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tv   News  Al Jazeera  March 11, 2014 6:00am-9:01am EDT

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they need assistance. ♪ new developments on the disappearance of malaysia flight 370 and what investigators say about a man who boarded the plane with a stolen passport and hear from a texas man supposed to be on the plane and the last-minute cancellation is a miracle from god and yanukovych speaks steps from the country he was forced out of and plans to return and plans for new elections in may.
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>> we are at risk of unjust fieed and unwarranted interference in our lives. >> reporter: after outing the program edward snowden speaks for the first time since fleeing the country. ♪ we believe that he is not likely to be a member of any terrorist group. >> reporter: chief of police speaking a short time ago saying one of the men who used a stolen passport to board flight 370 was not a terrorist and welcome to al jazeera, i'm stephanie sy and the hunt continues for the missing plane and they are expanding the search area, crews have been scouring the flight path around thailand and south china sea and going to the
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malaka straight between west malaysia and indonesia in case it tried to turn around which there are indications of and ten countries including the u.s. are in the search but cannot pinpoint where the jet disappeared four days ago and lisa stark is in washington d.c., good morning, are there any more clues? >> what happened to this flight truly does remain a mystery. authorities are desperate for clues to figure out what happened to the missing plane and as you can imagine the relatives of those on board are desperate for answers as well. for some family members of those missing on board malaysia flight 370 a lack of information has only brought agony. that agony turned into frustration for others who tossed water bottles and demanded answers from airline officials in beijing. the flights planned destination. the search has entered the
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fourth day and loved ones have been told to expect the worst they hope the plane's black boxes will eventually lead them to the jet's location. >> designed to activate in the water and once active they produce a brief pulse once a second for 30 days of a depth for 20,000 feet. >> reporter: the hunt for flight 370 is now an international effort and 34 planes from ten count countries including the united states are pitching in scorie thailand and the south sea. >> we do not have enough information to comment on the cause. >> reporter: a clue revealed when they said the plane may have turned back to kuala lumpur and prompting the search to be expanded west of the malaysia peninsula and more puzzling no warnings or distress calls or any apparent issues related to the safety of the plane.
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adding to the mystery two passengers traveling on stolen passports, copies revealed to the world as officers in thailand descended on this travel agency which issued one-way tickets to two men traveling on that missing flight. today malaysia investigators revealed one is a 19-year-old iranian citizen and f.b.i. is assisting and analyzing this to figure out what happened in the case. they do not believe that 19-year-old on that stolen passport had anything to do with this plane's disappearance and thinking he was going to germany to seek asylum because his mother was in germany and awaiting him and we still have not enough clues to figure out where this plane went down or why. stephanie. >> lisa, you covered aviation for years i know, why do you think they have not turned up even a trace of the plane and
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how unusual is that? >> it's very unusual for large jet liners like this and think of 447 which went down in 2009 in the atlantic and found some debris a few days later but took them two years to find the wreckage and authorities i talked with think that perhaps the plane may have even gone down over land. they just are not looking in the right place. this area has very spotty radar coverage, although they saw the plan on radar they don't know exactly where it went down and that is why they are expanding the search. it's there somewhere, we just have to figure out where, stephanie. >> lisa stark with the latest from washington, lisa, thank you. a texas man who was supposed to be on flight 370 is calling it a miracle that he decided not to fly. houston resident greg had a boarding pass for 370 and scheduled to fly to beijing to speak at an ibm sales conference but he cancelled the trip at the last-minute.
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>> some may call it luck or karma but it's the absolute providence and the grace of god i was not on the plane and made a typical 57-year-old guy's decision, i'm just getting too old for this and just really tired. >> reporter: another texan who works for ibm was on the flight 370 and we are following breaking news on the crisis in ukraine, the parliament has just voted for independence from ukraine. and al jazeera, phil is in kiev with more on this vote, phil, good morning. >> yeah, good morning stephanie. as you say this is happening as we speak. apparently the crimea parliament has just voted to break away from ukraine. the government here in kiev has repeatedly said that that parliament is continually overstepping its bounds and don't have the authority to make either the referendum and called for the 16th or certainly their own independence.
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so this is a flash in the face of the government here in kiev and certainly the powers that be will say that is an illegitimate vote but it's still is a very telling move stephanie they felt they had that kind of power and authority and now said we have broken away from ukraine and whether or not they follow-up with a referendum for joining russia we will have to see when that happens. the vote today however we are being told 78 members of the parliament out of 100-seat body voted in favor of breaking away from mainland ukraine, stephanie. >> reporter: big development as well, secretary of state john kerry rejected an offer of talks with russian president vladimir putin. how are the russians reacting to that decision? >> well, yeah, the russians have basically said that the proposal that john kerry secretary of
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state john kerry sent to moscow about how to deal with the crisis in ukraine is a nonstarter because it begins from a position of recognition of the government here and what the russians are calling a coup. the russians won't even entertain that premise, the basic premise from which the west and secretary of state kerry is coming. so they are apparently today trying to formulate a counter proposal to that proposition but as far as this western idea of dealing with this down the road and with this new government here the russians say we won't begin to talk about it if you think the government in kiev is legitimate. stephanie. >> reporter: we heard from the former president viktor yanukovych a short while ago, what did he have to say? >> well, viktor yanukovych had a lot to say but speaking over the border of russia and people say here in ukraine at least are saying he seems to be losing touch with reality and he said
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he did intend to come back and would be president again. and even moscow itself and vladimir putin said he had no political future there but he took a moment out to single things out toward the americans and the u.s. government proposing a $1 billion loan to kiev, saying that it's his understanding that under the u.s. law that the government cannot give money to a government that has come to power with a military coup. folks here would say it's not a military coup and a popular uprising but it does indicate just where the former ousted president is coming from. again, a lot of people here in ukraine are shaking their heads and saying, you know, does he really think he can come back. clearly the people here won't allow it if he even comes to ukraine the kiev government said they will arrest him. >> there were parliamentary procedures that took place
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before yanukovych was stripped of powers and in kiev and thank you phil and as he reported russia is working on a counter proposal for a u.s. plan for peace in ukraine and russian forces beefed up control over the southern ukrainian peninsula crimea. a referendum to split off and be cutoff from, become a part of russia is expected on sunday. the government in kiev along with the u.s. and european union declared the up coming vote illegal but nick reports russia does not seem to be loosening control over the region. >> in military base a 4519 they are reenforcing defenses and don't know if the russians will scale the walls or come right through the front gate. there is a new directive here and if the soldiers stand guard outside or inside guns must be at the ready. the pressure began last week. we filmed a mob of pro-russian activists tried to storm the
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base and they demanded ukraine surrender and let the russians through the gate. this is the gate six days later and it's calm and reenforced the gate with soldiers and not only that the view from the last time we were here and they have a truck filled with cement blocks to prevent people from coming in and fly the ukrainian flag and they are is so apprehensive is they would let me come if i snuck over the back wall and he has four kids on the back of the base and shows me how he will protect them and the troop and most defenses were used 40 years ago. >> translator: it can slow them down, in a fight a few seconds can give you the advantage. >> reporter: commander negotiating with the russians and believes he bought the base some time, at least until sunday's referendum that will decide crimea's future but worries that time is running
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out. >> translator: my troops and i are all the time under pressure, there are different provocations and different ultimatium. >> reporter: stand down and hand over all weapons. do you call what the russians are doing an occupation? . >> translator: it's a real occupation and we should not pretend otherwise. >> reporter: when they arrived they were under strict orders not to shoot and resisted the occupation however they could. today that order still stands. >> we are going to protect, absolutely, but not like that. >> reporter: major admits there is not much the troop can do to resist physically so all they do is resist the russian demand to deflect. what was the base's response to that? >> absolutely not. >> reporter: why not? . >> translator: we have already taken an oath. we are lawfully fulfilling our
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duty. >> reporter: fulfilling their duty as long as they can but not sure how long this lock will hold, nick with al jazeera, ukraine. >> reporter: and ukraine's new prime minister is scheduled to meet with president obama tomorrow in washington. day 7 in the oscar pistorious trial in south africa, the runner accused of killing his super model girlfriend last valentine's day and autopsy revealed she was shot three times in the hip, arm and head and he through up yesterday in court and the evidence was graphic that the judge barred it from being broadcast and he said he thought steenkamp was an increeder and could face life in prison if convicted. looking at the weather hundreds in montana are cutoff because of serious flooding plus we have a new storm bringing more snow to parts of the state
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and that is making matters even worse, heavy rain, warm temperatures and melting snow led to water logged roads and swollen rivers and the snow is already moving into neighboring wyoming where the national guard is protecting two towns protected by high water levels, good morning i'm metrologist nicole mitchell and let's see where this is going on and impacts for the rest of the the country and we already have the snow we were just talking about in montana and the higher elevations could see one or two feet, lower elevations possibly 6" or more. this is moving across the country already and seeing rain in places like the dakotas and minnesota and dramatic temperature drop with this, plus high levels of wind. so that is going to make it feel even more brutal. this system through the rest of the day moves through the midsection of the country. wednesday into thursday. makes its way into the northeast and it has a number of elements we are going to have to watch and not only areas of heavy snow and north earn parts of new
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england could see a foot or more. rain along the coastline, but the other thing we are going to watch for with that, we have the hazards up is high levels of wind. that is going to drop the wind chills below 0 after a lovely day today and more on the temperatures and back to you. >> two dozen democrats pulled a senate all nighter to draw attention to climate change and there are groggy lawmakers on capitol hill this mark and they are still going. senate majority leader harry reid kicked it off monday evening and no plans to bring a climate bill to the floor this year but he says it's time for the u.s. and other countries to act. >> the seriousness of the climate problem is not lost on our average american. the vast majority of americans believe climate change is real and believe it's here. >> reporter: 30 of the senate's
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53 democrats signed up and this is a picture of the talk-a-thon and the senator from connecticut still talking and hope to ral lie the base ahead of mid term elections and set to wrap up at 9:00 a.m. eastern time. recreational marijuana is bringing in big bucks in colorado. the state collected more than $2 billion in pot tax revenue in january alone, that number is close to 3 1/2 million in taxes and fees if you include medical marijuana sales and colorado legalized the drug in 2012 but commercial sales did not start until this year and washington state will begin in the next few months. the boeing 777, one of the most advanced jet plans built but they have limits on why the missing airlines plane has been so difficult to find. coming back to earth and touching down after six months in outer space and you may have to bring home some more bacon to
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pay for the pork and the price of the other white meat may be about to sky rocket.
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welcome back to al jazeera america, aviation investigators are puzzled by the disappearance of the flight 370, as the search for the plane continues the answer to the mystery likely rests with the black box and some are asking why in this day and age the block box data is not transmitted in real time. and scientist and technology shows there are limits with the technology. >> the cell phones that you and i carry with us use cellular towers to transmit information back and forth and there are so many of us using cell phones the cost of that kind of transmission technology is quite low and not the case when it comes to transmitting to and front an airplane and going across water needs satellite transmission to get information to and fro and those are very expensive. one study says replacing a black box with a live back and forth up link via satellite would cost an individual airline $300
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million per year and that is not an acceptable amount of money when you look i'm sure as the airlines have at the incredibly small and shrinking incidents of air disaster we are seeing this day and age and it's rare for it to go down and there has only been one incident in asiania which killed three people and one of the safest airplanes ever made and the idea you will spend $300 million in the face of incredible tiny odds doesn't make sense to the people who run airlines. at the same time there is of course the argument about search and rescue, couldn't the black box replacement, couldn't a live uplink via satellite give us a jump on finding survivors of a crash like this and typically there are not survivors of a crash like this and there are miracle on the hudson and the
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plane that sat down gently in the hudson river is an exception unfortunately and most of the time when a plane falls from the kind of heights, 35,000 height that this particular flight was traveling at, at that point the water is concrete and it's very, very unlikely anyone would survive. so having that kind of massively expensive dynamic system for transmitting information back and forth via satellite just wouldn't do all that much good when it comes to search and rescue. at this point it's really a question of trying to get the information from the black box to make the small improvements we hope to be able to make to airlines in the future but those airlines are doing a pretty good job when it comes to safety and it's unlikely they will make the investment in the near future. >> reporter: experts say the plane now could be under water, as deep as 3,000 feet and that fast-moving current could carry debris more than 50 miles a day and transportation contributor
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todd curtis joins us from austin, texas and what are factors making this so difficult to find? >> the biggest factor is there is just not a clear set of evidence as to what the flight path was for the final part of the plane's flight. and as some of the authorities in malaysia have stated, the search area has expanded to an area of several hundred miles away from the last radar location and quite frankly the search area may expand further because although some speculated there was a catastrophic event that made it crash immediately, the aircraft had been able to fly for several hundred more miles. >> and it's not even clear that there was a catastrophic crash. we do know obviously the plane is not in the air anymore but we don't know exactly where it is and, in fact, the focus has been on the water, our reporter interviewed an aviation expert that said it could technically
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also be on the ground somewhere. >> it could, and, again, this is a situation where although there are not devices on the aircraft who sort of have an emergency beacon that goes beyond the standard of the airlines right now, this is a case where one can point to the situation and say, gosh, if we had a difficult technology with constant streaming et cetera we would have found the plane more quickly. the search is about four days old and although it's rather frustrating i'm confident the search as it expands and gets more sophisticated may, in fact, find the aircraft. >> reporter: there are 40 vessels and 34 aircraft from ten countries and more on the way searching for this aircraft. is there a finite period that search teams have to spot any potential wreckage? does it get more difficult as days go by? >> it will get more difficult because as it was stated by the
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authorities the search area will be expanded. will this mean more ships and aircraft or a more creative kind of search effort being put forth? for example there is all sorts of surveillance aircraft and satellites that could photograph the areas, not just invisible light but another spectra and using more sophisticated search techniques pioneered by intelligence agencies that could, in fact, find the aircraft. >> reporter: there is a technology referred to as a live black box to allow flight data to be transmitted almost instantly in real time, is that technology being used by any of the airlines? >> not aware of it being used by the airline but certainly it's feasible, the question is given the cost and efforts to implement it, is it worth the effort for the airline industry to do so? and keep in mind, if tomorrow the rules change to make this happen, it could take years, perhaps decades before the
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entire world's fleet e vofls to the new technology. >> reporter: i think it's so hard for people, mr. curtis, to sort of understand this. we all have iphones and gps systems, jacob ward sort of went into way planes don't have this sort of signalling do you think there should be more signalling so in cases like in the plane is easier to spot? >> well, certainly one can make the argument that for finding out what happened after the crash this would be an invaluable tool but the question for the industry would be, well, that's obviously a worthwhile thing but we have to balance it against questions such as what are some alternatives that could be considered? that could be even more effective at preventing accidents, alternatives that may not include enhancing the black box technology so although it's a great idea, it's one that would have to be considered against other great ideas. >> yeah, have to consider that context and we appreciate that,
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todd curtis al jazeera america transportation contributor. a deadly attack on an unsuspecting target. >> it was black and disappears and it was a shock, i got up and the first thing that occurred to me was to throw myself out of the window on to the tracks. >> reporter: ten years later, how spain has changed since the 2004 train bombing in madrid. plus a moment of silence marking three years since the earthquake and tsunami that devastated japan and al jazeera goes inside the radioactive exclusion zone surrounding the crippled fukushima plant and edward snowden speaking publically in the first time since fleeing the u.s. and the challenge he gave to young internet users around the world. >> i'm john henry smith and cheers turned to stunned silence in dallas as doctors work to save a fallen star and we will hear from the shaken coach coming up.
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♪ welcome back to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie sy and these are our top stories at this hour, secretary of state john kerry turned down a meeting to discuss the ukraine crisis with russian president putin and the military intervention in crimea would make negotiations extremely difficult. the oscar pistorious trial entered the 7th day and court hearing details on how reeva steenkamp died after being shot last year and says she was shot three times in the hip, arm and head and the runner thought steenkamp was an intruder. and the search is still on for flight 370 and expanded to the strait and uncovered the identity of one of the passengers who boarded with a stole end passport and an iran
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national who investigators believe was looking for asylum and not likely a terrorist. malaysia airlines says it's caring for family and the crew from the flight 370 and many of the families are starting to lose their patience. >> the anger of relatives still waiting for answers about their loved ones and believing they have not been told the full truth. chinese government officials faced a range of complaints. why has it taken you all this time to hold the meeting this woman shouts? have you any idea of the pain we are going through another woman asks from the back. the officials tell them to the patient and not to talk any radical action. there was though evidence of a hijack they told them nor was there any evidence that the vietnam recovered parts of the aircraft from the sea but hundreds of relatives at the hotel the agonizing wait continues and malaysia airlines
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is organizing flights for them to go to kuala lumpur to be close to the search but so far there is reluctance in the news. >> translator: 80% of people don't want to go to malaysia until there is confirmation. >> translator: we want the government to tell us what is really going on, whether we go or not, at least we need to know. >> reporter: several nations and international organizations are trying to determine what happened to the missing jet liner. china's ministry of foreign affairs called upon malaysia to do more in trying to solve the mystery. >> translator: we have a responsible to demand and urge the malaysia side to increase search efforts starting an investigation as soon as possible and provide relevant information to china correctly and in a timely manner. >> reporter: three days without confirmation of the fate the stress is relevant and believe questions are going unanswered
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but the most important question, what happened to flight 370 still no one can answer that. rob mcbride, al jazeera beijing. >> reporter: malaysia airlines is providing hotel rooms for family members while the search is on going and offering to fly people to malaysia to be closer to where the plane may have gone down. today marks the 10th anniversary of the madrid train bombings and 191 people killed and more than 1800 others injured in the 2004 attack. it was the worst attack of its kind in history. and we report from madrid. >> reporter: every name here represents a life lost. 191 people victims of the madrid train bombings, their names carefully carved into the memorial marking their loss. ten years ago madrid was brought to a halt by carnige and terror and four bombs exploded on
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trains and packed with commuters. >> translator: everything went black, the floor disappeared, it was a tremendous shock, i got up and the first thing that occurred to me was to throw myself out of the window on to the tracks. someone helped me get up and i managed to climb on to the platform. i don't remember much more. >> reporter: in hours the conservative group blames a group but they denied it and then linked to al-qaeda was possible suspects. initially after the bombing there was a sense of shock and disbelief but quickly among some people that emotion turned to anger. more than 11 million people, around a quarter of spain's population took part in protests calling for an end to the violence, this was a nation grieving for the dead and also questioning the government's response. some felt that the bombings were
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in revenge for spain's support of the iraq war and just days after the attacks with the government, fernando believes the bombings were planned long before the invasion of iraq and the impact he says was seismic. >> contrary to that it divided society and divided terrorism. and, yet, a profound transformation of the sector was made to now have abilities. >> reporter: any divisions are likely to be put aside as spain unites to remember those who died and z though left behind, emma hayward al jazeera in madrid. >> reporter: a memorial mass is being held today in madrid to remember the victims of that attack. today is the third anniversary of japan's devastating
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earthquake and tsunami and 18,000 people were died and the magnitude 9 quake had a crisis and causing the meltdown of three reactors at the fukushima power plant and 270,000 people are still unable to return to their home. in tokyo the prime minister and emperor marked when the quake struck with silence and in the town they gathered to remember those lost and loss more than 600 residence and harry faucet is in fukushima where he got a tour at the epicenter of disaster. >> reporter: the streets in fukushima can feel like the world's strangest business park, the business here is managing a nuclear disaster. inside the earthquake-proof building we gear up to see for ourselves what they are doing on a tour of the plant. reactors one, two, three and four and three reactors melted down and this is very much the
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epicenter of japan's nuclear disaster. three years ago the magnitude 9 earthquake killed external power and got the generators backed up and lack of cooling caused three meltdowns and reactors one and two already has the feeling of a museum where a losing battle was fought against the coming catastrophe and reactor five was not running when the wave hit and it's a test bed for methods to check and repair the inaccessible reactors whose identical basements contain a raid active cocktail of flooding groundwater and cooling water. >> translator: our first priority is the contaminated water over decommissioning the plant, if we don't do it properly the people will continue to worry. >> reporter: one option, what they are testing here, freezing the soil around the reactors to prevent the groundwater from flowing in but if it works it's a year away. in the meantime they build more temporary tanks and 40 a month
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is this year's target but the more tanks and more complex and unwieldy it becomes and human error had tons of spilling of raid active water. >> they will have additional problems and what is important is that tepco can address and deal with them and communicate with the public and make sure it's safe. >> reporter: huge stresses on the men and women who work here and today helping me with my mask, last year working only water decon -- de-contamination. >> translator: when i worked on it i was mentally fatigued and didn't know what would go wrong with parts i didn't know about and why operators had such a hard time. >> reporter: we followed he and his wife as they checked only their abandoned home in the exclusion join and allowing the maximum exposure for workers and
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admits to being exhausted. >> translator: i think he feels responsibility more strongly than others. he can't just take it easy. i wanted him to quit but each time he found a reason not to. >> reporter: three years on this disaster is still at a heavy cost on a national level and on a personal one. harry faucet, al jazeera, fukushima, japan. >> reporter: the government has ear marked $250 billion towards rebuilding the disabled fukushima nuclear plant. the growing violence at an antigovernmeant antigovernment rallies and say it could get out of control and jeopardize peaceful political change and we are in the capitol of caracus and he spoke with one of the leaders of opposition movement. >> you said yesterday in an interview if things don't change this conflict is going to get worse, what do you mean? are we talking civil war or
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armed conflict? . >> translator: it's precisely what i want to avoid, a civil war between venezuela, that is why i'm asking the government to change. if the government doesn't change its attitude, if they maintain the suburb position because they are talking dialog but it's really a monologue where they insist in a model that doesn't work and we may be facing a social explosion where this would get out of hand. >> reporter: you've asked people not to go out and protest at night, you asked for an end to the violent clashes. but they continue. >> translator: some people in the opposition might think that throwing stones and building barricades is the way to fight and i think those people, which no one can control now, will stop when they realize the mechanism they are using to protest is not working. but the government will do what they can to go and if they are not there that may infiltrate the process because they can profit from this. without a doubt the government
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is profiting and it's not what we have not seen before because it divides the country. >> reporter: you expressed a lot of faith in the democratic process here but right now opposition does not have enough support for this to turn into ukraine. they are not going to topple the government. is it going to go more towards something like syria and more violence against venezuela and citizens by its government to stop this protesting? . >> translator: i would -- wouldn't want that, ukraine and-egypt, hard to compare with difficult cultures and customs and entering a crucial moment and waiting to see if there is a shift in the government position or attitude where they continue further repression or do they really want the peace they are preaching about on tv. >> reporter: reporting from venezuela, fugitive contractor edward snowden taking shots at the government's surveillance program and made the comments at
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the south by southwest technology in texas and al jazeera's erica pitzy and tens of thousands of people listened to the message and not everyone was happy about it. >> some particular and particularly in washington who want snowden behind bars right now but instead he is participating in an hour-long web session hosted by the civil liberties and it was pro-snowden gave him a standing ovation and saying every one is safer because of what he did. with an image of the u.s. constitution in the background edward snowden spoke at length for the first time since leaking national security documents on the internet. >> i took an oath to support in the constitution and saw the constitution was violated on a massive scale. >> reporter: snowden's image froze on screen most of the time due to several proxies he used to keep his exact location hidden but delivered by video conference was loud and clear
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>> we all are at risk of unfair, unjustified, unwarranted interference in our lives. >> reporter: called it a global problem and saying other countries are doing it too and called on the tech community to fix it by expanding encryption services to protect online users. >> fire to the future of the internet and the people who are in this room now, you guys are all the firefighters. >> reporter: some at the technology festival who applauded view the former cia and nsa contractor as a hero, others see snowden as a trader including the u.s. government and facing charges of espionage and theft in america and sought asylum in russia and asked if he would do it again. >> yes, regardless of what happens to me this is something we had a right to know. >> reporter: when it comes to changing the nation's surveillance system he says we
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need oversight like a watchdog that watches congress and being informd is the best way to protect your privacy. meanwhile his appearance comes at a time when a lot is going on at nsa. >> yesterday a federal judge blocking obama administration for destroying millions of records from the nsa telephone surveillance program and michael rogers going in front of the senate for confirmation hering to be the next director of nsa. >> no matter what you think of him he made an impact and thank you so much. in business news congress plans to launch an investigation and hearings into gm recall and they will look into why gm and safety people took so long to report an ignition problem and said it knew about the troubles a decade ago and it can turn off the car while driving is blamed on at least 13 deaths and effects 1.6
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million cars and 6 models made between 2003-2007. another car maker is jumping in the electric vehicle market, hondui will launch from the u.s. and has a small and growing ev marketplace behind nissan and bmw. stock futures are lower and fell on worries of the global economy and here is where we stand as we head in the trading day. dow jones is 16418. s&p is 1877. nasdaq 4334. overseas asia markets bounced back after the sell off and leading the advance and rising 3 quarters of a percent and european stocks are mostly lower. the pizza chain is going up for the second time in three years they are filing for bankruptcy and the company said the mall
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traffic had to close hundreds of restaurants and it still has 800 stores worldwide. a deadly virus going across missouri hog farms could increase the prices and killed 8 80% of the pigs that contracted and in some cases all nurseries wiped out and killed 4-5 million and that is 4% of the pigs that would go to market later this year. a frightening scene at an nhl game and john is here to explain. >> this is up setting when this happens, the athletes we root for look indeductible and super human but monday night we got a look at how athletes really are in the first period of an nhl game and he collapsed right after returning to the bench and teammates were yelling and banging sticks to get help and officials took him from the bench and a doctor applied chest
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compressi compressions and saying beverly was taken to the hospital after suffering a cardiac event and in the hospital and in good condition and beverly regained consciousness before regaining the arena and wanted to go back in the game. 31-year-old rich beverly is 8 year nhl veteran and won the coup with boston in 2011. and he was traded to dallas before this season and beverly has a history of heart trouble. he missed a preseason and the season opener due to a procedure to correct an irregular heartbeat discovered during a training m ka physical and this is lindy with more on what happened. >> i was scared. it was my first emotion was we need someone here real quick. when he dropped, it was red alert, don't worry about the game and nothing and turn around and scream for a doctor. and that is all. it was let's get him the help he needs and they came and got him
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the help and that is for me it was something i don't want to witness again and i know we play a game that there is a lot of emotion and a lot of passion in but, you know, the first thing i thought of rich and his family and his kids and what a good person he is and just prayed for everything to be okay. >> reporter: with playest on both teams shaken by beverly's medical emergency they postponed the blue jackets game until as yet to be determined later date and the coach says he would not speculate if his stars would be ready to face st. louis tonight. another day, another three tickets earns to the big dance and let's look on the latest tournament champion in college basketball and they are graspingly and down 18 seconds to play and carl with the lay in advantage and blue hens and william and mary down one and 5 left on the clock and 22 points
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but 24 is what he needed to win and misses and delaware wins 75-74, william and mary one of five original teams never to make the big dance. manhattan taking on ionia in the atlantic file and played each other close to and over 20 seconds left and english drives it down to pull them within two and last chance and david's first triple of the year and manhattan wins of last year's ma championship 71-68 and taking on western california for the southern conference championship and 10 seconds to play and goes to brandon who drills the three, one-point game and last chance for western carolina and down three and he has the rock and not giving it up and coast to coast and game over and they win 56-53. on the schedule today are the
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horizon summit and west coast games. >> reporter: thanks so much, a russian capsule carrying an american and two russians landed on earth and spent nearly six months on the space station and agreed after coming down and relationship is normal be and since nasa retired the program in 2011 russian rockets are the only way to and from the space station and say an elephant never forgets and they may be even smarter than we thought and letting the cat out of the bag or in this case out of the box. >> coming up, we take you to an unconventional climbing site where the next generation of mountaineers is learning to scale the ice.
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on al jazeera america ♪
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it's a rare sight, an endangered panther released in the wild after recovering from a broken leg and he was rescued last may and florida wildlife officials believe she was hit by a car but monday she was set free wearing a tracking collar so her movements is be monitored and the panther is endangered species and 160 in florida and looks like she is ready to leaf, ice climbing in a very unusual place and let's look at where the snow and rain may fall across the country and nicole mitchell is back. >> we have a developing system with a lot of elements with high snow and winds and plummeting temperatures. here is where it is. we will see problems in the midwest and rockys will see possibly 1-2 feet of snow. as this pulls out it's starting to kick up the wind gusts in the plains because of the pressure change associated with it and we
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will see high winds in kansas today and kicking up the red flag fire danger because we have high temperatures along with it. as this eventually hits the east coast not only snow northward but look at what some temperatures do, we go from temperatures near 70 degrees in washington d.c. to 20 degrees by thursday morning, wind chills sub 0 possible so that is almost a 17 degree flip-flop adding wind chills in one-day and people will feel this one. >> research suggests elephants are incredible listeners and can tell if a human poses a threat simply by listening to his or her voice and can even guess the anl, gender and the ethnicity of who is behind the voice and they played recording of human voices to wild elephants in kenya and watch how they reacted and found an elephant herd would come together in defensive position
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after hearing an east african ethnic group that hunted elephants for centuries. if you want to go on an ice cliff iowa may not be the first place that comes to mind but as we report iowa has become home to some of the most challenging ice climbing in the country. >> reporter: as sending the face of a glacier is a rush but this is not an ice-covered cliff in the swiss alps, this is in iowa and the challenge is taking place on the side of a cokorcor silo. >> the first word is so awesome. >> reporter: it's the brain child of rock climber and extreme sportsman don brigs. the idea came to him 13 years ago driving the wide, open flat lands of iowa. >> a lot of silos not used any
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more and used to feed cattle and no cattle on the farm and have an silo and no use for it and we are putting it to use i think. >> reporter: much like rock climbing but the frigid temperatures are a perfect opportunity to add slippery walls and grab some clamp ons to take climbing to the extreme. it takes 58,000 gallons of water sprayed on the silo with hoses and temperatures of 26 degrees or lower to generate the ice, the result is 80 feet of slick, frozen surface, perfect for climbing. >> set it, relax, test it and keep your arms straight. >> reporter: the last 8 years, brigs at professor at northern iowa have been teaching students the proper technique for ice climbing. it's the perfect training grounds for mountaineers who might want to go to cliff, slabs or frozen water falls. >> last week we had a couple of people who went to canada and
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said nothing compares to the silo. this is going to prepare you for any difficult climb that there is. >> reporter: on the scaling system known as the water fall ice grading the silo has a designation of w 15, a 7 is the most challenging. it's not easy even for world class climbers. >> this is some of the most difficult ice climbing to be found in the united states because of the verticalness of it. >> it's really tough and just consistently tough. >> reporter: so tough only 1-12 make it to the top on the first try. >> to actually see yourself going to the top is like oh, my gosh i can do it. >> reporter: for the climbers the best is scaling glacial heights right in their own backyard, cedar falls, iowa. >> reporter: in case you are wondering it costs $35 a day to go to silo climbing and they
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must dress warmly and sign a waiver and bill is here with a look at what we are following at the end of the first hour. >> the search for airlines 370 and saying the search area includes the strait in the west coast of the country. secretary of state john carry rejecting the meeting with russia president putin and saying the intervention in crimea makes any negotiation difficult and spain is marking ten years since the bombing in madrid, 191 people killed in a series of attacks on commuter trains during the morning rush. security questions being raised by the stolen passports used to board the missing malaysia airlines flight and why they are not checking passengers at an international database and also what an al jazeera investigation tells us about who was really behind the bombing of pan-am flight 103. >> reporter: i'm nicole mitchell and a storm will bring heavy snow and high winds and dropping temperatures, i'll have
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the national forecast. >> reporter: and al jazeera news and we are back with you in 2 1/2 minutes and leave you with a live look at the chambers where the climate change talk-a-thon enters the home stretch. >> and so the american military.
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>> frustrated family members of those onboard the missing malaysia airline flights demanding answers as the identity of two men who used stolen passports is released saying they are not terrorists. >> we're going to have a campaign against israeli and american targets. we want to inflict maximum
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damage. >> the details of an exclusive aljazeera investigation revealed who planned the bombing of pan am flight 103 and why. >> people are paying more for cupcakes and so i think i'd prefer this over a cupcake any day. >> the new food trend that is the toast of san francisco, why some say it is a symbol of what's wrong with the city. >> good morning, welcome to aljazeera america. >> the hunt continues for that missing malaysia airlines passenger plane. >> the search area is expanded. the flight path is being scoured. >> the focus shifting to the straights between the west malaysia coast and indonesia in case the flight tried to turn
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around, which there are now indications it did. >> 10 countries including the u.s. involved in the search but authorities hand pinpointed where the jet disappeared. >> two men boarded the flight with stolen passports. both men have been identified, but neither is considered to be a terrorist. >> lisa stark is in washington for us with more details. lisa, are there any new clues? >> stephanie, this really does remain a mystery for so many reasons. one is that airplane crashes are so rare, only 9% of crashes happen during that phase of flight. that's the first mystery. the bigger, where is this jet and all of the people onboard. it's something authorities are desperate to find out and the family members, of course, are desperate for information, as well.
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>> for some families of missing passengers, the lack of information is agony. they are demanding information from officials. the search has entered it's fourth day and while loved ones have been told to expect the worst. authorities hope the many blatche boxes will help lead them total jet's location. >> these are designed to activate in the water, once active produce a brief pulse once a second for 30 days at a depth of 20,000 feet. >> the hunt for flight 370 is now an international effort. at least 40 vessels and 34 planes from 10 countries, including the united states are pitching in, scouring the gulf of thailand and the south china sea. >> we're providing assistance, obviously the malaysians haved lead in this investigation, but we do not have enough investigation at this time to comment on the cause. >> a new clue was revealed when
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the air force said the plane may have turned back, prompting the search to be expanded west of the peninsula. even more puzzling, no warnings or distress calls or any apparent issues related to the safety of the plane. >> it went through its check, nothing untoward was found with the aircraft and it's been operating 14 or 15 hours a day since that time without any issues. >> adding to the mystery, two passengers traveling on stolen passports, copies revealed to the world as officers in thailand descended on this travel agency, which issued one way tickets to two men traveling on that missing flight. today, malaysian investigators revealed one is a 19-year-old iranian citizen. the f.b.i.'s assisting and analyzing some prints to learn more about the men in a case that has baffled everyone. >> authorities saying that they don't believe that 19-year-old iranian citizen had anything to do with the disappearance of
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this aircraft. they think he was traveling on that stolen passport to try tonic into germany and seek asylum. apparently his mother is in germany and was awaiting him. stephanie, still a lot of unanswered questions. >> you've covered aviation as well as several other major accidents over the years. why do you think they haven't been able to turn up even a trace of this plane? >> it's very unusual for a jumbo jet like this to simply disappear. it happened in the air france accident in 2009. they did find debris a few days later but didn't find the plane until two years later underwater. the best guess is they're simply looking in the wrong place. that's why they're expanding the search. maybe the plane actually went down on land, it's under some jungle canopy. there isn't good enough radar coverage in this area to know exactly where the plane was when it did disappear. they're basing it on last
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communications and last radar hit. they just have to keep looking until they find the actually area where this plane went down. >> thanks, lisa. >> a texas man was supposed to be onboard the flight and said it's a miracle he decided not to fly. the houston resident had a boarding pass. he was scheduled to fly to beijing to speak at an ibm sales conference but decided to cancel his trip. >> some calm it luck, but i consider it the grace of god i was not on that plane. i made a typical 57-year-old guy's decision, i'm just getting too old for this, and just really tired. >> another texan who works for i.b.m. was onboard the flight. >> stay with aljazeera america for continuing coverage of the missing malaysia airlines flight. we'll look at the security questions raised by the stolen passports used to board the
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plane and the international checks most countries aren't using. in our next half hour, what an exclusive aljazeera investigation has revealed about the moatives behind the bombing of pan am flight from years ago. >> voting for independence according to the website in crimea. phil ittner is in kiev. what can you tell us about this vote? >> well, del, it's a pretty aggressive move by the parliament that basically voted to break away from ukraine, become an independent entity. it's a little different than the referendum on the 16th. that will be more on whether or not to join with russia. this vote today will certainly go down as a very controversial
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one in kiev. they voted to incorporate the tartar, the muslim tartar minty into crimean civil society. they're trying to court that minority out in crimea, but the big news, this vote that they have posted on their website saying 78 out of 100 members of the crimean parliament ever voted to secede from ukraine. >> ukraine's out of thed president viktor yanukovych speaking this morning from russia. what did he have to say? >> >> if he comes to key every, police are authorized to arrest him. many ukrainians are saying it
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seems he's delookedded. he said that he's still in power. let's take a listen, to what he had to say today. >> i would like to remind you that i remain not the only one legitimate president, but also the chief commander of the country. >> what's also interesting about that statement, it seems as though he's the only man in the world who has has opinion. even vladimir putin, the president of russia has said that viktor yanukovych has no future politically in ukraine, so a lot of people are saying where's he coming from. >> secretary of state john kerry rejecting any meeting with the russian penalty vladimir putin saying that's not possible until russian military intervention ceases. how are the russians reacting?
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>> it's point-counter point. the russians say secretary of state kerry's proposal goes from a position of acceptance of what they think is a coup d'etat in kiev. when john kerry talks about setting up some sort of negotiation and talks between the government and russia in kiev, the russians say we won't begin with that. they have said that they are going to formulate a counter proposal to that message that secretary of state kerry sent out and we'll have to wait and see what moscow comes up with. >> phil ittner live in kiev, ukraine, that you can very much. >> the crimean people will vote in a referendum sunday. with russian troops occupying the peninsula and large number of ethnic russians in crimea, many say the outcome of the referendum is not in any doubt. >> suspicions run high in crimea these days. while we were filming russian troops outside a base, local
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troops demanded to know who we are and what we're doing. go home, they told me president the local ethnic russians protect the troops here and it took a while to convince them to talk to us. he says he's looking forward to sunday's referendum. >> we're making our own choice on the 16th of this month and we want to be heard. we live here. we are not the enemy and we are not trying to dictate anything to anyone. >> they're glad the troops here, though, because they i had the new government in kiev. >> it looked as though they were the working class but they tender out different. they started burning books, ruining memorials. the same thing is happening in ukraine and i don't like it. >> this village is an old soviet collective. in the summer the residents sell fruit to tourists. the russian flag flies here. they think russia will treat
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them better than kiev did. >> they were always cheating us and had different corrupt ways to steal and tear apart our land. >> he said corruption's been worse in recent years. he describes a crooked court system that rules in favor of whoever's in power. they hope moscow will soon be the ruling power here because they're hearing terrifying stories about what's happening in the rest of ukraine. >> we have old friends we've spoken to. they say it's scary there, that people have guns, they're scared to go out to go shopping. >> after the referendum, they say they know there will be a transition period as crimea turns toward moscow. by the summer, they hope the tourists will be back and life will be better here. aljazeera, ukraine. >> aljazeera has continuing coverage of the cries on air and on line. we'll focus on the economic influences feeling the conflict in our next hour.
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>> chile's president will be sworn in for another term today, vice president biden in santiago for the event, greeting her on her return to power four years after she left office. she promises to implement social sweeping changes. she faces stiff opposition. >> very young faces, some communist party faces, former student leaders and even a combative fisherman in congress. these are new times for politics and the new president. >> chile has been waiting a long time for major changes and now we will have a government that at least seems to have the will to implement them. >> former student leader who is currently secretary general of the communist youth league belongs to a new jeb reaction of
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deputies about to enter congress. they made their name on the streets, leading an unprecedented protest movement for free education and better distribution of chile's fast but unequal wealth. >> she was elected to return to this palace, promising these and other sweeping reforms. now her independent allies who are not beholden to traditional political parties or coalitions may become her fiercest critics in congress if she does not deliver. >> i hope we don't find any small prints that would change what we have interpreted as her program. >> and should bachelor waiver, there is this warning. >> clearly this would generate a reaction that would make things very complicated for her. for the government and for the country. >> it's not a threat to be taken lightly.
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chile's outgoing president was seriously undermind by relentless national protests, led by many of the very people who are now entering congress to represent their social movements and further embolden their cause. sanityback yo, aljazeera? >> she enjoyed an 84% approval rating when her first presidency ended in 2010. >> counting the votes after 3 million ballots cast, 3,000 votes separate the two candidates, both men claiming victory but the challenger has alleged election material fraud in el salvador. >> a judge accusing the pentagon of interfering with prosecution. the judge says army leaders may have pressured prosecutors to
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reject a plea deal perhaps bowing to political pressure to show the military is cracking down on sexual abuse. the defense has to decide whether to reenter the plea or continue with the trial. >> the senate passed a bill to strengthen protections for sexual assault victims in the military, imposing a half dozen changes to the way the army currently handles sump cases. the bill eni didn't believe so victims to have a say whether their cases are heard in the military or civil court. the house will take up the measure. >> two dozen democrats pulled an all nigher to call attention to climate change. >> that's just one example. in pakistan, we have invested a huge amount of money to work with the government to provide -- >> it is still going on. you are looking at the senate floor live right now. harry reid kicked offer the marathon. the party has no plans to bring to climate bill to the floor
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this year. they hope to make climate change an issue that will rally their base ahead of this year's mid term election. the talk fest set to wrap up at 9:00 a.m. eastern time, they've got about two hours to go. >> some democrats not participating because they're concerned how that vote will reflect in the upcoming elections. >> the use of stolen passports on that missing malaysia airlines flight raising security concerns. >> a billion passengers boarded planes without documents screened. >> a database widely used in the u.s. is not checked in other countries. >> the iranian decided to retaliate as soon as possible. >> an exclusive aljazeera investigation reveals new conspirators behind the bomb of of pan am flight. >> our big number of the day.
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>> union square in new york, little 42 degrees this morning, but wait until thursday. ♪
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what is this place? where are we? this is where we bring together the fastest internet and the best in entertainment. we call it the x1 entertainment operating system. it looks like the future! we must have encountered a temporal vortex. further analytics are necessary. beam us up. ♪ that's my phone. hey. [ female announcer ] the x1 entertainment operating system, only from xfinity. tv and internet together like never before.
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>> today's big number spells high times for colorado's coffers, $3.5 million, that is the overall marijuana tax revenue. the state pocketed that in just january. >> this is the first ever accounting of the recreational pot business. other states and countries all tracking just how much money colorado makes off of its marijuana taxes. the state legalized marijuana in 2012, but commercial sales did not begin until this year. >> the state collected $2 million in taxes from recreational sales, the rest of the money does come from medical marijuana. >> everybody watching colorado right now. >> also, a lot of people watching malaysia in this age of heightened security. how did passengers with stolen passports get aboard that airliner? we look at flaws in today's
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global airport security. >> it's hard to believe in this day and age people can board planes with stolen passports, but it apparently happens a lot. the cool la lamb purr airport never checked to see if those two airports were stolen. last year, people boarded planes a million times without having their passports screened. there is a database available to 200 countries and it has registered 40 million stolen travel documents. those countries simply don't bother running passports through that database. the united states is the best at checking, a quarter billion searches last year. experts feel if that flight was headed to america, it's likely those stolen passports would
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have been caught. few countries make sure their passengers are who they say they are. it's a huge hole in security. >> investigators do not believe either men are believed to have links to terrorist groups. here to offer his thoughts is tim crockett, aljazeeras security contributor, security consultant and c.e.o. of pioneer consulting group. he joins us from atlanta this morning. thanks for being with us. >> good morning, stephanie. >> why is it so difficult to check every international passenger's passport against this interpoll database? >> if you look at some of the numbers just quoted, the size and scope of the problem is huge. just last year, there was over 3 billion passengers traveling by aircraft alone, and again, some of these countries that you mentioned are not either members of the interpol or simply don't have the resources or perhaps technical capabilities to check
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every single passport and every single passenger, so it's very easy for someone to perhaps slip through the net. >> a billion passports are not checked. is it a technological issue, is it about efficiency, is it about willingness, is it about information sharing? >> i would say it is a combination of all. you've got a human factor involved here. you've got to have a very diligent official that is checking that passport, using whatever resources they have. it may be a technical issue, so they can verify the holder of the passport is in fact the true traveler, and then obviously time involved, so there are many factors that will weigh in on whether they can check the validity of the traveler against the travel documents. >> what is the last line of defense for something like this, a stolen travel document? if this for example had been a malaysia airlines flight bound for the u.s., would the passports have faced different scrutiny when those passengers
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left kuala lampur. >> i think at that stage, you're going down the path of profiling, which a lot of people are against. i think a lot of the time, the ability to check against the database which is continually growing and more people trying to actively participate in that program, again, it's time, resources. i think if the airlines perhaps had a facility to check against those, that might tighten the net a little more, but simply with the number of flights going on at any one time, it's a large problem to deal with. >> everything changed in the u.s. when new security measures were put in place. several of the 9/11 highjackers traveled on false documents. what can other countries learn from procedures used here and should the u.s. being doing more to distribute this technology
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for national security sake? >> i think there could be a lot more information sharing, perhaps cross pollennation of procedures and simply technical know-how to better implement these procedures, and are there gaping holes that need to be tightened up on movement of people on stolen documents. >> it's important to note that the latest information is these two men had no links to terrorist groups. >> but it's still frightening the fact that they can board a plane so far after 9/11 with fake passports and that database available but nobody checking it out. >> important discussion here. >> let's find out about the temperatures across the nation today. >> meteorologist nicole mitchell is here. good morning. >> good morning.
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looking at temperatures across the board, fairly mild this morning. northern plains in the midwest, this might be as warm as you get, holding steady, dropping with this front. if i hone in a little closer, you can see the dividing line where we have temperatures 30's and 40's, we get ahead of the front, 70's and 80's. that cold air dropping in some places 30-40 degrees, spreads more so wednesday and into thursday toward the east coast. back to you guys. >> nicole, thank you very much. >> we were just talking about the situation involving the passports, another deadly attack happened on an unsuspecting target. >> everything went black, the floors disappears. it was a tremendous shock. the first thing that occurred to me was to throw myself out of the window on to the tracks. >> 10 years later, how spain has changed since the 2004 train bombings in madrid. >> i often wondered whether or not the truth about lockerbie
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will ever come out. >> also an aljazeera exclusive investigation, our look into the bombing of pan am flight 103 and how it reveals new details about who really brought down that plane. >> when my mom and daddy used to work right there, i used to go and help them. >> growing up in a migrant worker's family, through the eyes of a child, our series, "being eight."
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real reporting that brings you the world. giving you a real global perspective like no other can. real reporting from around the world. this is what we do. al jazeera america. >> good morning, welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. >> i'm stephanie sy. ahead in this half hour, an exclusive aljazeera report that looks at who was really behind pan am flight 103's bombing. >> there is a new food fad some
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call nostalgic but others say is a symbol of what's wrong with san francisco. >> the chick reasons behind the ukraine crisis. >> japan is marking the third anniversary of that tsunami and earthquake. the country has struggled to rebuild ever since, nearly 270,000 people can't go home. the prime minister and everyone procedure observing a moment of silence. >> residents of a northern coastal town gather to remember those lost in the disaster. that one town lost more than 600 residents, another 200 reported missing. >> today marks the 10t 10th anniversary of the madrid train bombings. >> 191 people were killed and more than 1800 others injured in
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the 2004 attacks. we report from madrid where a momentum mother yell service is being held. >> the service of remembrance here has now ended. in attendance were the king of spain, the prime minister, and members of the families of the victims. most importantly, coming together for the first time, really, in 10 years. from here, they're now heading to one of the main parks in that dried where there will be a balloon release and a minute of silence for the 191 victims of those bombings 10 years ago today. not forgetting the survivors, too, because many of them were very traumatized by what happened that morning, march 11, 2004. it cannot be underestimated, let me say, just how divisive that attack was 10 years ago, how it divided spain, but today all of those divisions will be put aside and people will come together in a show of solidarity
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to show explain was not beaten by the events of 2004. >> it was 25 years ago that everybody onboard pan am flight 103 died when the plane exploded over lockerbie, scotland. one man, a libyan was found guilty of that crime. an aljazeera investigation suggestion there may be other parties to blame. we have a preview of a full report being released later tonight. >> 25 years after the lockerbie bombing which shocked the world, aljazeera has uncovered new evidence over the entire investigation and trial into what was the biggest case of mass murder ever seen in scotland. documents obtained by the network and verified by security and legal experts point to the involvement of iran's secret service, hezbollah and armed grooms, the popular front.
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a meeting took place between the four parties in malta nine months before the flight. the purpose of the meeting was to discuss potential american and israeli targets to attack and or blow up. >> let me tell you what was said at this meeting, in essence, they were recruiting support. we're all going to help each other. some of us maybe able to do something, do others, we're going to join together and have a campaign against israeli and american targets. we want to inflict maximum damage. we're not sure yet how we're going to inflict it. our targets could be gathering in public places, it could be buildings, it could be trains, it could be airplanes. >> that was dead on. >> it was only flee months after this meeting the u.s. navy shot
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down an iranian passenger plane killing 290 civilians including 60 children that the plan for the lockerbie bombs of finally hatched. then working for iran's secret service but later defected, he said a revenge had to be executed quickly. >> they decided to retall 80 as soon as possible, the decision was made by the whole system iran and then confirmed by ayatollah khomeini. the target was to copy exactly that was happened to the iranian airways. everything exactly same, 219 people dead. that was the target of the iranian decision makers. >> the theory that the pglc were involved isn't new. many other times had believed that there was sufficient
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evident pointing the finger at the palestinian group. what is new is the evidence that links iran's secret service with the attack. >> i've often wondered whether or not the truth about lockerbie will ever come out. so many people at such a high level had a stake in his guilt, talking about penalties of the united states, secretaries of state, heads of the f.b.i., british prime ministers. that's what makes this case so difficult. >> this is the truth. >> the only person to have been convicted of the bomb be are libyan agents, now dead. with the emergence of this new evidence, this could very well mean that the actual perpetrators of one of the most horrific attacks in scottish history are still alive and free. aljazeera. >> in our next hour, we'll look at u.s. reaction to that
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investigation, and you can watch the complete program, lockerbie, what really happened tonight at 9:00 p.m. eastern time, 6:00 p.m. pacific time right here on aljazeera america. >> oscar pistorius trial is underway. his if i recall grenned was shot three times. yesterday's testimony brought him to tears and caused him to throw up several times in court. the evidence was so graphic that the judge barred it from being broadcast. he claims he thought his girlfriend was an intruder. he faces life in prison if convicted. >> edward snowden taking shots at the government's surveillance program again making comments that at a festival in austin, texas. he is still standing by his actions. >> yes, he is, del, there seems to be quite a few people standing with him. he participated in an hour long
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web session hosted by the american civil liberties union. more than 50,000 people watched him speak on line across the world. at the end, the audience in austin gave him a standing ovation. with an image of the u.s. constitution in the background, edward snowden spoke via video conference, his image froze on the screen most of the time because of web programs used to keep his exact location hidden. he called mass surveillance a global problem saying other countries are doing it too and called on the tech community to expand encryption services to protect on line users. >> we all are at risk of fair, unjustified, unwarranted interference in our private lives. the people in this room now, you guys are all the firefighters. >> when it comes to changing the nation's surveillance systems,
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snowden said we need public oversight, like a watchdog that watches congress when asked if he would leak the top secret government documents again, snowden answered absolutely. >> thank you very much. the controversy with edward snowden continues. >> man power, finds the job outlook is improving, hiring planned to increase. dow futures flat at this hour. concerns over the global economy dragging down stocks yesterday. here's where we stand heading into the day. the dow jones industrial average at 16418,ation markets bounced back. >> congress will launch an investigation into the g.m. recall, a house committee
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looking into why general motors and safety regulators took so long to report a dangerous ignition problem. g.m. hired a high profile lawyer to lead the investigation, acknowledging it new of the troubles a decade ago but didn't recall cars until last month. the ignition problem which turns off the car while driving is blamed on 13 deaths. >> the tokyo based bit coin exchange filing for bankruptcy protection in the u.s., follows a bankruptcy filing in japan last month. the company is trying to shield itself from lawsuits after losing $474 million worth have bit coins. shutting down abruptly in february, after its service was hacked. >> cold and snow again, moving from the rockies to the plains today. >> for more on the national forecast, we turn to nicole mitchell. good morning. >> good morning, every time it warms up, people go is this over and i just shake my head. we're dealing with another weather system out there.
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this moves across the rockies bringing moisture into the midwest and with that, some of those higher elevations, one or two feet as it moves across the country, the northern tier could see places with a foot or more and then moisture in the form of rain south of all of that. on the snow side of this, there's people out there skiing still. in that case, easily parts of new england over a foot. you get closer to the great lakes, possibly six inches or more. that's not the other side of this storm. we have the winter storm warnings up. this system is going to develop or intensify as it moves along. these lines of black are pressure changes, the closer together, the more quickly the pressure changes and intensifies. the faster that cranks the wind aren't that. we're going to have high winds with this system. what does that mean? the cold front itself will bring in the cold air. this will draw in more cold air from canada.
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we'll have a lot of wind chills going sub zero. that's a harsh return to reality after the mild temperatures the last couple days. thursday, the midwest starts to rebound these temperatures a little bit, but look at some of these on the east coast, places that will be in the 60's and even 70's, today go into the 20's and 30's, and once again, these wind chills especially starting off friday morning for example could be sub zero. definitely don't want to put away all that winter gear quite yet. back to you guys. >> nicole, thank you very much. >> to our on going series being eight where we look at the world through the eyes of children. we take the journey of a migrant farm family in california. >> before dawn, they are awake, won't rest until darkness comes around again. they have four children, but before the girls, including the 8-year-old head to school, she drives her husband out to the
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strawberry fields. the california sun will soon rise and with it fierce temperatures in tough working conditions. >> he picks strawberries. when my mom and dad used to work right there, i used to go and help them. >> on this morning, she has to go to school. she gets ready on her own. her mother's energy and focus is often on her younger sister, who suffers from cerebral palsey and autism. >> you try to take care of her when she's like crying, but she doesn't stop. >> in the mornings, i go to school, learn, then go to recess. learn more, go to recess, learn more, and then go to resist and then come home, and do my
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homework. >> many children are migrant farm workers take on part time jobs once they turn 12, the legal working age in the agriculture industry. her mother will make sure she and her other girls never live their life in the fields. >> when i first got here, i would even cry while i was working in the fields. i arrived in me dara california during the grape harvest. i would ride in the truck and cry because it was a hard job. >> the family makes $18,000 a year. that's a typical income for field workers, picking broccoli, strawberries and lettuce. >> she is too young to understand why her parents so badly want to chart a different course for her. she just understands she must complete her homework if she wants to live in a big house.
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>> i want a big pool outside, flowers, lemons, oranges, apples. >> it's a dream bigger than the family trailer, and for 18-year-old, her goal. aljazeera, central california. >> one in three migrant students in the u.s. living by all the way in the state of california. >> a violent anti government protest in venezuela claimed the life of a student who served as an opposition leader. the student was shot to death monday night in the western city, his death following a day of street clashes between protestors and venezuela security forces. some opposition leaders are now trying to put a stop as to the violence. they say it will only keep the movement from reaching its goals. >> some people in the opposition might think that throwing stones
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and building barricades is all the way to fight and i think those people, which no one can control now, will stop when they realize the peck nix they're use to go protest is not working. the government will do what they can to keep them going. if they're not there, they might infiltrate the protest because they can profit from this. without a doubt, the government is profiting from this. it's not something we haven't seen before already, because that divides the country. >> opposition leaders expression fear that their current protest could lead to a civil war. >> protests in venezuela are taking their toll on major league baseball in the u.s. >> some players and teams are showing their support in troubling times there. >> there are many venezuelans playing major league baseball here in the united states, including miguel cabrera and felix sandoval. we talked what many are feeling,
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concern for their country man back home. >> with a pregame hug and kiss to his wife and daughter, miami star pitcher henderson alvarez props to take the mound. alvarez is over 100 major league baseball players from venezuela, a country now mired in social and political violence. anti-government political demonstrations in recent weeks result in more than 20 reported deaths in clashes between protestors and police. alvarez brought his wife, mary lee, his newborn daughter and father over earlier than planned. he says it's comforting to know his family is with him and safe as he prepares for the upcoming season. alvarez's wife describes events in venezuela as out of control. >> i'm very worried about the situation. my family is still in venezuela, high husband's family. the situation is too harsh. that's the reason i had to come to the states with my daughter. >> like motor professional
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athletes, alvarez said his priority is a winning season for his team but with so much tension in his homeland, the solidarity among venezuelan teammates is also growing. >> the few venezuelans that we have here, we support each other 100% and are focused on working very hard. we're training to be 100% ready. >> while baseball has long been considered america's past time, many of the league's players hail from venezuela. this season some are using their profession as an opportunity to share thoughts on more than just sports. many venezuelan major league players turned to social media to express support for a return to calm in their homeland. players from the miami marlins, including alvarez, the detroit tigers, minnesota twins, seattle mariners, texas rangers, philadelphia phillies and washington nationals have all recently posted images to twitter and instagram to alert the world to events in
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venezuela. the players are using hash tags like venezuela, baseball and mlb. the political crisis is now more visible to the world because of this intersection between sports and politics. major league baseball leaders say they support and empathize with their venezuelan players but is ultimately the game they expect these men to keep top of mind. >> they have a job to do and that's what he's doing. i know that's his focus is going out there pitching. you can only control the things that you can control. >> setting into the 2014 season, henderson alvarez said he is up to date on events in california and excited to have his family close at hand but his primary goal is a winning season. aljazeera, jupiter, florida. >> venezuelan ball players represent the second largest group of foreign ball players in major league baseball.
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that's sports for now. >> john henry smith, thank you very much. >> toast, it is the new food trend in san francisco. >> some saying this goes way too far. >> it has become a symbol for what a lot of people view to be wrong with the city. it's just bread and butter and jam. >> you might want to call it the rise of the controversial toast crazy. >> a social media campaign leading to thousands of pleas for medication for a 7-year-old with cancer. >> i told you about high winds affecting wind chills. i'll have your forecast. >> the sun is rising over capitol hill in washington, d.c., tuesday morning. they are still talking on the floor of the senate. they have been doing it all night, talking about climate change. it's expected to go for about another hour. >> and commit to go address the climate crisis, or whether we will continue --
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only on al jazeera america
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>> good morning, to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. >> i'm receive sigh. how toast is becoming the hot new food trend. >> first let's find out where it is going to rain and snow. we are still talking snow. >> some significant amounts on all the way depending where you are. parts of the rockies could get over a foot, up to two feet and then we get to the lower elevation, six inches or more. that's not the only element we are worried about with this system. all of this starting to move now into the plains, causing flooding in its way both with combinations of the new snow and snow melt and rain on the ground. as it now moves into the midwest, temperatures will be dropping but the winds are starting to kick up. places like nebraska, we see winds gust in the 30-mile per hour range and as though high
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winds spread southward with temperatures in the 70's and 80's drying everything out and high winds, we have a fire danger today with this same system. >> a virginia family has launched an on line campaign to get an unapproved medication for their dying son. 7-year-old cancer survivor josh hardy is battling a viral infection, and doctors say a medicine currently in clinical trials could save him but has not received f.d.a. approval and the drug maker has denied the request. thousands of people have taken to social media to get the company to get the company to recar. >> "the new york times" reporting that the president is going to appear in an off color on line parody of celebrity interview shows called in between the two ferns. he is going to be interviewed by zach galifianakis. >> he was in those hangover movies. >> he wants to promote healthcare.gov, but is he going
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a little too far? >> it is a cult favorite, apparently, among my len yells. >> i watch it all the time. >> i'm sure you watch it all the time. this is an stop story in the animal world, new research suggests elephants are incredible listeners. we know they are incredibly intelligent animals. how do you know they are great listeners? recordings of human vices were played while the elephants were examined. they went into a defensive position after hearing voices of people known to hunt elephants. >> this is the story that has everybody, the cat that has been terrorizing a family that portland police had to be called in to subdue them. you hear the family on the 911 calls locking the cat in the door. >> he has a history of violence. the cat attacked a seven-month-old baby, so maybe it was jealous. >> food fads come and go, think of high end cupcakes, gourmet
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popcorn, next up, toast. >> shops in san francisco finding a way to turn brown toast into a delicacy. we explain. >> plain toast is no longer a bread and butter affair. it's now a hit in san francisco. they use specialty bread. >> it's really thick, so the breads really fresh. >> this is one of my favorite toppings, the strawberry and butter really adds a great, great flavor to it. definitely worth it. >> in a city overrun by technology, start up hipsters, you might wonder whether the quest to come up with the next food trend has gone too far. >> it's kind of frustrating that it has become a symbol for what a lot of people view to be wrong
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with the city. it's just bread and butter and jam. >> who came up with this idea for trendy toast? well, it actually started in a not to trendy part of town. >> seven years ago, this little coffee house started selling fancy toast. it's taken all these years to wind its way to the city to become the toast of town. >> my mom just said it's probably a great idea to sell toast. >> julieta serves coffee and toast and said the secret is it's not about the toast, but nostalgia. >> i serve children, 90-year-old people. the cinnamon toast brings them altogether. it's a memory that everyone has. >> that theory of toast appears on target. >> this is like a chirp's food, right? you think when did i eat toast, and it was like i was a 12-year-old and my mom made me toast and butter and gave it to me for breakfast.
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>> san francisco and other big cities have seen food fads come and go. cupcakes were the crazy, but now. >> people are paying more for cupcakes, and so i think i'd prefer this over a cupcake any day. >> when toast time is up, what next? let the hipsters lead all the way. aljazeera, san francisco. >> here's what we're following at this hour, the search for the missing airlines plate in malaysia. two men with stolen passports have been identified. officials don't believe her terrorists. >> secretary of state john kerry rejecting that meeting with russia's president vladimir putin concerning his stance on crimea. ousted ukrainian president viktor yanukovych claims he is in charge. >> spain marking 10 years since the deadly train bombing in madrid, 191 people killed in a series of commuter train
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bombings. >> the global economic ties major a huge role in ongoing tensions. >> heavy snow, high winds and plummeting temperatures. the national forecast.
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>> ukraine's deposed president viktor yanukovych delivering a fee if i antmessage saying he is still in charge. >> new developments on the disappearance of airlines flight 370, investigators saying two men onboard with stolen passports weren't terrorists. >> an aljazeera investigation into who was behind the attack on pan am flight 10325 years ago. new government documents show multiple players were behind the
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lockerbie bombing. >> if you go through the site as you've seen today, they're going to have additional problems. what's important is they know how to address them. >> three years after japan's nuclear disaster, an effort to rare the plant and help the people who live nearby. >> good morning, welcome to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. vowing to return to his country, former ukrainian president viktor yanukovych said he is still the letting malt leader. the parliament of crimea voted for independence ahead of a referendum this weekend where the people will decide whether to secede from ukraine or join russia. phil ittner is live in kiev. what can you tell us about this vote? >> they have voted on a
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declaration of independence in crimea. the governor in kiev will say what they ever in the past since crimea announced with impending referendum. the message from kiev is you don't have that kind of authority. a local government, a local, even though it is an autonomous region doesn't have under the rue craneian constitution can't break away unilaterally. what we are hearing from the government is that the vote for the referendum and this vote today is above and beyond the crimean parliament's power and authority. >> a defiant ousted president
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viktor yanukovych speaking. >> he spoke just across the border inside russia. he said that he was sometime the president, he was still in charge. that has been already met with a lot of curious city here in kiev, because he just really has no possibility of coming back into power without some sort of extreme change in the situation on the ground here. there's even the point that russian penalty vladimir putin himself said that viktor yanukovych has no political future in ukraine, so people here are wondering what planet the ousted president's on. del. >> also secretary of state john kerry rejecting a meeting with russian penalty vladimir putin, saying that that meeting will not be possible until the russian military intervention stops in crimea. what are the people there saying about this. >> well, the people here gay
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with secretary of state john kerry. they want to see the russian military off the peninsula, but the russians say the proposal put forward by the state democratic and secretary of state john kerry starts from a position accepting what the russians consider a coup d'etat in kiev, so the russian have said you're coming at this from the entire wrong direction, it's a non-starter. they themselves in moscow have said we will formulate our own proposal to counter what the secretary of state put forward. >> phil, thank you very much. >> coming up, we're going to break down the economy affecting the crisis in ukraine. >> investigators say they have identified the two men who boarded the missing malaysia airlines jet with stolen passports, iranian nationals. they used stolen austrian passports and italian passports to board the plane, neither
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believed to be terrorists. the search area is expanding. they've scoured the flight path, now the focus shifting to the straights between west malaysia and indonesia. authorities are expanding the search is r. in case the flight tried to turn around. lisa stark is in washington. are there other new clues? >> it remains a mystery. the new information is that the two men on this plane with stolen passports appeared not to have anything to do with the disappearance of the plane, but it still begs the question where is this flight, where are the people onboard, what caused a jumbo jet to suddenly drop out of the sky. for some family members of those missing onboard malaysia airlines flight 370, a lock of information has only brought agony. that agony turned into frustration or others who tossed water bottles and demanded
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answers from airline officials in beijing, the destination. the search has now entered it's fourth day and while loved once are told to expect the worst, authorities hope the black boxes will lead them to the jet's location. >> these activate in the water. they produce a brief pulse once a second for 30 days at a depth of up to 20,000 feet. >> the hunt for flight 370 is now an international effort. at least 40 vessels and 34 planes from 10 countries, including the united states are pitching in. scouring the gulf of thailand and the south china sea. >> we're providing assistance, the malaysians have the lead. we do not have enough investigation to comment on the cause. >> the plane may have turned back toward kuala lampur. even more puzzling, no warnings
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or distress calls or any apparent issues related to the safety of the plane. >> it went through its check, nothing untoward was found with the aircraft. it's been operating 14 or 15 hours a day since that time without issues. >> adding to the mystery, two passengers traveling on stolen passports. copies revealed to the world, as officers in thailand descended on this travel agency, which issued one way tickets to two men traveling on that missing flight. today, interpoll released photos of both men, who they say are iranian citizens. the f.b.i.'s assisting and analyzing some prints to learn more about the men in a case that has bed everyone. >> authorities now say those men traveling on those stolen passports appear to be trying to get into europe to seek asylum, don't believe they have any
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connection to terrorism. it seems less likely that terrorism may have been the cause, but nothing can be ruled out completely. >> you are a veteran of the aviation, been covering it for years. why do you think they can't find this plane and is that really unusual? >> it is for a big commercial jet to simply disappear out of the sky. it happened with the air france flight in 2009. it took them a couple of years to actually locate the main wreckage of that aircraft. with aviation, we're not tracking these planes for the most part on g.p.s. they're on ground based radar and it can be spotty. it's why we don't know the exact last location of this plane. it's why they are having to expand the search. >> lisa, thank you very much. >> a texas man who was supposed to be onboard that flight says it's a miracle that he decided not to fly. houston resident had a boarding pass to board, scheduled to fly
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to beijing to speak at a conference but canceled in the last minute. >> some may call this luck, some karma, you consider it the absolute providence of god, by the grace of god, i was not on that plane. a made a typical 57-year-old guys decision, i'm just getting too old for this and just really tired. >> another texan who works for i.b.m. did board the plate and was onboard flight 370. >> an and thety government protest in venezuela claiming the life of a student who served as an opposition leader. his death followed clashes between protestors and security. opposition leaders are trying to stop the violence, saying it will only keep the movement from reaching its goals. >> chyllia's former president will be sworn in for another term today, vice president biden
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greeting her on her return to power. she enjoyed an 84% approval rating when she left office four years ago. she won praise for guiding chile through its economic cries. >> the trial of an army general on old, the judge accusing the pentagon of interfering with the prosecution. he is charged with sexually assaulting a 34-year-old female captain. the army leaders may have pressured the prosecutors to reject a plea deal, perhaps bowing to political pressure showing the military is cracking down on sexual abuse cases. the defense has to decide whether to reenter that plea deal or continue on with the trial. >> the senate passing a bill to toughen protections for sexual assault victims in the military. the legislation imposes a half dozen changes to the way the military handles cases, enable victims to have a say whether they will be heard in the military or civil court, the
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house now set up to take the measure. >> edward snowden taking shots at the government's surveillance program, making comments at the south by southwest tech festival in texas. tens of thousands watched him and heard him speak on line. not everyone is happy about it. >> there are people in washington who believe he should be in prison right now, instead participated in an hour long web session hosted by the american civil liberties union. the audience gave him a standing ovation. his main message, everyone is safer because of what he did. >> with an image of the u.s. constitution in the background, edward snowden spoke at length for the first time since leaking confidential national security documents on the internet. >> i took an oath to support and defend the constitution and i saw that the constitution was violated on massive scales. >> snowden's image froze on screen due to several proxy's he
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used to protect his location. >> we are are at risk of unwarranted interference in our private lives. >> he called mass surveillance a global problem, saying other countries are doing it, too, he called on the tech community to fix it by expanding encryption services to protect on line users. >> they're setting fire to the future of the internet and the people who are in this room now, you guys are all the firefighters. >> some at the festival who applauded view the former c.i.a. and n.s.a. contractor as a hero. other see him as a traitor, including the u.s. government, facing charges of espionage and theft in america, he was forced to seek asylum in russia. when asked if he would leak the government documents general. >> the answer is absolutely yes. regardless of what happens to me, this is something we had a right to. >> when it comes to changing the
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nation's surveillance systems, snowden says we need public oversight like a watchdog that watches congress. the idea that being informed is the best way to protect the privacy of the people. >> his appearance comes at a time when there are changes under way at the n.s.a. >> yesterday, you've got the federal judge out of san francisco blocking the obama administration from being able to destroy millions of records under the n.s.a.'s telephone surveillance program and later today, vice admiral michael rogers in front of the senate for his confirmation hearing to become the next director of the n.s.a. >> more than two dozen senate democrats pulling an all-nigher to draw attention to a different issue. this one, climate change. >> that reduces our carbon footprint, high speed rail does. >> that is maryland senator. thirty of the 53 democrats and two independents taking part hope to make climate change an issue that will rally the base ahead of this year's mid term
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elections. that talk fest set to wrap up in 45 minutes, 9:00 a.m. eastern time. tune in if you like, it is thrilling television. >> a huge storm system set to bring more than wet weather. let's get the very latest. >> just when a lot of people thought ok, finally a taste of spring, it's not quite over yet. we have another developing system. what we're going to watch with this, it's been causing heavy amounts of rain as it pulled through the northwest and flooding concerns as it melted snow off, higher elevation getting snow into the rockies today and the rain is already into the midwest. as this moves along, a lot of cold air is coming in with this. high winds, you can see some more significant rains for the ohio river valley and then as we get into wednesday and thursday, moving into the northeast. so, what we're going to see with all of that, already some of these winter storm warnings up for the snow coming in, because
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it will be significant in some cases. farther to the north, 10-20 inches, so some places easily over a foot of new snow associated with this. that's not the only element. you can see these black lines, those are lines of equal pressure. the closer together, the more dramatic the pressure change. this one has a significant pressure drop with it. that cranks up the winds. so, not only will the temperatures drop in some cases, easily 30 degrees, but this will push the wind chills below zero at times for anywhere from the great lakes to the northeast as we get into wednesday and thursday. look at this, d.c. into the 70's today, by thursday and friday morning, or by thursday morning into the 20's with a wind chill below zero, that feels like a 70-degree swing. >> israeli's i'm minute at her netanyahu said this are sit
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silence bound for the gaza strip. netanyahu says if iran's nuclear programs around stopped, the entire word will be in danger. >> those engaged in self deception must awaken from their slumber. we cannot lou iran to have the capability to produce nuclear weapons. >> iran rejects israel's claims, insisting nuclear programs are for appealsful reasons only. >> united nations saying syria is the most dangerous place on the planet for children. 5.5 million children have been affect by the war. 10,000 killed. that is the highest recorded death toll for children in any recent conflict. more than a million syrian children are refugees in neighboring countries. this weekend marks three years since that civil war began. >> russia now looking to offer up its on solution to the crisis
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in ukraine, one that says rivals the west. we look at the economic motives that may be fueling russias actions. >> an aljazeera investigation uncovers new information who was behind the bombing of pan am flight 103, the u.s. government's response to our revelations about the lockerbie bombing. >> is it finally over? >> i suppose so. >> you may have thought you would never, ever see this, the president teaming up with zack galifianakis to get out the word on health care.
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>> good morning, to aljazeera america. one thing that has come to light from the crisis in ukraine is how heavily europe depends on russia for natural gas. as aljazeera reports, that dependence is sparking new conversations on how to change the energy landscape in europe. >> it's the soft underbelly of western diplomacy laid bare by the crisis in ukraine. >> when it comes to real viable strategies to counter russia's
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energy influence, there are no quick fixes. >> russia's threat to scarf ukraine of natural gas prompted the readiness to pump gas back the other way. an engineering challenge that also doesn't address the bigger long term problem. >> there's a possibility that gas pipelines that now move gas west through ukraine could be reversed to send gas east, but there in lice the problem. where will you get the gas? >> europe produces only a third of the gas it consumes, the rest imported and russia has captured a growing share of the european market from just over 25% in 2012 to 30% last year. >> eastern and western europe should begin to develop their own natural gas resources. >> ramping up domestic production could take years in europe, a time line accelerating calls here in the united states to loosen restrictions on u.s.
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exports of natural gas. >> currently 24 applications are under government review that would allow u.s. energy producers to export natural goes to countries with which the united states does not have a free strayed agreement. >> producers would be free to sell to the highest bidder and that may not be europe. the effect oh the u.s. economy is uncertain. >> it may lead to some what higher prices for consumers but natural gas exports are a good thing for the economy. >> some say a change in policies would send an important signal to moscow. >> just those moves will begin to pressure the russians to not use gas in quite the same way they have been. >> august, new york. >> the crisis in ukraine started as a dispute over whether the country should accept a financial bailout from europe or russia. the numbers offer a better
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understanding of the situation. russia's world trade is represented here. $844 billion, most of that money as you can see comes from the european union, almost half, well over $400 billion. that explains how interconnected russia's relationship is with the e.u. loosely translated, russia needs the e.u. as much as the e.u. needs russia. china is the largest trading partner. only china exports more to russia than russia no china. ukraine has a population of only 45 million people, but its trading relationship is huge. $39 billion, close to $40 billion in trade between russia and ukraine. ukraine does more trade with russia than france and the u.s. despite the massive economies have the u.s. and japan, ukraine's trade with russia is
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even larger. a senior ukrainian analyst joins us from london this morning. is it your opinion that the crisis in ukraine is actually financial, not geopolitical or cold war as many would suggest? >> it certainly started by the former president viktor yanukovych essentially looking for the best deal for ukraine's association, and at that time considering the economic difficulties that ukraine had in times of finding external financing, it appeared that russia was offering a better deal. financial aid with very loose strings attached. european union at a time was insisting that really, ukraine has to embark on difficult paths of austerity measures and reforms to be able to integrate itself with european union, eventually, and get that i.m.s. loan. >> now the ukraine is set to
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accept that $15 billion aid package from the e.u. will that help calm the turmoil or is it your opinion it will only make it worse? >> we'll have to be very clear european union has set out the bailout contingent on ukraine signing the reform roadmap, with i.m.f. currently the missions working in kiev to find more details as to how much the country needs, the government that has just come to power in kiev has said that they need 35 billion u.s. dollars, slightly down played this figure. it's all sun certain. one thing is clear, that ukraine would have to go through that difficult part of eforms. this means increasing domestic gas prices, cutting public spending, lots of unpap lob measures that would unsettle any popular government, let alone a
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coalition government that doesn't have full control over the country. >> when we look at ukraine's export and i import number, the big piece of the pie belongs to russia. how would vladimir putin react to ukraine siding with the e.u.? >> i think we have already seen last year when ukraine decided that they may go with the european association agreement. russia started incrementing trade barriers and if the situation continues to escalate between these two countries, it's most likely that we'll see trade disruptions between russia and ukraine. of course it will have a detrimental impact on ukrainian economy, far more exposed to independent on russian economy than russia on ukraine. >> when we look at russia's exports, most oil that is well
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established, $1,174,000,000,000 worth of oil exported, it imports $154 billion worth of engineering and transport goods, so what does that say about russia's economic situation, russia's economic situation? >> it's no secret that russian economies heavily independent on export of raw materials, especially hydrocarbon exports. of course, any disruption in this area would have an impact on russian economy. it really depends, i think it will be speculative to say that there will be significant disruptions or that european union may see serious impact on its economy. i think that would be a speck lakes at this stage. in terms of russian economy perhaps the immediate impact will not be felt if there is a long term fallout with ukraine
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and european unions. medium to long term, the country will see shying away from almost all sectors of its economy which needs modernization, needs to develop sectors of the economy that will take away russia from its current dependence on i'll and gas, something that the putin government had been trying to pursue in the past years. it seems with the current diplomatic standoff, all these plans are being put away. >> the senior ukraine analyst as i.h.s. global in sight joins us from london. >> there are new questions emerging over airport security. we're going to talk about two men getting onboard the missing airlines plane with stolen pass sports. >> putting a stop to a popular
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vacation attraction. one california lawmakers wants to take orka whales out of team parks back into the wild. >> cheers turned to stunned silence in dallas as doctors worked to save a fallen star. we'll hear from the shaken coach.
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>> you are looking at a live shot of union square on what is set to abvery warm tuesday in new york. it will give way to a very cold thursday. it's going to be that way all the way up and down the east he were seaboard. welcome back. ahead in our half hour, an exclusive aljazeera investigation. we're going to unveil who was behind the bombing of pan am flight 10325 careers ago. >> the president looking to drum up support for his health care law trying to appeal to the funny bones of younger people.
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>> in this heightened age of security, the question is asked how about passengers with stolen passports get onboard a missing malaysian airliner. we look at flaws in today's global airport security. >> it's hard to believe in this day and age people can board planes with stolen passports, but it apparently happens a lot. we know the kuala lampur airport never checked to see if those two european passports were stolen. a billion times last year people boarded planes without passports screened, that's two out of five international passengers. after 9/11, interpol built a huge database of stolen documents from all over the world. it's available to nearly 200 countries, and now has registered 40 million stolen travel documents. the most countries simply don't bother running passports through the database. united states is the best as checking, a quarter of a billion
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searches last year followed by britain and the unit arab emirates. experts feel if that flight was headed to america, it's likely those stolen passports would have been caught. fewer countries are making sure passengers are who they say they are, a huge hole in security. >> the director of crisis in emergency management at red land security strategies, a homeland security firm joins us. how easy is it for somebody to get a fake passport? >> just like stolen jewelry, stolen art, just like anything that's stolen, there are markets out there, people who specialize in a variety of different things. if you know where to look, you can get stolen i.d. documents of any kind. >> a lot of people might assume that you can get the stolen passport, but didn't think you could get onboard the plane. how easy is that? >> in the united states, the security is multi-layered. a number of things happened when someone uses identification in
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an airplane especially in an international flight where a passport is being used. in addition to the f.s.a. checks that you go through, go through screening in the airlines proprietary databases, as you book the flight, before an international flight, the airline must send a complete list of all the passengers names including their passport numbers to customs and border protection. that is double checked against all the watch lists and the interpol list of stolen passports, wimp is apparently what was not done this time. >> so the concern that americans are going to have especially in these days post 9/11 is that somebody is going to get a fake passport, stolen passport, board a plane overseas, they're not going to be the person and wind up in the united states. can that happen? >> the flights that come into the united states, the d.h.s.,
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t.s.a. subject to the same screening we do for flights leaving the united states internationally. >> so you are saying that could not happen. >> it's very unlikely. there is no such thing as a 100% guarantee anywhere. >> when we see whether happened in malaysia and the authorities are saying these men were seeking asylum in germany and not terrorists, but it does point to a hole in security worldwide. should there to make americans feel for comfortable and to make the rest of the world feel safer be prescreeners from the u.s. in all these airports around the world? >> the t.s.a. does have screeners or people contracted to the t.s.a. checked by inspectors on any flight that has contact with the united states. if you are an international flight coming from a country that doesn't have t.s.a. personnel, the personnel who screen you are following t.s.a. rules and t.s.a. inspectors do
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make frequent checks to make sure they are following those rules. >> people that travel a lot realize there are different ways that the passports are screened in different countries, in our country, they go through a bar code scanner, our countries look at it. if passports can't be secure, is there technology the world needs to go toward? >> there are security items in the passport, a standard that takes how a passport -- it's not actually a bar code, it's an electronic number code that is read by the machines. new passports have rifd, radio frequency identification, including the e transport that has a myriad of electronic information and confirms that the photograph that the person who is looking at on paper is actually the same photograph that was put in there by the
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passport authority. >> thank you very much. these two people with these fraudulent passports were as i am ply trying to find asylum in another country but does expose a rather large hole in security. >> nearly a dozen people were injured when a subway train derailed in boston. the first trolley jumped the tracks and hit a wall, the second car came to a quick stop. then people including the train operator were sent to the hospital with injuries, the cause now under investigation. >> a new york city railroad worker was killed and struck by a train, the man working on the metro north traction monday morning when he was hit. it's the third fatal accident in a year for the nation's second busiest railroad. four passengers were killed in a train where the conductor nodded off at the controls. >> 191 people were killed more than 10 years ago, others
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injured back in 2004. ten bombs exploding on four rush hour trains packed with commuters was the worst attack of its kind in spain's history. a memorial for the victims was held today in that city. >> 25 years ago, everybody onboard flight 103, pan am flight 103 died when it exploded over lockerbie, scotland, only one man was tried and found guilty, a libyan. it is suggested there may be other parties to blame. we report on the evidence and u.s. reaction to it. >> the americans found that the investigation contains one of the most potent allegations, that u.s. intelligence agency cables showed iran contracted the palestinian group to bomb pan am flight 103 in revenge for the downing of a passenger plane in 1988. for political reasons, the u.s. decided to blame libya.
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the lead lawyer made up of families who successful live sued libya for $2.7 million, more information is welcome but opinion remains the same, the man was guilty of the bombing. >> i don't know that the u.s. has ever taken position publicly that iran had nothing to do with lockerbie. there's no question that the whole story hasn't been brought out, that the fact that the whole story has not been brought out, to me, does not cast dispersians on the proof that underlie the conviction. >> the documentaries presented evidence that the conviction was deeply flawed. in a written statement, frank dugan, president of the group victims of pan am 103 dismissed the latest findings linking iran to the bombing. there is not a shred of evidence to support this view, he wrote, you are trying to pointed the finger away from libya once more
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and it is guess graceful. the u.s. state democratic provided this written reply: >> families gathered outside washington, d.c. to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the bombing. the debate as to who was behind the attack is unsettled. >> you can watch the complete program lockerbie, what really happened. it begins tonight at 9:00 p.m. eastern, 6:00 p.m. pacific right here on aljazeera america. >> west virginia could pass a bill banning abortions after 20 weeks, both the state's house and senate approving the measure. you la makers say the decision was made on the belief that fetuses can feel pain after five months. ten republican led states have similar bans based on the same
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theory. it rests in the hands of the west virginia governor. he has said he believes the bill is unconstitutional. >> the national rifle associations challenging a california law that bans large magazine clips in guns. the law bans gun owners from carrying more than 10 rounds of ammunition. the measure is in effect in sunny veil. a federal judge ruled the law didn't vital the second amendment. >> a group of young people from mexico protesting u.s. immigration policies tried to cross the border without the right paperwork. they presented themselves to u.s. border inspectors in san diego. about 30 people tried to cross into the u.s., all of them requesting political asylum, each detained. >> willer whales are popular at sea world, but there's a california lawmakers who says
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keeping them in captivity should be against the law. >> killer whales have been entertaining audiences at sea world in parks around the country for years. california assemblyman aims to stop these shows, calling them inhumane and dangerous. >> the long accepted practice of keeping them captive for human amusement must end. >> it would make it illegal to hold them in cop activity for entertainment and put an end to captive breeding programs. it calls for a return to the wild whenever possible. >> the bill is credited to the documentary black fish chronicling the 2010 death of experienced trainer dawn brancheau. >> six time killer whale killed an experienced trainer. >> she was attacked and drowned during a performance at sea world in florida. the company is fighting back, sea world called the legislation
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flawed, issuing a statement saying: >> sea world is getting support including san diego's mayor. >> they've been such an incredibly strong fabric of the san diego community for generations. sea world has been a nationwide leader in marine conservation. they have my support. >> the mayor also says sea word is responsible for thousands of jobs, since the park attracts millions of visitors who calm to see the ores every year. animal activists say those shows put the ores and trainers in harm's way. >> this routine of having shows every 1:00, 3:00, 5:00 is a human construct that's put on these wild animals and stresses them out. >> the fate of killer whales in california lice in the hands of lawmakers who will decide if the
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show goes on or these creatures should retire to the sea. aljazeera. >> no word yet from california jerry brown as to whether he will sign that bill. >> day seven underway in the oscar pistorius murder trial in south africa, accused of killing his girlfriend last valentine's day. she was shot three times in the hip, arm and head. yesterday's testimony brought him to tears, causing him to vomit several times. the evidence was so graphic it was barred from bad cast. he claims he thought his girlfriend was an intruder. >> a at an nhl game last night, both benches stunned. >> people in the stands and watching on t.v. stunned as well. the athletes we root for can look almost super human, but monday night we got a reminder of how very human pro athletes really are.
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in the first period of an nhl game, dallas stars winger which peverley collapsed right after returning to the bench. teammates began yelling and banging sticks to get help. officials took him from the bench and applied chest compressions. peverley was taken to the hospital after suffering a cardiac event. he regained consciousness before leaving the arena and wanted to go back into the game. >> 31-year-old rich peverley is an eight year nhl veteran, won a stanley cup with bros stonn in 2011. the bruins traded him to dallas before this mistaken. peverley has a history of heart trouble. he missed a preseason and season opener due to a procedure to correct an irregular heartbeat discovered during a training camp physical. here's dallas head coach with more on what happened. >> he was scared, just, my first emotion was we need somebody here real quick.
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when he dropped, it was red alert, don't worry about the game, just turn around and scream for a doctor, and that's all. it was just let's get him the help he needs and they came and got him the help, and that's for me it was something i don't want to witness again. i know we play a game that there's a lot of emotion and passion in, but you know, the first thing i thought of rich and his family and kids and what a good person he is, and just prayed for everything to be ok. >> with players on both teams shaken by perfectly's medical emergency, the nhl postponed the game until an as yet to be determined later date. the coach said he wouldn't speculate if his stars would be ready to face st. louis tonight. >> congratulations are in order for manhattan delaware winning
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punching their tickets to the tournament. there are for more championship games on tap today, for more big dance tickets to be earned. at 7:00 p.m., eastern time, milwaukee and wright state view for the horizon championship. >> bay bonds is back in the san francisco giants uniform, a much smaller san francisco giants uniform. the controversial home run king slimmer than when he took his last at-bat in 2007. he was invited to spring training this week to serve as a hitting instructor for seven days. he said he had butterflies. >> it feels really good to be back, to participate in this. it feels good to give back to
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the game that i love. >> right now, i'm more nervous at this than playing, because it was only my mind and me trying to put that into other players, i don't know, i'm a little bit nervous about this side than i was on my side. timing's better now for me. back then it wasn't right, right now, timing's just better. there's a lot behind me now and i just want to look toward the future. that's all. >> also when asked about the buy joe genesis steroid stress rocked baseball last year, he chose not to comment. that's sports for this injure does look a little bit smaller. >> a lot a bit smaller. >> recovering from fukushima, thee years after the devastation, where efforts to clean up the contaminated site now stand. president obama pushing for his health care law and a fake talk show, why he decided to sit down with zack galifinakis. >> a potent storm system brings
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heavy snow to high winds and falling temperatures, i'll have that forecast. >> you're looking live at the senate chamber where more than two dozen democrats have taken part in a 15 hour talk-a-thon, trying to draw attention to climate change. it wraps up at 9:00 a.m. eastern time.
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>> breaking news out of sir yes, there have been at least three explosions in the capital city of damascus. media saying it was the work of three suicide bombers, all at a hotel in the northern part of the city. there are fears that there could
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be massive casualties, but so far, none has been confirmed. >> welcome back to aljazeera america. i'm del walters. just ahead, we're going to look at the efforts to clean up the fukushima nuclear power plant. first let's find out where it is going to rain and snow across the country. >> some areas of heavy snow in the rockies, one or two feet in higher elevations, lower elevations, six inches. you can see the rain is moving into the midwest, and this is going to come with falling temperatures. on the backside of this system, we'll have a flow from the north to the south drawing in that canadian air. already with the wind gusts that are starting in places like nebraska, winds gusting into the 30s. the hot air we have in the south central portion of the united states with those winds drying everything out, leads to fire danger. this is into tomorrow, more 20's and 60's and 70's for the east coast drop into 20's and 30's by
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thursday. >> small business optimism hit by uncertainty last month. in february, the small business index falling to a level seen with recessions in periods of low growth. the health care law, minimum wage and tax reform talk, companies pessimistic about future sales. concern over the global economy dragging stocks lower, the dough 16418, s&p 1877 and nasdaq at 4330 if you have. overseas, the asian markets bounce back after monday's sell off. the bank of japan keeping its stimulus measures in place and european stocks are mostly lower. >> he's been on the daily show, making the rounds on the nighttime talk shows, but this time, the president is venturing
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into different waters. a cult favorite, the show features zack galifinakis making his guest feel uncomfortable. >> have you heard of the affordable care act. >> oh, yeah, i heard about that. that's the thing that doesn't work. why didn't you get the guy who created the zune to create the website. >> a lot of young people think they're invincible. >> did you say invisible? >> invincible, meaning that they don't think they can get hurt. >> nobody can be in visible, if you'd said invisible. >> if they get that health insurance, it can make a big difference. they have until march 31 to sign up. you can call. >> i don't have a phone. i don't want you people looking at my texts, you know what i mean? >> in case you'd like to see it, the episode airs today on the sirius website. >> recreational marijuana
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bringing in $2 million in tax revenue in january. that number is closer to 3.5 taxes and fees if you include medical marijuana sales. the drug was legalized but commercial sales didn't begin until 2013. sales in washington state will begin over the next few months. >> japan is marking the 30 anniversary that left thousands there dead from the nuclear meltdown at the fukushima nuclear power plant. many people still can't come home. a moment of silence was observed. >> residents in this northern coastal town gathering to remember those lost. that town lost more than 600 residents and another 200 reported missing. aljazeera is in fukushima with a tour inside the epicenter of a disaster.
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apparently we are having technical difficulties with the story. the japanese government has ear marked $250 billion toward rebasketball the disabled power plant. many people there say they do not want that plant to be restarted. three of the four processors, plants now not working at fukushima. that will do it for this edition of aljazeera. i'm del walters in new york. we end our broadcast with a look back at devastation caused by that tsunami that hit japan three years ago. as always, more news straight ahead in just two minutes. we'll see you then.
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>> start with one issue education... gun control... the gap between rich and poor... job creation... climate change... tax policy... the economy... iran... healthcare... ad guests on all sides of the debate. >> this is a right we should all have... >> it's just the way it is... >> there's something seriously wrong... >> there's been acrimony... >> the conservative ideal... >> it's an urgent need... and a host willing to ask the tough questions >> how do you explain it to yourself? and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5 eastern only on al jazeera america one of the great things about working at al jazeera is the amount of space you have to do the kind of stories that take a long time to cover. to have the complete editorial freedom to tell these stories and do so with the adequate
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resources is amazing. >> announcer: this is al jazeera. ♪ hello, there and welcome to the al jazeera news hour live from our global news center in doha. these are the main stories we'll be covering this hour. a north korean flagged oil tanker evades authorities and escapes libya. new evidence in the lockerby plain

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