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tv   News  Al Jazeera  December 11, 2013 6:00am-9:01am EST

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>> a bipartisan budget deal comes together that could prevent another government shut down. president obama says it is a good first step, now it needs approval there the full house and senate. south africans line the streets to say goodbye to nelson mandela. the revered leader will lie in state for three days before his burial this weekend. u.s. secretary of state condemning the actions saying he is disgusted with the decision. a nevada family survived
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after being trapped in the snow for days. the unique way he kept them all alive. ♪ you are looking at live pictures of the union builds that's where nelson mandela's body will lie in state for three days. you can see throngs of people waiting to file past the cast cot, they are saying goodbye to the man. each day -- as the nation's first black president only two decades ago. it will be renamed the mandela am picture theater. good morning, and welcome to al jazeera america. more on the fay well to nelson mandela in just a few minutes. but fist, a major development in washington. congressional negotiators have reach add bipartisan
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budget deal. if it is approved it will prevent government shut down, now the clock is ticking. the plan must be approved by friday to make sure the government doesn't shut down in mid january. more details. >> in a case of rare bipartisan agreement, aimed at averting another government shut down, a new $85 billion deal seems to be in place. for now. >> over the past few years we have lurched from crisis to crisis and one from cliff to the next, and when one count down was stopped it wasn't too long before the next one got started. >> top me guy yea tors from the senate and the house, including 2012 vice president nominee paul ryan announce add deal that would fund the government for the next two years. >> as a 70, i think this is a step in the rate direction, we are finally starting to deal with auto pilot spending. that spending that has not been addressed for years. >> for republicans the selling point is a control on spending and budget reduction by
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$23 billion, paid for by a mix of programs including higher security fees for airline passengers and no tax increases. before democrats it is a win against across the board spending cuts, with the military and other domestic programs like health research and education. democrats, however, gave up a demand for an extension to unemployment that expire at the end of the month. president obama out of town to attend memorial services praised the deal. in a statement, the president said, this agreement doesn't include everything i would like is, and i know many republicans feel the same way. that's the nature of compromise, but it is a good sane that they were able to come together and break the cycle of short sided crisis driven decision making to get this done. >> republican leaders also weighed in on the announcement, house speecher john boehner said while modest in scale, this agreement represents a positive step forward by replacing
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one time spending cuts with permanent reforms to mandatory spending programs that will produce real lasting savings. but not everyone was pleased with the budget deal. the proposal did draw fire from some conservative whose took a beating in polls in the wake of the shut down. they will be holding out for deeper cuts than this budget provides. >> i am confident we won't have 100% of the senate or 100% of the house. >> speaker baner says the first vote will be held in the house, but if that doesn't happen, congress heads home for the holidays and returns in january, with another shut down deadline looming. something congressman ryan is hoping to avoided. >> i think alleviating government shut down does alleviate a lot of uncertainty. >> al jazeera. i guess the big question, can they convince their respective caucuses to pass it? >> that's the big question. as we just heard, the house is scheduled to
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vote on friday. the senate has more time for next week before the holiday. patty murray and paul ryan have taken this to their respective caucuses. they have gotten basic approval, but there is a fair amount of push back, now liberals have concerned that they are far more likely of the democratic caucus to go ahead and support this, because they are so concerned about the cuts trueing to get replacements for those. conservatives are pushing back, so the question can they get enough chunk of republicans led by paul ryan and house speaker who can support this in the house. so at this point, i think the odds are in their favor, but anything can happen one bonus is the that iser they move forward, because it is less time to build up momentum. >> let's not forget that paul ryan is a fiscal conservative, and yet he is getting a lot of push back from guys in the
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senate. what does this mean for his political future? >> definitely a moment for political posturing so we are already talking to members of congress who are pushing back against this, saying they don't like it. but paul ryan is putting himself in a different place. he is perceived as someone willing to negotiate, and talk, as we look to the next set of races, but of course the presidential race in 2016, what appeals to the american people, is it the hard lines is it the compromise. when he unveiled this proposal with patty murray, i am a fiscal conservative, and i like this, because it doesn't increase taxes and it does hold tough lines. so he might be getting push back from heritage action and over groups here, but he is putting himself now in a different category. he could be moving himself more towards the
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center. thank you, meanwhile a new poll says president obama's popularity is bouncing back. his approval rating is now 42%, that's 5% points higher than last month, when he had the lowest rating of his term. half of those polled disprove. but the president is getting far better scores than congress, just 10% think they are doing a good job that's 1 point lower than last month, and a single point higher than the all time low, 83% disapprove. south africa is preparing the final presessions leading to nelson mandela's funeral. as his casket was taken to the union buildings. the coffin could be seen inside a black hurst, draped with a south african flag. there will be public views for three days while his body lies in strait. the trip will begin at 7:00 each morning local
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time. the casket will then be taken to the military hospital from there the procession will held north to madiba street. then it will travel east before arriving at the union building each day. for more on the procession, we are joined now by allen. good morning, talk to us about the contrast that we are seeing between the mood of the celebration, really, yesterday at the memorial service, the celebration of his life, and the clear somberness we are seeing at the viewing? >> yeah, i think that is fair to say, very raucous celebration yesterday, and this has a very different tone, of course. we are not celebrating his life, there's much more aceps of mourning his passing, they are getting a chance to walk in front of the casket and say goodbye personally. officially they want to get 2,000 members of the
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public past the casket every hour, do the basic math and that's two to three seconds each, so it will be a quick final fair well for everybody. some of those farewells have been said by members of the mandela family, they have been up in the union buildings this morning to go say goodbye, the morning hours today, is a time when many of the v.i.p.es the family members have been up to see the body as it lies in state. many many members of the public will follow. people are taking buses up the hill, and he will be here for three days and they will try to get as many people as possible past the body as they have. people lined in a winding cue, as pharr as you could see.
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a very different tone, it is a time to say goodbye. is family, obviously had more time of the viewing two of the first people that the two women that men dwell la wins so much, winny mandela, his former wife, and michelle his widow. talk about how that played out this morning. >> that's right. the two of them on hand, of course, winny mandela his wife through so many of the years of incarceration. grass michelle who he married on his 80th birthday much later in life, those two together to view the body of nelson mandela today, and obviously they were given more time, the vips were given more time, the heads of state given as much time as they needed to view the body in
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coffin today. the next remainder of the day, the next couple of days will be much more for the public, and much more for south africans who want to say goodbye to the man they know as mandy ba. >> so interesting to watch those two women comforting each other in the final days. thank you so much. >> the casket will lie in the union building through friday, up to 2000 people will be able to view the body each hour. his remains will then be transported to his home village. the burial will take place on sunday. well, winter is officially 11 days away, but it sure looks like the freezing season tuesday in the northeast, snow snarled airline scheduled from new york to washington. and icy road conditions caused fender benders, and spin outs. even a deicing truck took a tumble, but the snow gave school children from maryland to connecticut a fun day off.
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the ice and snow are gone, but the cold is still a problem, for more on the morning national forecast, good morning, nicole? >> good morning, remember those days when you would get off from school, those were gold back in the winter. and we have definitely seen the new snow and ice taper off for the most part, still widespread coverage from what we have seen recently. right now, though, we have a little system going through. not a lot of know, and it is moving quickly, so it is nice to see a quieter radar. in the meantime, with high pressure, the rotation around that is bringing in cold air from the north, to where we are already cold from in the midwest, so that's one of our problems this morning that bitterly cold air, some of these feel like temperatures and temperatures below zero, fargo, for example, been a while since any of the temperatures have gotten above zero, then you add in the wind, feels like minus 35.
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so that's one condition that we are concerned with this morning. that's where we have the different warnings because it is so doing rousely cold this morning. bringing some light areas of snow, look at what happened this is from december 1st, and where we have the blues that is snow. systems over the last ten days this is what happened by yesterday. so we go from also no coverage to over 60% of the country seeing some sort of snow on the ground right now, so you still have to deal with what is out there as you head out. >> all right, thank you. the president of france is praising his troops for confronting what he calls horrendous violence in the central african republic. francoise allan flew there after two french soldiers were killed while trying to disarm fighters. nearly 500 people have died in battles between christians and muslims. authorities fear the
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former french colony is at the brink of civil war. the soldiers were the first french casualties since 1600 troops arrived to restore order. >> the big problem now is every day persons, the new horrific stories and situations. last week, it was the fighting between armed people, now we are witnessing fighting between communities excellent about 10% of the 4.5 million people have fled their homes and 1 million more urgently need food. demonstrators in thailand say they won't stop protesting just because a new election is scheduled, they claim their side will never win because of corruption, the opposition movement is trying to start a parallel government, with volunteers replacing police to keep security. its leader is issues ordered even though he had no authority. the protestors want the prime minister to quit, they say she is manipulated by her brother, a former prime
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minister that fled. security forced scuffled with protestors and tries to take down their tents and barricades. demanding the resignation. robin walkser in key ya with more on how lawmakers are frying to end the stand off there. >> everyone has been expecting it, confrontation, the revolutionary movement controlling and the government unwelcome to lose space. hours after high level talks government militias stormed the barricades. at one entrance to the square, a mighty wrestle between bro test tors and riot police. at first, it seems like a battle to reclaim the square, held by the opposition for more than a fortnight, progress was slow. it took nearly three hours but hundreds of police to break the lines. but the real objective to dismantle the elaborate
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blockade of wood and steel. >> the whole purpose it seems has not been to take back the square, but to take down the protestors around it. some appeared in the mood for trouble, but others were intent on preventing violence. there were consequences. >> we tried to stop them. take them out. >> catherine ashton the e.u. foreign affairs chief who earlier had stood with demonstrators in the square, said he was certain of the events and criticized the use of force. >> i make it clear that i come here all the people -- [inaudible]. >> the president close
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east foreign ally lives in moscow now prustles and as long as the russian president opposing ukraine forcing tying with europe, victor's lands are tied. this shows he is still in charge, even with the highest delegation in town. a show of strength, that enough is enough, and that it is time for everybody to go home al jazeera, kia. >> riot police and military troops have now been taken out of the protest area. secretary of state john kerry release add statement condemning the crack down on protestors. he said the united states expresses its disgust to meet the peaceful protests with riot police, rather than with respect to rights and human dignity. this response is acceptable nor does it befit a democracy. human life must be
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protected. authorities bear full responsible for the security of the people. >> the six month treatment is crucial, and said impoising new sanctions will jeopardize what is needing for a bigger deal that including asking you while we negotiate that you hold off imposing new sanctions. critics say it offers too much relief from sanctions without doing enough to limit its nuclear ambition. why it is a crime in india to be gay. plus, high times for
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uruguay, it is now the first country in the world to legalize marijuana. and poised for a big payday, while wall street bonuses are going up, and we leave you now with a look live look at south africa, where the public continues to pour through the union buildings are nelson mandela's body is lying in state. viewings will continue for three days before he is buried over the weekend.
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good morning and welcome back. why many are expected to make even more money than they did last year, despite new rules aimed at curbing big paydays. but fist, a look at what temperatures will see across the nation today. many places will still be below average. with many negative temperatures so as we zone in here, i just want to re-emphasize, some of
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these are negative teens you add in the wind chill, negative 20, negative 30, so be careful if you have to be outdoors for any period of time. remember i just showed you that snow map, it won't be melting off too quickly because of these temperatures because a lot of them stay freezing or below, cities like denver today. 33-degrees. p if it milt as little it can refreeze overnight. so still be very cautious on those roads. >> thank you. a law that makes gay sex a criminal act is upheld in him yeah. that court decriminalized how mention sexual acts. activists say the ruling is a major set back for gay rights in the world's second most popular country. the details from delly. >> disappointment for gay and lesbian groups
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listening to the verdict of the two man supreme court bench led by justice as they deliberated on the objections to the endian pennal codal code, that had been removed by the deli high court in july 2009. they were very clear in their judgements that they were not making any judgement about gay and lesbian lifestyles or the law, as it stands in india, but it was the procedure aspect of how penal code had been removed by the delly high court. and they dealed that illegal. and what they are saying now is the decision to remove the code is not up to the high court, it is up to parliament. so the supreme court is now throwing the ball already back into parliament's side, and saying you need to debate this.
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is removed from the statute, which would then allow gay relationships and gay sex not to be illegal. it is a blow for gay and lesbian rights at the moment, but the bigger question for those activists and their supporters will be will this issue be debated in parliament at the moment. we have seen state elections and everybody talking about the potential gender election in 2014. perhaps the question is how high the agenda is this issue or will it be debated in the new parliament post a general election. the will oversee its sails. citizen who is are 18 or older will be able to grow the drug or buy it from licensed pharmacies.
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here is what is making business news this morning. a public offering is said to be priced today, the i.p.o. is likely to pass twitter as the second biggist of the day. it is looking to raise as much as $2.7 billion. >> it is yet another sign that we have a recovery underway. new companies are coming to the marketplace, once again. which has literally been devoid for the last five to seven years. >> stock futures are a little changed at this hour, the dough jones industrial average starts the day below the key 16,000 level, the s&p 500 stands at 1802, the nasdaq at 4060. overseas european markets
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are slightly higher. a new era of reform, for american banks. five years after the financial crisis federal regulators approve what is known as the volcker rule. the 953 page rule won't take effect until 2015. on wall street 'tis the season for bonuses. they are expected to rise by as much as. %, but it isn't the usual suspects, al jazeera has the story. ranges from the thousands to the many millions they can comprise up to 80% of wall street packages. this season, payouts are expected to rise for the second year running but
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the spoils won't be shared equally. a deal means bonus for investment -- who advice firms are expected to be five to 10% lower than last year. >> the fixed income, they guessed it wrong, with the tapering of the fed and so forth. so they were on the wrong side of those trades. allen johnson produces a slowly watched survey. according to him, low risk steady income generators like mutual fund are this year's bonus winners and should enjoy a ten to 15% butch on the heels of soaring stock prices. historically, the big banks -- we have seen a change. mutual funds and other
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things are paid at least as well if not more and that trend is likely to continue. >> to tie executive compensation. by pressing firms towards bonuses primarily in deferred stock, regulators hope to discouraging the type of short term risk taking many believe caused the financial crisis. ironically the policy can generate more outrage, because this year's run up will collect huge pay out. those shares are now worth around $18 million. thanks to a 29% gain in the stock price this year, the same year that saw the bank get slapped with a $13 billion fine.
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>> right now most of your bonus when you are calculating your bonus you are looking at what profit did unique, and then some percentage you will get. the idea here would be to say don't just look at how much profit you make for the firm, but how much risk did you take. how much risk did you expose the firm to in your activities. >> last year, the average salary of a financial worker in new york is $360,000 that's five times higher than any other for profit business. sexual assault in the military why a growing number of male victims are coming out of the shadows. plus, a missing nevada family found alive and well, how they survived snow and sub zero temperatures. >> i heard you say racism, i heard you say color -- >> and nelson mandela's legacy lives on, using
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his story to teach about tolerance. it was a show down in indianapolis, featuring the eastern conference, and maybe the nb action's two best teams with the pacers and heat coming up later. >> looking live in washington, d.c., as the sun starts to peek over the capitol building. most of the students are black or latino, some with an undocumented parent. none were born with a silver spoon in their house. 98% qualify for free or reduced price launches. >> the majority of them face a challenge. it may not be their skin colour. it may be socioeconomic status. it may be being homeless. >> the
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children are quick to connect nelson mandela. >> i heard that he was, r martin luther king in another state. ms klieforth says her students are bringing their personal experiences to the classroom. >> the kids tell stories. i walked into a store and felt like people treated me differently. it. >> it's cool. what he did - he didn't came, if >> this isn't a new channel, this is a watershed moment in media for america. >> this entire region is utterly devastated. >> people our here are struggling. >> the fire jumped the highway we took earlier. >> your average viewer want's to actually understand how the health care law is going to help them or hurt them. >> they know they can get extremist bickering somewhere else. >> people say that we're revolutionary. our revolution is just going back to doing the best in journalism. >> this is the place to go watch
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high quality journalism, period. top stories this hour.ur thousands lined the streets. paying their respects to nelson mandela. a hearse brought his body to the main building where he will lie in state for three days. he h be buried sunday in his hole village.
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police in riot gear clashed overnight. the demonstrations have been going on for more than a month. since the government backs away with a deal that would have strengthened ties with the union. congressional -- if it is approved by the full house, it would prevent another government shut down. professor of campaign management, professor, thank you for joining us this morning always great to see you. i just want to start out with some of what paul ryan said about the accord yesterday, let's listen. this shows we can work together, to get our government functioning at basic levels. that we think gives us some confidence that brings some normalcy back
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to our government. so congressman ryan sounding pretty optimistic there, is there a realistic chance this bill will pass? i think he is right that we should be applausing the fact that they are able to reach a deal if it does indeed pass both houses, which i think it likely will. but you have the look and see this is a very small bill. it has tackled nothing of import, no entitlement reform. this is the smallest of incremental agreements, this was basically keep the government running that was all they had to do. after october, it was can we in fact keep the government open, and that's the big thing we are applausing is a little bit sad. >> this moderate bill is the only way we will have
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a chance at getting it through congress. will it keep the government from having another shut down in the next few years. we still don't know, it is likely that it will, what they are doing is setting appropriations for the next two years that the committee can then with the funding know what they can spend for the government. so it likely will avoided shut down, but it doesn't tackle the big issues. something everybody agreed needs to be done. indeed we will keep the government open, and that will get them through the mid year election, but it isn't the best way to make sound fiscal decisions. >> it is the old kicking the can down the road, which we have seen over and over again, like you alluded to, both sides
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both liberals and conservatives are a little bit unhappy. the liberals are unhappy because there may be too many cuts. and florida senator was very strong in coming out and criticizing who let's not forget is a fiscal conservative, can you talk about the political opportunity for some rep republicans in the house right now. >> both rubio and ryan, potentially contenders so they are not only speaking to their members, not only speaking to their constituents but they are speaking to a potential audience, and i think that's where rubio is coming from. ryan of all being being called out and not being conservative enough, and there's about 20 in the house who are saying they will fight this deal and the big question now is can ryan and baner hold them off on a kind of
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minirevolt. so that will limit the amount of time they have to fight on it. it is still an open question. i can't tell you how many times that will get done, and they shut down the next day. because congress' approval ratings are at a historic lou, and maybe this will do something to shape that perception, is that part of the reason we are seeing this type of bill? >> i think so. you are right, a do nothing congress, and it is 56 bills. even if they pass this, they won't change this monokerr. and it is difficult to know any that are of import, these are small businesses from a congress that hasn't been acting.
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they do have to get this bill done. >> well, we will find out in a couple of days. thank you for joining us. >> thank you. >> she is the 50 woman now representing massachusets in the house. she won the seat vacated by long time congressman. in her campaign, clark said congress should get back to work for families. and congress is focusing on a crisis in the military. sexual assault. a new rule would prohibit commanders from tossing out con vices in such cases. the changes were inserted in a senate bill that sets military policies. the bill has not been brought up for a vote. the pentagon says reports of sexual assault have increased 46% in the last year, and most of the cases you hear about the victims are women, but as al jazeera report ms. are men who struggle to find help, even years after
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they are assaulted. >> why do you come here? >> it's a place to reflect. a place to escape my anxious little world for 15 minutes or an hour. >> debilitating memories of mike scott's time in the u.s. military sit haunt him, more than a decade after his honorable discharge, he says another soldier sexually assaulted him in 1998. >> god didn't protect me, and that's the betrayal of all. but i also feel betrayed by the government, and the military. >> there are nearly six times more men than women in the military, and females are more likely to be targeted, but according to a 2012 department of defense survey, approximately 14,000 active duty men say they face unwanted sexual contact in the last year, compared to 12,000 women.
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the numbers don't reflect how many decades have been kept cedrate. armond do kept silent. >> i without sodomized and penetrated and i did not report my rape, because i was protecting my career. >> dr. carol o'bryant, helped develop the first v.a. treatment center for male victims of military sexual assault. >> it take as lot in order for a man to be willing to report. men are often worried that if they were sexually assaulted by another man, and they are married, if they tell their wife, then the wife will say then you must gay. >> many blame the macho culture from preventing them from coming forward. the culture still exists today. >> i think there are a lot of people in the military who think it is good to have rapists in the ranks, to have people without empathy in the
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ranks, because they think that means that makes the military tough. the department of defense told al jazeera it rejects the claim, and is working toward a military sculpture where sexual harassment, and sexual assault are not tolerated condoned or ignored. >> this is one of the only pictures i threw almost everything away. >> mike says the military must undergo changes to prevent assaults. meanwhile he is undergoing his own transformation. >> another proposed change, an independent council would be assigned to advocate for each victim. a family of six is alive and well after surviving two days stranded in the mountains of nevada. joining us now, and this was supposed to be a nice family fun day in the snow, turned out to be quite an adventure. >> an adventure is right. their jeep skidded off the road, and then
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flipped on to its roof, stranding them in snow and sub zero temperatures for two days. p all started on sunday, when the couple along with their two kids and niece and nephew office piled into the jeep and headed to the mountains. near a place called seven troughs an abandoned gold mining town a couple hours northwest of reno. more than 2,000 people scoured the terrain until they finally spotted the family. >> what turned out to be a terrifying trip to the mountains could have been a lot worse. >> but authorities say the quick thinking father did his best to better situation, and keep his family alive. i remained optimistic, but due to the weather conditions they were drastic, and it's a miracle. it really is. >> james grant and his girlfriend and four children ages three to
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ten, were on their way to the mountains when their jeep slid off the road and flipped over, with no cell phone service in the area, they were stranded. >> the jeep was upside down, so he just stays right where he was. >> search and rescue spent two days looking for the family, meanwhile temperatures hit 14 below zero. his survival skills kicked in. he burned the spare tire to start a fire. >> jay was heating up rocks in the fire, and at night he was putting them in jeep with them. >> fortunately they had enough food and water to last the 48 hours. a volunteer spotted the jeep through binoculars. >> we found their footprints so we kept going up the draw, and we started glancing with our bin knock lawyers and we saw the jeep down there. >> the whole family was in perfectly good condition, and that good news proved emotional for
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this close knit community. >> thank god they are okay, that's all i wanted to hear. >> the family did te'o night at the hospital, as a precaution, but doctors say they only needed minor medical attention, none of the adults or kids earn got frostbite. >> lucky family. thank you. >> mandela's name has become synonymous with the struggle for racial equality, but for young children, his death may be the first time they have ever heard of the leader. a classroom in denver, where his life was today's lesson plan. >> half a world away, the
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memorial service was just wrapping up as classes were getting underway in denver. this morning, the fifth grace class is starting an eight week unit on the subject of segregation. >> i heard you say racism, i heard you say color and difference, is that correct? >> the death of nelson mandela is one of those teachable moments. >> his name is nelson mandela. >> he may be new to these children, but after a little history. >> he became the most prominent voice. >> and group discussion, they had mandela all figured out. >> what he did was awesome. >> margaret smith school is a melting pot, most of the families in this part of denver are black or latino, some of these children have an undocumented planter, and none of them were born with a silver spoon in their mouths. 98% qualify for free or reduced price lunches. >> a majority of them are
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still facing a challenge. maybe is not their skin color or their socioeconomic status, maybe being homeless, and living in a homeless shelter down the road. >> they are quick to connect with american civil rights heros they seem to want to make mandela american. >> i learned that he was like martin luther king, but in another state. >> she says her students are bringing their personal experiences to the classroom. >> our kids they tell stories. one time i walk into the store, and i feel like people treated me differently, they are aware, they seat it. >> it is pretty cool, because what they did -- if he didn't come to -- if he do nothing to stop segregation, it will get worst and worst than right now. >> call for civil rights for everybody. >> with kids this age,
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they love role models. >> ma della's life striking a cord in these young minds after just one morning. as for that tricky new vocabulary. >> appar -- >> yeah. >> apartheid? >> yes, it is a tough word. >> well that part of the lesson plan might take a little longer. al jazeera, denver. >> a new school named for nelson mandela will open in new york city in september. well, it was a match up of the nba's best last night, that and more in sports, good morning. >> good morning, and the game lived up to the hype too. as often said, the team must learn how to win if they are going to claim a champion, and bart of that prorecess usually involved disappointing losses along the way. who have lost to the miami heat, including last year's defeat of the times. the pacers held the nb
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ark's best record in 18 and 3, now this features two f othe premier players in indiana's paul george and miami lebron james, and it was lebron who got his team off to the best start. they would lead by seven at the break, lebron finished with 17-points and 6 asís, now the pacers center, he led all scorers and george scored 15 of his 17 in the second half 90-84 the final score. john henry smith has more. if recent history is any judge, i guess we should have known -- you see,
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the indiana pacers have been the best team in the nba 24 season, in outscoring opponents in third quarters and so it was again on tuesday night. they outscored the heat. to get themselves a lead that they would not relinquish, they did it on the strength of their super star paul george, and on the strength of their super sized center. the two of them combined for 30 points whereas the super star duo dwayne wade were able to combine in the second half for a mere 15-points. we really didn't play very well, but not even very sharp on the defensive end, the third quarter came out with great defensive energy, and a calmer demeanor on the offensive end. and really took control of the game. >> we beat a team that is going to challenge.
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and it is good to go win a game and be one up. in a head to head match up, score the challenges for the first season, that's the only aspect. it wasn't a championship game, but we always enjoy winning games. 90-84, they improve their record to a lead best 19-3, while giving themselves a three game edge for best effort in the nba. from indianapolis, i'm john henry smith, al jazeera. a top 20 show down in gainesville, as the 19th ranked hosted number 13 kansas. just one of three coaches with 400 or more wins. and you can add one more victory to his total.
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that gave florida a 26 half time lead. led by scottie career high 18 points. kansas freshman, led a value come back thank thano a game high 26-points. as the gators hand the jay hawks their second straight loss. a huge night in basketball last night, best look at sports. >> the international space station mark add major milestone.
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the anger all one sided? i hear rumblings from the people who cover the heat that the heat are not in love with players in the payer side, there is real hate here. >> there better be. they can really mess it up for them. when they dislike there, yeah, i think there is dislike but they've got the bravado. they got their chests out. it's still their game. but that's where the home court advantage is important, this game is important because miami used game seven to advance to the championship. they don't get one tonight, i mean, they don't get one in the end, that game seven here in indianapolis could be a problem. (vo) al jazeera america
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welcome back, i hope you protestor off to a great morning. that includes the big band of snow has moved out, but you can clearly see how the wind flow is giving us those lake effects others. and a couple of clippers that will come through, there can be isolated shots. a lot of daily records. 2.3-inches with the snow
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that went through, and as i said more in the midwest right now. back to you. >> the international space station just turned 15 years old, it's been a pricety venture with billions of dollars spent. some are questions if the i.s.s. has been worth all that cash. >> 2 1/2 years after it was completed if it is onboard are now focused on research, in this case, a hefty $150 billion for construction, and another $2 billion a year to keep it running. with developing drugs for example, biological reas in the abceps and we can determine the way this takes place. and cures for cancer, who knows.
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it has been visited from astronauts from 15 different countries. how does the cost compare to other big projects? the large collider costs 10 billion dollars to build, this year it discovered the particle a significant advance in the world of physics. compare that to $9 billion a year, spent on researching cancer then there's nasa curiosity, that is still exploring the surface, be uh the mission costs $2.5 billion. the prolonged effects on humans important to be further manned exploration to the solar system. you haven't seen a nobel prize winning discovery, at least not yet. but what you have seen is the permanent -- from
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medicine, semiconductor structures. >> food i have chosen dry spinnage. >> his songs written and record redirect examination hugely popular on line. expected to be operational for the next 15 years and at time help the findings and the new technologies developed will eventually justify the costs. thomas. >> security fors have been clashing in ukraine, police torn down tents and barricades there. a bipartisan deal has been reached on the
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federal budget. to pay tribute the nelson mandela, his body lying in state for three days. what the white house is saying about a controversy hand shake, with the president of cuba. >> a big trade at baseball's meetings and that and more coming up in the next hour. >> heavy snow is winding down, but the colted air is still in full force. >> al jazeera continues thomas and i are back with you in just 2 1/2 minutes.
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>> al jazeera america is a straight-forward news channel. >> its the most exciting thing to happen to american journalism in decades. >> we believe in digging deep. >> its unbiased, fact-based, in-depth journalism. >> you give them the facts, dispense with the fluff and get straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news.
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u.s. secretary of state condemning the actions saying he is disgusted with the decision. a by party tan deal comes together that could prevent another shut down. before congress take as bread for the holiday. >> as a child, you see how far the city has come. >> many cash-strapped cities are
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trying to save money by cutting pension plans. we're going to look at the real live impact on retirees. >> riot police and protestors clash in ukraine. welcome to aljazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. >> good morning. i'm thomas drayton. it was a wild scene. officers ripped down tents and barricades in key every, confronting crowds in the square for weeks now demanding the president's resignation. >> the u.s. is condemn i go the use of force, john kerry calling the crackdown unacceptable. aljazeera's robin walker is in key every with more on the growing resistance. >> everyone had been expecting it, confrontation between the
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revolutionary movement control in the center of key every and a government unwilling to lose face. hours after high level talks, government militia's stormed the barricades. at one entrance to the square, a mighty wrestling between rioters and police. it seemed like a battle to reclaim the square held by the opposition for more than a fort night. progress was slow. it took nearly three hours for hundreds of police to break the lines, but their real objective to dismantle the elaborate blockade of wood and steel. >> the whole purpose of this operation it seems has not been to take back the square, but take down the protestors around it. it's been a show of force, but so far it seems without the use of violence. >> all the while, opposition leaders kept up their calls for the movement to stand firm and stay peaceful. some youths appeared in the mood for trouble, but others were
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intent on preventing violence but with consequences. >> we are trying to stop them, take them out. catherine ashton, the e.u. foreign affairs chief who earlier stood with demonstrators in the square criticized the use of force. >> i make it clear that i come here... the president's closest ally lives in moscow, not russ sells. as long as the president prefers closer ties with russia and not europe, the hands are tied. a show of strength that enough is enough, and then it's time for everyone to go home. aljazeera, key every.
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>> government officials say riot police and military troops have been taken out of the protest area. secretary of state john kerry released a statement condemning the government's crackdown. he said the united states expresses its disgust with the decision of authorities to meet the protest with riot police, rather than with respect for democratic rights and human dignity. this response is neither acceptable, nor benefits a democracy. we call for utmost restraint. human life must be protected. ukrainian authorities bear responsibility for the security of the ukrainian people. >> in thailand, demonstrators insist that the prime minister should quit, even though she has called for new elections. the opposition is trying to start a parallel government with volunteers replacing police to keep security. the head of the protest is issuing orders even though he has no legal authority to do so. protestors say the prime minister is manipulated by her
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brother, a former premier who fled to keep imprisonment from corruption. >> a bipartisan budget deal in the u.s. is on the table. it would prevent government shutdowns for two years. now house republican paul ryan and democratic patty murray must get caucuses to approve the plan by friday. we are joined from washington. you know it's a good morning when you hear the worth compromise. now that there's a deal in place, are there enough votes on both sides to get this thing done. >> we'll be watching this play out over the next two or three days. the house of representatives is scheduled to go out on friday. they could stay in longer, if need be. the senate's still here next week on the clock and working in washington. speaker john boehner that set the deadline friday to leave town. because paul ryan and patty murray were ready to get hear work done last night, the house could vote on it as soon as
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tomorrow. house republicans go behind closed doors this morning and when they come out will all be listening to hear what members have to say. leadership and rank and file is where the votes lie. we're hearing basic report from leadership, minority leader nancy policy, but the real question is where will the votes come from the caucus. the most pushback coming from conservatives, also liberals, both sides saying it doesn't come quite far enough to do what they like, but conservatives are the big question mark. democrats are more likely to vote on this. there are across the board cuts that if this budget plan goes through, would be in some part replaced, half military and half social programs, no one military programs. a little bit in there for everyone. there are boosts in airline ticketing fees to pay for
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security. it would lower the cost of living adjustment, the cola increase for members of the military and federal workers would have to contribute more to their pensions. not everyone is thrilled with this as it goes through. >> i want to get back to the pushback. what does this mean for paul ryan's political future. he's all right being attacked by his colleagues for if you will, giving in. >> i think paul ryan would like to devin between what it means to be a moderate and compromiser. he says i am willing to come to the negotiating table and talk things through. he and patty murray said they want to stop the lurching from crisis to crisis that washington has gotten used to. the question is how do the american people feel about that. he was a vice presidential ticket runner last year in the gop and head of the budget committee and now can point to this as an accomplishment if it does get past the house and
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senate. the key may be how it performs this week and if it's passed. if the american sees this as a moment for compromise, once again, not necessarily moderation, but compromise. >> a new poll says president obama's popularity is bouncing back. his approval rating in the new york times is now 42%. that's five percentage points higher than last month when he has the lowest rating of his term, following the rollout of the health care website. half of those polls additional approve. the president is getting far better scores than congress, just 10% think they're doing a better job, one point lower than last month and single point higher than his all time low. 83% disapprove. >> secretary of state john kerry is defending the deal to slow iran's nuclear program to skeptics in congress. kerry said the six month agreement is crucial and said imposing these sanctions would threaten the delicate diplomatic
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efforts needed for a bigger deal. >> we're asking you to give our negotiators and our experts the time and the space to do their jobs. that includes asking you while we negotiate that you hold off imposing new sanctions. >> as part of the deal, inspectors from the u.n.'s nuclear watchdog agency visit a plant for the first time in two years. it offers iran too much relief from sanctions according to critics while limiting nuclear ambition. >> chuck hagel is refiring america's ties with qatar, allowing the u.s. to keep troops in the region. he met with the emir and other officials. >> the president of france is praising his troops for confronting what he calls for rend dose violence in the central african republic.
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two french soldiers were killed. nearly 500 have died in battle between christians and muslims. authorities fear the trench colony is at the brink of civil war. the soldiers were the first french casualties before the first french troops arrested there. >> south africa is preparing the final processions leading to nelson mandela's funeral sunday. his casket was taken to the union building in pretoria. there will be public viewings for three days while his body lice in state. the trip to the union buildings will begin at 7:00 each morning local time. for more, we're joined by alan schauffler. talk about the contrast between the mood today and yesterday president memorial service. >> just watch that go video
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today, you really get a sense that there's been a bit of a shift here, a bit of a change in mood. very much sort of a street party celebration mood in johannesburg. this is different. this is a chance for people here to say goodbye in person. it may take some patience for them to do that, but a lot are going to do it before this three days of lying in state are over. let's go to some of the video that we shot just a couple of blocks down the way from our location here. this is one of the bus stops, several of them have been set up around the city. heavy police presence at these bus stops where people will be boarding transport to get up the hill to where the body is, long, long lines at these various stops. people boarding free buses, people very they'reful, patient, they know they may have to wait a very long time before they can get up the hill. we talked to some of the folks in line about why they're doing it and exactly what they expect when the kind of experience they expect when they get up on to the hill.
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>> i was at the am theater during his inauguration. now i'm going to complete what i started, i'm going to pay the last respect for my president here. >> as many people say, this is sort of a closing of a circle, a chance to just stand or walk slowly by and say goodbye to nelson mandela. this is the building where he was inaugurated in may of 1994, the inauguration that billy had attended. >> i think that's a great way to put it, alan. i want to get back to something from yesterday. there were reports that south africa's deaf federation said the interpreter was a fake. what can you tell bus that? >> this is just a really odd one. the federation for the deaf in south africa saying that it appears that man had no training
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in sign language, that deaf people around the world were tweeting and emailing that he didn't know what he was doing, that he appeared to be just signing jibberrish. we haven't had confirmation. we've seen repeated reports and african national congress who provided the interpreter are launching an investigation into who he was and what he was doing, just a bizarre aspect of a really interesting ceremony yesterday. >> reporting from pretore i can't, thank you, alan. >> it's a beautiful scene to give you an idea of what's going to happen over the next several days, mandela's casket will be moved, up to 2,000 people will be able to view the casket each our. his remains will be transferred to his home village. burial will take place sunday. >> we'll continue to follow that. >> meanwhile, winter is officially 11 days away, but
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sure looks like the freezing season tuesday in the northeast. snow snarled airline scheduled from new york to washington and icy road conditions caused fender benders, rollovers and spinouts in burlington, massachusetts. even a deicing truck took a tumble. the snow gave children a fun day off. >> the kiddies always love that. the snow moving out, we're seeing the colder temperatures and west winds moving in now. what's the latest? let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchum with the forecast. >> even though a lot of weather has moved out, we're dealing with the after effects still today. as we look into the region in the northeast, we see a lot of temperatures. this is how much different we are from yesterday at this time, in some days, 10 degrees cooler as we move through. as we get to the area around the lakes with the winds coming to the west, that picks up the moisture across the lake, recosts it on land. some areas with a couple clippers that will come through,
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not out of the question that buffalo, if you end up under heavier bands could get another foot in the next couple of days. we've had a number done on the country since december 1. this is snow cover where you see the blues, most of it along the border, up into canada and then of course those snow places in the rockies. look at what happened in 10 days, a couple of big systems, cold air well southward supported know well southward. we have snow can you have now in over 60% of the country. this time last year, that was closer to 30%, so double what we were looking at this time last year. speaking of the snow, still a little bit with the clipper system going through the midwest and then add that to what we have around the great lake. we have a couple of chances for that. one will come through, another come through. high pressure is pulling air from the north. very cold temperatures in the midwest. i'll have temperatures coming up in just a few minutes. >> a nevada family is safe after
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going missing for two days. a cell phone signal helped lead rescuers to them in a remote part of the state. their s.u.v. rolled over sunday. the couple and their four children survived temperatures that fell to 16 degrees below zero. authorities say they are all hospitalized, but are also in good condition. >> a former actress admits she is the one who sent letters laced with a deadly toxin to president obama and new york mayor michael bloomberg. richardson of texas was arrested in june after trying to pin the crime on her estranged husband. in a deal with prosecutors, she pleaded guilty to lacing the letters with ricin and now faces 18 years in prison. she learned how to make the ricin on line. >> two british nationals are pleading guilty to terrorism related charges in connecticut. the men were running websites to recruit and raise money for al-qaeda and the taliban. one faces 25 years, the other 15. sentencing is scheduled march 4.
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>> it was a handshake seen around the world. >> president obama's greeting to cuban president raul castro at nelson mandela's memorial raising a few eyebrows. >> we talked to a few expert about what that means. >> how the volcker rule will change the financial system and protect consumers. >> 76 million people, it is our big number of the day, and it's also the number of people who could be affected by a debilitating disease. >> you're looking now at a live shot of a snowy chicago this morning, creating problems for commuters on those slick roads.
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fight drug trafficking and forbid marijuana consumption, or let the
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>> today's big number is 76 million, representing the number of people scientists say will be living with dementia by 2030. it was revealed last week. scientists say 44 million people are living with the condition now. it's the topic of discussion today at the first ever g8
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summit on dementia. world leaders plan to double funding for new treatments by 2025. >> 76 million. coming up next, we're going to look at how that could have a big impact on china where a quarter of the world's as you haverrers live. >> let's look at temperatures across the nation today. nicole mitchell is back. >> we are running with a lot of temperatures well below average. it might be a morning where you can snuggle in. twenty's and 30's well through the south as we start the day off. i want to mention the midwest. you add wind gusts in the 20-30 power range and negatives feel like 20 and 30 below zero. far go, negative 30, so you need to be bundled up even heading to the car this morning. with highs not bunk that warm, still below average, i just showed you the snow cover.
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it's not going to be melting quickly in a lot of these cases. we'll to have deal in the days ahead. if it refreezes overnight, watch for slick roads in the morning. back to you. >> not even winter time, is it? a couple more weeks here. let's talk about that number in a moment. >> countries worldwide are struggling with alzheimer's, especially in china where the aging population is putting a burden on families. >> who am i? >> my brother was looking after her, but he's getting old himself and can't look after her. he decided to admit her into this nursing home. >> the story is familiar in a
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country increasingly struggling with the burden of an aging population. set up nearly 30 years ago, this home and its director have witnessed the growing problem. >> when we first started, the average age of the patient was 76. now it's more than 80. there has been a sharp rise in the number of alzheimer's patients in the past 20 years. >> china has only several thousand beds in nursing homes for people with dementia, so it falls largely on the families of the countries 9 million patients to provide for their care. >> the challenges for china can only increase in the years to come. as the one child generation starts to move into middle age, most couples will find themselves looking after four aging parents. that's in addition to their own one child. >> when china relaxes the one child rule in the coming year, allowing most families to have a second, that burden will increase further you.
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>> when we ask why is alzheimer's disease such big problem, i think because there's no other disease area where the numbers of patients growing so fast, and the burdens to economy is so heavy. >> a growing health crisis on a global scale with china at the forefront. rob mcbride, aljazeera, beijing. >> a study found that as many as 90% of china's die men is that sufferers are diagnosed. we're getting data on the housing news is mixed. applications for home mortgages rose after five weeks of decline, but the mortgage bankers say mortgage rates are at their highest since december. the average stands at 4.61%, up from 4.51% just last week.
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>> hilton's stock price is likely to pass twitter as the second biggest of the year. the hotel chain is looking to raise $2.7 billion. one watcher said the i.p.o. is boosting optimism in the market. >> so while still not as sexy as the twitter i.p.o. it has worldwide appeal and it's a well recognized name particularly among retail investors. i think that's an important sign in terms of the catalyst that it could drive into the marketplace. >> the i.p.o. market this year could be the big evident since the dot com era. >> the second biggest credit cord processor master card is splitting shares for the first time since going public in 2006. investors will get 10 new shares for each they own. share price is the third highest in the s&p 500. >> g.m. plans to stop making
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cars in australia by 2017, blaming high costs, competition and its strong currency. the move will cut 3,000 jobs. >> wall street remains cautious ahead of next week's federal reserve meeting after a budget deal was reached. do you futures are down 18 points. the dow jones industrial average starts the day below the key 16,000 level. the s and p.500 stands at 1802 and nasdaq at 4060. over seas, european markets were slightly higher. in asia, markets ended the day in the red. >> it's been five years since the financial crisis that cost taxpayers hundred was billions of dollars in bailouts. a new set of rules limit the risks banks can take. the new regulations are stricter than expected. >> in 1933, to protect the public from the financial abuses that caused the great depression, congress passed the
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glass-steagall act to prevent banks from placing deposits at risk by borrowing them from speculative trading. the law was repealed, but when the 2008 financial crisis left taxpayers on the hook for hundred was billions of dollars in bank bailouts, the spirit was row born as the volcker rule. >> we want to make sure we are protecting the deposits that are federally insured from risky speculative behavior that a bank might take someplace else. we don't want to endanger those deposits. >> named after the federal reserve chairman, it bans banks that take federally insured deposits from engaging in proprietary moves for its own
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gain. it does not ban all trading. >> under the volcker rule, banks can trade securities to offset risks or execute trades for their customers. for years, regulators have wrangled with separating those from ones that harm. >> strict or lenient, the rule is already having an impact on wall street. >> even just knowing it's coming, most banks have gotten rid of their own proprietary trading debt. >> whether the volcker rule contains the excesses of wall street, only time will tell. >> aljazeera, new york. >> aljazeera's real money will take an in depth look at how the markets respond to the local rule. you can check it out tonight. >> it was five years ago today that bernie madoff was revealed to be a fraud. the 75-year-old is now serving a
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150 year prison term in north carolina. he said that he alone was responsible for defrauding investors of more than $17.3 billion. now five of his former employees are on trial for their alleged roles in the massive ponzi scam. >> honoring nelson mandela. >> tributes to the late leader continue to pour in. >> how some of the poorest in that country celebrated a man held in high regard. >> the handshake between president obama and cuban president raul castro and what it could mean for relations between the two countries. >> kobe bryant looked much closer to the kobe of old tuesday night, but would that be enough to beat the suns? that and more coming up in sports.
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most of the students are black or latino, some with an undocumented parent. none were born with a silver spoon in their house. 98% qualify for free or reduced price launches. >> the majority of them face a challenge. it may not be their skin colour. it may be socioeconomic status. it may be being homeless. >> the children are quick to connect nelson mandela. >> i heard that he was, r martin luther king in another state. ms klieforth says her students are bringing their personal experiences to the classroom. >> the kids tell stories. i walked into a store and felt like people treated me differently. it. >> it's cool. what he did - he didn't came, if
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>> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be at hand and just in the nick of time. >> thousands of new yorkers are marching in solidarity. >> we're following multiple developments on syria at this hour. >> every hour from reporters stationed around the world and across the country. >> only on al jazeera america.
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>> a reminder of how wide the
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global situation has become. in new york, they continue to clean up there, while the look at the progress being made, everyone trying to put their progress back. >> mandela was sworn in nearly two decades ago. he will always be remembered for bringing down apartheid, but he couldn't bring economic equality. some of still waiting for what mandela promised. >> in the poorest corner, the
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t.v. barely receives nelson mandela memorial. this is where crime is high, sanitation low and garbage barely collected. here they mourn a man they considered a saint. for decades, miriam struggled working for white families. she wouldn't miss a minute of today's service. >> somewhere, somehow, it is before my eyes. >> it's noon on tuesday, but busy. here they toasted tata, or father. >> respect. what we have achieved because of him, and what we learned and live with. >> mandela didn't promise racial equality. he promised economic quality. >> that economic vision still hasn't been realized across the country. whites make six times the amounts blacks do. unemployment is 50% and most of the homes are no bigger than
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shacks. >> this is prosecutor freddie lives behind his own bar. >> this is my one property. >> been here 12 years and you sleep on the floor and you have no bathroom. >> yes. >> why are you staying? >> scratch beneath the surface and most are too worried about their daily lives with the memorial service. >> we don't have hope anymore. >> we try to be patient, but no more. we can't take this anymore. >> down the road, miriam enjoys
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a more comfortable home. even she says as long as some suffer, black south africans aren't really free. >> today was honoring a great man whose life long struggle freed his people. here, they didn't think they'd be struggling this hard for so long. >> at mandela's memorial, it was a gesture by president obama that made headlines. he shook the hand of cuban president raul castro. it was only the second between american and cuban presidents. the other was in 2000 when bill clinton and fidel castro greeted each other at the united nations. >> it lasted six seconds, but the handshake has reverberated around the world.
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here to weigh in on the gesture is juan carlos delgado from a public policy think tank. good to have you with us this morning. good morning. >> good morning. >> what's your thoughts on the handshake? >> i think we have to look at it within the context, taking place in a ceremony where they were celebrating the life of a man who brought his country together, whose main legacy was reconciliation, was reaching out. i think it's appropriate for the moment that the united states didn't avoid. it was very difficult for president obama to avoid president castro and greet others next to him. it was difficult for him to avoid raul castro and not greet him. i think it was appropriate. >> given the setting here, but what do you make of the body language. are a rule castro embraced him
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with a smile on his face. >> i think it was the moment, it was appropriate. let's remember that these things happen usually when there is a funeral or something. i remember book in 2005, when then president of israel greeted the president of iran. at the funeral of john paul ii. i wouldn't reach much into it. i would expect policy changes to be more optimistic about the possibility of change between the relations of cuba and the united states. >> the white house said this wasn't planned. do you think this was an opportunity the white house couldn't miss? >> no. i think, i mean, we have seen that both countries have tried to tone down, play down the handshake. the white house said that nothing should be read into it, and even that cubans tak cubanst broadcast it at all. that shows how frosty it
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remains. >> venezuelan president chavez a big critic of the united states. what does it say about the obama administration, might this handshake have a large impact? >> i think president obama is genuine when he talks about building bridges to regimes that historically have been antagonistic to the united states. we have seen that with iran recently, the fact that the administration has been initiating this nuclear deal with iran. it shows the administration is always open to talk with foes and build bridges. i would expect that there is a certain bolder move from the administration in the upcoming months in order to improve relations with cuba. one of them will be to take cuba out of the list of state sponsored terrorism. let's remember that cuba's one of the few countries on that list. if that happens next year, i think we can definitely discuss the possibility, the real
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challenge that things might move towards normalization between both countries. >> here at home, cuban lawmakers weren't happy, calling it a propaganda coup. >> indeed, that shows how difficult it will be for the administration to move ahead in that direction. let's remember most of the sanctions required congressional approval to be lifted. if the nuclear deal with iran is any, you know, like parallel, we can see how difficult it will be for the administration to move ahead. we have seen how the administration struck a deal with iran and how congress has moved in the opposite direction, trying to pose new sanctions on the regime. i think it will be very tough for administration to pass through congress and ask congress to lift some of the sanctions that have been in place for 50 years. >> there really is a distrust of the castro government that runs deep in the cuban american community.
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we're going to have to leave it there. policy analyst on latin america, appreciate your time this morning. >> thank you. >> the u.s. is hoping some of afghanistan's neighbors can persuade the countries leader to sign a a security deal. the deal would keep american troops in afghanistan after next year. hamid karzai will be in india this week. he hopes to shore up american support before troops leave next year. leaders of china and pakistan and india have been encourages karzai to sign that agreement. >> for years, security officials warned that malls were vulnerable to attack. 67 people were killed in kenya. the nypd used that attack to conduct their own drill. we have more. >> the nypd's report paints a very different picture of kenyan authorities as to what happened in the west gate mall attack
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back in september. new york police investigators found you that probably only four gunman were involved in this attack, not the 15 initially described by kenyan authorities. they say that there was no evidence that these men took my hostages or even remained in the malafter the first day. they site video surveillance showing four men in a storage area near a loading dock after the attacks initially took place and they surmise that these men escaped into the night. the siege continuing for yet another day, ending with dozens of people being killed. new york police went to nairobi, kenya, to investigate in the hopes of preventing similar attacks from happening in the united states, but what we come away with is a very strong
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critique. >> speaking to kenyans on the ground, police didn't know the layout of the mall and didn't know they could access closed circuit television. there are lots of questions raised that kenyan authorities will have to answer. >> an nypd authority who studied the attacks there said police response was slow without good coordination. >> a man was found guilty of man slaughter and serving a 25 year term when his conviction was overturned for shooting a man during hurricane katrina. >> insurance companies are tallying up the losses from last
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month's tornado. the town of washington, illinois was hard-hit. we visited the community you taking steps to rebuild. >> this is my house. this is the garage. that's my house deconstructed back there. >> the concrete foundation is all that's left of the two story home after an et4 tornado ripped through washington last month. debris from her home is waiting for removal while cox is planning to make a new home where her old one stood. >> the question is, i mean our kids are grown, so our needs are a little different. we'll probably build something a little bit different. >> nearly 600 washington homes were leveled in the november tornado, another 400 damaged. city crews continue clearing away tons of twisted metal and splintered wood left by the storm while some neighborhoods look like war zones, others recovering as residents rare
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damage with money from insure settlements. >> come on in. >> all right. >> all right. >> insure agent roger hickman said 270 of his customers, including cox, have already gotten claim money. most of that has been for minor damage, destroyed vehicles and living expenses if customers lost homes, but hickman said final settlements on properties that need to be rebuilt could take weeks or months. >> the contractor will need to know this is the house i'm going to build, state farm, are you ok with that, and there will have to be a meeting of the minds so to speak as what type of home and how much money it's fog to cost. >> while there could be a real wildcard for washington, since the tornado hit so close to winter, most of the cold, wet weather could make it hard for homeowners to build in the same spot come spring. >> that's because the weather could damage foundations exposed to the elements. >> there you go. >> ok. >> washington's planning and
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development director is warning residents about that threat as they apply for building permits. >> there's really no telling from one house to another as to whether they're intact. we require a structural engineer certify every one is ok prior to us issuing a building permit for it. >> it could take years to recover from the tornado. cox is taking her recovery one day at a time. >> as you put pieces back together, every day gets a little bit better. >> last week, she got a new car to replace the one lost in the tornado. next year, she hopes to have a new home. diane esther brooke, washington, illinois. >> officials say if i have five tornadoes struck the region, including 2e.f. category four twisters in illinois. >> it's a long road to rebuild. >> it was a matchup of the nba's best last night. >> yeah, pretty good game living up to the billing.
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part of the championship process usually involves disappointing losses along the way. the indiana pacers have lost each of the two seasons to the heats including last year in game seven of the eastern conference finals. entering last night, the pacers held the nba's best record at 18-3. of course this matchup featured two premier layers in indiana's paul george and miami's lebron james. it was lebron off to the best start with his team, the heat jumping out to a double digit lead. they would lead it by seven at the break. roy hibbert led all scorers with 24 points and george scored 15-17 points in the second half. the pacers outscored the heat 50-37 to improve their home record to 10-0, the best home start in franchise history.
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90-84 was the final. >> paul george struggled through a tough first half where his coach wasn't giving him enough good looks and his teammates set him up in the second half and finally got him going. to do what he did in the second half, one of 15 points in a half while guarding lebron james and then guarding dwyane wade, it's a special performance by him. >> we beat a team that's going to challenge for the first. it's good to go win a game and be one up. it gets in a head-to-head matchup to go to challenges for the first season. >> we try to win every time we step out on the court. if we lose, it's not the end of
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the world. we're mature enough to know if we made mistakes, to know we've had chances during the whole game, and we came up short. >> also in action last night, los angeles lakers star kobe bryant back on the court. he dunked for the first time, also scored a team-high 20 points over the course of 29 minutes. the problem was suns guard led all scorers with 31 points, including 25 in the fourth quarter, taking down the lakers 114-108. >> there are conflicting report on the status of mat brown. two sources say that brown will announce resignation by the end of the week. longhorn's athletic director say no decision has been made on brown's future of texas and
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texas recruiting site reported that brown denied that report in a text from florida, where he was recruiting. brown is 158-47 in 16 seasons at texas, including a national title in 2005 and another bcs appearance in 2009. >> finally, ahuge deal going down in baseball as the arizona diamondbacks had a trade involving trumbo. he heads to arizona while the white sox acquire outfielder adam eaton. the angels pick up hector santiago and tyler skaggs. >> high hopes for legal marijuana. the country that's given the green light to the world's first national marketplace for legal pot.
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>> i say we're going to collect your check in hand. >> looking to bounce back, residents are forced to make changes to keep their heads above water. ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5pm et / 2pm pt only on al jazeera america >> and now a techknow minute...ñ
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>> good morning. welcome back. a growing number of cash-strapped cities are looking to restructure pension plans to deal with debt. that's impacting retirees who rely on their pensions to survive. we'll look at the close impact. >> first we saw the snow in new york city yesterday now being replaced by colder temperatures. who's going to see the snow and rain today, nicole. >> we only have a little know left. there it goes. in the meantime, another clipper system, let's look closer. yesterday, around new york, new jersey, we did see for the day about an inch and a half for newark, snagging travel going
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through. the winds out of the west with, that's picking up some moisture, so we have some definite lake effect bands all through the lakes including around the midwest. you can see this clipper going through. for example on the chicago side of the lake, it's the clipper, if you get towards somewhere like south bend, it's the combination of the clipper plus lake effect impacts. back to you guys. >> ok, nicole, thank you. >> uruguay is the first country in the world to legalize marijuana. citizens who are 18 or older will be able to grow the drug or buy it from licensed pharmacies. officials hope the law will slow drug trafficking by taking business away from criminals. the law will officially go into effect in mid april. >> it's happening in cities like detroit and states like illinois. lawmakers are desperately looking for ways to deal with out of control debt. one of the ways of doing it is by restructuring pension plans. one example of that is
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pritchard, alabama, which filed for bankruptcy back in 2009. the impact is being felt by retirees and the cities as a whole. >> gene everett built this house 47 years ago. >> it ain't much of a house, but mine. >> after saving money, investing and retiring from the pritchard fire department, all he wanted was a modest makeover for the old house. >> i'm a scavenger. >> after the city declared bankruptcy for the second time in 2009, there were tough decisions to be made. pension plans payments were cut. >> guys asked me how did it affect you. i asked him let me ask you this, how would it affect you if they took your check next week and say we're going to cut it in half. >> we did everything we could possibly do to stop the bleeding, but the pension plan was bleed in faster than we could bring in income for that.
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>> city council president arlene martin harris recalls the numbing decision to pitch the pension plan, a move still being challenged in court. >> i was sick at the stomach. i was truly sick, because i just didn't see the pensioners sitting there, i saw me when i turned 78 years old. >> pritchard was the home to a bustling downtown and 50,000 people, but today, many businesses are gone. only the bare floors are left. that and 22,000 people. when you come down here and you look at all this, what do you think, what do you feel? >> well, because i remember vaguely about how it was as a child, it saddens me to see how fallen the city has come. >> while the past is a problem for the people here, concerns about paying for the future lie before them. >> i don't particularly like being where we are, but there's nothing i can do about it. what am i going to do about it?
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>> it's not clear if the pension cuts will save pritchard, but for dean everett, what's more important now is to get what he thought he had already earned. aljazeera, pritchard, alabama. >> in detroit, where the city's bankruptcy filing is moving forward, the unfunded pension liability has been estimated between $3 billion and $8 billion. >> at the end of our second hour, del walters joins us with a look at some stories we are following this morning. del. >> security forces clashing with protestors, police tearing down barricades in key every while protestors defiantly shot at them. >> a budget plan would prevent a shut down of the u.s. government over two years. >> paying tribute to nelson mandela, lying in state now for three days. >> as services continue to honor nelson mandela, we'll talk total first black u.s. ambassador to
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south africa about the changes brought to the country and however it has really come since the end of apartheid. >> a battle taking place in hollywood, not found on the big screen. developers want to build two massive key scrapers. some sky they will trigger earthquakes, some say it will block views. >> sports coming up in the next hour. >> i'm meteorologist nicole mitchell. the heavy snow is winding down, but the cold air is still in full force. i'll have your national forecast. >> the aljazeera news continues in two and a half minutes. dell is back in two and a half minutes. >> have a good morning.
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have been telling you in the san joaquim river, freeze warnings in effect. never seen too much in terms of rain. los angeles, you are going to be seeing some beautiful weather all the way to sunday even into the low 70 did or high 60s, partly cloudy conditions, overnight, about 44 degrees. texas also dry for you as well. we saw rain showers and a mix of precip just a little bit up here towards the north. temperatures for dallas at about 42. san antonio at 55. for houston, well, you are going
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to be seeing rain by the time we end the week. 59 degrees there. that will will last one day. your weekend should look better with a high of 63. over here towards the southeast, some rain showers pushing through orlando right now. atlanta is going to be about 56. an american auto maker making history. the newer ground general motor is making as it names its latest ceo. >> an al jazeera america exclusive... former president jimmy carter reflects on the life and legacy of nelson mandela. >> that spirit of nelson mandela is embedded deeply in the heart and soul of the south africans... >> they worked side by side for freedom, now president carter talks about mandela's global impact. a revealing interview you won't see anywhere else. >> i've never heard him say, that he was grateful to the united states... >> talk to al jazeera with jimmy carter only on al jazeera america
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>> south africans paying their respects to nelson mandela. the revered leader will lie in state until his burial this weekend. >> in key every, riot police with ba tons and bulldozers cracking down on anti-government protestors. u.s. secretary of state john kerry condemning the decision. >> in hollywood, a bottle over buildings on very shaky ground. some are trying to stop sky scrapers from being built on a quake fault line.
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>> south africa is taking it is final steps in its farewell to nelson mandela. his funeral has now been set for sunday. good morning and welcome to aljazeera america, i'll del walters. people lining the streets today as nelson mandela's casket was taken to the union buildings in pretore i can't, draped with a flag. his body will lie in state for three days. the trip to the union buildings will begin each morning at 7:00 local time. the casket will be taken to the military hospital. from there, the procession will head north. it will then travel east before arriving each day at the union buildings. we are in pretore i can't. alan, the talk is about the contrast between the mood of celebrations yesterday and the somber viewings today. >> that's right, del. it was sort of hard to make
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broad generalizations about that, but i think we can. just a general feeling today, like a bit of a door opened. all the celebration yesterday and in the previous days on the streets of jonesberg and other cities around this country, then the sometimes raucous memorial yesterday. today, there is a sense there is a chance to say goodbye and the energy level damped down a bit. let's take a video of the block here. this is the bus stops, heavy police presence. so far, we're seeing no problems. long lines of people here in looping lines wait to board the bus to get a chance to say goodbye, to walk by the coffin of nelson mandela. we talked to some of the folks in that line about going up the hill and what they expected. >> i was at the am theater
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during his inauguration in 1994. now, today, i'm going to complete what i started in 1994. i'm going to pay the last respect for my president here. >> billy also says if he doesn't make the bus today, if the police stop him because viewing has ended for the night, he'll sleep right there, catch the next bus in the morning. he wants a chance to get up the hill and say goodbye to nelson mandela. i walked up that way and talked with a couple people coming out of viewing. one woman said it was sad, but she just had to take the opportunity to say a personal goodbye to nelson mandela. another woman about my age said yes, it hurts to see him that way, but she had to see him nonetheless. >> a mini scandal, south africa's federation for the deaf saying the interpreter on stage was a fake. is that true? >> that's apparently what's coming out, yes. it's at least being investigated at this point.
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the african national congress looking into charges from hearing impaired organizations around the world that the man signing yesterday was basically signing physical gibberish, it didn't appear to be language of any of the deaf that many people around the world were familiar with, so a very odd quirk in what was a very interesting memorial service. let me just show you the coverage of this local newspaper, what a shame, it says. this is in reference to some of the political statements that were made in the form of booing of the current president of south africa, jacob zuma, who was booed every time his face appeared on the stage. local papers saying it's a shame that was on display during a ceremony that was supposed to be a tribute to nelson mandela and then we hear this thing about the interpreter which is bizarre in the extreme. you can't imagine why they would
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put anybody up on the stage like that. >> as we mentioned, mandela's casket will be moved to thein buildings for viewings each day through friday. up to 2,000 people will be able to attended the viewing each other. his burial will take place sunday. >> a major and surprising development coming out of the nation's capitol, congress reaching a budget deal. it would prevent a budget shutdown for two years. the plan has to be approved by friday to make sure the government doesn't shut down by mid january. we are in washington. libby, surprising developments today. >> good morning, del. it's been weeks of meetings behind closed doors, confidences over the phone between two key players and last night, they announced they have a deal. >> in a case of rare bipartisan agreement aimed at diverting
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another government shutdown in january, a new budget deal is on the table for now. >> we have lurched from crisis to cries and one cliff to the next. when one countdown clock was stopped, the next one got started. >> budget negotiators representing the senate and house, including 2012 vice presidential republican nominee paul ryan announced a deal. >> i think this is a step in the right direction. >> we're finally starting to deal with auto pilot spending, mandatory spending that has not been addressed by congress for years. >> for republicans, the point is a control on spending and budget reduction by $23 billion, paid for by a mix of programs, including higher security fees for airline passengers, but no tax increases. for democrats, it's a win across automatic across the board spending cuts known as the quester, hitting military and
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domestic programs like health research and education. departments gave up on trying to roll in an extension to unemployment benefits that expire at the end of the month. president obama out of town to attend memorial services for nelson mandela praised the deal. insta statement, he said this agreement doesn't include everything i'd like and i know many republicans feel the same way. that's the nature of compromise. republican leaders also weighed in on the announcement, house speaker john boehner said while modest in scale, this agreement represents a positive step forward by replacing one time spending cuts with permanent reforms to mandatory spending programs that will produce real lasting savings. not everyone was pleased with the budget deal. the proposal did drop some who say it doesn't go far enough. patty murray said compromise is key. >> i'm confident that we won't have 100% of the senate or
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house. >> speaker boehner said the first vote will be held in the house. in two days, members of scheduled to head home for the holidays. congress would return in january with another shutdown deadline looming, something congressman ryan hopes to avoid. >> i think it does alleviate uncertainty plaguing this country acknowledge capitol. >> you see where things are at. here's the deadline situation. friday, the house is scheduled to gaffe very well out for the holiday recess. the senate still has one more week of work. this really is an arbitrary deadline friday. if they can't come to an greatly, they would still have time to hammer out more details and get this passed. if they can't get it did you now, the longer it sits on the table, the more time there is for skeptics of this proposal to push back and derail it. friday is a crucial day. >> powell ryan, the congressional budget hawk of the represent side seeming to move
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to the center already attacked by his colleagues. >> the question is what does it mean to move to the center. he's saying that he's a fiscal conservative and holding to his conservatism and there are things that he likes, including no tax increases. it also holds some tight budget lines and does work to decrease the deficit. he says that doesn't make him any less of a conservative. the question is how do you judge that and is anyone even willing to talk now and negotiate labeled as something other than true to their party? this is an entering moment. he's one of the negotiators willing to come to the tail. others in the republican party are pushing back, setting up interesting dynamics for political races in the future. >> i guess it depends on your definition of center. thank you very much. >> there is a new approval
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rating for the president now at 42%, five points higher than last month when he lad the lowest ratings of his term. half polled disapprove, but the president is getting far better scores than congress, only 10%, one in 10 people think they are doing a good job. that is one point lower than last month, and a single point higher than its all time low. 83% disprove of the job congress is doing. >> now much of the country is facing the prospect of a deep freeze. for more, we turn to nicole mitchell. >> i was stuck trying to get out of town on a trip that turned from a thursday into a friday. we are going to see better conditions today because of the lack of moisture. these temperatures dropped in the northeast about 10-15 degrees from yesterday. the moisture moved through
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quickly, the main round of it. if you're in the lake effect areas, some of these places, buffalo for example over the next couple of days, the combination of lake effect and clippers could be a foot of snow or more if you really get under one of those bands. as we get across the country, we already have one clipper moving through, another one that will come in behind that. that is sucking in cold air still this morning for portions of the midwest that will moderate most places getting above freezing as we get into the day tomorrow. here's that one clipper i was talking about and then you add in the wind and lake effect. we've got a couple of things creating the snow across this region. the wind chills are what we are really concerned about. i'll show you the temperatures in a couple of minutes. i'll show you how dramatically things have changed. already by yesterday, it had taken over, over 60% of the
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country, by late yesterday, had snow on the ground and it's not going anywhere fast because of those temperatures. i'll have more in a couple of minutes. nicole. >> just six more months until summer. >> riot police storming protestors in ukraine, security forces scuffling with demonstrators ripping down tents and barricades, crowds filling the capitol for weeks, demanding the resignation of the president. we are in key every. >> everyone had been expecting it, con frontation. hours after high level talks, government militia storms the barricades. it seemed like a battle to reclaim the square.
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>> the e.u. foreign affairs chief who earlier stood with demonstrators in the square was saddened by the events and criticized the use of force. >> i make it clear that i come
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here... >> the president's closest foreign ally is in russia. this is a show of strength that enough is enough and that it's time for everyone to go home. aljazeera, key every. >> secretary of state john kerry releasing a statement condemning the government's crackdown on the protestors saying the united states expresses its disgust with the decision of the ukrainian authorities to meet those peaceful protests with riot police. demonstrators in thailand won't stop protesting just because a new election is scheduled. their side won't win with the polls because of corruption. opposition is trying to stop a
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parallel government with volunteers replacing police, its leaders issuing orders because it has no authority. protestors want the prime minister to quit. >> as the word continues to mourn the loss of nelson mandela, we talk about mandela's unique role in history. >> breaking a glass ceiling. we take a closer look at the first woman tapped to head a major automakers. >> quake fears, shaking up los angeles, debating whose fault it is that a building was planned on a fault line. >> 27 degrees in new york, and it is probably cold where you are.
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>> good morning, welcome back. coming up, we'll talk about nelson mandela's place in history, hear the views of the
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first african-american to serve at u.s. ambassador to south africa. first, let's find out how combed it is around the nation today. >> we're starting to see moderation in some of the temperatures, but still well below average in a lot of cases, as cool as 40 in houston this morning, of course, you know, in minneapolis, a minus seven saying houston, you guys are lightweights. i want to emphasize that the wind is making those wind chills into the 20 below zero rake. that's dangerous if you're outside for any period of time. the snow cover with a lot of the temperatures staying below freezing, we are not going to see that melt off very quickly. >> nicole, thank you very much. legions are nelson mandela admirers are waiting to pay respects to the man who broke the back of apartheid. we want to take you to the casket being placed inside the building's am theaters. those are the lines of people lining up to see him. the theater is where nelson
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mandela was sworn in as the nation's first black president two decades ago. it's not long ago that it was a very, very different place, it was white, racist and in the cross hairs of the sufficient. we reason that south africa and america well, tapping the first black am bass door to south africa. ambassador, good morning. >> good morning. >> what was your reaction when youing the call from ronald reagan to become the america's first black ambassador to south africa. >> i actually got the call from secretary of state george schultz speaking on behalf of the president. i didn't think anybody would ever think about sending me to south africa. >> did you feel because of the time, that you might have been used. >> actually, that part never came across my mind and during the time that i spent with
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president reagan as he interviewed me, he brought it up in saying that what do you think black americans will think about you for taking this job if i nominate you. i said i don't know, mr. president. well, he said they don't like it, that means you'll have to get out of the country and meet as many black leaders as possible and tell them what you told me in terms of how you intend to try to make a difference in south africa on behalf of the united states. >> why do you think ronald reagan picked you. do you believe it was because of the time or because he believed it to be the political correct thing to do. >> he picked me because secretary of state george schultz had early on according to schultz when he talked to me, early on had said to the president, there's a rumor going around the white house that maybe the time has come to a point a black american and perhaps that will quell some of the protests going on in the
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united states under the free south africa movement. when the secretary of state heard this, he went to the president, according to secretary schultz and said indeed, i think it is time to send a black ambassador, but we need to send a professional man or woman, and i would like to look for such a person and send his name over to you. so it was george schultz who first of all called me in liberia when i was on my first ambassador yellship and ask permission from me to send my name to president reagan. >> now, when you arrived in south africa, you met with the white president, a man described by many who didn't like people who looked like you. he described a lot of people who looked like you to be the enemy. that what was your reception? >> my reception by the president
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was decidedly unfriendly. as a matter of fact, he had thought about -- >> did he shake your hand? >> he did not shake my hand when i first met him. >> unfriendly is a dep low mattic term. tell me what it means to americans, real african-americans. >> first of all, he wanted to receive my credentials on the steps of the union building, where the president is lying in state now, and he demanded of his people that i stand one step blow him. below him so that i would have to look up at him? >> did you? >> i did. he was standing one step higher. then, when i handed him the credentials, he had to look down, he had to look at the credentials and then he had to look straight into my eyes, because i'm taller than he is, or was, so his ploy didn't work.
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he received the credentials and he was decidedly unhappy at not having to force me to look up at him. he took me inside for a little tete and i told him i was happy to be in south africa. he lost his temper and said your country has just declared economic wear fair on my country. then he said about your president, he's a good guy, meaning president reagan, but he said the congress did. i told him that the congress and the president both represent the people of the united states. >> did he use derogatory language? i'm curious. >> he did not, but wagged his finger in my face several times as he was wont to do. >> you were given a parallel task of trying to get nelson mandela out of prison.
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did he know about that task? >> he knew about it, knew about the order from congress and they confirmed me. the congress said we want you to get nelson mandela out of jail. the president said i would like to make sure that you can do the things that you think you can do, but we don't have any suggestions from washington. you'll have to do what you want to do from pretore i can'ia and capetown. i did instructions from the secretary or the president, but to do everything possible to eradicate apartheid and get nelson mandela out of jail. >> can you shed light on what happened to south africa's nukes? >> well, i cannot shed any light on it. >> is that for security reasons?
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>> is being well served by history when it comes to south africa, and what do you say to people who argue that there might be a bit of revisionist history taking place now. >> certainly that's possible. i found the president totally different from what i've come to see him as. i neve met the president. i went into his office one saturday morning and he and i talked one-on-one for about an hour and a half, and he was up to date on south africa and he wanted to know about me, my family, where i went to school. that he knew a lot about
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america, as well. more importantly, he knew a lot about south africa and the apartheid system. he said what do you think of it? i said that's inevitable to what we believe in as a nation. he said what will you do if i send you? i said well, i like to say that i have an answer, i didn't have an answer. i said well, mr. president, if you send me, i'll try to use the power of your office to bring about change in the apartheid system. he thought that was pretty interesting. he said how are you going to do it? i said first of all, the black south africans all think you are a racist president. i have to disaview them of that, because you just said you want to bring about change and you are thinking about sending a black ambassador. therefore, i think i need to let south africans know where you stand and what you're about. that will be first. >> what was it like for you personally watching nelson mandela walk free?
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>> it was a feeling that i've never had in my life or since. it was looking at a person who had actually had, i think had a kind of a rebirth inside of prison. the first thing he said to me when i finally met him was mr. ambassador, i'm looking forward, not backwards. i was -- i felt that i was kind of in the presence of a surreal person. i've often said that i'm glad i lived during the lives of three people, gandhi, martin luther king and nelson mandela. >> we should point out it was not easy four as an african-american, was it? >> no, it was not, and the feelings of people on the street, a sea of white people on the streets especially in
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pretoreia was absolute outrage that i would walk on the same died of the sidewalks with them. it was not friendly except for the freedom fighters, the united democratic front and mrs. isuzulu, who's husband was in jail with notice. and nelson mandela himself, sending word through winnie. he said every time you get in the news means i am getting more powerful inside of prison. >> thank you for joining us this morning. ambassador edward perkins. >> thank you very much. it's been a pleasure. >> still ahead, a big step backwards for gay rights where a court just rule that had gay sex is a crime. >> we'll tell you about a seismic battle over a building at a famous hollywood site. why some say skyscrapers could be dangerous.
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>> the walking horse industry, claims of abuse and what's being done to keep the breed safe. >> the pacers took the two time defending champion miami heat to the brink last season. this season about to prove that they can take that next step. that coming up next in sports. al jazeera america is known for. >> to find out more about al jazeera america go to aljazeera.com >> an al jazeera america exclusive... former president jimmy carter reflects on the life and legacy of nelson mandela. >> that spirit of nelson mandela is embedded deeply in the heart and soul of the south africans... >> they worked side by side for freedom, now president carter talks about mandela's global impact. a revealing interview you won't see anywhere else. >> i've never heard him say, that he was grateful to the united states... >> talk to al jazeera with jimmy carter only on al jazeera america
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most of the students are black or latino, some with an undocumented parent. none were born with a silver spoon in their house. 98% qualify for free or reduced price launches. >> the majority of them face a challenge. it may not be their skin colour. it may be socioeconomic status. it may be being homeless. >> the children are quick to connect nelson mandela. >> i heard that he was, r martin luther king in another state. ms klieforth says her students are bringing their personal experiences to the classroom. >> the kids tell stories. i walked into a store and felt like people treated me differently. it. >> it's cool. what he did - he didn't came, if
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>> welcome back, i'm del walters. the india supreme court upholding a law that makes gay sex a crime, the top court overruling a decision decriminalizing sexual acts involving consensual adults. activists say it is a set back. that law has been in place for more than 150 years since british colonial rule. same-sex couples will be allowed to marriage since march, saying
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this is another step in the evolution of marriage. the change will also include same-sex couples who are british loving overseas. those marriages could be held in british consulates around military biases if the host country agrees. >> uruguay is the first country to legalize marijuana. private companies will now be able to grow pot. the government will oversee the sale. citizens 18 or older will be able to grow the drug or buy it from licensed pharmacies. officials hope it will take business away from criminals. that law goes into effect in mid april. >> southern california residents are no stranger to earthquakes, some saying they barely notice the smaller ones. the reason behind the seismic activity now is the hollywood fault line, just one of many fault lines crisscrossing the city. what it's about, overbuilding two skyscrapers in what some consider to be the danger zone.
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we have more from hollywood. >> imagine hollywood before all of this, when it was citrus groves. then came the movie studios, walk of fame and capitol records building. now, imagine two skyscrapers eclipsing the view and overshadowing dangers beneath. >> this project will celebrate the idea of community. >> these are renderings of the towers, more than 1 million square feet of apartments, hotel rooms, restaurants and shops. l.a. city council approved the project this year. >> what they have planned is high rise development and destruction of neighborhoods. we want to protect our community. >> so, long time hollywood residents george abrahams is suing both the city and developer, millennium hollywood. joined by a coalition of homeowners and businesses who claim they withheld critical information and evidence that
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suggest it might not be safe to build there. >> if the towers are built, it will be a site that cannot be built upon much less with two skyscrapers. >> to fully understand and even appreciate the controversy surrounding the building of the millennium towers, you've got to get off the ground. from up here, you get the best views, a proposed site for the two towers is right down there and at 35 and 39 stories tall, it will dwarf the capitol records building and forever change the view from the hollywood hills. it's actually what's happening beneath the surface causing the most concern. >> the hollywood fault and millennium site is about at this location. >> john is the leading
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geologist. he has studied the faults and say l.a. is overdue for a big earthquake. the fault could generate between a 6.5 to seven magnitude earthquake. we are talking about surface rupture here with the hollywood fault and surface rupture tends to destroy the foundation of the building. >> the city insists the project is safe, and they say they stand on solid ground, literally and figuratively. >> where do we stop. if we base everything on fear of what might be, and we stop all economic development in los angeles, then we are in real trouble as a city. so i think that everyone needs to take a deep breath, let the science come in, let the facts come in before we jump to conclusions. >> no one is saying that we're against development. it has to be good development and it has to be legal development. no development cap happen on top of an earthquake fault. that's not us talking. that's state law and mother nature talking.
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>> groundbreaking for the towers has now been suspended while the fight moves off the street and into the courts, leaving the future of hollywood's most ambitious project very much up in the air, while all parties involved continue to argue about what's happening above and below ground. >> jennifer london, aljazeera, los angeles. >> pat abbot is a retired professor of geology. we are looking a it is a map of the hollywood fault line from a geological perspective, what is the real problem about this area? >> first from a broad scale view, the reason the whole hills are there because they've been thrust or shoved up along a hole system of faults. it's not just a simple drawing one line on a map. you have to think three dimension ally. these faults are miles deep. >> you've flown on a helicopter
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during your research on this fault line. what are the real risks involved if these skyscrapers are built? >> you find little hills through there, fault offsets, where the ground has been offset by faulting in earlier times. the idea of building big buildings right on top of the areas where the ground has ruptured before, that's really challenging mother nature and i think unnecessarily so, for that specific site. not the project as a whole, but why go right into the middle of a very active fault zone where you may have untold damage and problems. >> developers say after that north ridge quake of 1994, we all watched it as we were watching the world series, et cetera, they say quakes have become more violent and codes put in place to make sure buildings were safe from earthquakes, so they argue why is this such a big deal?
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>> well, we learned every time we have an earthquake, we learn the failures and adopt the building codes. in a pure engineering or design sense, we don't have enough earthquakes, that is enough to say we don't have enough tests. so the 1994 north ridge earthquake, that movement began below the ground surface, moved upward, never broke the ground surface and you saw all the destruction that did. so there's a lot going on below the surface at the state geological survey. they are not going to see those things. why challenge mother nature? why not move out of the fault zone on a safer site to build? >> professor, when you talk about skyscrapers in hollywood, you talk about landmarks, specifically the hollywood sign. is this more about fears over an earthquake or views being blocked? >> well, i can't really get into the political economic things.
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i'm merely talking about it is site itself, you know, you don't build on top of faults. now, that's what the state geologist was talking about. you're not allowed by law to build on top of a fault. the faults go down below the surface and you might actually be on top of one that's right below the surface that doesn't break it that you can't see. the idea is why create unnecessary problems by going into the heart of a fault zone where we know that fault is overdue. it could do a 6.5 magnitude earthquake today, on the other hand, it might not come for a century. we know what's going to happen, we just can't tell you the day. >> thank you for being with us so he really on the west coast. >> one of the world's most famous horse shows is rocked by allegations of abuse. some trainers being accused of
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abusing those tennessee walking horses known for their smooth, high stepping gait. jonathan has our story from shelbyville, tennessee. >> the walking horse national federation is filled with pageantry and pride. >> it's the largest horse show in the country. >> every august, it pumps around $38 million into the local economy. >> my first time here is 1955 when i was eight years old. i've been coming ever since. >> the celebration and walking horse industry itself are embroiled in an ongoing controversy over training methods used to encourage the breeds distinctive high-stepping gate. larry wheeler a long time show judge and member of the walking horse trainersettics group has been charged with felony aggravated cruelty to livestock and conspiracy to commit cruelty. more than a dozen horses had their legs chemically burned, a process called soring and long used by tennessee walking horse
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trainers. the horse develops the high stepping gate because of the pain experienced in its legs hooves. undercover video showed a horse being beat in his stable and using soring tactics. many say the actions of a few have given the entire industry a black eye. >> we get categorized as all of us being bad when just because you own a gun mean you're a murderer. just because i got a horse mean i'm an abuser. >> the humane society of the united states insist abuse is still going on with trainers placing more value on winning than on the animals themselves. the new u.s. department of agriculture inspection process that dramatically cut down on
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abuses. >> a horse that is inspected and monitored more closely than any other horse and breed. >> the humane society is skeptical, offering a $5,000 reward for tips. some trainers say the scrutiny is unnecessary and further punishes a sport already in turmoil. others say the attention is forcing an end to cruel training methods. aljazeera with, showing, tennessee. >> tennessee has the highest number of horse protection act violations, more than 3,000 since the mid 1980's. >> a nevada family is safe after going missing for two days, cell phone signal leading investigators to them. their s.u.v. rolled over on sunday. the couple and their four children survived temperatures that dropped to 16 degrees below zero. they are all in the hospital, but all in good condition.
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>> the first woman to lead a major car company officially takes over the reigns at g.m. next month. the new c.e.o. is moving up after 33 years at the company. aljazeera has the story. >> 51-year-old mary about her are a will take over at c.e.o. from outgoing chief dan ackerson. he says the perception of g.m. as a boys club is dated. >> i think roughly 25% of our plants are run by women. the number of senior jobs in our engineering organization are run by women. >> an engineer by trade, about her are a has risen through the ranks, starting as an intern and right up to the position of global product development. she has spoken fondly of the company where her father also worked. >> i've worked with a lot of great people, been given the opportunity to do great things that really challenged and gave me the ability to challenge my
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leadership style and skills and knowledge of the vehicle. i've had a great career. >> her success remains an exception. the number of women heading up corporations has remained steady and small in recent years. only 16.9% of corporate board seats were held by women in 2013, a number that hasn't changed significantly in eight years and only 14.6% of executive officer positions. that number hasn't changed in four years. >> the most recent data suggests that women are doing fairly well when it comes to lower level passes, about half of the workforce overall and over half of management positions are held by women. i think the current area where things should be perhaps emphasized a bit more where we need work is in those high-level positions. >> in about her are a's case, financial analysts are more concerned about her market friendly credentials rather than her gender.
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>> mary brings a long time out totitive perspective. she's been with the company since 1980. most of that time's in engineering. she was in human resources briefly, mostly before her promotion. >> about her are a will assume the new position next january. >> let's look at other trail-blazing fee mile c.e.o.'s, the highest ranging is meg whitman with hewlett packard. the head of xerox is a woman, the first african-american woman to head a fortune 500 company. she has been leading that company since 2009. >> here's making news in the financial markets antbusiness world. some mixed data on the housing front. applications for home mortgages were up last week, following five weeks of declines.
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the banking association said interest rates are higher, at the highest rate since september. average 30 year fixed rate low now 4.68%. costco saying quarterly earnings were up 2%, blaming the shortfall on lower gas prices and weaker foreign currencies. wall street is playing it safe, dow futures turning around, starting the day below the key 16,000 level. the s&p at 502. overseas, european markets are slightly higher. in share is that, they ended in the red. >> hill top stock price will be set today, the initial public offering likely to pass twitter as the second biggest of the year. the world's largest hotel chain looks to raise $7.2 billion. one market watcher saying the
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hilton i.p.o. is boosting optimism in the market. >> it is yet another sign that we've got a recovery underway, that the i.p.o. pipeline, new companies are coming to the marketplace once again, which has literally been devoid for the past five to seven years. >> the i.p.o. could be the world's biggest since the dot com area. former students will be taught liz razz, part of a proposal for the state legislature there. one supporter saying it's important for students to know calculus and shakespeare, but also how to manage their 401k's. something they could use in the nba after a big matchup last night. >> some people say it could be a changing of the guard in the eastern conference. they say revenge is a dish best served cold. the pacers losing to the heat
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would like nothing more than to dish up some revenge to the heat on indiana's way to a title. the pacers owners of the best record had the first chance this season to serve miami a statement loss. this map that matchup featured paul george and lebron james. it was lebron getting his team off to the best start, jumping out to a double digit lead in the first quarter, would lead it by seven at the break. that lebron finished with 14 rebounds and six assists. roy hibbert led all scorers and george scored 15-17 points in the second half as the pacers outscored the heat 50-37 over the last two quarter to improve their home record to 10-0, the best home start in franchise history. 90-84 was the final. we have more from indianapolis. >> the indiana pacers first matchup this season with their nemeses, the miami heat didn't start well at all, but if recent
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history is any judge, i guess we should have known that the pacers had the heat right where they wanted them when they went into the half time locker room trailing miami by seven points. you see, the indiana pacers have been the best team in the nba this season, and outscoring opponents in third quarters. so it was again on tuesday night, they outscored the miami heat 28-17 in the third stanza to get themselves a lead. they did it on the strength of their superstar, paul george and roy hibbert. the two combined for 30 points. raid and james combined for 15 points. >> i was happy to be down seven with this, you know, with the way we played in the first half. we really didn't play very well, in particular offensively, but not even very sharp on the defensive end, but, you know, the third quarter came out with great defensive energy, and you
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know a calmer demeanor on the offensive end. we were able to take control of the game. >> we beat a team that's going to challenge for the first seed. it's good to go, you know, win a game and be one up, you know, against the head-to-head match up against challenging for the first seed. that's the only aspect. there was no significance behind it. it wasn't a championship game, but we always enjoy winning games against the lead teams. >> the indiana pacers win game one of four matchups that they'll have this year with the miami heat, 90-84. they improve their record to a league-best 19-3 while giving themselves a three game edge for best record in the nba. from indianapolis, i'm john henry smith, aljazeera. >> also in action last night, los angeles lakers star kobe bryant back on the court for the second time this season as he continues to recover from
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surgery. he looked much sharper tuesday night against the suns as he dunked for the first time and scored a team high 20 points. suns guard led all scorers with 31 points including 12 of the suns 35 in the fourth quarter. phoenix takes down kobe and the lakers 114-1 owe eight. kobe get i can back on the court is a victory. >> time magazine's person of the year is revealed. who is it and why this announcement is important for the magazine. >> lake effect snow, i'll have your forecast. >> you're looking live in south africa at those lining up to say their final goodbyes to nelson mandela.
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>> welcome back to aljazeera america. just ahead, time magazine reveals its person that of the year, but first let's get a peek
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at where it's going to snow. >> we're still digging out of a lot of places that got it over the past several days. behind that last system, we ever winds pretty much out of the west coming across the lake, so the areas you see highlighted in blue are the different lake effect snow warnings and advisories that we have and pretty clear to see where that is. some of our cities particularly prone, you can see over a foot where all this comes in. a clipper in the midwest, so we've had snow in cities such as chicago. you need to still take it very slowly this morning. back to you. >> a big announcement this morning. who was the most influential person of the year, and john is is the iting next to me, so i can't say him. who did time magazine choose to be the person of the year? in the end, time picked a pope, pope francis.
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john, there were fears this time. why did they pick a pope? >> they put a very low write up on their website. it will explain why they picked the pope. they say in a matter of months, the pope elevated the healing mission of the church above the doctrinal police work that was going on before. they make the point that the two predecessors john paul and benedict were both theological previousors. although pope that francis is very 11, they make the point that he was previously a janitor and a nightclub bouncer. in other words, he's more a man of the people. >> there's still hope for me. >> there's hope for you, del, he softened the edges at the catholic church at a time when the layers were needed to take place. >> we make a big deal out of it each and every year at this time, but what about the average jane and john doe. >> you have to take a view on
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the time person of the year, because time magazine is operating a very, very difficult environment, magazines generally not doing terribly well, so they could do with the publicity and they get the publicity and for them, it's very, very valuable. you could argue it's a publicity stunt. if you put pope francis alongside all the other winners going back down the years, then this christmas season, holiday season, it's very, very good dinner table conversation. why not? it's a little social piece of somebody and talk about your short list. who was on the short list? >> in second place, edward snowden, the whistle blower, third place, edith windsor. she sued the united states and overturned the marriage act. then comes bashar al assad, the president of syria.
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miley cyrus. she won the popular vote. >> the breaking news of the pope being time magazine's man of the year. we just received this release from the vatican saying the holy father is not looking to become famous or receive ors but in the choice of the person of the year helps spread the message of the gospel, the message of god's love for everyone, he will certainly be happy. >> that will do it for this hour of aljazeera america. we have more news ahead in two and a half minutes. you can check us out 24 hours a day at aljazeera.com.
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>> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be at hand and just in the nick of time. >> thousands of new yorkers are marching in solidarity. >> we're following multiple developments on syria at this hour. >> every hour from reporters stationed around the world and across the country. >> only on al jazeera america. have been telling you in the san joaquim river, freeze warnings in effect. never seen too much in terms of rain. los angeles, you are going to be seeing some beautiful weather all the way to sunday even into the low 70 did or high 60s, partly cloudy conditions, overnight, about 44 degrees. texas also dry for you as well. we saw rain showers and a mix of precip just a little bit up here towards the north. temperatures for dallas at about 42. san antonio at 55. for houston, well, you are going
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to be seeing rain by the time we end the week. 59 degrees there. that will will last one day. your weekend should look better with a high of 63. over here towards the southeast, some rain showers pushing through orlando right now. atlanta is going to be about 56. an american auto maker making history. the newer ground general motor is making as it names its latest ceo. >> this isn't a new channel, this is a watershed moment in media for america. >> this entire region is utterly devastated. >> people our here are struggling. >> the fire jumped the highway we took earlier. >> your average viewer want's to actually understand how the health care law is going to help them or hurt them. >> they know they can get extremist bickering somewhere else. >> people say that we're revolutionary. our revolution is just going back to doing the best in journalism. >> this is the place to go watch high quality journalism, period.
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