico wants to put one of its most notorious drug records behind bars again.
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canter row was convicted in the 1985 torture and killing of a d.e.a. agent. he was freed in august after a judge threw out his 40 year sentence. mexico supreme court decided that he should finish his prison time but his whereabouts are now unknown. the u.s. is offering a $5 million bounty for his capture and conviction. >> the drug violence in mexico has been escalating for years. it has claimed between 60,000 and 100,000 lives in the last decade. now the leaders of two vigilante grooms are pulling back from their bloody battle with drug traffickers. this follows a promise from the government to step in and clear out the notorious drug cartel. >> it has become a lightning rod for parishioners to call out for help, hearing stories of people threatened, have been missing or killed. for years, church leaders have remained relatively silent in
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the face of drug violence. around 100,000 people have been killed or are missing and feared dead. cortez says it's time for the church to speak out. >> the rise of the groups indicate how tired people are. we are tired of being surrounded by death. when you're tired, that's when you say enough. >> people are so dress pretty here that the catholic released statements than perhaps from any other diocese in mexico, saying specific criminal groups, even naming them, like the ninth templar responsible for the violence and calling on the federal government to come in and stop the rye lens now. across from the church is where people took cover on october 26 as shots range out when vigilante groups marched. for months, the self defense forces avoided the town because of the drug cartel.
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they started a fight back. the mayor of the town said the town isn't a cartel-based, but acknowledges violence nearby. >> there have been a lot of killings, a wave of violence between the groups as they fight for territory. >> this doctor is one of the vigilante's leaders. for safety's sake, we had to meet him an hour's drive away. he's one of the leaders pushing for the arrest of cartel leaders. he said the economy depends on it. >> if we let these criminals keep the hold, it will be worse, because they took control of all our packing plants. >> if the government doesn't bring the cartel down, he and his men will set up, a move which threatens more blood shed. caught in the middle are people
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who have been squeezed off dying farms. they hope the killings will end soon. >> during recent clashes with vigilante groups, suspected drug cartel members coordinated attacks on power plants and substations, cutting power to 14 cities and towns. >> a former black panther who highjacked an airliner 40 years ago will make his first u.s. court appearance today. william potts returned to face piracy charges. he diverted a plate to florida to havana. he was imprisoned by the cubans. he says he came back because he is home sick. he hoped the 13 years he served in cuba will mean a lighter sentence in the u.s. >> the judge kicked off the stop and frisk case in new york city says she wants back in. in a highly unusual request a
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u.s. district judge asked an appeals court to reinstate her to the case, sake she was unfairly removed. she was removed last week, after granting media interviews. she shut down parts of stop and frisk in september. >> under increased security, shoppers returned to the new jersey mall where a shooting erupted this week. the mall reopened wednesday. a 20-year-old gunman fired shots into the ceiling monday night and then took his own life. investigators say richard shoop never aimed the rifle at others. >> a rocket carrying the olympic torch blasted off today into space. >> we have lift off on a truly olympic leap. >> the torch reached the international space station and will be taken on its first space
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walk ever as part of promotions for next winter's games in sochi. the olympic torch has gallon in space once before in 1996 for the atlanta summer olympics, but this is the first time the flame will be taken outside the spacecraft. the torch will not be lit. it won't be the flame, it will be the torch. let's check in on sports. john henry smith has the latest developments on the miami dolphins scandal. >> the controversy has taken significant turns in the last 24 hours. wednesday, nfl commissioner roger good dell appointed new york attorney ted wells to investigate the situation. martin checked into a hospital to get treated for "emotional distress." espn reports that the dolphins organization arranged for martin's parents to travel to south florida and take their son home. the report also says that the
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coach visited martin in the hospital. speaking of dolphins coaches, the sun sentinel reports that alleged bully richy incognito may have been acting at the behest of some unnamed dolphins coach to say toughen martin up. this it is reported that when martin's agent called to tell them about martin's concerns, it was suggested that martin punch incognito out. then wednesday in the dolphins locker room, many players came to incognito's defense instead of martin's. >> my point that i took from it that one, if i was not mistaken, this is the same guy who was laughing about this voice mail. second, if you go through the whole voice mail. there's some things said that you probably shouldn't say to friends. i know i've said things to my friends that i wish i'd never said, either. what that being said, i never thought it was a death threat. i never thought he was going to
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do the things he said. if you can't take validity from one part of the voice mail, you can't pick and choose which parts count and don't count. >> i think if you would ask john martin a week before who his best friend on the team was, he would have said richy incognito. the first guy to stand up for jonathan on the field, any kind of tussle, richie was the first guy there. when they wanted to hang out outside of football, who was together? richie and john. so i can't, you know, i'm not in those guys' shoes. i can't plain what's going on. >> when it happened to me, i would just get up and they come sit back down and everybody have a good time laughing about it. >> more trouble in football news. hall of fame running back tony dorsett is diagnosed with c.t.e., a degenerative brain condition linked with depression. he carried the ball over 3300 times and accumulated
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13,000 yards. dorsett played from 1977 through 1988 understand says he frequently suffers from memory loss. he also says thoughts of suicide have crossed his mind. dorsett got his diagnosis after participating in a study at ucla. former giant leonard marshall also discovered c.t.e. diagnosis as a result of this study. >> to hoops and lighter fare. when talk about in the barbershop turns to the nba, situations seem set to change. paul george and his undefeated indiana pacers hosting a disappointing chicago bulls. when you mess with paul george, you get the horns. he led the pacers with 21 points, adding six rebounds. the bulls never had any control in this gail. it was all george, all pacers all the time. stat geeks, check this out, this is for you. george with an astounding plus 28 on the court.
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that's a grade of a plus plus plus. pacer are 5-0, bulls 1-3. >> coming up big with the game on the line, scoring 15 of the spurs last 16 to lead spurs to a win. they are now 4-1. >> the clippers rattled off three straight wins before their trip to disney world. there they ran into the magic's version of the to your of terror. 21 boards to go with 20 points. 96-90, that's sports. back to you. >> around one in 88 american children affected by autism, now
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researchers say a baby's gaze could be a signal to detect it.
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>> taking a live look at the capitol rotunda on this gloomy morning. good morning. let's look at what potential precipitation we are looking at across the nation today. nicole is here. >> yesterday, you showed the same shot, it was a beautiful sunrise and i said enjoy it while you can, because tomorrow it's going to be different. we have that front moving across the country now hitting the east coast. almost the entire state of vermont is under rain right now. it's at least quick-moving and the cloud cover kept coastal temperatures mild overnight. you definitely have the cloud cover and rain. a lot of this will be out early into the afternoon, and then chances of diminishing through the rest of the afternoon. at least it's a quick mover, temperatures will drop below it. the one area we have more rain moving in oregon to washington.
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the next system has a fair amount of wind associated with it. more coming up, back to you. >> a baby's chances for developing autism could be revealed in its gaze. researchers analyzed how children look at faces. in those later diagnosed with autism, scientists observed diminished eye contact when they were between two and six months old. reservers say this is the earliest indicator of autism they've ever seen, hoping the discovery will lead to earlier intervention. authorities in japan are starting the clean up of the crippled nuclear fukushima plant. it was damaged in the earthquake and tsunami. more than 1,000 damaged radioactive fuel rods were taken care of. operators say the new safety procedures are the first step toward decommissioning the plant. the process is expected to take decades and could cost billions
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of dollars. >> in an aljazeera exclusive, scientists in switzerland have evidence that palestinian leader yasser arafat was poisoned. their tests showed unusually high levels of a radioactive substance in arafat's remains. joining us is phil rees, investigative reporter, working on the exclusive documentary "killing arafat" which reveals details into the investigation. also with us is arafat's lawyer, the widow of arafat's lawyer. they are with us this morning. the cause of death was never exclusively determined. what caused the initial suspicion to open this cold case again? >> well, at the time, there was a mystery, really. nobody could pinpoint the reason why yasser arafat died in
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november, 2004. in fact, it was my colleague, clayton swisher that actually triggered things. he's head of the investigative unit here. he went to see arafat's widow and she had remains of his clothing, a duffle bag full of the clothes he'd worn in the last days prior to his death. mrs. arafat suggested that somebody look into her husband's death, sips it was a mystery, so clayton initially had these clothes analyzed. this was the first step of what has now been a two year investigation, because the first step suggested that it was polonium. the problem is, we didn't have what has been essentially an accurate chain of custody. people could allege that the clothes had been tampered with. now it's the bones. nobody could have tampered with those. >> i was reading the report this morning. it's fascinating. by the way, that is on our website, aljazeera.com. i want to get your reaction, there were rumors from the start of arafat's death that he was
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poisoned. what is your reaction to this new report? >> it is factually very, very clear. the swiss gave us a presentation before we handed over the report. we were very thorough. looked at every possibility. they have commissioned certain parts to examine with the best. you have hurdles to go through, we have done them. we have no doubt that their work was very serious. we have concludes the very serious conclusion, and i have no doubt in my mind that there is an overwhelming case for murder crime. >> phil,ar rat was a powerful leader. why were the palestinians
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immediately after his death not more aggressive in finding out the cause? was this a cover up of some kind? >> well, that's kite an issue. >> go ahead, phil. >> sorry. >> at the time there was no autopsy. the mystery was there and many people in the palestinian authority had suspicions. i think there are two arguments put forward, one, they didn't want to did he say kay the body by having an autopsy, equally, there's nothing ruling against that in islam or any other reason not to do that. i think there is a view that people thought that it's an inconvenient truth if they found the israelis or palestinian side were involved in the murders. it's something several people, we find this today, prefer to look away, because it is very
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hard for the palestinians to sit down and negotiate with people who they believe and they believe it is the israelis who perhaps had murdered the father of their nation. >> we know that secretary kerry is in the region this week to get those talks reignited. >> it sounds like you had a reaction to my question about why palestinians were not quicker to look into his death. >> well, this is a very complicated case, and you cannot exclude politics, political convenience and sometimes cover-you thats, which would help both political convenience and conspiracies. when arafat died, he died in a military hospital. no one would have right to have access apart from the authorities. now the investigating magistrates in france, we hope that apart from the findings of
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the swiss report, maybe the magistrates for the investigation in france would have the right to have access to all sides, and so on, i would not exclude political convenience in order to for the palestinians to look forward. remember in 2004, the palestinians were hoping to have a short transition to reach their own entity or state, but i'm sure some parties in the leadership in the palestinian authority thought if they yessed on an investigation, that might hinder their chances to have a short transition in order to have -- >> all right. i'm going to have to leave it there, but it's fascinating and we'll continue to talk about it today on aljazeera. you can see the full documentary, "killing arafat" an
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aljazeera airing this sunday. >> at the end of our second hour, here's what we're following this morning. scientists in swisser evidence that palestinian leader yasser arafat was poisoned as we were just talking, their tests showing high levels of polonium in arafat's remains. iran's foreign minister is cardinally optimistic about talks in geneva with the five permanent members of the united nations security council. >> twitter priced its shares at $26 for its initial public offering, just a couple of hours away. aljazeera continues. we're back with you in two and a half minutes with del walters and there's a live look at wall street, preparing for the twitter i.p.o.
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>> al jazeera america is a straight-forward news channel. >> its the most exciting thing to happen to american journalism in decades. >> we believe in digging deep. >> its unbiased, fact-based, in-depth journalism. >> you give them the facts, dispense with the fluff and get straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news. determining using some sort of subjective interpretation of their policy as to whether or not your particular report was actually abusive, because if it doesn't contain language that specifically threatens you directly or is targeted towards you specifically, they may not consider it abuse. they may consider it offensive. and in that case they just recommend that you block that person. >> i don't want to minimise this, because i mean, there's
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some really horrible things that are on line, and it's not - it's not just twitter, what has happened through social media and the anonymity of the net is that you see websites, hate-filled websites targetting all sorts of groups, popping up. there has been a huge number of those that exist as well. >> they say they did it because they were trying to protect my children. they didn't protect my children, they traumatized them. >> fault lines examines why so many native american kids are caught in the child welfare system. >> any time they see a social worker its like seeing a police officer. the immediate response is, "they're here to take my kids". >> from the indian perspective who sees this in terms of history, this is as about as adversarial as it gets.
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>> this crime has to be punished, killing and elected leader. >> the widow of yasser arafat reacting to an aljazeera exclusive, new evidence that the palestinian leader may have been murder road. the smoking gun, a powerful radioactive poison discovered in his remains. >> a possible break through as new talks get underway with iran. there are reports the u.s. maybe willing to ease cripple little sanctions if iran agrees to halt it's nuclear program. >> twitter will be trending on twitter today. the popular social media site going public in the most eagerly anticipated i.p.o. of the year. >> shaking up those skinny
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stereo types, a british retailer now using curvey mannequins. why some say the full figure displays just don't go far enough. >> good morning, welcome to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. we begin with a story first reported exclusively here on aljazeera. there is new evidence supporting the theory yasser arafat was murdered. swiss scientists conclude the palestinian leader was poisoned, finding a radioactive substance called polonium in his body. those findings released wednesday in a 108 page report. the body was exhumed one year ago in response to an aljazeera investigation. the report supports years of suspicion by arafat's widow that fall play was involved. >> i'm full of anger.
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this is a crime, this is an assassination of an electioned palestinian leader by his people. it's a political assassination. you can imagine my daughter and myself are in a very sad situation. we are mourning the father and a husband again. >> we have complete coverage of how israelis and palestinians are reacting to this news, but we begin with clayton swisher, who explains just how scientists reached their startling conclusion. >> first they found abnormally high amounts of polonium 210 in his clothes, now discovered the substance inside his bones. swiss scientists produced this 108 page report after an exhumation of arafat's body last november, saying they are clear of poisoning within an 83%
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confidence. they received an analysis from professor of forensic science. >> if i was a judge and jury, this is absolutely stone-cold certain. this is beyond any doubt, in my opinion, that it was polonium that caused the death of yasser arafat. >> to widow and daughter, it is 100% proof. >> when they came with the results, i'm mourning yasser again. my daughter and i will go you will over the world to punish who did this crime. >> i'm going to have proof that he was poisoned. i feel proof. final closure for me would be knowing who killed him, and the motive and the ambition behind it. >> more than 40 years of research have given scientists knowledge of the average levels
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of polonium and radioactive lead in human skeletons. what was found in arafat's ribs and hips was the highest ever published. >> everybody has a very finey amount of polonium in their bones. the level in yasser arafat is about 900. that is either 18 or 36 times the average, depending on the literature. >> what's more, the soil around his body absorbed his decaying flesh and organs. that soil measured at least 18 times higher than earth not visibly stained. the report rules out any outside contamination. on a sale of confidence one through six, six being strongly can have. data supports poisoning at level five. these results confirm a theory of polonium poisoning.
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the same swiss scientists found blood and urine stains were contaminated with polonium 210 including in its purest form. they examined clothing he wore in his final days. this latest test was on his flesh and bones. buried since his death in 2000 fore, the samples were gathered when his body was unearthed in november last year. three teams took 20 samples each. aljazeera released the swiss team's results. a russian team also carried out tests. their results have not yet been made public. there was a team in france. the french results remain a secret, but as three investigating magistrates continue, they now have new evidence. the looming question beyond all of this is whether the palestinian authority shifts the case to the international criminal court. perhaps ms. arafat and her daughter will see the suspects brat to trial and learn not just
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what killed arafat, but who. >> the new findings are prompting israeli officials to say their government had nothing to do with arafat's death. mike hanna is in jerusalem with reaction. >> the israeli government has been dismissive of the report. a spokesman describes it as a soap opera. he says that it is possibly part of the feud between arafat's widow and the palestinian authority. the key issue is that the report has been handed over to the palestinian authority. an investigative committee will be deciding as to what to do next based on this latest round of evidence. important, too, to remember the context in which yasser arafat spent his last days. he was cordoned off within his headquarters by israeli forces. the number of people within the headquarters in those last months that he spent in ramallah were finite.
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it was very clear who was there and who was not and certainly the israeli's themselves having encircled and cordoned off that headquarters would be well aware of exactly who went in and who went out at any ditch time. the other question, too, whether the palestinian investigative committee is going to ask israel to take part in the investigations into who killed arafat. >> aljazeera's mike hanna in jerusalem. the controversial report is parking reaction in the west bank. aljazeera has more fro from whee lived. >> the findings are not shocking or surprising. many palestinians have widely held the brief that arafat did not die a natural death and was poisoned. we heard that the p.l.o. is demanding an international, independent and credible investigation into the death of
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arafat. the palestinian authority has yet to make an official state. we understand that the committee is meeting in rimala this morning to discuss the report. we understand that we won't be hearing anything official until the head of the palestinian investigation committee announces publicly the results until the other reports are submitted. palestinians await the next step that the palestinian authority would take, whether they would demand an international investigation and then they say maybe press ahead and move ahead to take the case to the international criminal court. the palestinian state is a non-member state at the united nations and does have the right to request membership at the international criminal courts.
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>> what is polonium and how hard is it to get this highly radioactive substance? aljazeera's jacob ward explains. >> polonium is not dangerous outside of the body. it's when you ingest it, inhale it or get it inside an open wound that it does damage, attacking your organs, shutting them down until finally your bone marrow comes apart, your white blood cells drop off and pretty soon you diane exacross 80ing death. why didn't doctors detect it? it's not part of the standard check list. flu symptoms or food poisoning are the first things you look at. even if you expect the the poisoning, a typical geiger counter doesn't pick it up. in the case of yasser arafat's death, the question everyone wants to know is who did this. >> most industrialized nations of access to polonium, tiny amounts used in lab testing.
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it's highly unusual to get enough to kill someone. >> authorities in japan are cleaning up the nuclear power plant after the earthquake and tsunami there, crews arriving to remove 1,000 damaged radioactive fuel rods. that's more than stored in chernobyl. the new safety procedures are the first step toward decommissioning the plant. that process is expected to take decades and cost billions of dollars. >> forecasters say a typhoon heading toward the philippines is the most powerful storm of the year, packing a category five hurricane. it is expected to bring winds up to 200 miles an hour on friday when it makes landfall in the philippines. it is gathering strength in the pacific with sustained winds of 175 miles an hour. authorities in the philippines are bracing for mud slides and
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eight inches of rain. for more on this very powerful storm, we turn to nicole mitchell. >> yes, definitely a potent system, already those outer bands hitting the philippines. one of our concerns is not just the wind speed which at 175 miles an hour is sustained, the gusts going over 200, but that the rain coming to the island is going to cause on that terrain, landslides, mud slides, because it will be widespread. you can clearly see in this part of the world, we don't actually have the aircraft reconnaissance that measure the storms. this is what we would call a typhoon. signs of a very strong storm as it moves toward the philippines. as it hits, it's going to be the northern side, the right front quadrant, the combination of that's where the winds are hit i can land from the circulation around the storm, plus the forward momentum of the storm, that's where you get the biggest
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upwell and storm surge as these storms hit, plus we could be seeing high tide at the same time. that surge is going to be very devastating particularly for the low-lying areas and going to be doing this for us overnight tonight, but really in the next 24 hours, as i said, already feeling those impacts here could be very devastating as this makes its way on land. after that, it heads late into the weekend, lose in intensity toward vietnam. >> there is big news on wall street today, of course that being the public debut of twitter. it will begin trading on the new york stock exchange under the ticker symbol twtr in little more than an hour. it's build as the splashiest i.p.o. since facebook debuted. the price debuted at $26, valuing the country higher than macy's, and bed, bath and
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beyond. there is caution on wall street for a company that has yet the to make a dime. you're looking live at pictures behind the new york stock exchange. the country has draped the exterior with a banner bearing the logo. heidi is on the floor. the if i'm a consumer, do i want to put my money into a company that hasn't made a dime yet. >> that's still an unknown. all of the shares, the 70 million shares that twitter was selling, they sold yesterday to investment banks. twitter has already made over $18 billion and that's all it will make from this i.p.o. in a little over an hour, you'll hear the opening bell ring and it won't be until after that, maybe not until after 10:00 that the average investor sitting at home in front of your computer will get a chance at this.
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the number here, of course, the key is 26. that is how much those investment banks paid for the shares. it could be a drastically different number by the time the average consumer has access. that's because one man, who is very important in this process, a designated market maker, he is one guy who will be at the twitter station soon is coming up with the price that will start when the average consumer can start investing, and that could be much higher than the 26 it's currently priced at. >> there are a lot of people that are going to be saying we've been here before and point to facebook. what do you say to those people? >> well, the good thing is the facebook traded on the nasdaq. this is a whole other game here in the new york stock exchange. that one person, the designated market maker's job is to prevent something that was a disaster
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like facebook. he invests his own firms money into the stock. he works for barclays and he will if anything goes unstable, he can put money in, making liquidity and keep the process on track. >> heidi zhou-castro on the flower, wearing the colors of the day. thank you very much. >> you're welcome. >> the twitter i.p.o. is going to make a lot of people very rich and happy soon. what happens when you have so much money, you don't know what to do with it? we talked to a man faced with that rather unpleasant problem. >> you'll find paul gross pounding the trails on his mountain bike. it's one of his passions and he can indulge as much as he wants. he retired from microsoft a senior vice president with stock options and more money than he ever expected. >> it's a dream come true growing up. everybody wanted to figure out how to make it. it was like the american dream and it was happening.
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it was fun. >> he spent money on cars, golf and travel and it left him uneasy. >> i was studying spanish. i planned to learn other things that didn't happen. i was more drawn to things with computers and things with making changes with people. i just wasn't feeling rewarded. >> he came here to social venture partners looking for the best way to make his life and all that money rely. >> success for significance or what do you want on your tombstone. >> rules jones runs the non-profit. s.c.p. has offices in 34 cities and has given out more than $50 million in grants to 630 different organizations. it was a good fit for gross. >> if we pool our money, our human capital and our time, we can do a whole lot in social
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issues, and entrenched social issues much more so than we can do on our own and paul is a perfect example of that. >> after giving time and money to support a local school, a new reason for caring and giving dropped into his life. his son, william was born 10 weeks premature. >> as the layers of the sort of preemie onion unpeeled, he ended up with a brain condition called hydroseverus. he embraced to simple new philosophy. >> he donated and raised millions more to support research for water on the brain. he served on the board of the hydrocephalus association and company found understand the research network for sharing data and ideas. wealth brings responsibility, he now realizes, and he offers some advice for newcomers to the
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multi-millionaire game. >> find out what you are passionate about and do something, because how much more do you need? how much more can you have? >> it's a responsibility this bike ride every says he really didn't understand, until the life trail he was following made him rich. aljazeera, redmond, washington. >> we are following breaking news out of the middle east. secretary of state john kerry says he is now confident that a date for a syrian peace conference is going to be set sometime within the next few days. kerry also says significant process has been made in the push for an agreement between the israelis and palestinians. >> chris christie is said to be the front runner for the 2016 presidential nomination. how will his brash style do on the national stage? we'll talk to a reporter who covers him daily. >> this different look for
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dummies, mannequins that look like real women. on inside story, we bring together unexpected voices closest to the story, invite hard-hitting debate and desenting views and always explore issues relevant to you.
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>> welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. we're going to talk to the writer of the christie chronicles about how the newly reelected new jersey governor will fare with a national audience if he decides to run in 2016. >> we have a cold start in the midsection of the country. the sun is you, we're starting to warm up. oklahoma and north texas started out around freezing. it's been one of our colder starts with frost and freeze. you can watch for that again tomorrow. now that the front's come through and skies cleared up, the temperature's dropped down overnight. where it's been milder, 50's and 60's ahead of the front, 40's behind it. a combination of cloud cover with the rain coming in acknowledge warm air out of the south, once the front pushes through, that's going to change that. the mild start today will be
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replaced by a crisp start tomorrow. otherwise the southeast is our warm spot for the rest of the day. del. >> it didn't take long, governor christie's landslide victory starting conversation with presidential prospects. he said he thinks he's a better executive today than two years ago. he is not bothered when asked if he would like to be the next commander-in-chief. >> it's -- it's -- it's an indication from at least the person who asked the question, do you think you're doing well enough that you might be worthy of consideration for most important leadership job in this country. if you're burdened by that, get out of the business. >> and christie says while he is flattered by questions about a 2016 run, he says running new jersey is his top priority, and this just in. a short time ago, time magazine
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releasing its latest issue. as you can see, it has chris christie on the cover. the headline is the elephant in the room. a columnist for the philadelphia inquiry writes the christy chronicles. no doubt his political enemies are already digging into his part. does he have any cell tons in his closet that we have yet to see. >> most of the cell tons have been aired in his political campaigns prior in new jersey, like in 2009. voters in new jersey didn't seem to care. there have been questions about his health, he's overweight. he released his medical records and all seems normal for a 51-year-old guy. there are questions about trouble his brother got into involving stock trading while christy was u.s. attorney and then able to avoid prosecution. >> you say troubled, what type of trouble? >> there was some -- the firm
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that his brother was running, about a dozen other traders were indicted and christie's brother was not. at the time, christie was u.s. attorney in new jersey and the u.s. attorney in new york was prosecuting the case. there were questions about whether christie might have influenced things in a way that would have protected his brother. this came out a great deal in 2009 by his opponent at the time when he was first running for governor, and nothing ever really stuck, either in voters' minds and there was never really any evidence of actual impropriety involving the governor. >> the nation sees chris christie as the guy from the hurricane hugging people. how much, though, has he really done for the state of new jersey and what has he fixed? >> he would point to some of his fiscal policies, one success that was clearly a bipartisan success was cutting benefits for
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public workers, like teachers. he cut pensions and medical coverage for them to some degree in order to close severe, severe deficit that the state was in. most experts believe he made some headway in that regard. he capped property taxes. it is the number one thing in new jersey, the highest property tax in the country. he capped the increase, so while property taxes are still going up, the rate of increase has slowed. those, he points to as his two biggest accomplishments. on the other hand, the budget has increased each year he's been in office. he's done things that some have found too conservative, veto gay marriage bill, an increase to the minimum wage. it depends where you stand on the spectrum of whether you agree with what he's done. because of sandy, across the board. a third of democrats voted for him and that is considered
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totally based on almost entirely based on sandy. they love the work he did. >> i wanted to go this question in before we run and you have time, but he bills himself as a guy who gets things done and reaches across the aisle. that statement is as old as washington. what happens in this case when mr. christie goes to washington? >> that's a great question. it's certainly easier to get things done in new jersey, a small state where you know everybody than washing to be, where there's several hundred unwieldy legislators. he believes that he understands how leadership worse. he believes it's about relationships. he believes it's about talking behind closed doors and making deals if you have to and he believes that he can bring this to the national stage in 2016. >> most believe he will be running for president in 2016. matt joining us from philadelphia this morning, thanks very much. >> voters in washington state rejected a plan to label
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genetically modified foods, shooting down the measure 55-45%. it was one of the costliest battles in state history. many of the countries biggest food producer raising $22 million to fight it. they spent double to defeat the measure in california last year. had that measure passed, washington would have been the first state in the country to require that labeling. >> crippling situations against iran by the u.s. navy willing to ease them and the big step iran would have to make to make that happen. >> new spy game allegations, this time it's not the u.s. at the center of this latest cloak and dagger scandal. >> they say that the eyes are the windows to the soul. they may hold the key to early autism detection. what new parents should be looking for. >> i'm john henry smith. there was an explosion in the miami dolphins hazing scandal.
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this is the 900-page document we call obamacare. it could change costs, coverage, and pretty much all of healthcare in america. my show sorts this all out. in fact, my staff has read the entire thing. which is probably more than what most members of congress can claim. we'll separate politics from policy, and just prescribe the facts.
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>> welcome back, i'm del walters, these are the stories we are following at this hour. in an aljazeera exclusive, swiss scientists now have evidence that palestinian leader yasser arafat was poisoned. their tests showed unusually high level of a radioactive substance in arafat's remains. >> thousands of people in the philippines moved to safety as the massive typhoon haiyan approaches. this super storm is expected to hit tomorrow morning with winds topping two runs. >> a new round of negotiations on iran's nuclear program is underway right now. members of the u.n. security council are in the geneva. the international community hopes for a positive first step, a pullback by tehran in its
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nuclear program. sanctions against iran could be rolled back for six months in return. hardliners could slow the process, iran's foreign minister expressing cautious optimism about the agreement. aljazeera's phil ittner is in london right now. how are both sides approaching these talks? >>well, del, they're approaching with cautious optimism, as you say. we've heard from the western side of things, the europeans saying they expect concrete progress, in their words and there was a background briefing last night here where the u.s. team expressed similar optimism. nobodying expects this will be easy, but certainly, there is an air of optimism here. the iranians saying there is some progress being made, but it is difficult. del. >> phil, there are hardliners in
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both camps, there are israeli. how are these hard liners affecting negotiations in geneva? >> well, the hardliners on all sides are causing difficulty. they are pushing for more deepening sanctions, hoping congress would hold off. the iranians have come to the table because of the sanction. they're already here, apparently, the talks in good faith. any further sanctions might poison the well. of course, we're also hearing from the israelis, deep concern by prime minister netanyahu saying not only should there not be an easing of sanctions, but a deep then. the iranian hardliners making their views known most notably
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on those marches november 4 in which thousands came out in anti american protest. certainly, there's hardliners on all sides, but the atmosphere here in switzerland cautiously optimistic. >> phil, thank you very much this morning. >> joining us now is lacy he'lly, the director of middle east and defense policy for the center for arms control and non-proliferation in washington, d.c. this morning opinion the negotiations today and friday in geneva are a follow up to talks. few details emerged from previous talks, so put these negotiations in historical context for us. >> sure, the negotiations previously actually were a follow on to many negotiations that have taken place between the permanent five members of the security council and iran plus germany over the last couple of years. the last negotiations were significantly more positive. we have the election of a more
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moderate president in iran, historic talks over the phone between the u.s. president obama and president ar rohany in iran. we previously heard from the previous president and the new president is much more positive. there are a lot of things happening going into these negotiations. there's definitely an air of cautious optimism around this entire agenda. >> there are also those hardliners. israeli prime minister netanyahu saying it would be detrimental. what effect would that have on the negotiations? there's a long history of
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mistrust between the u.s. and iran and between israel and iran. there is a lot to overcome in these negotiations and iran's going to have to take serious steps toward fixing some of that, some of that past mistrust and really assuring the u.s. and iran that they will be able to confirm that iran is not building a nuclear weapon. i do think that some confidence-building measures can be taken, though, iran can do a lot of things to cease their current enrichment levels, implement the additional protocol, which allows much more strict inspections, and some of those countries, some of those hardliners will be in some way satisfied by that. i do think they are taking a very hard line right now hoping to get the most they possibly can out of these negotiations. >> iran's foreign minister saying he believes a possible deal can be reached this week. what is leading to that remark? >> we've heard that he hopes this week, we have heard it from
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sufficient officials that they are somewhat positive that some steps can be taken this week. i think that's a very, very positive talk coming from both sides. i think everyone who's been watching this would be somewhat surprised to see things move so quickly, but very happy to see things move so quickly. >> joining us from washington, thank you. >> there is a new report out raising questions about the possibility of war crimes by u.s. troops in afghanistan. a rolling stone magazine investigation says u.s. special forces tortured and murdered civilians. it highlights a specific case, the killings of 18 men last year outside kabul. the human rights watch is now calling for an investigation. >> a former black panther who highjacked an airliner 30 years ago is going to make his first appearance inside a u.s. courtroom today. william potts crime from cuba to
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floored wednesday. he faces air piracy charges. he diverted a u.s. flight to havana in 1984. he thought he would be held as a revolutionary hero there, but was put in jail instead. he said he came back because he's home sick. he hopes the 13 years he served in cuba will mean a lighter sentence here in the u.s. >> the n.s.a. spying scandal could bring changes at the top of the agency. the white house is thinking of naming separate chiefs for the u.s. cyber command and nsa. the current chief is retiring this spring. >> the c.i.a. shelling out big money to at&t for counter terrorism. "the new york times" said the agency is paying $10 million a year to access that company's huge database, including international calls made by
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americans. there are no court orders or subpoenas ordering at&t to cooperate. the c.i.a. is forbidden prom spying on activities of americans. >> healthcare.gov needs hundreds of fixes, but there's no need to delay the rollout of the affordable care act. that was the message taken to capitol hill wednesday by kathleen sebelius. she not only afforded the affordable care act, she had to defend herself. >> your main goal should have been to protect americans and ensure their safety. in your zeal to implement this law, not warnings, advice, not counsel would deter you from implementing the exchanges. you said america should hold you accountable, which is why today, madam secretary, i repeat my request for you to resign. >> she also fought or delays to delay the implementation.
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>> some have asked why not delay implementation until all the problems are fixed. there's a pretty straight forward answer. delaying the affordable care act wouldn't delay people's san kerr or diabetes or parkinson's. it didn't delay the need for mental health services or cholesterol screenings or prenatal care. delaying the affordable care act doesn't delay the foreclosure notices for families forced into bankruptcy by unpayable medical bills. >> meanwhile, stepping on to what some say would be enemy soil, president obama hit the road to defend his health care plan, going to texas. the trip sparked a blunt response from the accident governor rick perry. >> here in just the dallas area, 133,000 people who don't
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currently have health insurance would immediately get health insurance without even having to go through the website if the state of texas decided to do it. >> perry quickly released a statement to respond saying the president of the. >> just son cart are is going to run for governor of georgia, that job once held by his grandfather. he could faces incumbent nathan deal. deal will have to defeat two
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primary challengers first. let's get a look at sports now with john henry smith. >> the hazing controversy in miami has taken significant turns. wednesday, nfl commissioner roger goodell appointed new york attorney ted wells to investigate. we learned that martin checked himself into a south florida hospital around the time he left the miami dolphins to get treated for emotional distress. espn reports that the dolphins organization arranged for martin's parents to travel to south florida and take their son home. the report also says that the coach visited martin in the hospital. >> speaking of dolphin's coaches, it is reported that alleged bully richy incognito may have been acting at the behest of unnamed dolphins coach to say toughen up martin. pro football reports that when martin's agent called the dolphins to tell them about martin's concerns, ireland suggested that martin punch in
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dog night toe out. in the locker room, many players came to incognito's defense instead of martin's. >> my point that i took from it, that one, if i am not mistaken is the same guy laughing about this voice mail first of all. second of all, i believe that, you know, if you go through the whole voice mail there are things said that you should not say in front of general friends. i know there's things i said to friends that i wish i hadn't said either. i never thought it was a death threat, that he was actually going to do the things he said. if you can't take validity from one part of the voice mail, you can't pick and choose which parts count and don't. in my mind, i think it was -- >> i think if you would ask john martin before who his best friend on the team was, he would have said incognito. the first gay to stand up for
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martin, richie was the first guy there. hanging outside of football, who was together, richie and martin. >> what happened to me, you all just get up and come sit back down and everybody have a good time laughing about it. >> hall of fame running back tony dorsett has been diagnosed with a degenerative brain condition linked with depression and die men is that. he carried the ball over 3300 times in his 12 year career and accumulated almost 13,000 yards. dorsett played from 1977 through 1988 and he says he frequently suffers from memory loss. he also says thoughts of suicide have crossed his mind. he got his diagnosis after studying at ucla. two others discovered their diagnosis as a result of the same study. >> to hoops, when talking at the
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barbershop turns to the best in the nba there's a team not talked about. that could change. paul george and his undefeated indiana pacers hosting the disappointed chicago bulls. george was fantastic on this evening, leading them to 21 points, adding six rebounds opinion the bulls never had control in this game. it was all george, all pacers all the time. george was an astounding plus 28 on the court. that means he had a grade of a plus plus plus. pay theres win by 17, 5-0, bulls 1-3. >> tonight is a huge night in college football, not one, but two top 10 matchups on tap. first at 7:30 p.m. eastern time, number 10 oklahoma 7-1 on the season travels to number six baylor, the undefeated baylor bears. we move out west at 9:00 p.m. eastern time where the number three oregon puts their 8-0 record on the line as they
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travel to fifth ranked stanford. 5-1 in the pack 12. that's sports. >> i got the chips, you bring the dip. >> absolutely. >> john henry smith, thank you very much. along with twitter, we want to tell you what's making news in the financial markets and business world this morning. there is breaking news on the economy. the government now reporting the u.s. economy growing 2.8% from july through september. that is better than economists hoped and the best showing for the economy in a year. also, weekly jobless claims fell by 9,000 to 336,000, signaling employers are now reducing layoffs. stock futures are higher at this hour. that could mean a strong start to the trading which begins shortly. the markets also welcoming a surprise decision by the european central bank to cut its key interest rate. the dow set to open at a record high this morning, the blue chips stand to get 15746, the
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record set just last week. the s&p 1 point below its all time high. overseas market in europe changing direction, shooting higher after the european central bank decision, stocks retreating in asia, tokyo, hong kong and shanghai, all ending lower. >> it is time to say goodbye to block bester. owner dish network is closing the last stores and laying off 2800 workers. it is a dramatic end to a company that was once valid at $5 billion. dish bought the firm after it went bankrupt in 2011, it couldn't compete with on line rivals like netflix and amazon. >> turns out there are some deals even too good for wal-mart. a computer glitch caused problems on its websites, products winding up being priced
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ridiculously low, like a computer for $9, the glitch creating a buying frenzy. wal-mart canceled the orders. the error is fixed and the website back to normal this morning. >> mannequins are now being changed to look like real women. why not everyone is too happy about it. >> there's a new clue which would determine which babies are at risk for babies with autism. >> it's quiet in the midsection of the country, but on each coastline, we have areas of rain, causing big time flight delays. where you might be off to a slow start this morning. >> looking live right now at new york, those cloudy skies could be coming to a theater near you. we'll be right back.
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>> welcome back to aljazeera america. in just a few minutes, we're going to tell you about a store that is using rather shapely mannequins and why some say the did you meanies just aren't curvey enough. >> first, is it going to rape no
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we'll check in with meteorologist nicole mitchell. >> as we head out this morning, you certainly don't need an umbrella in the midsection of the country. definitely up and down the east coast, watching for that, because we have the rain moving in and already the clouds have moved in. if you're trying to get a flight out today, east coast are all delayed. early afternoon, when this all moves through, it is moving through quickly, rain chances go down into the afternoon hours, but watch for delays to be pretty persistent possibly around d.c., too. another big weather system pushing into the midwest. >> they are passing the torch here in outer space, taking the olympic spirit to new heights. we want to show you picture from the international space station.
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a russian rocket blasting off carrying three astronauts from three countries. they also had the olympic torch. the torch relay has been making its way across russia and will continue until the winter games in sochi in february. the torch will spend the next few days in space and return to earth saturday, but not before an astronaut takes it for a space walk. the torch isn't lit. it would eat up precious oxygen in the space station and pose a threat to the crew. >> a plan to separate young men from young women at colleges in turkey sent students there into the streets. that change being ordered by the prime minister, who says he's responding to neighborhood complaints. critics say the conservative government is trying to police the students and their private lives. aljazeera reports from istanbul on this heated debate. >> this is the statement of
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turks arguing whether turk issue society is going forward or backwards. >> there will be no student loans for boys and girls to be able to share and stay under the same roof. there have been serious complaints about boys and girls sharing the same flats. >> the prime minister that give the turk issue authorities the green light to close mixed sex university campus residences and even segregate private residences. some turks agree. >> any turkish family would oppose their daughter or son living under the same roof as someone of the opposite sex. >> others disagree and question why after 11 years in power, the government's begun a morality campaign. >> they want to limit our freedom. they want to limit our life freedom and they want to lock us
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into their definition of a conservative mind. >> students protested against the prime minister's actions in several turk issue cities, demanding the authorities stay out of their personal affairs. >> this crowd has been chanting we will resist with both gender. the population is still angry at the way the government handled the protests earlier this year. >> the prime minister was criticized at the time for ordering a heavy crackdown on nationwide anti-government protests. he now says he is involved in security services in closing down the mixed student dorms. >> this student lives with her fellow male students. >> i'm angry. i cannot accept it. we are not in the relationships that he thinks. it's about friendships, about studying. >> the reaction from young turks
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who previously supported the government may come as a surprise. >> i back the prime minister in many things, but he has intruded too far into people's private lives. in the future, he could intervene in mine. >> even if some young turks are more religious, that doesn't mean the government can always count on their endorsement. >> most of those students are over the age of 18. the turkish civil code says they can make their on decisions on marriage, housing and work. >> a baby's chances for developing autism could be revealed in the way it looks at you. researchers analyze how children from birth to age three look at faces. scientists say they observed diminished eye contact in children with autism when they were between two and six months old. researchers say this is the earliest indicator of autism they've ever seen. they hope the discovery will lead to earlier intervention. >> a store in london introducing
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mannequins that they say looks more like the customers replacing rail-thin models with curvey ones. we have more. >> young, beautiful, and thin, the fashion industry is notorious for using achingly slim models to sell clothes. this store wants to buck that trend, using larger mannequins to appeal to shoppers. the typical woman shopping here is surrounded by mannequins on average three sizes smaller than themselves. they've introduced this plus-sized mannequin hoping it will change the shape of the way women think shopping for clothes. the mannequins are meant to shake the idea that women have to be tall and thin to look good. >> we are shown and image that we are supposed to think is perfect and in many cases, that isn't feasible. we have people that shoppize say
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and size 10, but also people that shop for larger sizes, maybe a side 20. this hopefully is about projecting a positive body image can be an array of shapes, and sizes. >> is this mannequin really considered a larger size? it has more curves than the mannequins stores typically use, but far from what most people would consider heavy. still, many sigh it's an improvement. >> it's very brave and a positive step forward. if all people come on the bandwagon, that's great. if it just stops there, then it's just going to be stagnant. >> this move could be a sign that fashion retailers are under pressure to make an effort to appeal to their biggest customer base, a woman who typically doesn't strut down the cat walk. aljazeera, london. >> sizing variations have long plagued the women's fashion industry. while the average woman hasn't
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changed much over the decades, the clothing they buy has. a woman with a size 32 bust would have worn a size 14 in the 1930's. two decades later, she would be buying dresses in a size eight and today. that same woman would be wearing a size zero. aljazeera continues in just two and a half minutes. your headlines are straight ahead. we're going to leave you with a look at the new york stock exchange, the floor of the new york stock exchange, actually the outside of the new york stock exchange. today is the day that you have to wear twitter blue, twitter making its i.p.o. today. the question is who will buy and how much will twitter be worth? some say at much as $14 billion.
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(vo) al jazeera america we understand that every news story begins and ends with people. >> the efforts are focused on rescuing stranded residents. (vo) we pursue that story beyond the headline, past the spokesperson, to the streets. >> thousands of riot police deployed across the capitol. (vo) we put all of our global resources behind every story. >> it is a scene of utter devastation. (vo) and follow it no matter where it leads, all the way to you. al jazeera america. take a new look at news.
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