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tv   News  Al Jazeera  November 17, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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prayers from the rubble. filipinos are keeping the faith despite death and destruction. an attack in afghanistan - a suicide bombing before elders meet to decide how long american troops should stay. >> and election day in chile as two women compete for the highest office in the land. speaking of tough love - a rutgers university football player quits - calling his coach a big bully.
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>> good morning, welcome to al jazeera america, i'm morgan radford. >> relief efforts are picking up nine days after typhoon haiyan struck the philippines. more than 3,600 died. those who survived are finally getting the help that they need. food, water and medical supplies have started getting to areas that were completely cut off by the storm. the u.s. military is now dropping food and water to survivors in the area. but more than 1,000 people are still missing. some 4 million people are homeless. for the latest - we are going to talk about - talk to craig leeson, who is standing by in the philippines. first let's tell you about an attack in afghanistan where more than 2,000 afghan elders will meet in kabul. they'll vote on the future of u.s. troops in afghanistan. the u.s. is trying to hammer out an agreement to keep forces on the ground beyond 2014. that effort was dealt a blow on
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saturday after suicide bomb attack killed six people. jane ferguson reports from kabul. >> it was an attack on the footsteps of where the country will debate the future of u.s. forces here. a suicide bomber rammed a car packed with explosives into an afghan military vehicle as the afternoon rush hour in kabul beginning. civilians were killed >> translation: i had a kebab store. there was a bang. everything went dark. they took me to the hospital. they took me back to see the shop - a lot were injured. there was a lot of dust. >> the blast destroyed cars and hit a street lined with market stalls. >> translation: at around 3 o'clock there was a big explosion. there were huge flames and smoke. i know some of the shopkeepers
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there - there were butchers, vegetable sellers and a mechanic - they were all hurt. >> the police say it was a suicide car bombing here, targetting afghan military presence - present here trying to protect where the loya jirga hall is, beyond the row of trees behind me that you can see. the loya jirga hall is meant to host 2,500 representatives from around afghanistan later next week. they'll come here to discuss the future of us troops in the country. there has been a heavy security presence here for weeks. thousands of security forces have been deployed on to the streets of kabul, trying to stop this happening at next week's meeting. loya jirga hall gather community leaders. it's an afghan way of making a major decision. in this case about whether u.s. forces should stay after their deadline for withdrawal next year. those responsible for this
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bombing prefer to use their voice in a more direct violent way. >> meanwhile the u.s. is in talks with libya to train up to 7,000 security forces. according to "the wall street journal" the head of command, admiral william mcraven said there was promise and risk. it was a violent day in tripoli after libyan soldiers stormed a militia base killing four people. >> now to the philippines. craig leeson is standing by in cebu. are you with us this morning? >> yes, i'm standing here at the philippine airbase in cebu. we are watching all day the refugees from this disaster streaming in, and further afeed gaahn on the east coast, some of
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the u.s. navy personnel flying helicopters into that area have been evacuating people from the islands into geahn and taking relief aid into there. the problem has been, particularly for the government, where to put the people when they bring them to the mainland. they have been busy setting up shelters around cebu, particularly in some of the barren guyes the villages in the outer outskirts. gym face -- gymnasium and schools have been utilised. for the first time since this ordeal some have had food, water, shelter and medical help and assistance. many of them had injuries from their ordeal in this disaster. and, of course, there now is the risk of disease. >> can you tell us more about the risk of disease, craig.
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does that have to do with the number of bodies found. can you explain what is happening on that front? >> yes, well there are still a large number of bodies left on the roadsides, particularly in tacloban, and the province of leyte, where they are trying to get into some of these areas. they are cut off. there's debris. that is is one issue. there's a problem of water borne diseases because the groundwater is unsafe. they are having a lot of trouble with children starting to show symptoms of diarrhoea and they are getting pneumonia because of the differences in the dampness in the days and evening. doctors and nurses have been flying them in for most of the day, medical issues, bringing in field tents and medical
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supplies. they are operate operating in the airport at tacloban, under candlelight because they don't have power. they have power to four of the 20 provinces here, so we are told. it shows that there is a lot to sort out with these disasters areas, and a lot to fit. that's because there was so much damage done by the typhoon. >> you mentioned there's a lot to sort out with those that survived. what about the people missing. we understand that there are now over 1,000 missing, and that - have we heard anything about when their families will be notified or any have been found? >> well, that's the problem. many people within tacloban and the province there, where the highest number of dead were found are still searching for their relatives, and they are spending their days picking through the debris to try to find their relatives, family, children in many cases.
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that's a difficult task because there are so many bodies laying about, so many bodies placed in some of these government institutions such as gymnasiums and town halls. they are open to the public so people can walk through and look at the faces, if they are recognisable, depending on the condition they were in if found. a tragic story, but a necessary one. the government only counts people identified and tagged, and that's how they are able to come to their accurate count. but, of course, the estimates that the count is much higher because people haven't been able to find their relatives inside this disaster, and that is something that they are trying to help them with now. >> craig leeson live from cebu. thank you for joining us this morning. >> while the world attention is focused on the tragedy in the philippines, a powerful cyclone devastated somalia's north-east coast. at least 300 are dead.
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hundreds are missing. tens of thousands are without food, water and shelter. roads have been washed away by floods making it different for aid agencies to deliver supplies. the government of puntland declared a state of emergency. . and speaking of severe storms, severe storms could pose major problems in the midwest. for more on that and the forecast, let's bring in jalelah ahmed. >> whelm have a severe weather outbreak for sure. we are looking out for damaging winds, hail and isolated tornds. look at the match. there's a lot of moisture pushing off the coast of mexico, warm, hot, unstable air, and a cold air mass producing snow across montana on into idaho. it will push to the east. really, along the line of -
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creating a difference in temperatures. that's where we are going see the volatile storms erupt. now some light showers across portions of minnesota, into michigan and down to arkansas and missouri. in the afternoon, and in the evening we'll look for temperatures deriving from the sunshine, moisture pushing in out of the south, 79 in memphis, 59 in denver, a 24 degree temperature difference - this is the fuel to create the difference that sparks the volatile weather across the portions of midwest into the plains. 65 miles and above - toppling trees and powerlines. heavy rain fall. i-70, i80 and i40 - use precautions. the wind advisories spread into new york and the great lakes. if you travel, use precaution
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out there on the roadways. in addition we have a tornado threat. where? from illinois into indiana. there'll be a lot of instability, the colder air pushing from the west. damaging winds and a chance of tornado. this area representing 45 in the pink, it represents damaging wind. again, it has the ability to topple trees, power lines and cause destruction. we'll keep you monitored on that. >> the federal bureau of investigation recently revealed hackers from "anonymous" accessed u.s. government computers, and infiltrated agencies and stole sensitive information. online security experts try to outsmart cyber attackers, a target is getting special
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attention. that's the american power grid. john hendren talks to those working to protect it. >> for power companies, this is the new frontier - cyber warfare. cyber security experts say power stations are a target. north american power stations face 10,000 attempted attacks each month. >> they are more sophisticated now. 10 years or so earlier you didn't have so much attention on the power infrastructure, now there's more attention on the infrastructure. >> the power grid is a target because it touches so much of our lies. without the power grid we don't have emergency communications, routine communication, hospitals, heating and cooling. lighting. it's just such a desperately large impact. >> last year the world's most valuable company. the $10 trillion saudi arabian
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gas company was attacked by shamoon. >> we lost 3,000 pcs, and servers. >> power companies are hiring special items like those at purdue university homeland security institute and they carry out practice exercises. 1800 officials, regulators and security experts gathered in secret to practice fending off a hybrid attack. >> you have, maybe, a small power company transformer station that they would physically attack. drive a truck into it. cut powerlines or knock a couple of towers down. at the same time that happened we'd attack the technology, the command and control systems, monitoring systems, blinding the companies as to what is going on. >> cyber attacks can be crippling and expensive. a series of attacks by north korea cost south korea $800 million. >> power stations like this dot
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the landscape across the u.s., canada and mexico. cyber communicative experts say one attack could darken north america and knock this out of the commission. that happened in 2003, when a power outage spread across a canadian province affecting 55 million people. experts say it could bring on widespread public panic. >> the mother of one of the 19 firefighters killed in an arizona wildfire is suing the state. marcia mckee is seeking $36 million saying the state is to blame for the death of her 21-year-old son grant. mckee says state and local agencies failed to follow proper firefighting procedures. santa claus is coming to town with hundreds of helpers. we'll tell you about one chris tradition causing controversy
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overseas. >> next up - a mission to save a san francisco neighbour hood. and speaking of techies, a legal victory for google that is no happy ending for authors.
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. good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford. coming up - a look at why sewerage is backing up in the gaza strip. first temperatures across the country with metrologist jalelah ahmed. >> we'll continue to have to deal with a severe weather threat. when we factor in the temperatures, especially the wind from the south, there'll be a lot of instability. they'll push off the coast of mexico. colder air. as we monitor that we'll see a severe weather outbreak between indiana all the way back to eastern portions of illinois, damaging winds, hail and the chance for a few isolated tornados, if you live in
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cincinnati, nashville, chicago, there'll be winds greater than 80 miles per hour. there'll be travel troubles when there's rain coming down. be careful on the roads and at your homes as the storms come through. >> voters in chile are heading to the poll to elect a new president. two women are among those. former president michelle bachelet has a strong lead against right wing evelyn matthei. michelle bachelet is within striking difference of the 50% mark she needs to avoid a run off. daniel schweimler is live from santiago. these candidates have deep roots in the trouble of the past. tell us about the history. >> it's fascinating history. both are daughters of former military officers. evelyn matthei's father,
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fernando, sided with augusto pinochet during his coup in 1973. michelle bachelet's father opposed the coup, was tortured and died from his injury. the two women were friends, their father at the same military base in the north of chile. they were friends at 12-13 years of age, and now face one another in the polls in today's election. absolutely fascinating story with that friendship there in the background. >> let's talk about the front runner. during the presidency from 2006-2010, michelle bachelet had a few stumbles - namely her handling of the 2010 earthquake. could that come back to haunt her? >> it doesn't seem so. one might have thought so given there was a fair amount of criticism at the time. it was the beginning of the
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student protests, which continued up until now. she left office in 2010 with a high approval rating, over 80%. went to new york to work for the women's department of the united nations. and has come back as a popular candidate. as we say, the big question is whether she will make that 50% plus one vote to avoid a second round on december the 15th. those issues being discussed certainly, but i think there's a perception here that michelle bachelet will be able to deal with those problems haunted by the last term in office. >> everyone is talking about michelle bachelet versus evelyn matthei. there are several other candidates - do any of them stand a chance? >> well, i think the big
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question is do they stand a chance of pushing michelle bachelet into a second round. evelyn matthei is in second place in the opinion polls, the question is whether she'll maintain the second place. there's a candidate, franco fardici pushing her close. the 13 million registered to vote, 5 million are new voters - new on the electoral register. we don't know how they'll vote. voting is not oblig atry. that'll have an affect on the final vote. michelle bachelet almost certain to win eventually. the question is whether it will be the first round or the second, and against whom she will battle in the second round if she comes to power. >> daniel schweimler live from santiago. thank you for being with us this morning. >> meanwhile some illegal immigrants are breathing a sigh of relief. the white house ordered
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immigration officials to stop deporting family members of u.s. military personnel. applying to spouse, children and parents. all current service members and veterans are eligible. >> the heart of san francisco's latino drict is struggling. family owned businesses are bought out by tech boom billionaires. there's a landlord going against the tide. marta sanchez talks about the business her family started in san francisco's mission distribute in 1970. casa sanchez, a restaurant and a well-known salsa produced right here. >> we have a box of jalopenos here, where i would take the stems off. my sister would take the skin off the onions, my brother cutting the onnians. >> after marta's mother died. they decided to take a break from running the restaurant and looked for a business to rent the space.
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that's when the sanchez family realised the neighbourhood was changing. offers came in from 5-star chefs. one offering $200,000. the siblings didn't like the arrogant attitudes that accompanied the officers. they decided to pass op an offer of $6,000, accepting half of that from grade school friend emelia estrada. she opened her own restaurant using the sanchez name. she's gratefulful. >> thank you for giving us a chance to be here. hopefully we can make the 4-year lease. emelia estrada says it's a struggle and she sees investment from people who head a lot of money overnight from tech money. >> they are buying off latin restaurants and are becoming into american style - coffee - a lot of coffee shops.
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>> erick arguello, head of the lower 24th street merchant and neighbours association says it is a challenge to preserve the art history culture and social activism in the district. >> we are very concerned that, you know, these people that have been here for a long time can survive this. >> there's no commercial rent control law in san francisco. so landlords can ask up to $10,000 a month, and with the tech-boom cash, they'll get it. >> according to erick arguello some things are positive. one example - he says the streets are in better shape now. >> well, it's due to the fact that the city is starting to invest in the neighbourhood, due in part because of money coming into the neighbourhood. >> marta sanchez point out the new money is tempting for older businesses that lost customers to higher end businesses.
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>> we need people to cox. if someone waves that much money and you need it, eventually you'll take it. that's the problem. >> for now the sanchez family is holding out. they committed to emelia estrada, in hopes that holding on to the history here. >> iran's nuclear program is expected to top the agenda during french president francis hollande's trip to israel. france took a tougher line than western partners over the iran nuclear program. israeli's president benyamin netanyahu will ask francis hollande to keep the pressure on iran. >> next door in gaza the streets are almost completely submerged in sewerage, ongoing shortage of electricity left the streets flooded with filth. nothing is being down. >> it's not floodwaters which this map is struggling to walk
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through - but human waste and sewage. it's almost impossible to avoid the filth in the al zeitoun of gaza city. the sewers have overflow the and could affect the homes of 20,000 people. >> translation: the suffering increased. we are unable to put up with it any more. as you can see our children, if they want to go to the schools or shops, were forced to carry them of the the ill suffer the same. we become sick and have trouble breathing and new skin diseases are emerging. >> the situation is power has been cut to a sewage treatment center, because of a lack of fuel. >> the treatment plant is flooded with waste water, up to 2 metres high. it's between 10, 15 and 20 centimetres further afield. >> the territory relies on underground tunnels linked to
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egypt. since the egyptian army took over, it destroyed hundreds of tunnels in an effort to secure the peninsula. >> gaza's only power plant has been shut for the last two weeks, giving people 12 hours of electricity. for those who can, gazas are buying fuel from israel at double the price, $2 a litre. authorities in gaza warn that other waste facilities could run out of the petrol. palestinians in gaza are used to harsh continues, being under siege from israel. being forced to sludge through sewage is another problem. >> maintenance workers in spain reached a deal to end a 12-day strike. garbage has been piling up since thousands of workers protested against pay cuts and lay off, and emergency workers cleaned up
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saturday as talks continued. >> a bonanza for boeing as airlines in the middle east kick off the dubai air show. >> a christmas controversy, uproar - a character in the netherlands is spreading racism instead of holiday chill. we'll wrap up a wild day in college football. who was upset thanks to a field goal or a hail mary touch down - that's later in sport.
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. relief supplies finally started reaching remote locations in the philippines, nine days after typhoon haiyan left areas of the country in ruins. the u.s. military is dropping food and water to survivors in areas completely cut off by the storm as rescue workers search for more than 1,000 missing people. >> election day in chile. two childhood friends compete for the highest office in the bland.
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looks like former president michelle bachelet is in the lead. >> a decision on the future of u.s. troops in afghanistan could come as early as this week. tribal elders are voting on whether to keep american boots on the ground. the efforts have been dealt a blow after a suicide bomb ripped through kabul on saturday. >> relief supplies started to reach remote locations nine days after typhoon haiyan. the u.s. military is helping airlift food and water to survivors. rescue teams are searching for 1,000 missing people. >> al jazeera's veronica pedrosa is in leyte province, she knows the area well and sent this report. >> in a country of the 92 million, around 11 million people have been affected. i happen to be one of 11 million people. i am told that i have distant relatives who live in a neighbourhood along here from palo, who lived here.
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most have been killed, i'm told. the caretaker of our ancestral home - his entire family has been kill. in fact, there's one person left in that person's family. that ancestral home was completely destroyed. my grandparents donated to this church an enormous mahogany door, the major door to the church - it's been destroyed. as i say, it's one of a million - 11 million stories of people affected. so you can just get a sense of how kilometre after kilometre of this island is just littered with trees with no leaves, that have lost their branches, sugar fields that have decayed, fallen down. it's a major source of income. big institutions, big buildings,
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like hospitals and colleges have been destroyed right cruise the island. it is going to take a lot to come back from this for later island. but everywhere what i'm hearing from people is a kind of fatalism and a determination to get back as soon as they can. >> meanwhile in the netherlands, a holiday tradition is igniting claims of racism. it's about a long-standing christmas tradition where residents dress in black face. le phil lavelle is in amsterdam as the festival gets under way. >> sinterklass is under way, it's like their version of santa claus. it's a little helper, black peat that is causing controversy. they go for the festive period in a big way, santa, angels,
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christmas trees - racism - that's what this is, say campaigners. meet black peat. the face of sinterklass, a dutch holiday preceding christmas. santa's little helper, a hindrance to those that say he doesn't belong in the modern age. every year children paint their faces black to look like him and have done so since the 1820s. many say that's where he belongs, at the heart of this is a question - is black pete harmless fun, something for the children, tradition that should be left alone or a symbol of racism, slavery, something that should not be around in 2013. what started as a discussion involved into a fierce debate. the man leading the campaign said as a result he has received death threats. >> if you have kids running home after school scrub k the skin
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off their bodies because they are called dirty black pete. there's a problem. if we have elderly parents who won't leave the house because they are terrorized we have a problem. >> is that happening? >> it is happening at the moment. >> black pete may live in the story books, his fate is fought out in the digital world. it's the tale of two facebook campaigns, one to have black peat changed from this to this - 13,000 members strong, compared to 2 million and say pete and politics should be kept separate. >> do you understand why some people think it is racist? >> no, i cannot understand, no. it's a free country. if so many people from i think, 30, 40, years - we have no problems. in the last years there's problems. i think people that live here - i think it's not a problem. >> on sunday thousands will take
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to the streets for the annual sinterklass parade. there'll be some costume changes, they may not be enough. black pete will be black. he survived nearly 2300 years. the question is how many more are left. >> this is quite the story. what is the crowd saying. is it no big deal or to they want an end to black pete? >> i have spoken to a few people - not just white people but black people. pretty much everyone is saying leave black pete alone - and we have spoken to black people not just white. >> 13,000 want to abolish black pete. 2 million want to keep him. he's not going anywhere, is he?
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>> for a century's old matter en routed in society, the genes of all dutch people. every year they wait for this. it will be difficult, but nowadays there are less children made black than in the past years, there's a difference. you see there is a little - yes, not so good feeling about the people here, well, making children black. >> what's the involvement of the united nations. there has been human rights intervening in a way. >> they sent a letter to the dutch government asking them to explain if black pete is racist and whether it will be on the list of the cultural heritage, implying the dutch government will save pete as he is.
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>> as we heard there are fewer painted faces. this is amsterdam, where the protests took place, not representative across the country. in many cities this is a national holiday, there are as many black painted faces as there have always been. >> how interesting. phil lavelle live from the netherlands. thank you for being with us this morning. speaking of controversy, a southern california school has buckled under pressure to change its mascot. sports team at coachella valley high school call themselves the arabs. the mascot they have - he's a bearded man in a head scarf as you see there. after sparking criticism from civil rights groups across the country the district rethought their mascot's look. change the the nickname - the school used that since the 1930, they said that is off the table. >> now jessica taff is here with sport. one of the top college football teams gets an upset.
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tell us about it. we'll start with usc, recent success on the grid iron looking to be a case of addition by subtraction. since lane kiffin was fired, the trojons flyered under coach ed orgeron. and are gunning from their sixth win. number four against stamford, winning the last four, stamford trialling. tyler gaffney got the cards into it. 18 yard scamper. we are tied at 17. in the fourth the trojan defense came up. he throws it, forced into the turn over. how about the nice intersense with three minutes to go. we go into the fourth. and how about the field goal to win it on the drive. andre. usc win, ed orgeron may have
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earnt the official title of head coach. not the only game of fire works. georgia upset against auburn. tigers let. nick marshall the keeper for the quarterback. 34-17. dogs getting the ball back. two to go. aaron murray diving into the end zone, barely gets it in, it counts. 38-37. tigers ned a miracle in the fourth at 18. check it out. the ball is chipped by two defenders, falling into the hands of ricardo louis. one on the spot. 73 yards for an unlikely touch town, tigers 43-38. georgia knocking on the door. murray belted. it is incomplete. a wild win. the tigers avoid the spent. 2-10 and 1. the nfl not only league battling
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bullying, jvon tyree said it caused him to leave the rutgers. david cohen threatened to head-butt him during a study hall session, and it led to jvon tyree being aust ra sized. the school dealt with it. jvon tyree and his father say it was not enough. flood was asked if this has become a distraction. >> i think it would be nooe eve to say there was a certain degree of the distraction over the last day or so. we have to do a better job imagine that. no one feels sorry for you for that. things will happen, and the situation that we have been dealing with over the last 24 hours is one where, you know, we have to do a better job of handling it. not allowing it to be a distraction. >> we are at a make or break point of the season for coaches
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on the hot seat. who needs to throe a hale mary to keep their job alive. john henry smith gives us his take. >> the vikings was on the way to a play-off. this seven they've passed it. the revolving door of three quarterbacks hasn't helped frasier's case. >> they had play-off expectations, but have not been the same team. they have the second toughest schedule coming up. the chances of leslie frasier getting a contract are not good. >> graciano's future is in doubt. a fuel with josh freeman and rumblings for other players may have the coach looking elsewhere, combined with a 1 and
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9 record. >> the team is worse now than they were when they hired him. going 7 and 9. high expectations for the team. they have not gotten it done. what might save grasciano he has threes years and $9 million. will the bucks pay that money. >> expectations in big deer. it could be make or brake for jason garrett as cowboys head coach the the cowboys are battling for a spot. history is not on their side. garrett posted a 5 and 3 after taking over from phillips. he is yet to record a winning season. if the boys don't ge over the hump it's tough to see jerry jones bring him back. if the cowboys miss the playoffs, it will be for the fourth season. after a 4 and 1 start miami
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dolphins ed-tilburn had his name in as coach of the year. with the jonathan martin-rickie incognito saga unfolding filburn may be a casualty of the scandal. coach filburn had a large role in establishing leadership. >> the head coach of the miami dolphins - a control freak wanted to control all that went down in the locker room and the council that rickie incognito was a part of. he was appointed. these are joe filburn's guys that were the leader in the locker room. >> more news and more news from. nfl. that's a look at the sport. >> and next up - dubai is on a major shopping spree at this year said air show and gulf car iers are spending big money.
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many of the cords going to boeing, $130 billion worth of orders on the first day. for more, the largest air show let's go to the correspondent live in dubai. it's been a record-setting day. tell us about the purchases there. >> yes, it's been a huge, huge day. sorry we are having communication problems. there's an arabian sandstorm blowing in, making it difficult. it's a great day for boeing, if we look at the manufacturers. they sold over 200 jets in a few hours. upwards of $100 billion worth of plaps. now, that's a long-term order, boeing has 4,000, 5,000 on back order. we are talking a long time in the future. it is a great day for them, a lot of work building up for that. this is the gulf carriers, a big part of this. emirates buying them on their
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own. it's the home airline. they had a huge day, buying a 380 super jumbo jets. it's proof in this part of the world recession has not hit the aviation sector, it's growing and expanding at a fast rate. >> you mentioned that part of the world. this is a push by regional carriers to add to the fleet. how are the expansion plans going over in the rest of the aviation community? >> look, it's fair to say that a lot of the - particularly the european carriers and the american too, they don't like the gulf airlines, they don't like the competition and why would then. if emirates can plash $100 -- splash $100 million on 2-00
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planes, that's a serious competition. doha, et cetera are all flying to the united states it europe. they represent huge, huge competition. that is why, i think, internationally a lot of carriers - the international carriers are wary of what the gulf carriers do. probably being jealous of what they can manage. >> a bit jealous. in dubai, thank you for joining us. >> childrenaa -- china is con sl dating, a new department to oversee police forces and military. as andrew thomas reports the new committee is being set up to assess internal and external threats. >> it has the biggest military and a civil law enforce. topping other community ris. china is setting up an agency to
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obvious see both. they'll respond to domestic and external. a national security commitment was a big announcement. why, and why now? partly it's likely to be responsible for handling foreign security issues. they have the potential to grow as the united states pivots foreign policy priorities to asia. maritime disputes over ireland in the south china sea as is the perceived threat from cyber attacks. the agency is a response to growing internal unrest. there has been wry ots in tibet and other reemons much there was an attack by ethnic wigers, killing five. the growing number of individuals with gripes against the state are mounting attacks.
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>> the thing about domestic and international threat is it allows the leadership. ctw allows an increase on the grip of power. that is a move it tried to make. hu jintao and xi jinping tried to institute a similar body. they were rebuffed because of the position of the defense established. >> a central national committee is a sign that xi jinping is strengthening his political power. other announcements - reform of the one-child policy and the reform of labour camps gave a glimpse of a government relaxing its glimpse. when it comes to its position, threats to its position, china leaders make it clear they will not be tolerated. >> china unveiled bold social and economic reforms in three
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decades after the third plenary session which ended last week. improving the literacy rate in nigeria, how they are helping millions of adults read once and for all.
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. and welcome back to al jazeera america. just ahead how nigeria is working to educate a large segment of their adult population. interested in catching up on one of the classics this holiday season. maybe charles dickens "tale of two cities," or herman melville's "moby dick" - there you have it. or department of human evolutionary biology's "three muskateers." that is one of my favourites of the those famous stories, and countless others are available online for free through google books. google is trying to give classics a lease on life. some of those books have copyright which is why google is fighting accusations of a massive copyright infringement. the author's gild sued google for its book project.
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it is leaguele under fair use. >> after eight years in litigation, it's an slewed complete support for google. a real repudiation of the people who brought the lawsuit, and a real win - a victory for google. i am sure some of the executives at apple and microsoft were looking for google to lose on this one. the judge really came out swinging for google here. >> nick o'malley from the harvard kennedy school researching links between culture and technology. 40 million people in nij can't read or write. it's half of the country's population. numbers have pushed the world bank to interoo vene and they are pledging $150 million to report the literacy rate. we have a report where there's a push to challenge traditional belief on education.
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>> these men are some of the million nigerian adults learning to read and write. some never went to school because of poverty, some because their parents didn't believe in western education. like this 53-year-old messenger. being illiterate means he's not able to get a good job. he's happy about the aid money, but is benefitting from a local campaign. >> when i grew up, my mother looked at western education with distain. the world has changed. i can now read. >> this man used to have a low literacy rate. it's been recognised for its anti-literacy campaign. over the last six months the state government taught 3,000 adults to read and write.
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by the time its literacy campaignened it hopes to have taught 1.5 million, root causes may take time to resolve. because they are historical. >> when western education, it came with mission airies, and predominantly the people of northern nigeria are muslims. >> the world bank hopes to challenge the beliefs by supporting literacy programs. >> the world bank rule in nigeria is to support the government. in terms of how to improve literacy. iliterates must be determined to learn without age. >> translation: no matter how old you are, you can come out of shame and fight ignorance.
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>> the world bank's aid will help some people, for more than 40 million adults unable to read and write, increased government funding for campaigns could be the best way forward. >> nigeria is in the middle of a program aiming to educate 4 million adult. now to jalelah ahmed for the weather. >> we have a severe weather outbreak that will be a problem across the midwest. take a look at the area that looks gold. the high wind warnings across the great lakes down towards illinois, we'll see damaging winds, greater than 65 miles per hour. those winds have the ability to topple trees and powerlines. we shift to the north-east. what you are looking at is a tornado outlook. we'll see a chance for tornados across illinois, and on to indiana. stay with us through the course
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of the day. >> at the end of the first hour, here is what we are follow scroing. aid pours into the philippines as residents take time to worship in the middle of destruction. an election in chile. michelle bachelet and evelyn matthei run against each other to become president. >> the taliban take responsibility for a suicide bombing. >> mixed martial arts are legal in new york states. i'll have a story of how a fight club stages legal fight. >> al jazeera continues and i'm back with you.
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prayers rising from the rubble. filipinos keep the faith despite death and destruction. an attack in afghanistan. a suicide bombing before elders meet to decide how long american troops should stay. >> election day in chile. two women compete for the highest office in the land. >> the count down to the start of the holiday season - less than two weeks away. what you need to know if you are planning to drive, fly or take the train to where you want to go. >> hello, welcome to al jazeera
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america. live from new york city. i'm morgan radford. international aid that poured into the philippines is starting to reach remote areas. the u.s. military is airdropping food and water by helicopter to victims isolated by the storm. many struggled to survive. a u.s. soldier involved in the relief effort underscores the urgent need for relief supplies. >> people are desperate. i have not seen people this hungly before. they swarm the aircraft. we never want the situations to happen. when they happen, it's nice we are getting tasked to help them. getting the food in and be there handing them the food. it's very rewarding compared to anything else we do. this is it tops. >> for the latest, craig leeson is in the philippines in cebu. we are seeing pictures of desperation. are there areas that have not
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got help? >> well, there are. and, in fact, we are hearing that only 30 of the 40 main areas in the province of leyte island have received any aid at all yet, which suggests that there's a great deal of work to be done. in fact, some of the islands off the east coast that were the last to receive aid, and that's only happened today, have complained loudly and vocally to the philippines government about how long it's taken to get aid to them. so that's going to be something, i think, that the philippine government is going to look at. the president benigno aquino has been addressing it in the past couple of days. it is something that many people within the area, and as you say, they are desperate, they have not eaten or got access to clean water and there's no shelter. they want to know why that's a case when they hear that international aid is coming into
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the philippines. a problem has been that the aid is coming in, and it's been flooding in, particularly here at the air force base in cebu, and pushed out to tacloban. the epicentre of this disaster on leyte island. from there they have had to coordinate where it should go and how it should get there. that has been difficult because the local coordinators have been victims and survivors of this typhoon. >> speaking of the difficultyies, the number of people left without homes is up to 4 million, are there enough shelters to hold them? >> well, there hasn't been, many people are spending the night in darkness. there's power only to 24 provinces that have been affected and had the power cut by the typhoon. it is a major concern. the relief effort has not just
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been about food and supply, it's about bringing evacuees in from some areas where they simply want to get out of because they have lost everything. there's nothing there for them. we have seen hundreds coming through. and the government set up shelters specifically to take care of their needs. >> thank you for joining us this morning, craig leeson. >> violence rocks kabul, this time in twin bombings, a suicide blast ripped through the side of a key national council leaving 12 dead. elsewhere in afghanistan a senior official narrowly escaped a suicide attack. the blast comes a day after a bomb killed six people in the capital. it happened at a site where more than 2,000 afghan elders will be meeting to vote on proposals to keep u.s. forces on the ground after 2014. >> the u.s. is in talks with libya to train up to 7,000
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security force, according to the "wall street journal." the head of the special operations, admiral william mcraven says there was promise in the effort. there was violence in libya after soldiers stormed a militia base killing four people. a day after armed groups opened fire on protesters, demonstrate juniors demanded militia leave the county. civil was were caught in the crossfire, 43 were dead. >> two sailors were injured in a drone accident off the coast of southern california, it fell from the sky and struck a navy ship. the ship was testing combat weapons systems off point magui. the two victims are treated for burns. the drone was used to test the ship's radar. >> voters in chile are lining up at the polls to elect a new president. two women are among those
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competing for the highest office. former president michelle bachelet - with a strong lead against right wing candidate, evelyn matthei who you sigh. opinion polls suggest michelle bachelet is within striking distance of avoiding a run-off vote. daniel schweimler is live. these two candidates have deep roots in the dark history of the country, particularly when it comes to their families, can you tell us about their background? >> well, yes, what happened was they are both daughters of former military leaders, michelle bachelet's father - the two leaders lived together. michelle bachelet and evelyn matthei were friends as young dirls, 11, 12-year-old girls. when the military coup happened in 1973, augusto pinochet came to power. evelyn matthei's father sided with augusto pinochet, rising to become a major member of his
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military government. michelle bachelet's father opposed that government, was tortured and later died back in 1974. they now face one another as candidates in the elections. >> and, daniel, during the presidency from 2006 to 2010, michelle bachelet had stumbles, namely her handling of the 2010 either quake. could that come back to bite her. >> it doesn't seem so. it was criticism at the time. perhaps some are criticising her still. she left office in 2010 with an approval rating of 80%, which is rare across latin america to leave office with a high approval rating. she went to work at the united nations in new york, in the women's section there, and has come back, people feel, with greater experience, having learnt from her time in
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2006/2010. whether there's some criticism, i don't think that's wrong. she seems to be a strong candidate. it's an exciting election. thank you daniel schweimler, live from santiago, chile. >> severe weather is hitting the midweest. let's bring in metrologist jalelah ahmed. >> stay with me, i want to explain something. there's warm air off the gulf of mexico, and another off the west. when they clash you get instability in the atmosphere, and the chance for thunder storms. those forms will be very explosive, dangerous here today across a large majority of the midwest. we'll see the threat for damaging winds, hail and a chance of isolated tornados.
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where exactly. i think we'll see across illinois, back into indiana, ohio, and portions of pennsylvania into new york. not doing. now, a little rain is falling across southern minnesota. later in the day, with the heating of the day as temperatures reach the peak, when you have the cold air pushing through is when you get instability, high wind warnings and advisories from central plains back to illinois, great lakes michigan. some of the cities affected by the storms chicago, on into indianapolis, cleveland, nashville, louisiana and memphis tennessee. the threats extend to the north-east across portions of new york, and a problem in pebz later in the stay -- pennsylvania, later in the day. then the threat of tornados, from indiana to eastern
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illinois. i want folks to be careful on the i 70, i 80. the storms will be dangerous from the evening, overnight into the early morning hours. >> meanwhile santa claus is coming to town with hundreds of helpers, a christmas tratition in the netherlands is -- tradition in the neth lands is splitting dutch society. some businesses in detrite are thriving -- detroit are thriving despite bankruptcy. plane, trains and automobiles, last minute tips for those hoping to make it home for the holidays.
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>> good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford. up next - a holiday tradition in the netherlands is causing controversy. first a look at how the temperatures are fuelling the storms in the midwest. >> thank you, again the bulls eye pointing across illinois into indiana, take a look at the map. quiet across the western portion
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of the country, there's a cold front pushing through. a colder air mass pushing through the midwest and the north-east. there's a tonne of warm moisture enriched air pushing in off the gulf of mexico. culminating with the front, that's where we'll see volatile storms. i want to emphasise the fact that between indiana to eastern portion of the illinois, there's bell damaging wind, hail and tornados. look at the red zone, michigan, illinois, ohio, and portions of kent kentucky and pennsylvania. a greater threat for winds. greater than 65 miles per hour, across the ohio valley to the lower portion of tennessee valley. folks urged to use caution. in the afternoon and evening,
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heating continues to rise, we'll continue to deal with the threat through the afternoon, evening and overnight hours. back to you. >> residents of detroit are waiting for a judge's decision only bankruptcy. detroit is seeing a revival in business activity. >> this is the detroit most of the world knows - high crime, blighted neighbourhoods and poor city services. not this - new stores, restaurants and growth and small business. >> i have never seen it this busy in detroit. >> mark dennison with the detroit economic group says economic development in the city is thriving. tech start-ups and creative-based companies are looking past detroit's problems and finding opportunity. >> a luxury wrist-watch factory could have been based anywhere.
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>> we came to detroit 2.5 years ago, met fantastic people in the business community. found an amazing energy about moving forward and less about the past. >> since 2008 more than $11 billion has been invested in business. the downtown landscape has seen a resurgens, buildings are filling um. and residents are moving in from the suburbs. >> so i came down thinking that i would spend two or three years having a decent job and move out. you get down here. there's more to the city than you imagined. >> some here think a bankrupt detroit may help the revival. >> bankruptcy is a process. it's a process that at the end of it will only improve city government and its ability to deliver services. better services will be more attractive to long-term
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investors and businesses, and more importantly residents. >> while the bankruptcy judge may decide the larger fate. small businesses have started rewriting detroit's future. >> that report from detroit. >> kalamazoo is another michigan city making headlines. it's offering students free tuition thanks to one of the nation's generous scholar shxes that's the kalamazoo promise. the social experiment has been so successful cities around the country are trying to do the same thing. we explain. >> michigan state universitiy freshman is thinking about graduate school. part of an experiment designed to revibrate kalamazoo. >> it gives you an extra push. >> students completing 9 through 12 in kalamazoo get 65% of
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tuesdayation covered at state university. those going through 12 years of kalamazoo get a fuel scholarship. requirements - live within the school district, no gpa requirement and the money can be used for 10 years after high school. kalamazoo has 75,000 resident. sensis figures somehow one in three live in perfect erty. enrolment in the district shot up 24% since the scheme was announced. families who would have avoided kalamazoo moved in and smashed up prompt. dr janice brown says because of increased enrolment more teacher jobs were created. 70% of students enrolled in two schools, both saw a jump in tewition revenue. $30 million in the community swirling around that was not there before. >> more than 30 similar programsed up around the country
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and dozens in the works. pittsburg that is 26,000 students, twice as many as kalamazoo. pittsburg statements it needs a $250 moilion endowment. the university of pittsburg medical center pledged $100 million considering the money on investment. >> many students become nurses, doctor, human resource professionals, finance professionals, all things needed here. >> like most programs pittsburg's relies on the generosity of middle class people, not the super rich. >> some programs are struggling because they have funding needs. >> michelle adams wrote a book saying it's too early to tell in the social experiment is changing economies. many are convinced the boost will come around the 10 year mark when students come home as professionals with high income
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jobs and a mission. >> i couldn't think of anything better than to come back and help where i came from. >> another note on kalamazoo, the city was ranked fourth of the 10 best cities for cheap skates. >> former treasury secretary timothy geithner designed on with a private equity firm. warburg pincus managed bye outs such as high-end department stores. timothy geithner will serve as president and managing director. he left the treasury after dealing with the fall out from the financial crisis. critics accused him of being too lax on the big banks. >> speaking of money, 25 million people are expected to fly over the 12 die thifg thanksgiving period. here to provide travel advice and how to save money is kim, a travel journalist and blogger
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for traveller magazine. >> thank you for being was. for the people who have not booked their thanksgiving ticket what would you advise? >> a trick is - it used to be the rule of thumb that you had to get a round trill airfare with a saturday night stay. you can get better deals doing one which each way. you can use different airlines, there are no penalties, and you can find good one-way fares. that's one trick. if it's last minute. you may want to think about flying into a smaller airport, into longbeach is cheaper than lax. >> going into a neighbouring airport. >> some of the ones off the radar. >> are there websites better than others to cyst out the one-way fliers. >> we, if you use travelocity,
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xpedia and others. they have negotiated fares. sometimes the smaller airlines are advertising on consolidated websites. have you to go to direct websites. if you do a little research you can save money. one thing to be careful of is the discount aer fares, where it's demr 100, they are -- $1-00 r00, they have -- $100 they have hidden fees. some make you pay for a carry on. if it's too big at the gate they charge $100. >> one way ticket and smaller airports. what are the best days. >> i've searched a lot. i notice it's differing by $10 if you want to fly out on a sunday instead of the monday or tuesday. it's not going to save that
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much. >> if you weren't planning on flying, what about the train, is there advantages to that? >> i love the trap. an advantage is you don't have to pay for cab fare or porking because you go straight from a downtown to another and end up outside the destination you are trying to get to. >> where should people stay. what is the advice on hotels? >> if you are going to be somewhere for more than a few days, it's a great thing to use homeaway.com. vacation rental. if you are leaving the city and want to rent your apartment you can do that. people will save money. it's similar price to a hotel, but you can cook your own breakfast. multiple bed rooms, i like to travel. >> what about chris, is it too early to book a plane.
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>> trav, losity did a study and catalogued when people are booking and found three weeks out from the holiday is the best time. >> i still have time. >> you have definitely go somewhere. >> very nice. kim nance a travel journalist. thank you for being with us. >> in the netherlands a holiday tradition is under way despite claims of racism. the debate stands around a tradition where revellers dress in black face. we look at blackfeet. >> they go for the festive period in a big way. santa, angels, christmas trees. racism - that's what this is say campaigners. meet black peat, the face of sinterklaas, the dutch holiday preceding christmas. santa's little helper much more of a hindrance to those that say he does not belong in the modern
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age. children across the country paint their faces black to look like him and have done since the 1820s. campaigners say that's where he belongs. at the hear of this is a question - is black peat harmless fund, dutch tradition which should be left alone. or a symbol of racism. something that should not be around in 2013. what started as a discussion turned foo a debate. a man leading the campaign says he's received death threats as a result. >> if you have kids trying to rub skin from their bodies called dirty black peat and grandparents not leaving the house because they are terrorized. >> is it this happening? >> it is happening at the moment. >> black petely live in the
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story books, his fate is fought in the digital world. this is a campaign of two facebook campaigns. 13,000 strong compared to 2 million saying pete and politics should be separate. >> can you understand why people think it is race. >>. >> no, i can't understand. it's a free country. so maybe people from outside. recent years there are problems. people that live here and are black. i don't think it's a problem for them. >> on sunday thousands take to the streets for amsterdam for the sinterklaas parade. there will be some costume changes, but they may not be enough. black pete will be black. he is survived 200 years. the question is how many more does he have left?
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>> phil lavelle in amsterdam. >> and still to come the latest on the struggle for survival in the philippines, that's after the devastating typhoon a week ago. people headed to church to pray. >> the race to rescue a man trapped in a cave for a week. coming up in sport - meantime the guys that endure the pain of mixed martial art without the glory.
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. welcome back, you are watching al jazeera america, and i'm morgan radford. these are the top stories. . francis hollande arrives in israel. the nuclear program is expected to top the agenda during the 3-day trip. prime minister benyamin netanyahu is expected to ask francis hollande to keep the pressure on iran in the next round of multilateral talks on
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november 20th. >> twin bombs rip across afghanistan, a day after a bomb hit a site where 2,000 tribal elders will meet to decide the fate of american troops. >> nine days after typhoon haiyan left large areas aid is reaching remote areas. the u.s. military are helping to airlift food to survivors. rescuers are searching for 1,000 missing people. marga ortigas is in tacloban. >> we have seen pictures of uter devastation in tacloban. are the people where you are getting food and shelter? >> well, this is actually a huge, huge, huge problem here, as you can imagine. this has affected close to 13 million people across 13 provinces. three million of those people
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are displaced. their homes wrecked. evacuation centres are full. building makeshift shelters out of debris from their old homes, on the side of the road or in areas where there are dead bodies uncollected. it's a very, very grim situation. the relief efforts have been problematic. the infrastructure has been devastated. many of the people who would have been the emergency responders who would have been involved in the distribution of relief goods are victims now. all of these are further complicating the situation. the national government has been doing the best they can as they put it, but they don't have enough hand on the ground. they are mobilising the army and the police. they asked for help. all of this has poured in. making sure that the relief gets to those that need it has been very challenging. >> in addition to getting relief
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to those who have been cut off, disease is a real problem now. can you tell us why and what is done about it? >> indeed. there hasn't been any running water, no power, no food, really, and no clean water to drink before going on nine days. imagine what that is like for people left with absolutely nothing. many of them don't have shelter, they are sleeping in the open amidst the rubble and the debris and the dead bodies that are uncollected across this province alone, for example. it's been raining nearly every day. so with all of that, they have been having to make do with what they can. the drinking water that is unclean, they are eating what they can, including carcasses taken from slaughter houses where freezers have not worked. the health situation is worrying and the u.n. says one of the
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most important things to get people to help with right now is to make sure that the evacuees have shelter and, indeed, that their health is looked into. >> what about those missing - what has been done to find them? >> that is another huge problem. as it is, it may look - the number of missing in the philippines is relatively small considering the amount of people that have been affected by this typhoon. but the thing is here people are only counted as missing if a family member or a friend registers them as such with the national government. so they expected number is to be larger because communities are reported to have been wiped out. >> marga ortigas reporting from tacloban in the philippines, thank you for being was. >> meanwhile al jazeera's veronica pedrosa is in leyte province, she knows the area well and went there to file this report.
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>> in a country of 92 million, around 11 million people have been affected. i happen to be one of 11 million people. and i am told that i have distant relatives who live in the neighbourhood along here, or lived in the neighbourhood. most of them have been killed. i'm told. the caretaker of our ancestral home, his family has been killed. in fact, there's only one person left in that person's family. that ancestral home has been completely destroyed. my grandparents donated to this church, a mahogany door, the major door to the church. it's been destroyed. it's one of a million of 11 million stories of people affected. so you can just get a sense of how kilometre after kilometre of
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this island is riddled with trees with no leaves, that have lost their branches, sugar fields with cane fallen down - it's a major source of income. big institutions, buildings, like hospitals and colleges have been destroyed across the island. it is going to take a lot to come back from this for leyte, but everywhere what i hear from people is a kind of fatalism and determination to get back as soon as they can. >> a man in china is lucky to be alive after being trapped in a cave for nine days. firefighters rescued the man on thursday after local residents heard him crying for help. he descended into a 20 foot gave and he survived by eating anything he could find and
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drinking rainwater. >> israel will build a separation wall in the jordan valley. palestinians insist the wall is part of a strategy based on the control of water. >> only one family lives in the village here. this is all that remains of a cattle farming industry that blossomed in the jordan valley. 84-year-old man and his children stayed. 50 families left. squeezed out by the israeli settlements built all around. >> he now pays more than $1 a litre for water. israeli settlers pay $0.10 for the same amount. >> translation: we used to have access to the jordan river. it was not offlimits like now. >> this is what decades has made the jordan river off limits, a
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military zone cutting off access. the israeli government says it's essential for the security of the state. in years jewish settlement have been established in the area, 40 of them. 9,000 sedlers drilled -- settlers drilled wells. of the more than 50 springs, only one, near jericco is under palestine control. the area where clouds grazed have been declared a nature reserve and animals that strayed there have been shot. the last family in the village has been circled. we used to farm the land and other palestinians farmed the plots. the israelis closed the wells. people left because of the water action access -- access. if there's no water, there's no
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life. >> the pump has been shut down. the walls adorned by graffiti. >> when this and other pumps worked 350,000 palestinians lived in the jordan valley. now only some 60,000 remain. a quarter of a million have been driven off the land. the co control of water the primary reason. the separation wall built is not the beginning of a process but an end. >> earlier this month prime minister benyamin netanyahu told his cabinet these security arrangements are important, we insist upon them. >> boeing kicks off the dubai airshow in style with record sales. the aircraft manufacturer racked up deals worth $130 billion.
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airbus announced a $23 billion order. gulf carriers are spending big bucks to expand their fleet as they compete for stop-over traffic of the this is upseted to be a record of had breaking deal better than 2007. right now jessica taff is here with the story of an extreme sport taken to the limits by some in new york. >> we are talking about a sport where there are - the rules are there are no rules, there's no pay at least in new york. i'm talking about mixed martial arts or mma. new york is only one of two where fights are legal. on a trip to the bron. bronx we are learnt it didn't stop people participating. >> drone is on the way from his
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day job to take part in a sport he loves, and that he hopes will take care of a son he loves, a son he was separated from after a clash with the law. >> i have been away for two years. since object i have been doing damage. >> when jerome says damage, he means damage. on this night jerome's competing in a mixed martial arts fight, a sport illegal in new york statement. >> i thought i used to see them on tv. are there fights like this locally. >> this is an underground combat league. jerome is the 175 pound uca champion. it's the brainchild of peter storm. >> it's old school. fight show on this day, we text people. that's the invite. >> is there a reason it's not on facebook? . >> i have a league called the
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underground combat league. when i advertise it's no longer underground. >> the athlete k commission was trying to shut down anything mma. >> there's two reasons he's not shut down - it doesn't serve alcohol or pay its fighters. as long as no one is paid tlos only so much to do. >> i have guys that want to go pro. and his opponent james that want to get in shape and be in pro fighting shape. guys do it to test their skills. everyone has a reason. >> it's not the only thing lacked. >> you might be lucky if there's an ambulance in the crowd. >> if someone is injured - we had two or 3 injuries, we drive them to the hospital. >> no pre fight aids testing. >> it's no different to amateur mma in most states where they don't to the hiv testing.
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>> no rules except for what the fighters agree to beforehand. >> gentleman rules, no eye gouging, biting, scratching. everything else - beat the hell out of each other. >> sometimes no fight if one tighter doesn't show. >> last minute a guy that fought me said, "i'll take it." >> waking up one day as a professional at the highest level is something mma journalist says is possibleful. >> it's been a viable springboard. fraping ji eggburg is the most famous. >> the biggest mma league, the ultimate fighting championship is pursuing a lawsuit to lift new york state's ban on the sport. >> and a controversial mascot at
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a california high school has a community in uproar. still ahead - we'll tell you why. fighting to bring whales over from russia after the break of. >> another accusation of bullying in football. this is at the collegiate level. which university yit is at the center of the accident.
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. welcome back to al jazeera america. just ahead a mega-church of i think yists. first of all metrologist jalelah ahmed is here to tell us about the storms that could be dangerous in the midwest. they have the potential to produce tornados and damaging winds and unite fires, take a look across nebraska, into kansas. we have a critical risk. when the cold front pushes across, we have levels of humidity. in this area, it is very try. an inferno could erupt across
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the state. that's the reason we have red flag warnings, strong winds will push across the region, that's why showers have broken out across kansas into nebraska. the cold front pushing through to the east. that's the reason we have a chance of damaging winds over a large area. chicago, indianapolis, memphis, nashville, detroit want to be on the look out for the storms. wind will be a problem. >> america's largest aquarium is planning to have 18 beluga whales into the u.s. jonathan martin has the story. >> there are 31 beluga whales in human care in north america. the georgia aquarium has four.
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>> they are a remarkable species. >> now the aquarium wants to import 18 whales captured in russia. some would be bept at the george , the others split between five parks and aquariums in the u.s. the georgia aquarium says receiving the whales is critical for public education. we have to have animals in the our care, moving forward so we study them and learn everything we need to know so we can take the body of knowledge and apply it to beluga wales. the national oceananic and atmospheric association denied the request over concerns it may hurt the population in the wild. belugas are not endangered but with 150,000 worldwide, they e arer in danger.
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a statement from noah reads: >> the federal agencies says it determined five whales may have been nursing when captured. >> there's no evidence to support the claim. >> the george says it's acting on behalf of the zoo logical community by suing noah over a decision to import the whales. it states education and increasing breeding. >> there's a possibility if we don't take action, we could lose the pop u lags in human care. >> it does not justify pulling them out of the wild and putting them in conditions which they don't thrive. >> martha brock is a member of a group that's been an opponent to the georgia aquarium request. >> we don't need them in here to
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learn about them. we don't have access to dinosaurs and we learn about them and appreciate geology and archeology. >> noah is reviewing the complaint. if the challenge is successful it will be the first permit to import recently caught wild marine mammals in 20 years. >> beluga whales are threatened by climate change, hunting and urb urban pollution. >> a southern california school buckled under pressure to change their mascot. coachella valley high school calls themselves the arabs, a bearded man in a head scarf. after sparking criticism from civil rights group the district decided to rethink the look. the superintendent said changing the nickname was off the table since the school used it sips the 1930s. >> speaking of sports, one of the top college football
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programs had a very disappointing seat. jessica taff is here with sports to tell us about it. disappointing for some, others excited. sometimes the teams need a new voice. for a struggling ucs team it was the raspy one that hails from the louisiana bay yu, ed orgeron. in the wake of lane kiffin's firing, usc flourished under their interim coach and guped for their fifth wins. the trojans hosting stamford who won the last four meetings. stamford straling. tyler gaffney got them into it. an 18-yard score. tied at 17. that's where it stayed to the fourth. the trojans defense come off big. a turn poring the int. 3 minutes left to play usc ha
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two quarter picks and a mealed gold from andrei ha-dari. game over. fans erupted at the colosseum. and ed orgeron may be the official head coach. >> fire works at the scc we saw this, georgia with an upset. tigers led. nick marshall quarterback gave the tigers a 3417 lead. here are the bulldogs under two minutes to player, that was aaron murray pulling it in, look at him dive in, gets the touchdown, and the dogs come all the way bark and lead at 3837. tigers need a miracle. here is a hail mary, going through two defenders. the tigers have it. ricardo louis, johnny on the spot. 73 yard reply.
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tigers hang on 43-38. they avoid the upset and improve to 10 and 1. rutgers lost it cincinnati. it's not the score that kyle flood, head coach was asked about, he fielded questions about jevon tyre, who never suited up for the game. he left the team after he was said to have been bullied by coordinator dave cohen who threat eped to head-butt him. jevon tyre said the incident led to him being ostracised by team-mates and coaching staff of the the school dealt with the incident and apologised. but jevon tyre and his father said it was not enough. flood was asked if it was a distraction. >> it would be naive to say there wasn't a certain degree of
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distraction over the last day or so. we have to do a better job at handling that. no one feels sorry for you for that. things will happen in the situation we have been dealing with over the last 24 hours is one where we have to do a better job. >> the nba - help may be on the way for the labors. their star player kobe bryant back on the practice court for the first time in seven months sips having surgery. that's no timetable for a return. koby said if it was play-off time he would be in the game. that's a look at the sport. back to you. >> cody's comeback. >> an atheist movement is attracting thousands looking for camaraderie without the religion. it started in a pub. spreading to major cities over the world. >> founders will not thank god for any of their success. >> sanderson jones and pippa
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evans are on a tour in the u.s. >> twitter was invented for people you don't know to tell you you suck. >> they are not here to spread laughter, they are here to change the world. >> we would like to make the world as good as it can be. >> welcome to the world's fastest atheist mega-church. jones and evans call it sunday assembly. >> we celebrate being alie. >> the first sunday assembly was held in north london in 2012. >> we thought a few people would like it. it turns out that there are millions across the world. >> fast-forward 11 moments and the comic approaching duo turned to crowd funding to raise money and are racing through 40 cities in north america and australia - launching local chapters for godless-fearing people.
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los angeles hosted a sunday service. >> we took all the best bits out of church and got rid of the god bit >> evans means creating a community with the focus on good and gratitude. >> when people sing and dance it's wonderful. >> religion is out at sunday assembly. there's no escaping the church-like feel of the service. sipping -- singing, dancing, donating and the founder himself. >> jones admits he's heard plenty of jesus jokes, but he had the beard first - not before jesus, but sunday assembly. >> he can't do anything about it, it's his face. >> all humour asued. it comes at a time when according to pou research, 20% of americans say they have no
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affiliation, an increase of 15% in five years. >> they need community support as much as anyone. >> father james heft says picking and choosing the best bits from church. they may end up with all flash and no substance. >> if they automatically exclude a possibility of something behind community, i think that they are probably missing something profound. >> back ot sunday service, it's clear jones and evans can get the party started. whether they can lunch a movement depends on non-believers choosing to believe. >> the sunday assembly service is open to everyone regardless of religious beliefs. organizers say services are free and run by volunteers on a not-for-profit basis. at the end of the second hour, here is what we are following -
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relief supplies started too reach remote locations in the philippines, nine days offer typhoon haiyan left large areas of the country in ruins. the u.s. military is dropping food and water to survivors. rescue teams are searching for more than 1,000 missing people. >> tribal elders are voting on whether to keep american boots on the ground. those efforts have been dealt a blow after a suicide boom ripped through kabul. it's election day in chile where two friends compete for the highest office in the land. it looks like michelle bachelet is in the lead. >> in sport - we'll look at the tough task that the kansas city chiefs will have. a severe weather threat will
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trashing across the plains, pushing into the west. all the details soon. >> al jazeera conditions and rochelle cary is up next in 2.5 minutes. follow us online at aljazeera.com. i'm morgan radford, we look forward to seeing you shortly.
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prayers rising from the rubble. filipinos keeping the faith despite death and destruction. attack in afghanistan, a suicide bombing before elders meet to tide how long american troops should stay. election day in chile as two women compete for the highest office in the land. >> i'm john hendren on a diverse street anywhere in the world divon avenue. >> a street deemed a united nations investment city.
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. good morning, welcome to al jazeera america, i'm richelle carey. relief efforts are picking up nine days after typhoon haiyan struck the philippines. those that survived are finally getting the help they need - food, water, medical supplies are getting to the areas cut off by the storm. military is dropping food and water to remote areas. more than 1,000 are missing, many are homeless. >> relief streams in to the philippines from over the world. 97 million usd has been pledged by the international community. it has not just been about delivering food and water. what has been incredibly important is removing people who can no longer living in the disaster area because they have lost family, their homes, they have no shelter and no ability
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to sustain themselves. that's part of the job of the u.s. navy, which has been airlifting some of the people from the philippines, the first place hit by the typhoon. many of these evacuees have been brought to the philippines airbase at cebu and taken to shelters. the city government is using basketball courts and gymnasiums, and with international aid they are setting up medical posts and field hospitals to deal with the injured, sick and the newborn. many places we have seen pregnant women giving birth - a ray of home and sun light in a strait situation. >> the world's intention has been focussed on the philippines, a cyclone devastated somalia's north-east. 300 are dead, hundreds missing,
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tens of thousands without food and shelter. roads have been washed away making it difficult for aid agencies to deliver supplies. the government of puntland declared a state of emergency. >> voters in chile are heading to the polls to elect a president. two womenar competing for the highest offer. former president michelle bachelet has a strong lead against right wing candidate evelyn matthei. >> a poll suggests michelle bachelet is within striking distance of a 50% margin needed to avoid a run off. daniel schweimler joins us. the two danned dates have an interesting backstory and history. tell us about that. >> it's a fascinating story. the two daughters of military
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leaders, growing up together. they were friends as 10-year-olds. they used to ride around the base on their bicycles. when the military coup happened in 1973. evelyn matthei's father fernando sided with the military leader augusto pinochet, michelle bachelet's father opposed that dictatorship and was imprisoned, tortures and died afterwards. we have those two daughters as women in their early 60, facing one another. >> it's a remarkable history. chile has seen substantial economic growth under the current pd. could a win by michelle bachelet threaten that? she obviously says not. chillaans have been asking for, with mass protests is change to
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the constitution, saying the laws imposed during the military dictatorship are in place. that chile has some of the poorest distribution. rich are rich and poor are struggling. there's a movement to change the constitution and the make up of a chilean society, something that michelle bachelet said she will to once she takes office. >> she's campaigning on a platform of freed use -- free education for children. talk about the appeal that has. >> these are issues that have taken that voters are interested in. most promise change.
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most talk about the continuation of the right win government. perhaps she has sufrt in the opinion poles. we are waiting to see if michelle bachelet will win in the elections, or whether we'll go to a run off against the second-placed candidate. that looks like being moise metellus, but she is being challenged. >> the boxes are filling up. it looks like an interesting day ahead of us. >> absolutely. i know you'll keep us posted. daniel schweimler live in santiago. >> twin bombs rocked afghanistan today. a suicide blast ripped through the side of a key national council killing 12. a separate attack targeted ofirstly. the violence came after a suicide bomber blew up a site
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where tribal elders are meeting to decide the future of u.s. troops. jane ferguson reports. >> it was an attack on the footsteps of where the country will debate the future of u.s. forces. a suicide bomber rammed a car packed with explosives into an afghan military vehicle as the afternoon rush hour was beginning. civil whereas were among those killed. >> translation: i have a keb cab store him. it went dark, they took me to hospital. a lot of people were injured. there was a lot of spoke and dust, you can see from my clothes. >> the blast destroyed cars and hit a street lined with market stalls. >> translation: at around 3 o'clock there was an explosion. there were flames and smoke. i know the shopkeepers - there
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were butchers, vegetable sellers and a mechanic. they were all hurt. >> police say it was a suicide car bombing here targetting afghan military president, trying to protect why the loya jirga hall is, just beyond that row of trees behind me that you can see. the loya jirga hall is meant to most 2,500 representatives from around afghanistan later next week. they'll come to discuss the future of u.s. troops in the country. >> there has been a huge security presence, thousands of forces deployed on to the streets, trying to stop this happening at next week's meeting. loya jirga hall gather community leaders, it's an afghan traditional way of making a major decision. in this case about whether u.s. forces should stay after the deadline for withdrawal. those responsible for the
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bombing prefer to use their foys in a direct violent way. >> a final agreement between the u.s. and afghanistan still has to be worked out. one sticking point - a requirement that american troops be granted immunity from prosecution under afghan law. the u.s. is in talks with syria to train up to 70,000 special forces. according to admiral william mcraven. it could integrate armed groupt fighting. violence continued when libyan soldiers stormed a base, killing four people. >> it happened a day after armed groups opened fire. demonstrators demanded militia leave the country, fighting broke out. 43 people were killed.
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>> storms could pose problems in the midwest of the for more on that and the warning forecast let's bring in metrologist jalelah ahmed. >> let's start with temperatures, that will be the drying force, fuel for the storms. 84 in houston, 55 into denver, a 30 degrees temperature. 79 in memphis, 55 in denver. temperatures, a big difference in temp tours, cold air mass pushing in out of the west. hot, unstable air pushing in out of the south. there's a trough in the jett stream, where the curb in the jett tram is that we'll see the threat. see the wind pushing in through the south and then out of west. the air masses - where they meet, that's where you'll see the friction and strong thunder storms capable of producing
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damaging winds and chances of isolated tornados. where is it? along the line of storms. that's where we'll see the outbreak through the course of the day. now, not a lot going on. light showers pushing in across iowa down to ilia noi. the -- illinois. the heating will reach the peek. the greatest threat is not torn aido, but wind. we have a chance to see tornados, wind a concern across portions of the great lakes to ohio, back into illinois and indiana and across portions of the north-east. right around the great lakes. the storms pushing to the east. it will bring a lot of wind into the region, wind is the greatest threat. by the pink area it's the area that will see the damaging winds. the areas that will deal with the tornado again between illinois, and into indiana.
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we could see a few isolated tornadoes outside the pink bulls eye. i want folks to use precautions as the storms push towards the east. we have a critical firedanger across kansas and nebraska. back to you. >> thank you so much. it's been a tough way for barack obama and his heath care plan as officials scramble to fix problems with the healthcare.gov. the president cases criticism from democrats. we have this report. >> now challenges for president obama's heath care law. not only are rep caps relentless in criticisms ux. >> his attempt to transform a health care system is not pretty. >> he's faced with revolt from his party. friday 39 democrats jumped ship supporting a gop plan allowing americans whose plans had been cancelled to keep them for a
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year. it allowed plans to be sold that don't meet guidelines for a year. legislation weakens the haeltsd care law. >> this takes the cake. it is, essentially pull the plug on the affordable care act. >> the president met with insurance company executives making good on his pledge to fix the website by the end of the month. >> will solicit ideas from them. we are working 24/7 to get it fix. >> the lead contractor that built the website is filled with executives from a country that flooded 27 other projects. the president is promising to get it done. >> the senate is unlikely to vote on the bill that passed in the house with democrat support. the president threatened to veto it. >> santa claus is coming to town with helpers.
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we'll tell you about a tradition causing controversy overseas. >> a mission to say a san francisco area. tech residents are causing problems. >> and a legal victory for google that is not good for authors.
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google that is not good for google that is not good for good morning, welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm richelle carey. coming up - research suggesting that doctors may be able to detect autism at an earlier age with an eye check. >> first the temperatures - what they are telling us with metrologist jalelah ahmed. >> they are telling us that there'll be a severe outbreak between indiana and ohio. scattered snow showers across montana. as the frontal boundary pushes into warmer air across the midwest and the central plains, the snow is turning into rain.
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now that's what we are looking at across illinois, all the way into michigan. none of if is causing rain on the roadways. as we track into the afternoon, into the evening and monday morning, the storms are going to become dangerous. we are talking damaging winds and chances for isolated tornados, gusty winds, 60 miles per hour, with the eighty to topple trees and powerlines. it will be a major problem. we'll keep you updated. >> some illegal immigrants are breathing a sigh of relief. the white house ordered immigration officials to stop deporting undocumented family members of the military personnel. it plies to spouses parents and grandparents. the san francisco's latino district is struggling with identity.
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family-owned businesses are being bought out by tech-boom mill job airs. >> marta sanchez proudly talks about the business her family started in san francisco's mission district in 1970. casa sanchez a restaurant and salsa produced right here. >> i would have a box of the jalopenos, where i would take the systems off. my sister taking the skin off the onions, my brother cutting them. >> after their mother died. they looked for a business to rent the space. that's when they realised the neighbourhood was changing. offers came in from 5-star chefs, one offering $200,000 up front. the siblings didn't like the arrogant attitudes accompanying the offers. they passed on an offer of $6,000, accepting half of that
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from emelia estrada, a high school friend. she opened a restaurant using the san chaz name. >> thank you for giving us a chance to be here. hopefully we can make the 4-year lease that we have. emelia estrada says it's a struggle and sees investment pouring in by people making money overnight, saying they are changing the face of the mission. >> they are buying off latin restaurants, they are coming into, i guess, american style coffee - a lot of coffee shops. >> erick arguello, head. lower 24th street merchant and neighbours association says it's hard to maintain the art, history, culture and social activism. we are concerned people that have been here for a long time
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can survive. >> landlords can ask up to $10,000 a month. in many case, with the tech boom cash, they'll get it. >> according to erick arguello, some things are positive. one example - he says the streets are in better shape now. >> it is due to the fact that the city is starting to invest. due in part because of money coming to the neighbourhood. >> marta sanchez points out new money is tempting for older businesses that host customers to higher end businesses. >> we need people to come to the businesses. otherwise eventually if someone waves that much money at you and you don't have it and you need it, you'll take it. that's the problem. >> for now the sanchez family is holding out. they have committed in hopes of holding on to history here. >> immigrants in california make sackry forces to uphold their
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heritage, in one neighbourhood they are blending in. it is a place that is american and a microcos m of the larger world. >> john hendren reports. >> in the time it takes to drive through one street in chicago you can travel half the world. winter olympic to devon avenue, a diverse street. new immigrants come to the northern boundary of the chicago to find inexpensive housing, acceptance. >> it look like india, yes. we don't like like american. >> on a short ride you can have a bagel breakfast in a jewish deli, tacho lunch and curry dinner. >> in america, it's like a melting pot or a salad bowl. people are keeping identities,
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while being part of the american experience. >> with the mingled aromas of the world's kitchens and ak sent. >> all languages, arabic, hindy. >> this used to be a jewish neighbourhood, but portions have been renamed. >> wave after wave of immigrants enriched devon avenue, you can roll through little pakistan, little india, little arabia and little israel, one after the other, like on a map. >> india's patel family has down well, a short drive from the baghdad barber shop. in asia pakistanis and indians bicker. but not here. >> it's the american way of life. people come here, we under - how
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america is about tolerance and acceptance. i think those conflict were - i am not saying that it went away, but they were somehow put on the back burner. >> in other words, the resident of devon avenue may bring their culture to america but they lee anmosties in the rear view. >> 1% of u.s. children, ages 3-17 have an autism spectrum disorder, including difficulties with social interaccess, compete ty behaviours. according to a study, tracking a baby's gaze and eye movement could offer behavioural signs of whether a child is likely to develop autism. it is not new, but using it to detect autism is. here to help us understand the findings is dr roberts from
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brain balance achievement center, who offers an extensive approach to helping children with autism or behavioural issues. >> you were not part of this study. >> no. >> but you have done similarly work. >> yes. >> tell us about the findings. >> autism is a fast growing diagnosis. being able to identify it early on gives better outcomes. this is a significant thing because it's non-invasive. we can look at eye movements, and it's a relatively inexpensive technology and may give a clue that tern children are at risk and we can intervene earlier. >> what does that mean. what is intervention? >> well, when we look at the eye tracking the important thing as a researcher is why do children
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with autism have this finding. why are their eyes not focused on people's eyes. research shows that it's a delay in the right side of the brain, where it is the side of the brap that is developing in the womb for the first 2-3 years of life and that's the side that gets us to understand empathy, helps us with nonverbal communication. we can do things to stimulate that area of the brain. if we can do that, and create balance between the hemispheres it may be the long-term answer. >> we have video we'll look at. if we can pull this up. some of this eye tracking technology - on a baby that does not have autism. what are they doing, what are we seeing. >> it's noninvasive where they look at the pupils. what you see in the video is the pupil of the baby is focussing on certain areas of the face.
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we look at that saying what area of the face is the child spending time on. a typical time spend on the eyes and face. a child with autism is less on the face, more on other environmental objects, and maybe the mouted. >> is this a matter of all parents taking children to have the test down. is that how it plays out. >> it may be routine. mothers have said early on that the child isn't focussing. this shows us that autism is present early on. one of the things that may confirm is that vaccines are not an issue. autism starts in the womb, and it's present and some of this research showed that you can use it at one month of age to identify children more at risk. >> okay. this is interesting. i am sure there'll be more
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research along these lines and we'll call on you again. thank you so much. we appreciate it. >> a new jersey town is getting opposition from wall street in dealing with the foreclosure crisis. irvington is thinking of reconstructing under water mortgages. at a rally wayne smith, the mayor said the plan would focus on private label mortages, not those backed by the government. >> the dubie airshow coming up. chris controversy. uproar that a character in the netherlands is spreading racism instead of holiday cheer. >> controversy in college football and wild finishes. field goals, pass and a coach that may have earnt a new title.
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it's all coming up in sports.
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welcome back, i'm richelle carey, nears the top stories. police in afghanistan say six afghan contractors were found beheaded in kandahar after their vehicle was stopped by the taliban. they claimed responsibility for a suicide bombing in kabul that killed 12 people on saturday. the attack target of the site of a meeting of tribal elders set for later this week. the employeders will discuss the future of u.s. troops in afghanistan. more on the beheadings throughout the day. >> election day in chile. two childhood friend compete for the highest office in the land. it looks like michelle bachelet is in the lead. >> relief supplies reach remote locations in the philippines. nine days after large areas of
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the country are in ruins. u.s. military are helping to move food items. >> 1,000 people are being searched for. veronica pedrosa is in leyte province, she knows the area well and went to file the report. >> in a country of 92 million, around 11 million have been affected. i happen to be one of 11 million people. i'm told i have distant relatives living near palo, or lived in a neighbour hood near here. most have been killed. the caretaker of our ancestral home - his family has been killed or there's one person left. the ancestral home has been destroyed. my grandparents donated to the
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church, a mahogany door, a door to the church. it's been destroyed. as i say, it's one of a million - of 11 million stories of people affected. so you can just - you can get a sense of how kilometre after kilometre of the island is riddled with trees with no leaves, that have lost their branches, sugar fields, the cane fallen. big institution, buildings, like hospitals and colleges destroyed across the island. it is going to take a lot to come back from this for leyte. i'm hearing a fatalism from people to get back where they
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can. >> support for the philippines can be seen in the skye line, the empire state building draped in the colours of the flag. >> france's president francis hollande is in italy for talks with benyamin netanyahu. top of the agenda iran's nuclear program. for more on the talks let's bring in mike hannah? jerusalem. what can you tell us about the meeting between these two leaders? >> well, francis hollande will spend three days here with a huge french delegation, including nine ministers. there's one thing on the agenda, iran. israel known for its opposition for striking a deal with iran. france, it is believed, put a spanner in the works during the talks in geneva, wringing in now ramifications for a deal close
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to being reached. the french president and israeli prime minister will discuss the issue of iran and particularly how to prevent a deal being reached with iran. >> we know that benyamin netanyahu is expected to launch a campaign against iran wanting nuclear power and the first stop a meeting with russian president vladimir putin. how is that expected to go? >> once against it's part of what he is going it the talks with francis hollande over the next couple of days. he'll go to russia, hold talks with vladimir putin. once again benyamin netanyahu will make his position clear. not only does he not want to deal with iran, but he's clear about the bottom lines, no nuclear reactors or form of nuclear technology, it is ruled out by israel. he'll discuss that with
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president putin, having scuffed it with president francis hollande. and the u.s. secretary of state will come to israel with another round of talks with benyamin netanyahu, and the focus will be iran. >> mike hannah, thank you for keeping us posted. >> in gaza the streets were almost submerged in raw sewerage, the shortage of electricity left the streets flooded with filth. nothing is being done. it's not floodwaters that this man struggles to walk through, but human waste and suage, it's almost impossible to avoid the filth in al zeitoun. the sewers overflowed and could affect homes of 20,000 people. >> translation: sufg has increased, we are unable to put up with it. our children, if they want to go to schools or the shops - we are forced to carry them.
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the ill suffer, we have become stick, we have trouble breathing and new skin diseases are emerging. >> power has been cut to a sewageage treatment center because of a lack of field. >> the treatment plant is flooded with waste water. it is between 10, 15, 20cm outside the plant and afield. >> the territory relies on tunnels limed to egypt to smuggle in fume. the army has destroyed tunnels in an effort to secure the sinai penn inns u la. as a result gaza's only power plant has been shut, giving people 12 hours of electricity. those that can, they buy fuel from israel at $2 a litre.
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other facilities could run out of petrol. palestinians in gaza are used to harsh conditions. the area has been under seize by israel. being forced to walk through sewerage is a knew suffering. >> the ministry of malth in gaza warns if the troubles persist results could be catastrophic. >> boeing kicks off the airshow with over $100 billion in deals." airbus announced a $23 million order. >> both are competing for stop-over traffic. this edition is expected to be record breaking deals set in 2007. >> a southern california school buckled under pressure to change its mascot. sports teams at the coachella valley high school call themselves the arabs.
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the mascot is a bearded man in a head staff. civil rights groups criticised it. after a special meeting the distribute decided to rethink the look of the mascot. but the superintendent said changing the name used since the 1930s is off the table. >> despite a controversy the second-ranked college football team made a statement on the people. jessica taff is mere. >> details emerged of an assault involving jamesin winston, from florida state. that is continuing to evolve. jamesin winston, who has not been charge the remains on the field and the freshman's section about le tested against sir awe cues. for jamesin winston it was business as usual out of the gate. 28 points in the first point. jamesin winston finishing the day 19 and 21 for 277 yards. two td, 10 and 0, and
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embarrassed sirra cues. 59-3. cardinals had won the last four meetings between the two. they trail at the break until taylorer gaffney had an 8-yard store. trojans with a smoothering d. it led to a picked pass, and on the ensuing drive there's a pass. andrei ha-dari from 47 yards out boots it between the pipes. usc knocks off stamford. 20-1 the final. ed orgeron may have go from interim to head coach. >> tigers need a miracle. they get it. nick marshall heaving it into a triple coverage. the ball tipped by two defenders. it falls into the hands of woup
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of their own. 73 yard score. tigers 43-28. a wild win. tigers avoid the upset. today it's the nfl's term to make must-see tv. >> denver broncos against the kansas city chief. 9 and 0, kansas city is the only undefeated team. they are yet to pace peyton manning and we have is a preview of the battle. >> the denver broncos have mile-high expectations which is why peyton manning will man up and plif despite aggravating a -- and play despite aggravating a high ankle injury. >> i made a lot of adjustments in these past two years, you know. at this point in time in my
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carrier. this is another one of them. i think it makes sense. i'll be better for it. >> the 37-year-old manning orchestrated the highest office. kansas city has the nfl's stingiest defense giving up 12 points for the context. the chief's under that peyton must go down and go down hard. >> we are playing, people will get hit. we do as good a job as anybody in terms of protecting our guy. it's important. >> we have to put the pocket on him. make him move. he's not a mobile guy. we won't bell fuelled thinking he won't be 100%. he knows what he needs to do. >> we have a tonne of respect for their offence, for paiton, for the things that they have
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accomplished. we understand that. they have done a great job. it's important that we prepare ourselves to play a good football team. >> statistically they are number one in all the main categories. their ability to create points in the defense, and certainly not giving up points - that's, i guess, two that jump out at you. >> despite a perfect record the chiefs ran into a string of losing teams and backup quarterbacks and are underdogs heading into denver. sunday night is a chance for them to earn respect. meantime the broncos under jack dell rio will hope to john fox a get well as he recovers from heart surgery. it's an asc west game, the first
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time playing the chiefs. it's unique. >> we recognise this has play-off implications, it's a division game. all those things, sunday night football is exciting. we are looking forward to it. >> are we - the chiefs and broncos score off. they meet in two weeks. that's the sport. >> thank you. china is consolidating control of security apparatus, an agency to oversee military and civil police forces is a major announcement. as andrew thomas reports the committee is being set up to look after internal and external threats. >> it has the world's biggest military and a civil law enforce. prayings topping other countries, china is setting up an agency to oversee both.
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a national scourty committee was a -- security committee was a big announce mented follow a third plenar meeting but why and why now. partly it will be responsible for handling foreign security. they have the potential to grow as the yates pivots foreign policy towards asia. maritime disputes in the south china see is growing, as is the perceived threat from cyber attacks the agency is an internal response. there has been riots in some regions, earlier this month there was an attack in the heart of beijing bin wigers killing five, and the government described as a terrorist attack. a growing number of disgruntled individuals are mounting attacks. >> the thing about domestic and
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international. it allows senior leadership to increase the grip on power. this is a move that previously they have tried to make. hu jintao and jiang zemin tried to do it. they were rebuffed but were not able to push it through. >> more than anything a central national security committee is a sign president xi jinping is strengthening his political power. >> other announcements following the plenary, reform of the one child policy and the abolition of a labour camp. the announcement of a national security committee is the opposite. social reform maybe, when it comes to threats for its position china's leadership wants to be clear they will not be tolerated. >> china unveiled some of its boldest social and economic reforms in three decades after the third plenary session.
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improving the literacy rate in nige , how the country -- nigeria, how the country is helping millions of adults read once and for all.
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>> welcome back to al jazeera america. ahead, how nigeria is working to educate a segment of their adult population. first the forecast with jalelah ahmed. >> we have severe threats. you are looking at a wind outlook issued by the storm prediction center. we have a wind advisory and warnings. across michigan, down into ohio, illan joy and portions of the indiana, wind greater than 65 miles per hour. then we have a torn outlook, you see the area saying 30% situated between illinois and indiana. it shifted into ohio. damaging winds and isolated tornados across the area.
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we'll keep you monitored. a critical area. >> interested in picking up a classic. maybe charles dickens, "tale of two cities," herman melville's "moby dick," and department of human evolutionary biology's "three muskateers." and countless others. they are available through google books, working to give classics life the the free library is not limited to books whose copyrights are expired. millions of copyright are included having them fight copyright. the authors gild and association of american publishers sued google for the book project. this week a federal judge ruled the project is legal. >> after eight years in litigation it's a complete support for google.
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a real repudiation of the people who brought the lawsuit recollects and a real win, a victory for google. i am sure that some of the executives at apple and microsoft were looking for google to lose on this one. the judge really came out swinging for google here. >> that was nico maley a lecturer at the harvard medical school. >> 40 million people in nigeria can't read or write. it's half of the population. the numbers pushed the world bank to intervene. we report from one region where there's a push to challenge traditional belief on education. >> these men are some of the millions of nigerian adults learning to read and write for the first time. some never went to school
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because of poverty or their parents didn't believe in western education. like musa who is 53 and works as a messenger. being illiterate means he's not able to get a good job. he's happy the world bank is giving aid money, but he's profiting from a local came pain. >> my mother looked at western education with distain. without education you cannot survive. now i can read some symbols. >> they used to have a low literacy rate. it's been recognised international lie for its anti-literacy campaign. >> over the last six months, the state government taught 3,000 adults to read and write. by the time the literacy campaign ends, it hopes to have taught 1.5 million, the root
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causes may take time to resolve. >> they are historical. >> i have western education. predominantly the people of nigeria, predominantly they are muslims. >> the world banks hopes to challenge beliefs by supporting literacy programs. >> the world bank rule is to support the government. the government determine the strategy that they want in times of how do you want to improve literacy. >> they believe iliterates must be determined to learn without aid. >> no matter how hold you are, these are things you should embrace to come out of shame and fight ignorance. >> the world bank's aid will help some people. for 40 million adults unable to read and right. increased funding for campaigns like the
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one in kahno could bet the best way forward. >> the country is in the middle of a program aiming to educate four to five adults. >> in the netherlands a holiday tradition is uniting claims of racism. it's about a lopping standing christmas tradition where revlers dress in black pat. phil lavelle is in amsterdam. tell us about this. this is sinterklaas. the dutch prelude to christmas. it's a big affair. they are waiting for sinterklaas, a variation of santa claus to arrive. wh him is a helper, and this helper is causing controversy. his name is black peat. >> they go for the festive period in a big way in the netherlands. santa, angels, christmas trees.
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racism - that's what this is say campaigners. meet black pete the face of sinterklaas, a dutch holiday that precedes christmas. santa's little helper, more of a hinned rans for those that say he does not belong. children paint their faces black. they have done since the 20s. >> at the heart of this is a simple question. is black peat harmless fun, something for the children. dutch tradition, or is he a symbol of racism something that should not be around in 20 and. what started as a discussion evolved into a debate. in fact the man leading the call pain says as a result he's received death threats. >> if you have kid running home after school trying to scrub thash skin because they are
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called dirty black pete we have a problem. if we have grandparent, elderly people who will not leave the house because they are terrorized, we have a problem. >> is that happening? >> it's happening at the moment. >> black pete may live in the story books, his fate is fought out in the digital world. this is the tale of two facebook campaigns, one to have black peat changed from this to this - 13,000 strong, compared to the 2 million who say pete and politics should be separate. >> do you understand why some say it's racist? >> no, i don't understand. we have so many people. no problem for 30, 40 years. in the last few years there are more problems. i think people that live here and are black, it's not a problem for them. >> on sunday thousands take to
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the streets in amsterdam. there'll be some costume changes, but may not be enough. black pete will be black. he survived nearly 200 years. the question is how many more does he have left? >> phil, the images are jarring, to see so many people in black face. it is jarring. the people that are there at the festival, what are they saying about the controversy? people are very defensive. this is part of their heritage. it's not a case of no big deal. people are very, very opposed to losing black peat. they are aware that they could be branded as racists if they go too far. we spoke to a few people, a white man with a white child. he said, "leave us alone,
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there's no problem, it's a bit of fun." i spoke to a black man, he said, "i'm black, it doesn't offend me, it is fun." i spoke to two americans here on holiday and asked what they thought. they were horrified this happened. they couldn't believe a country as progressive as the netherlands is allowing it to happen, it's a throw back to slavery. there is a reduction in the number of faces painted black. some comments are taken on board. >> it's an interesting story. i guess it depend on where you are from. thank you phil lavelle, live from the netherlands. we appreciate it. >> that will do it for this decision of al jazeera america. i'm richelle carey, thank you for joining us.
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ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> here are the headlines at this hour. >> only on al jazeera america.
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