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tv   News  Al Jazeera  March 30, 2014 6:00am-9:01am EDT

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keep on fighting... ...it's so seldom you get that access to the other side. >> faultlines: on the front lines with the taliban then an america tonight: special edition, only on al jazeera america >> a community in mourning. the death toll from the washington state mud toll continues to climb. this while the number of missing takes a dramatic drop. >> 23 days and counting in the mystery of the flight mh370. search clues are trying to beat the clock to find the black box. >> ukraine and russia leaders meet face to face again.
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>> it's election day. turkey holds it's first vote since anti-government protests last year. >> good morning to you and welcome to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford life in new york city. the search for survivors of that deadly washington mud slide enters a second week. the number of missing has been revised from 90 down to 30. that drop due to duplicate reports of missing people and others found safe and sound. but the death toll increased to 18, with more bodies waiting to be identified. crews are using heavy equipment, dogs and bare hands to search for the victims. an estimated 180 people were in the path when it hit the village of oso.
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seven were immediately pulled from the record and are hospitalized. we have more from derrington. >> a week after the mud slide heavy rain soaks trees, mud and debris. that's all that's left of the lives here. earlier at 10:37am a moment of silence. the moment a week ago when oso became home to one of the worst mudslides in washington state history. more than 200 crew members and rescue dogs navigated through the floodwaters, in search of the victims. the letters pv are spray paint to notify rescuers of suspected victims. >> diana has come to terms with the worse, her youngest son alan would not return home. the hope lingered for three or four days.
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probably the knowledge was immediate. >> rescuers have not recovered alan's body, bobbel is certain her son, delaney and grandparents are among the missing. >> i picture them as being fast, as being in the kitchen, having breakfast going "what's that noise?", and it being over. alan and delaney were planning an august wedding along the river. they were eager to start their lives. before death allan wrote a facebook post about his fiancee. >> his last text was about 45 minutes before the incident. it is to delaney and it said "the 10 things i need to make me hope", and it was all you, 10 yous. >> entire families have been vibed out. bobbel understands the possibility that while rescuers work around the clock, alan's
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body may not be found. >> it's only their body, their shell. they are together now. i picture them together where they are at. that's only their shells. but i still picture them toot. -- picture them together. the town was tight knit with a population of 200. friends, family members and neighbours gathered together in prayer. funerals have been planned and one of the first memorials was for linda mcpherson, the town librarian. she was reading the paper with her husband when it his. rescue workers saved her husband. she didn't make it. she managed the library for 30 years and retired, and enjoyed work engine her garden. >> it's been 27 days since
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malaysia airlines flight mh370 disappeared. ships and planes are searching the area, but none of the debris so far belongs to the missing jetliner. until something is found family members cling to hope. many are angry. several dozen chinese relatives arrived in malaysia demanding answer. two-thirds of the passengers were chinese. >> one of the objects from the plane that could explain what happened is the plane's black box, as randall pinkston explains, time is running out. >> teams are racing against the clock to find the black box for the vital information on the airliner. the transmission will only work 7-10 days before the battery dies. crews from two ships, one from china, the other from australia pulled debris from the water.
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despite satellite images of hundreds of objects, it's the first time anything has been retrieved. so far, the objects do not match the missing malaysian airliner. on saturday eight planes scanned a 97,000 square mile area. australian maritime safety authority officials who are coordinating the search say two planes spotted objects which ships will try to locate. four ships are in the area now, with five more from the multinational task force expected to reach the zone on sunday. flight mh370 has been missing since march 8th, with 239 passengers and crew on board, triggering a search that covered an area from central asia to the southern indian ocean. today, more than 20 nations are involved in the effort at huge expense. >> every country is bearing its own cost, that the chinese are flying their aircraft and
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planes. australia is flying our aircraft, and we are running our planes. we aren't counting the costs. we are doing what needs to be done to try to get to the bottom of this mystery. and that will go on. >> a pentagon spokesman says the department of defense spent 2.5 million of 4 million set aside to find the missing plane. that should last until april. it does not mean that the u.s. will stop then if the plane has not been found. >> secretary chuck hagel made it clear that we'll stay with this as long as the malaysians need our help. the u.s. is providing law enforcement assistance to the malaysian authorities, who are investigating the disappearance as a possible criminal act. >> it's still going to take three to four days for the ship to reach the search zone. >> the obama administration is
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stepping up an effort to find a solution to the ukrainian crisis. there's a concern that russia may be eyeing more territory after taking over crimea. secretary of state john kerry is meeting russian counterpart sergei lavrov in paris. in kiev the interim government handed out presidential nominations for elections in may. this while people in crimea are celebrating their new nationalities, switching to a new time zone on saturday. others are still leaning towards russia. >> the heavy industry of eastern ukraine. steel factories and coal mines that helped to drive the soviet machine. some believe vladimir putin has plans to take it back. for now, this is a region in the grip of an information war. >> i'm not afraid of russian soldiers here. their peacekeepers to me. as for western ukraine, with
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fascist slogans, it's not just a little, it's criminal. >> across the region, like here in the port city, protest groups gather in support of federalism. they want autonomy from what they see as pro-european factionists and thugs, it's an image portrayed by news can else, widely watched. >> the ukrainian tv channels called separatists. we are russian speaking people who want to preserve ties with russia. >> in place of russian news a sense of siege captured on mobile phones. ukrainian tv one man told me barely reports on the progress. another man says these tanks appeared in his village by the border, sent by kiev to encircle them. >> then, in the midst of the misinformation there is the
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reality of political upheaval, and ukraine's new borders across the sea. of coast guard vessels retreated to new ports. like the family i met earlier. >> cartia and her 2-year-old daughter made a home after leaving crimea. her 9-year-old daughter stayed behind with grandparents. >> i feel sadness. it's a pity to have lived our lives in crimea, and now to have to move here is sad. >> kattia's husband is a coast guard officer. his vessel released and at anchor. we are brotherly nations. we have nothing to divide us or to fight for. >> roman says he wishes things could be the way they are. reality again, they may never
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be. >> as ukraine's interim government struggles to keep the government intact they are trying to establish a new government. elections are set for may 25th. in a surprise move vitaly klitschko dropped out of the race, putting his support behind billionaire petro porashenko. it could be a set back for the former prime minister yulia tymoschenko, who is hoping to return to power. nick spicer has more. >> the two front runners in the opinion polls have joined forces. former heavyweight boxer vitaly klitschko forfeited the match to his political partner, por -- petro porashenko, a respected figure. it takes place in a climate of destrust where many are convinced that kiev politicians
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are stoojs of the west, if not factionists. >> people in the east and south may be fearful of the election because of interventions by moscow, what message do you address to them. >> if you read our program, there's a special message for the eastern south ukraine. first message is a security, second message is the real defending of their rights, including language, religious, minority and everything. >> the deal prevented a subdivision, among politicians with closer ties and who were furious. there would be another candidate. >> yulia tymoschenko was nominated of the presidential candidate of her party on saturday and is promising a cleaner form of politics, and to stand up to russia.
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>> translation: if the people trust me with the presidency, i will never let an aggressor take our land without a fight. my aim is to demand a cessation of occupation of crimea. i do not accept analytical evidence. we have to come to terms with that. i must tell you now, we will never accept that. >> crimea is ukraine and we'll have it back from aggressors. >> the party of ousted president viktor yanukovych dismissed him as leader as it chose its presidential candidate. the former mayor pledged to give more power to the regions. >> petro porashenko hopes yulia tymoschenko may join forces with him. the stacks are more that choosing the president, but determining if and how the country can stay together.
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>> more than 100 aftershocks jolted california after the 5.1 earthquake. dozens of people had to evacuate homes that suffered structural damage. 83 people were forced out of the apartment building. fortunately the earthquake damage was considered minor. >> speaking of the weather, stormy conditions moved across the country. for more, let's bring in meteorologist eboni deon. >> we'll be dealing with the rainy side of the story, but the threat waned. damaging storms rolled across florida. we have video to show you where the winds picked up. up to 55 miles per hour, downing trees, and power lines. hail the size of half dollars was reported. storms also developed in north
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carolina, and that spawned a tornado and produced flash flooding. we are clearing out across the south-east. the storms moved out, but into the carolinas, the storms linger, and we want to show you what wound up here. this is what we call a hook echo. that usually indicates a rotation. here in carolinas it was reported. notice on the backside of it we are see some snow. cooler air is moving in. we are dealing with a wet and windy day. with the rain coming down we have picked up an inch to an inch and an a half on saturday. that will add to the flooding concerns across much of the areas. do keep it in mind. the area of low pressure will crank up.
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it will kick up the winds along the coastline. on the back side of it there'll be a warm uch, it's in advance of the next storm system. we will bring snow back to the upper mid west. this is an area where we are watching snow and windy conditions. that will cause conditions in areas across minnesota back into the dakota. >> voters in turkey head to the polls. elections that would be routine could have implications to the leadership. >> health insurance ends tomorrow. how to avoid a penalty if you are planning to sign
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>> good morning to you and welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford live in new york city. still ahead - why the prime minister in turkey could be looking for a new job. first, let's get a look at what textures we can expect across the country meteorologist eboni deon. >> it's mild in the north-east, but cooler than what we dealt with yesterday. we saw widespread 50s across the
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region, but 30s showing up. 41 in boston, and sitting in the mid 40s in new york city. in the mid west mid 30s. 38 in minneapolis. temperatures falling switching over to snow, across the south-east and a cooler start getting colder. frost advisories over alabama. >> thank you so much. >> at least 30 have been arrested in chile after protests turned violent. demonstrators threw bombs at police. they were to remember two young brothers killed by police 30 years ago. they were attending a protest of dictator augusto pinochet. violence is breaking out in caracas venezuela, where 39 people died in anti-government protests since the unrest began weeks ago.
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protesters were angry over crime, inflation and a shortage of basic goods. a rally was healed in support of nicolas maduro. >> palestinians marked the 38th anniversary of land day on sunday. protests are expected against israel's confiscation of galley lay. the palestinians are threatening to walk away from peace talks before they missed a date to release prisoners. >> in the face of a man he never med. avie sees himself. he's 32. that's the man he was named for. his uncle, an israeli soldier, was kidnapped and killed. >> translation: i was born a year to the day after his
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murder. >> this is his son. >> 30 minutes down the road they flip through photos. 33 years ago. kareem killed his uncle. he is serving a sentence. israel was supposed to release him. the deadline came and went. >> there's nothing deerer than a son - not a brother or a father. no one in the world can re place a son. >> the son and his victim's fate is forever linked. they may help to determine the fate of middle east peace talks. when the talks be gap, they agreed to release 140 prisoners. palestines agreed not to seek u.n. recognition. so long as kareem and the final round of prisoners are not freed, palestinians are threatening to walk away. his mother supports that.
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we'll talk after the prisoners are released. they must come home. >> for his rail the prisoner releases are unpopular. avi leads protests against them, accusing the government of betrayal. negotiations are painful for the families. we are talking about a knife stabbed in the heart. >> israel's government is not willing to face the anger. palestinians argued before the talks are extended israel needs to uphold its commit the to release the prisoners. >> i support palestine president pursuing the united nations and relevant institutions. my brother will not be the price that obstructs this. >> kareem's family opposes the palestinians giving in to demands, even if that might mean furniture brought for the homecoming stays.
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>> avi's family will fight for release. even if it means the peace process fails. as both sides dig in, the more likely peace talks will collapse. >> a roadside bomb has been a member of the international coalition in south-east afghanistan. it follows a day of violence following elections. >> security forces killed four armed men at the election headquarters in kabul. violence continues as the country prepares to choose a new president. charles stratford reports. >> under a weak until presidential elections and the taliban attacks again. the target this time the headquarters of the independent election commission in kabul. four fighters were disguised as women when they entered a house close to the election building.
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>> afghan special forces and police reinforcements took their positions. four inside bombers entered my house. we have three guards. i don't know what is happening right now. >> a witness fold al jazeera, the taliban fighters were armed with assault rifles, and rocket-propelled grenades. >> this is the second attack, and the fourth in a week. the distance between the targets show how the taliban can strike where it likes in the capital. march 20th, the taliban shot nine civilians dead, including two girls, in the serenna hotel. on the 25th, the office near the darrell la manned palace was attacked. two police officers and five taliban were killed. two days later a building used by an american aid group was
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targeted. a girl was killed. security forces killed four gunmen. saturday's attack was on the election commission hq, close to the east of the city. the taliban seems to be doing all it can to square voters from polling stations in the presidential vote. >> as the week is close to the afghan elections, which is important for afghanistan, we do believe and understand there are enemies who warrant attacks like they have in the past few days. but they will not deter us from our commitment. >> an election commission network told al jazeera that the fighters provide at least 10 grenades from the compound. >> in a final address hamid karzai said u.s. soldiers must leave afghanistan. afghan forces are ready to
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protect the country on its own, it doesn't need u.s. military trainers before it goes home. >> regardless of whether it's true, a surge in attacks shows afghanistan is determined to disrupt the april 5th vote. >> most of afghanistan security is in the hands of its own security forces. international troops help out in high danger areas. >> americans shopping for subsidised health care has one more day to apply for coverage. more than 6 million people signed up for the affordable care act, but that's a million less than the administration's goal. the white house extended the deadline to mid april, so long as applicants start the process by monday. >> cuba suffering under more than 50 years of the u.s. trade embargo. now there's a plan to boost the economy without any help from the u.s. >> one woman's emotional story
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of leaving the life she knew. in her own news, why she had to flee the ultra conservative jewish community. >> a number one seed falls in the
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>> good morning to you. welcome back. you're watching al jazeera america. and i'm morgan radford live in new york city with a look at the top stories. officials in washington state say 30 people are missing after saturday's mudslide. that's down from 90. the death toll rose from 17 to 18. plus the search continues for a malaysia airlines jet missing for 23 days. 10 planes, eight ships scour the
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ocean, but so far none of the objects spotted earlier belong to that flight. >> millions of voters across turkey head to the polls to vote in local elections. it's being framed as a national referendum on the leadership of the country's prime minister recep tayyip erdogan, who is currently in the middle of a corruption scandal. you are looking at live pictures from anchora. it's the first elections into how anti-government demonstrations began last year. we are in the capital for this report. >> angaria is a tightly contested city. the fight is between the ruling party and the people's republican party, and are likely to be close in an election seen as a referendum on the governing party's popularity and the prime ministership of recep tayyip erdogan. here at the school, the president will cast his ballot.
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they've been here from the early hours, casting his vote. also from the early hours. queues upon queues. they are lining up to cast their vote in angaria and nationwide. it is tight in angaria. a lot of people waiting to see if the party will retain their control, as well as managing the victory percentage that they are looking for nationwide. three lebanese soldiers died and four more died in an explosion near the border. a suicide bomber drove a car into the town. the wounded were rushed from the border area in helicopters, and a sunni group claimed responsibility. cuba is updating the way it's doing business. a new law to spur investment and
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lifting a sagging economy. >> this may be qantas but thousand of workers - it's just peanuts. cuban authorities have, for the past few years, been opening up their economy. it's not enough. >>. >> translation: one of the problems the cuban economy has is providing incentives. cuban workers in the state sector are not happy because the state paid to little. a special session has taken a fundamental step to open its economy to greater foreign investment. it will create a development sewn in the port city west of havana, partly financed by brazil. foreign investors will pay less of their profits while working
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with security, guarantees. foreign investment helps to save cuba. it sits awkwardly here, and the new expansion that some call an evil will have to be tightly controlled. the move was fuelled that oil from venezuela may dry up. certain pill jars of the revolution, such as health and education will remain off limits to foreign investments. the state has been too involved in businesses, it's a mistake. the state did not have to control everything, on the fundamental areas like education, health, but not the small personal enterprises. >> foreign companies have been deterred by the 50 year embargo and want the authority to tackle
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their on problems like internet service, bureaucracy, and efficiency. many will want to the invest in an island that has potential and will study the new laws carefully. >> cuba's economy expanded by 3%. officials estimate it needs to grow 5 to 7% each year to see substantial development. >> over in argentina, more than 3 million students head to school tomorrow. the teachers union is on a 17 day strike, but called it off after agreeing to a pay raise of 30%. teachers returned to the classroom. the strike continues in other provinces. >> it's not the most comfortable subject and deciding how to handle a loved ones remains can be a difficult decision. in the united states app increasing number of deaths are
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handled by cremation. jonathan martin has the story. >> i love pretty finishes on wood. i pick a wooden urn. snow after losing her husband betty wanted his remains cremated. she plans to release his ashes in a place that was special to both of him. >> we'll take a hike to watch the sun go down. for her, cremation was an environmental decision. a way to avoid breaking up space. it's in your spirit. it's a vessel that holds your spirit. once you pass that the spirit passes on. i don't need a place to remember someone. >> the percentage of death handled by cremation is increasing, 40%, compared to 30% a few years ago. for many families, it is
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economics, against the cost of a traditional funeral and coming to a funeral to escalate a loved one. >> they don't see spending $10,000, $15,000, $20,000 on a funeral service. >> basic cremation services cost $800. a number of families have doubled. poin de.er winds with a number of generation, beliefs and traditions are changing. and don't want to be died to a permanent grave site. >> that is an old southern tradition of where you have the visitation and the viewing of the body. and then the funeral, and go to the cemetery. people are getting away from that. for many, a ground burial is the way to go. some review burning a body as an
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abombination. >> within the next 10 years cremation will be held, and more than half of deaths will be handled. >> betty says letting go of her husband's ashes is about remembering him in a reasonable and affordable way while respecting his wishes. >> in the next 20 years, the number of cremations are expected to surpass traditional funerals. two basketball teams found a creative way to raise money for typhoon haiyan victims. they had the longest game of hoops ever. they raised $70,000. givenest reviewed the evidence and chaired their attempt victorious. speaking of basketball the
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n.c.a.a. tournament is keeping fans on the edge of their seats. mark morgan is here with the details of how the game went down to the wire. >> if your team is in the tournament you are losing a lot of fingernails. the games are fantastic. we have seen it all in march madness. blow-outs, stunning upsets, and down to the wire finishes. the west regional final was the record tying 7th overtime game of the tournament. we'll pick it up with under a minute to go. arizona trails by two. it's off the mark. jefferson is there for the putt back. 10 off the bench. we go to ot in the extra period. trayvon jackson to the bucket. frank is there. 28 points and 11 boards up by three. arizona down one. johnson drives and is calling for the offensive foul. you rarely see that call in an
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end game scenario. the ensuing pass tipped out of the bounds of the it was ruled wisconsin's ball, but the officials go to the sideline and review it, change the call, it's arizona's ball. instant replay used a lot. 2 seconds on the clock, johnson with the last chaps for the wild -- chance for the wildcats, it's off the mark. badgers to the final four. a bitter loss for the wildcats. >> this one hurts. you know, the worst, in the worst way. you can take a lot from this game by the way we battled, and it came down one play. it didn't happen for us. >> i thought it was a tough call. i'm going to stop there, i've already been fined. >> florida playing in its fourth straight elite eight and the gaiters broke through, sending
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home a scrappy date. scotty led the scores with 23. florida finishing the first half on a 15-1 run. 52-# 2 is your final. the gaiters winning 31 in a row, and it is on to the final four. >> he's welcome up the ladder, i was thinking about how i wanted to do this again. i want to do whatever i can to help the team reach the ultimate goal that we set at the beginning of the year. >> moving to the n.b.a. and this is one to avoid. the philadelphia 36ers have been beyond inept. they are staring down the barrel, trying to avoid a 26th straight loss. 17,000 on hand despite the team's struggles. the 36ers pummelled the detroit
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team. the 36ers led wire to wire. they avoided setting the longest losing streak in u.s. pro sports history. let's take a look at the streak by the numbers. a few interesting nuggets. 59 days lapsed between wins, last winning on january 29th. 18 of the losses occurred on the home court. in the last two months the philadelphia area collected just under 36 inches of snow while the team collected just one win. now, at the other end of the n.b.a. spectrum, greg popovich's first. marco's 18 points lead five spurs in double figures. san antonio's last loss to the suns. >> the spurs face indiana on the road. >> all this march madness. i want to go back to what
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happened in tew san. so people were arrested during a riot after the university of arizona failed to make the final four. police used pepper spray and rubber bullets and a group of students were taken down and arrested. the crowds threw beer bottle and fire crackers, no one injured the police. millions of americans with severe mental disorders were living out audiences. >> tom takes a look at the lives of america's mentally ill. >> she understood the meaning of helplessness as she watched her son struggle with schizophrenia. >> he felt like i'm doing fine, taking my medication and doing
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great. that's when she learnted that a mentally ilperson posing no threat can no longer be held against their ill. such a person must be released within six hours. >> every which way i turned. family members had no right. legal protection against confinement explained why so many seriously ill people go unmedicated. there's another factor. an historic shift in the policy that will be ongoing. in is how public hospitals used to be portrayed as united and humane. >> all gathered together in a mental institution... >> however accurate that description, the u.s. has the same raisho of psychiatric
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inpatients. >> this psychiatric hospital is one of hundreds across the u.s. that are no longer in operation. many seriously ill patients of the kind that used to be served by these hospitals returned to a network of community mental health centres for the medical, housing and other needs. after $4 million in budget cuts the centres are short of psychiatrists, and many say they are unsuited to the task. >> they don't handle people who think the fbi is talking through their teeth. you can throw all the money at the world at the interests. it will not take care of a population that is ill. >> most facilities with a bed will not accept patients without medical insurance. >> in the wake of a gunman's
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murder of connecticut schoolchildren many states began to destroy money for mental health services. some say society must learn to deal with illnesses of the mind as directly with physical injury. >> the world health organisation ranked mental disorders as the number one source of disability, and that is ahead of cancer or heart disease. coming up in the next hour we'll look at the connection between mental health and homelessness. >> an american man moves to myanmar to teach english to monks, but teaches life lessons about the tolerance of other religions. >> there were people who were enraged that wanted me dead. i had letters from my former family members telling me "we have your grave ready and we can't wait to dance on it." >> a young woman leaves ultra
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orthodox jewish roots and reveals what life was like with the secretive community. >> and rain to snow, and watching out for blizzard conditions. we'll have the details. vé
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>> good morning to you. welcome to al jazeera america. just ahead an american man giving life lessons to a group of buddhist monks. first a look at the forecast with meteorologist eboni deon. >> it is definitely a wet start to the day across the north-east. that rain is going to hang on throughout much of the afternoon and into the evening. we are dealing with an area of low pressure. it's starting to wrap off across the carolinas.
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and we are seeing sleet and snow behind it. cooler air. they continue to live northward. they are bringing it in off the atlantic. it will kick off the wind. it will be wet and windy. it's snow. watching out for winter weather. across the upper midwest, it's quiet, and a beautiful day shaping up. we stood stay on the quiet side. further to the west we are expecting snow and bliz art continues to pick up. >> now to myanmar, a country that until recently had a strained relationship with the u.s. those ties ae gan to approve in 2011. the country has a long way to go when it comes to the suppression of minorities. it tells us about an american man that teaches buddhist monks about tolerance. >> mourning for the young monk
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begins with meditations. today a chance for me, their guest. the prayers are for everyone, asking for love and happiness for all. >> we want to live in piece forever. >> some monks in myanmar are spreading a different message. buddhist mob chased muslims from their homes, set villages on fire or in some cases killed them. inspiration is this man. time magazine called him a face of terror. back at the monastery an american is caught between the two worlds. >> good afternoon venerable sirs. >> last year jack left his family in minnesota english.
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he learnt they wanted to learn more. >> what were they curious about? >> the first question was what's the difference between human rights, freedom and democracy. >> jack had the student write essays for the class. the subject how human rights apply to myanmar. they are taking turns to read out loud. >> human rights mean freely speaking. one of the human rights rule is freedom of thought and religion. i like it so much. >> the students seem to under the concept, but some of them see muslims in myanmar as an exception. >> there's not as much acceptance, that human right should apply equally to muslim population. >> jonah became a monk when he was eight. we asked what he learnt about human rights. he is a senior. >> do you think all people in
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myanmar should have the same human right? >> yes, like other countries. >> every race and religionism. >> yes. >> then we asked him about the monk who compared muslims to mad dogs. >> he is a hero for you? >> yes. >> why do you like him?
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>> how these monks define human rights matters to the future of myanmar. >> the monks are regarded in this society and culture as the keepers of ethical and moral flame that is at the heart of buddhist. >> every day the monks of the monastery file through the village. the people live in shacks and own little, but give what they can to the monks. >> i donate food to them every day, to do a good deed to reach heaven. >> 12 of the monks will graduate. whatever path they follow, jack hopes they remember the lesson. >> tension between the muslims and buddhist crew in the past few years. last year three muslim men were convicted of raping and murdering a buddhist woman, and mobs have burnt down villages.
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>> britain's duke and duchess of cambridge take times to pose with their son, prince george. they were photographed sitting in a window of their apartment at kensington palace and it was released ahead of a visit to new zealand and australia next month. >> a woman who grew up in an ultimata orthodox community leaves the only life she knew. deborah feldman had to keep her head shaved, and was forbidden to sing or read books. she tells us why she left her family behind. >> i'm deborah feldman, i'm the author of "unorthodox and exodus", it's a book about growing up in brooklyn in orthodox sect, and exodus, leaving with my son. it was founded after world war ii, with the belief that the
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holocaust happened because of asamelation. and the only way to prevent another happening was to recreate the european ghetto and live a fanatical version of jewish life that had been lived. that's what we grew up in. women had one role. they are expected to have a lot of children. i was not allowed to read. >> i didn't get a high school diploma. my marriage was arranged. i was sent to marriage classes. you can't unlearn that. when my second was born, i wanted everything changed. it became less about me and my unhappiness and more about what i could offer him. that's when i started to sneak out to go to college. this is when there were several sexual abuses in the community, the victims were blamed and the
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abusers protected. and i knew i could not defend my sop in a circumstance. i thought i had to get out and i'll write a book. if i write a book they won't kidnap my son because the world will know they do that. people were enraged, wanting me dead. former family members wrote saying "we have your grave ready, and we can't wait to dance on it." what kind of family does that? no family worth staying with. i have friends who accept me for who i am. it's okay, no matter where you are, it is okay to be you. it's the best possible way to be. it feels the best. and i think that's how we start change. >> deborah attended sara lawrence clem and is working on her third book. >> at the end of the first hour here is what we followed.
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officials in washington state say 30 are missing after the deadly mud slide, down from 90. the death toll rises to 18. the obama administration is stepping up efforts to find a solution to the ukrainian cries suss. secretary of state john kerry meets russian counterpart sergei lavrov in paris. mill lions of voters across turkey are heading to the polls. a wave of anti-government demonstrations began last year. >> i'll show you where blizzard conditions are expected. >> i'm morgan radford. al jazeera news continues. i'm back with you in 2 minutes. you cap follow us online at aljazeera.com, or at twitter. we'll leave you with a live shot of new york city.
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>> a dramatic drop - the number of missing in the deadly mud slide falls, but the death toll rises. an earthquake in southern california forces hundreds from their homes. >> plus a diplomatic push. secretary of state john kerry and his russian counterpart are set to discuss possible solutions to the crisis in ukraine. >> i don't receive the fremantle
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-- treatment i need. >> part 2 of our series "the hidden heart." >> good morning to you and welcome to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford live in new york city. the search for survivors of the washington state mudslide is now in its second week. the number of missing han been revised from 90 down to 30. that drop due to duplicate reports of missing people and others found safe and sound. the death toll increased to 18, with more bodies waiting to be identified. crews are using heavy equipment, dogs and their bare hands to search for the victims, an estimated 180 people were in the mudslide's path when it hit the small village of oso. seven were immediately pulled
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from the wreckage and five are hospitalized. we have more from the nearby town of derrington. >> a week after the mudslide rain soaks tree, mud and debris. that's all that's left of the lives that lived here. >> earlier at 10:37 a moment of silence. the moment a week ago when oso became home to one of the worst mudslides in washington state history. more than 200 crew members, along with rescue dogs navigated through the waters in search of victims. the letters pv are spray painted to notify rescuers of possible victims. >> the slide hit with force that oftentimes the rescuer are not recovering full intact victims. >>an diane came to terms with the knowledge that her son alan
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was not coming home. >> hope lingered but the knowledge was probably immediate. >> babel is certain her son and fiancee and grandparents are among the missing. i picture it fast. i picture them in the kitchen having breakfast going "what's that noise?", and it being over. alan and delaney were planning app august wedding along the river. babel says they were eager to start their lives toot. moments before death alan wrote a facebook post about his fiancee. >> his last text was 45 minutes before the incident. and it was too delaney and it said "the 10 things i need to make be happy", and it was all you, 10 yous. >> there are many stories like the babels, entire families wiped out. babel understands the possibility that while rescuers are working around the clock,
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alan's body may never be found. >> it's only their body, their shell. they decide together, they are together now. i picture them together, where they are at. it's only their shells, but i picture them together. >> that was al jazeera's tania moseley reporting. rescue work stopped for a moment of silence to honour those that lost their lives. >> more than 100 aftershocks jolted residents in the aftermath of the 5.1 earthquake, centered 25 miles east of los angeles. it could be a sign of trouble ahead. >> in an area that has not had a massive earthquake, the quake rattled the shelves and nerves much. >> the souped was horrible. >> damage was light, it was the second significant shaker to strike los angeles in the past few weeks.
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a 4.4 quake shook residents out of their beds on st. patrick's day. they do recall the days of the northridge quake. los angeles has been in a quiet time since the last northridge, since the after shocks from north rig. the decade before, we had a damaging earthquake almost every year. >> friday's 5.1 quake was centered south-east of los angeles, below the 25 long witier falt line. the geological survey mapped 300 fault lines in california. it appears that people here should be prepared to feel seismic activity. >> we should expect the new normal to be higher. the last 15 years is quiet. whether or not we have gone into the phase, we'll have to wait and see.
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>> more than 100 aftershots hit the quake. they struck while we talked to a resident. >> that was a strong one. >> what the heck was that? >> that is what you call an earthquake, honey. >> oh, my gosh. >> friday's quake was the strongest to hit the area since 2008. >> and mother nature will continue to play a role in the rescue and recovery out west. for more, let's bring in meteorologist eboni deon. >> unfortunately we are not expecting to see a break in the weather pattern until we get into the work week. the pattern is the same with the area of low pressure. it's the second low to move in, ushering in the moisture. more rain and snow into the higher elevation. the snow picking up and down across the sierra nevada where we expect to see more snow. here is a look at the radar.
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you can see spotty activity. it continues on into monday. by tuesday we'll catch a break across the north-west. for now we remain upped a flash flood watch near the area of the landslide, watching the debris. it's been blocking the river. if it's dislodged it could allow the river to over run. up to the midwest it's quiet. it will be a mild day in advance of the storm system. note the moisture moving in from the west. it will filter eastward as temperature falls, rain will change to snow. blizzard warnings effect in this area in the hot bing, by this evening. the watch is in effect for western minnesota back to the dakota, overnight into monday. snow will be heavy at time, and upwards of about a foot in
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localized areas. snow expected. cities along the coast will deal with rain and wind. >> thank you so much. the obama administration is on the diplomatic offensive, trying to get russia to pull back troops from the ukrainian border. the secretary of state will meet his russian counterpart in paris. there's concern that russia could be eyeing more territory after annexing crimea. as jonah hall reports many in eastern ukraine sided in russia. the heavy industry of eastern ukraine, steel factories and coal mines driving the machine. some believe vladimir putin has plans to take it back. for now, this is a region in the grip of an information war. >> i'm not afraid of russian soldiers here, they are
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peacekeepers to me. to me, it's not just a little, it's criminal. >> across the region, like here in the port city, protest groups gather in support of federalism. they want outon omy of what they see as fascists and thugs. it's an image portrayed by russian state news channels, watch pd until the government switches off. the ukrainian tv channels called separatists. we are patriots, russian-speaking people who want to preserve ties with russia. >> in place of russian new, a sense much siege. ukrainian tv, one man told me barely reports on the protest. another man said the ukrainian tanks appeared in his fill im by the border sent to encircle, rather than defend against a russian invasion. >> in the midst of the
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misinformation there's the reality of the political upheaval and ukraine's new borders, retreated to new sport and families separated like the family i met earlier. >> kattia and her 2-year-old daughter made a temporary home after leaving crimea a week ago. her 9-year-old daughter stayed behind with grandparents. >> translation: i feel sadness, it's a pity to live our wheels lives in crimea and now to live here is sad. >> kattia's husband is a coast guard officer. >> we are brotherly nations, we have nothing to divide or fight for. >> roman wishes things could be the way they were.
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reality again, they may never be. >> many in the former ukrainian prove province of crimea are celebrating a new nationality. crowds gather to serve the changing of the clock. nick spicer takes a look at economic consequences. >> a whole new economic future is unfolding in crimea. a richer country than ukraine. one blighted by corruption. the new leaders of the peninsula annexed promise exchanges for the better. >> translation: we expect an economic boom and growth. unfortunately, as a part of ukraine, crimea was a region where the rate of development and per cap ita income were below average. the population is boar, the infrastructure underdeveloped. we hope that finally all of this will change. >> the main sectors of the
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crimean economy are agriculture and tourism. in the past the majority came from the mainland. it's far from certain they are willing for able to come back. moscow is spending a million a year, and 4 billion annually. >> local entrepreneurs are hopeful there'll be opportunities in the russian market. but wary. >> we have heard the promises but heard how soviet money doesn't trickle down to the ordinary people. however much money is spend, moscow wants to show crimeans and the world that the annexation is a success. the hope is moscow would spend life here. international sanctions are imposed after crimea doesn't damage the russian economy and
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budget. >> at least 30 people have been arrested in chile after protests became violent. demonstrators threw bombs and police responded with tear gas. the rallies were held to remember two young brothers held by police 30 years ago. at the time the young men have been fanding a protest of then dictator augusta pinochet. >> meanwhile violence is breaking out in an anti-government rally in caracas venezuela. 39 people died in demonstrations since the unrest began weeks ago. protests are angry over crime, inflation and goods. a separate rally was held in support of president nicolas maduro. >> three lebanese soldiers died and four were injured in an explosion near the syrian border. a car bomb exploded near a down. al jazeera's correspondent has
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more. >> it's not the first time the lebanese army is targeted. there has been an increase in these attacks against the lebanese security forces. in the past week two security members were killed in tripoli, and there has been other attacks against the army forces. the army's campaign against al qaeda-linked groups, because they are suspected of being behind the suicide attacks targetting shi'a neighbourhoods themselves. these groups made it clear that the lebanese army is a target and a legitimate target. they feel the campaign to go after their members is part of a campaign to help the militant group hezbollah, and as a rut of these attacks, the army has been on high alert. today after the attack on its soldiers, the lebanese army soldiers shot at a car, a syrian
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woman and her child were killed. the driver of the car did not comply with orders, but showed the level of intention amongst the lebanese soldiers in that area in general. >> palestinians marked the 38th anniversary of land day on sunday. protests are expected against the confiscation of land in galalia. at the same time the u.s. is trying to save the peace talks. john kerry, in paris, is keeping a close eye on the negotiations. the state department released a statement after reports of a peace deal being breeched and talks breaking down. >> in regards to reports on the agreement of release of prisoners, no deal has been arrived at and:
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>> israel wants assurances the peace talks will be extended after the prisoner release. >> it's been 23 days since malaysia airlines flight mh370 vanished on its way to beijing. today, 10 planes and eight ships scoured the southern indian ocean where experts believe it went down. they are trying to locating objects spotted by aircraft. none of the debris belongs to that jetliner. until something is found family members are clinging to hope. others are angry as weeks pass by without signs of their loved ones. several dozen chinese relatives have been in malaysia demanding answers. two-thirds of the passengers were chinese. >> an object from the plane could explain what happened, and that's the black box. as randall pinkston explains, time is running out. >> teams are racing against the
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clock to find the black box the the transmitter will only work another 7 to 10 days before the battery dies. >> one day after the search moved 700 miles north in the indian ocean, crews from two ships, one from china, the other from australia, pulled debris from the water. despite satellite images of hundreds of objects spotted, it's the first time anything has been retrieved. so far the objects do not patch the missing malaysian airliner. >> on saturday eight planes scanned a 97,000 square mile area. australian maritime safety authority officials who coordinate the search say two planes spotted objects which ships will try to locate. four ships are in the area now, with five from the multinational task force expected to reach the gown. flight mh370 mh370 has been missing since march 8th with 239
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passengers and crew on board, triggering an area from asia to the southern indian ocean. today more than 20 nations are involved in the effort at huge expense. >> every country is bearing its own cost. the chinese are flying their aircraft and planes, australia is flying our aircraft and we are running our planes. we aren't counting the cost. we are doing what needs to be done to try to get to the bottom of this mystery. and that will go on. >> a pentagon spokesman said the u.s. has spend $2.5 million of $4 million set aside to find the missing plane. it should last until april. it does not mean the u.s. will stop then if the plane has not been found. secretary hagel made it clear we'll stay with this as long as the malaysians need our help.
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the u.s. is providing law enforcement assistance to malaysian authorities, who are investigating the plane's interference as a criminal act. >> it's still going to take three or four days for the ship to reach the search zone. >> the housing crisis is in an unexpected place, andia mini boom is leaving thousands without a home. >> i'm ross ren old with a report of why so many mentally ill people end up behind bars. >> and why so many iconic landmarks went dark last night.
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>> good morning to you, welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford live in new york city. an economic boom is causing a housing crisis in ireland. first a look at temperatures across the country with meteorologist eboni deon. >> it is going to be a fantastic day as far as temperatures are concerned. in the nation's mid section temperatures close to 60
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degrees. north of the twin cities. but temperatures will turn colder again. enjoy it while it lasts. unfortunately rain will keep things on the cool side in the north-east, highs topping out near 50. and take a look at atlanta 65 degrees. this morning we have 30s and 40s in place over much of the deep south. if you think it's cold this morning, it will turn colder. starting off your work week on monday, we have widespread 30s. with temperatures dropping down to the freezing point. locations in northern georgia and alabama. we see a rebound on monday. temperatures going up to 26. still low 50s, around new york city, but the southerly wind flow mixing up. that will allow temperatures to rise as we get towards the day. we'll talk about a 68 in d.c.
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as we warm up in the east we see the cooler air moving in. minneapolis dropping to 32. billings 42. not bad around phoenix. it's a cool day in the week with a high in the mid '60s. >> americans dropping for health insurance has a day to pay for coverage to avoid penalties. that's a million less than a goal that have enrolled. the white house extended to mid april as long as applicants start of the process by monday. >> cuba is updating the way it does business. lawmakers approved a new law to spur investment and lift a sagging economy. it calls for the creation of a special port development zone and foreign investors will pay
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less taxes. the investment law was part of a package of reforms starting in 2008 to boost cuba's economy. speaking of the economy, the economic recovery in ireland created a housing development. it's leading to a trend of working families having their homes repossessed. laurence lee has the story. >> a country can claim to recover while many get poorer. in dublin, there's a mini housing boom, while 200,000 people have no way to pay their mortgage. jillian went bankrupt and lost her home. the effects hit her like a truck. >> i understand what it's like to feel no hope. during the six months i was a zombie, barely functioning. i could hardly put one foot in front of another. it was horrendous. >> the foreign capital is behind
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the boom, but locals lose out. the banks have little reason to repossess the home. in a depressed markets prices rise. peter was granted the freedom of the city of dublin for his tireless work with the homeless, and witnessed a phenomenon first hand. >> the majority of people became homeless and are working clals and middle class people who can no longer afford to pay for accommodation. >> the homeless have nowhere to go, huge homes, where construction stopped and the last property bubble popped remind us of a previous nightmare. >> it's an extraordinary situation. the government says there's not enough housing for property speculators. homeless campaigners say there's a lack of affordable housing for the dispossessed and the poor, and yet there are thousands of empty unoccupied homes like this
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all over ireland, which apparently nobody wants. never again the issue government said would it repeat the mistakes of the past, which destroy so much. is that no longer true? >> we do not and never will get to a situation where it's the property openers and the developers who lead in terms of where we build houses. it's about the community, not the developers. >> banks can refuse to lend to citizens, foreign speculators inflate the housing market leaving houses unaffordable. the question is whether the government can stop this happening all over again. >> researchers say two out of every five 20 somethings in ireland live with their parents because they can't afford to move out. >> in argentina 3 million students are headed back to school when a walk out by teachers come to an end.
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they agree it a pay raise of 30%. the union rejected a proposal saying it was not enough to combat inflation. teachers return to the classrooms and the strike is on. >> local elections with national implications. voters in turkey head to the polls. in what is called a popularity test for the embattled prime minister. >> the culture of coffee drinking. why argentinians are brewing up new ways to enjoy a cup of joe. >> i'm mark morgan, a great story. a baseball coach using his musical talents to help a fan in need.
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>> good morning to you and welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford, these are
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the stories right now. officials in washington say 30 people are missing after the mudslide on saturday. it's down from 90, but the death toll is rising from 17 to 18. the barack obama administration is on the diplomatic offensive, trying to get russia to pull back its troops from the boarder. secretary of state john kerry will meet its counterparts. there's concerns that russia could be eyeing more territory after annexing crimea. three soldiers from the army are dead following a car bomb attack. the suicide bomb targeted a checkpoint and four soldiers were wounded. >> millions of voters across turkey are heading to the vote in today's local elections. it's framed as a referendum on the leadership of the country's prime minister. recep tayyip erdogan, who is
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currently in the middle of a corruption scandal. it's the first election since an anti-government election. >> this is one of the tightly contested cities in the election. the fight is between the ruling party and chp or people's republican party. it's very close. in an election seen as a referendum on the governing parties and the alertedship of prime minister recep tayyip erdogan. the school, the president will be casting his ballot. they have been here to catch a glimpse. also from the early hours, cues of people have been lining up to cast their vote in an election that will be decisive for angaria, but turkey nationwide. >> it is tight. a lot of people waiting to see if the party is able to retain
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the control of the capital as well as manage the victory percentage that they are looking for nationwide. >> with us to discuss the election. the visiting scholar with the chairman at the think tank. he joins us from turkey. good morning to you. awant to jump into it. what effect if any will the corruption scandal have on the polls? >> i think we have dropped connection. we'll come to him later in the program. >> while turkey's elections are in full swing, slovakia's vote is over, and an underdog wins, andrei kissga beat out prime
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minister by 19%. kissga's campaign was fuelled by anger over corruption and unemployment. many want him to focus on the law and attracting foreign investors. he is the first president to never have a role in the communist party. a peace deal between the government of the philippines. bringing hope to a baron region. people admit and hope that it turned into economic prosperity. >> the area was once at the star of muslim insurgency, but not any more. but these rubber trees are growing where there was baron land. the project was set up in 2012 by the local government. the economic solution for a region battered by armed conflict. it appears to be working.
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>> around 2,000 farmers are benefitting from this project. they are from different tribes and religious groups. despite the differences the initiative has given them a chance to work together. >> the philippine government signed a peace agreement with the largest rebel group. it end decades of fighting that killed 150,000 people, and displaced millions more. war left most of the mindanoa poor and largely undeveloped. the economic potential is huge. this is the way for investment to come into the region. >> we hope the peace agreement brings progress. we know that if there's development in the area, there will not be conflict. this man has been a fighter for the moro since the '70s, this gives him a chaps to look at the
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fewer -- chance to look at the future. this gives us unity across tribes, and the livelihood to live without dignity. now, in his 70, he's ready to lay dawn his weapons. the group plans to expand to far flung villages and reach out to others. everything is possible because peace has come to their land. >> under that agreement mindanoa is required to split its revenues with the capital manila. we'll return to our guest on the turkey election. a visit ag scholar, and chairman of the istanbul think tank. he joins us from angaria. >> it's a pleasure to have you back. >> what effect, if any, will
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recep tayyip erdogan's corruption scandal have on the polls. >> well it will have an impact. that is for sure. what we don't know is the size of the impact. before the elections there was certainly a wide range of opinion polls. which show support for the ruling group weakening, but whether that's going to weaken by 5%, 15%, it's something we'll find out tonight. >> you mentioned the weak nipping. is there any way the government leak could work in recep tayyip erdogan's favour. could people become so disrupted with the release of state secret that they back them up? >> i mean, there has been so much of these type of allegations, the latest one that you referred to which is likely to boost support for the government.
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there has been other allegations involving members of the parliament, members of the knept cabinet, people close to the prime minister that is apparently weakening support for the government. but at the end of the day, this is a set of local elections. it has been constituted as a referendum for the deposit and depending on the outcome, the prime minister will essentially determine the near future of turkey's politics. it will determine whether he'll be a candidate for the president sal elections set for august. if he gets the support that he seeks he's likely to become a candidate. if he doesn't get the support he seeks, he may want to continue as the prime minister of the country, by presenting as the head of his party for the national elections that will happen in 2015. if there's a real substantive
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drop in support for the ruling party, then he will have to deal with possible - the possibility of trying to safe guard the cohesion of his own party. really, this is going to tell us about the near term of turkish politics. >> all right. visiting scholar with carnegie europe joining us live. thank you for being with us. >> the problems of mental illness, homelessness and incarceration have been intertwined in america. some say that gaols have become the new insane asylum, and in our hidden hurt series we speak to the sheriff in los angeles and he says he intention runs the single largest mental institution in the entire country. >> he says his name is ethan. he wanders the streets of los angeles. barefoot, disshelved and
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bleeding. ethane says he doesn't take antipsychotic medication. he's toort tured. >> i'm mentally ill, i don't receive the treatment i need. >> ethan is one of tens of thousands mentally ill homeless people and has been arrested more times than he remembers and locked up here in the l.a. county gaol. >> we have prisons and county gaols serving as de facto mental hosts. >> author steve lopes researched the criminalisation of mental illness. >> l.a. county gaol has more than 3,000 inmates with a mental illness. we prosecute rather than do the medicine. we are more apt to punish than to provide the necessary treatment. >> until the 1960s and '70s, most mentally ill person were confined in state-run mental
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hospitals. advances in medication and concern over abuses led to patients being released. and the asylum seekers were not shut down. federal and state funding were planned. a network never materialized leaving thousands homeless, untreated and in trouble. >> gaols were never meant to be treatment centres. >> most people that work in the gaol system do not understand mental illness. they don't know symptoms, they don't know behaviours, they have no clue as to how to de-escalate. nor was ites designed that they should. advocates say what the mentally ill and homeless need is a place to live and to get treatment. that would require taxpayers' money. according to the national alliance on mental illness, since 2009 funding for mental
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health by the state has been cut by more than $4 billion. rob reynold's, al jazeera. >> nationwide experts estimate that 450,000 mentally ill people are behind bars. coming up in the next hour is the heart and hurt series and how the definition of mental illness is changing. >> march madness leads to mayhem in tucson where 10 people were arrested. that's where the university of arizona failed to make the final four. >> police use pepper spray and rubber bullets to disperse the crowd and the group of students chanted police brutality after a man was taken down, there he goes, and arrested. thousands poured out of bars and restaurants after arizona lost in over time. police say the crowd threw bottles at them.
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no injuries were reported. >> mark morgan was here now with a baseball fan, and those that reached out to help. what do you make of that in tucson of. >> it's the downside of the passion that surrounds. n.c.a. tournament. you don't want to see that win or lose. >> is it a norm? >> it's hit or miss, it happens from time to time. that's what you have to deal with as far as the passion of march madness. >> remember a vicious attack op brian stow well outside a dodgers stadium. it left the vic film in a wheelchair and scarred a rivalry. the two men and boat brian sfoe were convicted. for him and his family the struggle continues. john henry smith has their story. >> on a saturday night in northern california, the stow family arrivings to take in a concert. nights out are rare since march
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31st, the day their brother, their son was left brain damaged by two dodgers fans who attacked him because he was a san francisco giants fan. going as good as he can. every day is a struggle. it's a journey. made longer and hard ir by the fact that it will no locker pay for brian to get treatment. he had to move in with his parents, where they and sisters care for him. >> it's hard, because we don't get to be his parents, we are his caregivers. >> i had a wonderful experience meeting the stow family. >> the artist on this night made the stowe, the guest of honour. if you are a fan maybe you recognise him, his name is tim
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flannery. >> we love him. >> padre's fans, that tim flannery. the short stop who played 10 years if the majors and hit nine home runs. >> i can tell you the day, the texture, the count, the wind direction. i didn't forget nine. >> giants fans know him as an animated third base coach. >> we are watching his wild antics. ♪ my heart will tell the story... ♪ >> he's an accomplished musician, he and his band produced 11 albums. >> i don't sell 100,000 records or 10,000 records. garth brooks said my record went cardboard, you know. >> tim flannery takes pleasure from performing. tonight's performance is as much about purpose as pleasure. we are in santa cruz, close to
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the some of injured giants fan brian stowe, and tim flannery plays for him. [ ♪ music ] >> flannery is donating all the proceeds of this show to the stowe family, and that is not all. >> november i released a record called outside lands, and this was going to be my way again: every penny was going to brian. i wrote a check, it's 16, 17,000 to produce the record. that was my little gamble. where i felt if i write this check, i think i can write more with it. >> flanner which made more with the help of giant pitcher. he matched what flannery made with another 25,000. >> we tried to figure out how to help. flannery did a great night.
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flannery took the money to bonnie stowe. >> i carried $96,000 and laid it in her lap. with the money they owe, that probably keeps the lights on and pays the bills more than anything. it let's them know that people care. >> life throws you hard balls, no pun intended. you have to stick together to fight them. as the stowe's stick together to help brian claim as much of hums as he gan, flannery plans to help them meet the challenge head-on. >> all right. that's our john henry smith reporting. according to the family's attorney, the medical costs exceeded $5 million and will top $34 million over the course of his life. it's great to see other people are pitching in and helping out. >> meeting for a coffee is a way
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of life in argentina. daniel explains the passion for coffee, and why it should be declared a cultural heritage. >> morning, afternoon or evening the residents of the buenos aires drink coffee. expressos, macky artos, with cream, double, in a cup or mug amongst others. the art of coffee drinking is an intrinsic part of daily life. >> translation: more than a custom, it's an excuse to meet, chat for a while - 20 minutes, half an hour. it's a good excuse. >> the argentine ministry of culture called on unesco to declare coffee drinking a part
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of buenos aires heritage, along with tango dance and music. the city has designated more than 50 of what it calls notable cafes. local landmarks with a history and client 'em. there are a few finer places in the world in which to drink coffee, to chat, to read, write or stare blankly into space. i risk offending a few locals, sometimes the coffee could be a little better. >> there's a new wave of cafes aiming to improve coffee drunk by the locals. >> it seems to be to their taste. >> the reaction has been one of surprise. they have been drinking something out of habit and try something delicious and ask themselves why was i drinking that? >> the coffee drinking culture
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is changing. the independent cafes facing challenges from outside. something for the locals to discuss over a cup of coffee, obviously. >> surprisingly arge tines only drink an average of three tenths a cup of coffee every day. the dutch top the list with two entire cups. >> lights out. why so many flip the switch on the famous monuments in the world. >> while protests threatens to steel the show at an exhibition. >> rain on the east and west coast coast. i'll let you know when both areas will catch a break and dry out.
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>> now you see it, and now you don't. parliament switched off the
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lights saturday night in london, and it's part of the events around the world where the famous landmark shut off the lights to mark earth hour. welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford live in new york city. more on earth hour. first a look at where the rain may fall with meteorologist eboni deon, unfortunately we have it coming down across the north-west. another low moving in, bringing the moisture in. coastal areas, showery into northern areas of california. high elevations, it's snow. they are lowering through the overnight hours, we have to watch out to the sierra nevada, and watching this area. by this evening we'll deal with snow and windy conditions causing blizzard conditions in the dakotas. >> millions of people in more than 150 countries across the world are taking part of the
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earth hour campaign. cities are shutting off lights as gerald tan reports. >> sydney started the earth hour movement, a bright idea for the city to go dark, to raise awareness about the environment. itself it's planet wide - 7,000 cities taking turns to switch off their lights at 8:30pm. hong kong's harbour partly distinguishable. paris, the city of light without the glow. london and dubai sitting in the blackness of night. >> it's a voice to stand up and be counted. 1.8 billion people, a significant number standing up. it can't be business as usual,
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we have to do something about the planet. >> earth hour aims to raise money through the internet for green projects. from a turtle in italy to biogas in nepalese villages. organizers say it's not just about powering down for 60 minutes, but to keep the conversation about climate change and the environment going strong and to show that every little bit counts. >> controversy is taking center stage at australia's largest art fair. artists threatened to boycott the event because of its main sponsor. andrew thomas explains. >> with live performance, sculpture, video and architecture experience, the sydney been articly is one of
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the biggest events. olaf and olivia were artists contributing but withdrew appalled that the main sponsor was the one that ran the examples in papua new guinea and nauru. >> ethically it was impossible for us to continue. >> we felt we did not want to be an active part in this chain causing human suffering. others pulled out because of the financial backing of transfield. camps they have been running have been accused of being inhum join. the chairman resigned and corporate ties were cut with transfield, although too late for their name to be removed from branding. most boycotting artists returned. >> if the beenale is known for
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bringing this issue to the for. that's one of the things that the artists are keen to explore. australia government is angry saying artists bullied organizers and questioned whether government money should be held for events that turned away corporate sponsors, because it sets an awkward press dent. >> it may make givers nervous about giving. bringing controversy. into helped by the extra publicity, it should attract record numbers. but will future events have the same taint. >> the protest overshadowed the art, a sign of how controversial the refugee policy became, and anything or anyone to do with it. >> originally nine of the 92
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artists pulled out of the exhibition. and brit april's duke and duchess of came brick took time to pose. the royal family was pictured sitting in a window of their apartment. this is ahead of their new zealand and australian visit next month. >> at the end of the second hour, here is what we are following with you. the number of people missing in a mud slide has dropped significantly. 30 are missing, down from 90. a diplomatic push, secretary of state john kerry and his russian counterpart said to discuss possible solutions in the crisis in ukraine. plus, it's election day in turkey, where millions are casting ballots in elections. they are called popularity test for the turkey's prime minister. temperatures will be cold enough
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to see frost. i'm tracking a winter storm. i have the details on the texture swings ahead. >> i'm morgan radford, and i'm back with you in 2.5 minutes when al jazeera returns.
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>> that deadly washington mudslide. the number of missing now down to 30. it's of little comfort to those who lost loved ones. we'll talk with a woman whose mother and infant daughter were killed by the wall of mud. >> fears of a pandemic as one of the deadliest violence spreads to a city. counting down to the deadline to
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register for obama care. the republicans can be eyeing for president. dancing diplomacy bringing israeli and palestinians together. we'll talk to a man so inspirational antonio ban dare us played him on the silver screen. >> good morning to you. welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford live from new york city. the search for survivors of the mud slide enters its second week. the number of missing has been revised from 90 down to 30, the drop due to duplicate reports and others found safe and sound. the death toll has increased to 18, with more bodies yet to be identified.
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crews are using heavy equipment, dogs and their bare hands to search for the victims. an estimated 180 people were in the path of the mudslide and the small village of oso. seven were immediately pulled from the wreckage, five are hospitalized. >> a week after the mud slide heavy rain soaks the trees, mud and debris. it's all that's left of the lives here. earlier at 10:37 a moment of silence. the moment a week ago when oso washington became home to one of the worst mudslides in history. more than 200 crew members along with rescue dogs navigated through the waters. the letters pv are spray-painted to note vi rescuers of victims. the slide hit with such force that oftentimes rescuers were
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not recovering full intact victims. >> diane babel came to terms with the worse. her younger son alan would not be coming home. >> the hope lingered, but probably the knowledge was immediate. >> rescuers have not recovered alan's body, baibel is certain her son, his fiancee and grandparents are among the missing. >> i picture it as fast. i picture them in the kitchen having breakfast going "what's ta noise?", and it being over. alan and delaney were planning a wedding and were eager to start their lives. next before death alan wrote a facebook post. >> his last text was 45 minutes
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before the incident was to delaney. it was 10 things i need to make me happy and there was tone yous. >> babel understands the possibility that while rescuers are working around the clock, alan's body may never be found. >> it's only their bod i, their shell. they skied together. they are together now. i picture them together. where they are at. that's only their shells. but i still picture them together. >> that was tonya moseley reporting. >> joining us from ar lipping tonne washington is natasha hooust es, thank you for joining us via phone, and our condolences for the lose of your mother and daughter in the landslide. >> thank you. >> natasha, i understand that you and your stepdad were not home at the time of the mud slide. how did you find out your mother, christina, and your
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daughter were both missing? >> i found out over the phone. i had gone shopping. i was supposed to go grocery chopping before i came home. another volunteer firefighter saw me walking in the store and said "you need to call home and find out what happened", and i did. no one answered the home phone. that really got to me. that never happens, somebody immediately called me from my dad's cell phone, it was not him, it was a firefighter and said "you need to come to the fire department as soon as you can, there has been an accident", >> and you found out about your mother first? >> i found out about both of them at the same time. >> and natasha, you said your daughter was only here for four months but she's going to
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change lives. what do you want people to take away from all this? >> that you know, i felt so much more inspirational at the beginning of the week, and this has become so real that i can't believe it. you know, she was here and her phone circulated around the world. and people from china and france have been facebooking me and saying i'm so sorry. i feel so bad for you, what can we do to help you. there's so much health and love going up all over to all the families. it's amazing. >> that's great to hear. >> how do you plan to cope in the days ahead? how will you help people honour your mother
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and your daughter's legacy. >> i think the best way to honour my mum and daughter is to not curl up in the dark corner and just stay there. but to do all these amazing things that we can do, one of my friends set up a fun run, not even fun run, a run and walk of 5km. doing positive things, raising awareness. i hope to do something very similar, like a stroll or jog with women in the community, and, you know, raise money for all the kids. i wanted to do something with kids. i haven't known what that was. this just seems too real and i - i was trying to grab every opportunity i can to change it
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around to not make a hazard of the dark tone. >> speaking of the dark tone, have you been able to salvage anything from his home? >> yes, we found a lot of photos and almost all of them, mum's clothes. and, you know, you see different stuff that was all over in the mud and when i was out there walking around, helping, i just so so much of myself and you wonder "do i get it, do i take it home?" do i wash it off? is it worth it? but it's just - i can't believe that it happened. >> speaking of going through your belongings, i understand that even after you heard the news, you kept digging through the debris alongside rescue workers searching for your neighbours, are you still helping with the rescue effort.
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i haven't more recently because of the paperwork that comes with people dying. so i'm waiting to get that out of the way. there's medical examiners consistently calling us who identified my mum and daughter. just yesterday one of the sheriffs came over to swab my mouth for d.n.a. there's just - it's hard, because it makes it seem more reel. >> rite. >> but i fully intend to help and go out there any way i can, trying to get the small part out of the way. >> well natasha, our condolences for your loss and the sympathies for the day ahead. >> if you would like to personally help our guest natasha and her family, you can donate online at gofundme.com.
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it's the seth jeff ard recovery, that's natasha's stepfather mourning the loss of his wife and granddaughter. and more than a dozen local and national agencies are accepting donations: >> the town of oso is a tooet knit community with a population of 200. friends, family members and neighbours gathered in prayer to remember loved ones. funerals are being planned for spom victims lost in the tragedy. one of the first memorials is for linda mcpherson, the town librarian. she was reading the paper with her husband when the mud slide hit. rescue workers where able to save him, but she didn't make it. she retired and enjoyed working
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in the garden. we'll continue to bring you the latest in washington. for up to the minute information. for search and recovery, you can log on to the website at aljazeera.com. >> rain is slowing the recovery mission. let's turn to meteorologist eboni deon. >> it's not as heavy as yesterday morn, but we have a lot of moisture in the area. as the low pressure winds up here off the pacific north-west. it's pulling in the moisture, creating the rain showers that we continue to see around washington and western areas of washington. where the grouped is saturated. we set a record, receiving more rain than we have seen in the month of march alone. we are talking more rain as we get into the day on into monday. the rain will continue and we are not expecting a break until
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tuesday. to the upper midwest and we are watching a storm system. as we move to the east, rain changing to snow, and it will be snow by tonight across the dakotas, and the areas could end up with a foot or more in the localized areas. >> the obama administration is stepping up its effort to find a solution to the crisis in ukraine. there's concern that russia may be eyeing territory after it took over crimea. secretary of state john kerry meets its russian counterpart. while over in kiev, ukraine's interim government handed out presidential nominations for elections that have occurred op may 25th. all this happened while the people of crimea celebrate their new nationality. there are others in eastern
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ukraine leaping towards russia. the heavy industry of eastern ukraine, steel factories and coal mines that helped to drive the soviet machine. some believe vladimir putin has plans to take it back. >> for now, this is a region in the grip of an information war. >> i'm not afraid of russian soldiers here, they are peacekeepers to me. as for western you grain with its fascist slogans, it's criminal. >> across the region, like here in the port city, protest groups gather in support of federalism, they want autonomy. it's an image readily portrayed by russian news channels, widely watched until the government switched them off. >> the ukrainian tv channels are
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separatists. we are russian-speaking people that want to preserve our ties with russia. >> a sense of siege captured on mobile phones. ukrainian tv barely reports on the protest. another man says these ukrainian tanks appeared in his village near the border sent by kiev to encircle them, rather than defend against a russian invasion. in the midst of the misinformation there's the reality of political upheaval and ukraine's new borders. coast guard vessels retreated to new ports and marine families separated. >> kattia and her 2-year-old daughter made a temporary home leaving crimea. her 19-year-old daughter stayed behind with grandparents. >> translation: i feel sadness,
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it's a pity to live our whole lives in crimea and now to move here - it's sad. >> kattia's husband is a coast guard officer, his vessel released and at anchor here. >> we are brotherly nations. >> he wishes things could be the way they were. reality again. they may never be. >> russia has said it has no intention of sending troops currently positioned on ukraine's boarder into the country. it's been 23 days since malaysia airlines flight 370 vanished on its way to beijing. 10 planes and eight ships scoured the indian ocean where experts believe it went down. they are trying to locating objects spotted by various aircraft over the past few days. none of the debris belongs to
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the plane. until something is found, many family members are clinging to hope. others are angry as weeks pass by without sign of their loved ones. several dozen chinese relatives arrived demanding answers. an object could explain what happened to it, and that's the little black box, as randall pinkston explains time is running out. >> time is running out to find the black box. the transmitter will work another 7 to 10 days before the battery dies. >> a day after the search moved several hundred miles north of the indian ocean, crews from two ships, one from china, the other from australia pulled debris from the water. despite satellite images of hundreds of objects, it's the first time anything has been pretrieved. so far the objects do not match
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the missing malaysian airliner. on saturday eight planes scanned a 97,000 area. australian maritime safety officials who are coordinating the search say two of the planes spotted several objects. fourships are in the area, with five from the multinational task force expected to reach the search zone on sunday. >> flight mh370 has been missing with 239 passengers on board, frigerring a search. today more than 20 nations are involved at huge expense. >> every country is a bearing its own cost. the chinese are flying their aircraft and planes, australia is flying our aircraft and running our planes. we are aren't counting the cost, we are doing what needs to be done to try to get to the bottom
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of this mystery. and that will go on. >> a pentagon spokesman said the department of defense spent $2.5 million of $4 million to find the plane. that should last until april. it does not mean the u.s. will stop then. >> the president and secretary hagel made it clear. we'll stay with this as long as the malaysians need our help. the u.s. is providing law enforcement assistance to malaysian authorities who are investigating the plane's disappearance, as a possible criminal act. >> respect it's still going to take 3 to 4 days for the ship to reach the search zone. one of the deadly viruses is spreading. ebola causes internal bleeding and has killed 70 people in guinea. the outbreak was in a remote area. it's surfaced in the seaside cap
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tam, sparking fears that it could spread beyond guinea's borders. victims and their families are asking for help. >> we are still... people are crying down. they need help. everybody needs help. even the children. >> health officials warn the virus could spell disaster in 2 million people. aid groups are trying to identify and isolate knan that may have been exposed. >> residents in southern california may be used to it, but you can never be prepared for an earthquake after a 5.1 earthquake rattled the coast. >> defining mental illness, how it's changed over the past
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century. we look at what it meant then and now.
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. >> that was a strong one. >> what the heck was that?
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>> that is what you call an earthquake, honey. >> oh, my gosh. >> the sound was horrible. i never heard it before. almost like an explosion. then i felt the quake. >> that is one person from fullarton california reacting to one of the 100 aftershocks rattling southern california. the 5.1 magnitude earth quakes struck on friday and the tremors could be a sign of more activity in the future. >> we should expect the new normal to be higher. the last 15 years was too quiet. it can't be the long term. whether or not we have gone into the new fadphase, we'll have to wait and see. >> friday night's quake caused structural damage. no one was injured. >> welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford.
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>> a look at the forecast. >> it's a cool one to start across the upper midwest and the mid south where we are at 38 degrees in memphis. it's 36 degrees closer to the great lakes. as we head into the afternoon textures warm up. we are talking '70s, and 58 around chicago. enjoy it while it lasts. there's a blast of colder air coming in behind the warm air, cooling off for the week ahead. >> thank you so much. >> not long ago homosexuality was classified as a mental disorder and grief referred to as hysteria. in hidden haurt tom ackerman looks at how the definition has changed. >> mental illness has many names. >> i'm a woman... >> i became progressively
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depressed over a period of a couple of years. >> i'm also diagnosed bipolar. >> recognising the varying forms of mental illness shifted with the scrims. until the 70s, moemo dispoultie was classified. in a major revision. it has been accepted as clinical depression. >> the psychiatrists bible includes several categories and disorders, including binge eating and harding. autism, seen as a condition in children is now recognised as persisting through adulthood. we'll have a consequence. especially in the school systems when, say, as perkingers no longer exists, but the children are diagnosed as autistic. it will change the way services
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are provided. >> some prominent psychiatrists are speaking out against overuse of the term mentally ill. >> people essentially are normal, are being diagnosed with mental disorders they don't have, and treated with potentially harmful medication they don't need. >> the head of america's national institute of mental health. he says the diagnosis manual lacks biological validity. it must be redefined as organic disorders of the brain. >> we have been able to identify connectional disabilities. >> identifying molecular structure unlaying mental disorder will be a long-time quest. >> the research is in its earlier infancy and is being done on animals, we are a long way to make definitive
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statements about what is going on in brains that makes us suffer. until then the challenge will be to win the public's confidence in the capacity to heel the mind. >> the world health organisation ranked mental disorders as the number one source of disability, and that is ahead of cancer and heart disease. >> there may be a new ring for the republicans. the g.o.p. may be eyeing a familiar face and name to run for president in 2016. that and obamacare, christ receiver, and hillary clinton coming up in the weekend politics segment. [ cheering ] . >> there you have it. chaos erupt on the streets of arizona, where we'll tell you about the sporting event that sparked a wild night in tuscon. >> i'm mark morgan half of the final four field is set, but one
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of the the number seed will not make the trip.
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>> good morning to you. welcome back to al jazeera america. i'm radford, these are the top stories. officials say 30 people are missing after the mudslide last saturday. it's down from 90, but the death toll rose from 17 to 18. rain is impeding the search. >> secretary of state john kerry is heading to paris to meat with russian counterpart sergei lavrov. there's concern that russia could be eyeing more territory after annexing crimea in month. >> and the search continues for that missing malaysian jetliner, missing for 23 days.
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shapes scour the ocean. so far none of the objects spotted be long to the flight. >> americans have until monday to sign up for president obama's hath care law or they'll face fines, so far more than 6 million people enrolled, but a million less than the intended goal. the white house extended the deadline to applications still processing, and ashar quraishi tells us about the push to get people signed up. >> about health insurance, you may have to pay fines and bills. >> a massive campaign is under w way to get people to sign up. >> we are on billboards, we have an rv, on television, ads. it reminds people march 31st is the last day to enrol. >> in chicago, get covered
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illinois, the state-run organization charged with helping people to line up has been going door to door looking for people. it's not been a smooth process. 27-year-old single mother jacqueline diaz. >> i called the number, never got anything back. we went back on, i had to reapply, do the whole application again. the deadline is soft for those who have begun the process. last week the obama administration issued an extension as long as participants started on or before march 31st, they could avoid penalties. the concern is that the administration's early enrolment goal of 7 million was looking less achievable. >> we are getting mixed signals - is the deadline for real. what penalty do i face if i don't follow through and get
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insurance. is that going to be enforceable. is in an individual mandate that means anything. >> according to a caser family foundation poll, 39% of people surveyed could answer when the health care sign up was. half said they planned to remain uninsured. >> ramal decided to mote with a personal navigator days before the deadline. >> i found out about it today. as i walked. a guy told me "you need to ply." >> there are various exemptions that would allow some more time to sign up under the affordable care act. a life change, like having a baby or losing a job. without an exemption the financial penalties could be $95 or 1% of yearly income. >> on average is a person may see 30 plan options, there's help, but you need to start.
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you don't want to wait until the last minute. that may mean missing the deadline, which means a wait until the next open enrolment in november. >> meanwhile, some influential republicans are circling the wagons around their presidential candida candidate choice. republicans are working to draft jed bush. g.o.p. insiders believe bush is the best candidate given the controversy around chris christie, and the popularity of kentucky tea party senator rand paul. joining me in our special week in politics is tar a, a democratic strategist and aid to new jersey governor, and boris epstein, a republican strategist and an aid to the mccain-pallin campaign. >> jed bush, is he in it to win
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it? >> no one knows, we've gone through this since '08, last time round. if he sees the right opportunity he'll go in. "the washington post" says republicans reportedly. you have the chris christie, and rand pauls and scott walker, someone who is making the rounds on the speech circuit. if jed bush sees the right opportunity, he'll jump in. he won't let his brother or father deter him. >> is he too moderate. a lot of republicans gathered to kiss the ring of sheldon aidele son at the republican jewish coalition. he basically in a private meeting says "we have to warn the party of being too
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isolationist". >> appealing to the whole and beyond. sf you look at the past nominees, george w bush, no way right wing conservative. bush, mccain and romney are middle of the road. as far as sheldon goes, he backed newt gingrich and then mitt romney, on a lecture night in boston. he'll back several people, and come around and back whoever the nominee is. it's not necessarily the first person he backs is the person that winning the republican primary. >> tara, let's go to someone else, chris christie. he gave a national press conference and let's listen to what he said. he basically said he was in the clear. >> i'm the governor of new jersey. i have everything walking in my door saying "hey, i have something to tell you", it's not
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the way you work. to run an efficient office you have to run lanes of traffic, especially to me - i taught you now that. >> that report was not thorough scro or independent. >> the report was done by a lawyer he used in the part. the damaging part making it not have a lot of limb massy. the four implicated were not interviewed. the report is not comprehensive or thorough. the governor is shrewd. i don't think he should be underestimated. i think he's damned goods and i don't think he has a real opportunity. but i say stranger things have happened in politics, and governor chris christie is a master fall politician. everything he has done to get to this point has been calculating
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and effective. this is his first trip up. he had many issues that should have come to life. this is his furs real trip-up. i think he'll manoeuvre and weigh up the clock. he'll try to leverage this and hindley street happening. what he's doing is leveraging this to say it's a liberal press, they are attacking me, getting them attraction amongst the conservative who never leaked chris christie. >> if he's as calculating, is he all clear. >> i think chris christie knew. he is a micromanager and extraordinarily hands-on. >> you're shaking your head. >> you don't do anything without asking chris christie in his administration. >> i don't think he knew beforehand. the time he found out is in question. i don't think he knew before. it was a minor stretch and a lot of the folks were involved in the process, and i'm convinced
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as far as the future goes, there's no reason to write chris christie off. >> speaking of a comeback. let's stay with you and go to mitch mcconnell. he made a video showing duke basketball players. >> it's not a big thing. >> it's not a big deal. >> you don't think it will damage the campaign. >> mitch withstood a lot of storms over his career. he's done a great job of the senate and for the people in kentucky. they'll judge him on that, not an ad in the election in november. he'll be fine. >> i have no worries. he has a good challenger in the tea party. the tea party, isolation is part of it. they'll not make the necessary progress within themselves and in kentucky to beat someone like
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mitch mcconnell who is a larger main. >> does a mistake like that happen? do you buy that? >> mcconnell has been making a lot of mistakes. >> knock on knock. >> i'm from uva. duke, what are you doing. >> exactly. i think the largest problem for him is his popularity is low in the state of kentucky. that's the real achilles hill. if he makes the foe parse. he will drip, drip, drim when you are already not popular. >> he leads his opponent. i hope he leaves, because the opponent is koouk u. hopefully he is leading the opponent. >> the democrats have not had to come up with anyone, and rand paul. a representative is standing behind mitch mcconnell so he you
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nights the ken tuckians behind him. >> i want to go to another bush. >> w. >> no, george h.w. bush. he'll receive the profile encouragement reward for reversing the tax policies he set in the '80s, let's line to a sound byte of that. >> read my lips - no more taxes. [ cheering ] >> but thin grover nor quest said "lying to the american people is not an act of courage." do you agree. >> grover said that an act of courage - would he rather have the medal than the 1992 presidential election. probably not. if he doesn't make the change, he beats bill clinton. grover was wrong to go after the former president. hw wished he didn't get the
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medal because he would have had another change. >> act of courage. things change. you say things when you campaign based on the fact when you campaign. when you get into government office and you realise the reality is different. which oftentimes you don't have all the information until you are in public office and president. but to say you can't ever raise taxes, it's not a realistic position. that's a problematic for the republicans, because they have a lit mist test, you can never raise taxes no matter what. that will be a problem. it's unreasonable. >> you bra with that. >> it's a good point. to go out and say we are never going to do x or y - i think it's a make. maybe we would at some point give on certain issues if there's give from the democrats on other. as far as hw goes, he was vice
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president for eight years. and last year, raying was active. he now what he said when he made the campaign promise, and he new the consequences. >> look at the ending, our week in politics in agreement. >> thank you both so much for joining us this morning. >> an oil boom is bringing an innux of wealth to the -- unflux of wealth to the capital of nigeria, many cannot afford. >> this man finished work at a state-run radio station. instead of going home, he comes and waits. like many civil serve apts, he lives outside the city. going home during rush hour
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extents a 20 minutes trip to four hours. >> everyone wants to stay here because of the facilities, and the president, you truly want the social amenities, but the exorbitant rates of houses. so damn expensive. >> 70% of civil servants live in satellite towns or neighbouring states as far as 200km away. there's no shortage of real estate, but properties loi empty with the middle class priced out. the average income of a federal reserve apt is $340 a month. look at the rent. a 2 bedroom apartment costs $1,250 a month. in the suburbs a 2 bed room $120 a month. >> realising the problem. the city's administration introduced a mass housing
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scheme. the government provides land and infrastructure to developers who turn around cost effective units. city planning official admit the plan has failed to meet objectives. it ranges from substandard development. developers are accused of using the land for other services. >> we have to do roads, electricity, and add it to the cost of the land, plus the cost of the construction of the house. then you found out the price that you sell it to the people that are going to buy if is going to be higher than what they can afford. >> a federal capital territory administration says it formed a committee to fix the problems it's not clear what measures will be taken. officials were unable for comment. hundreds of thousands of people have to deal with this. not quite the thing to look forward to at the end of the
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work day. >> the n.c.a.a. tournament is keeping fans on the edge of their seats. mark morgan joins us with the details. >> the arizona wisconsin had a thrilling down to the wire finish. it was a record-timing game. arizona trails by two, nick johnson's floater off the park. ronno hollis jeffer ston, there for the dunk. 10 off the bench. trayon jack sop, he'll cut to the bucket. frank for the put back. wisconsin up by 3. time winding down. he has called for the offensive foum. shaun miller, can't believe it, you rarely see the ball made. that's the ensuing inbound pass. it's tipped out of bounds.
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resumed wits's ball, but the officials went to the score, changed it so it's arizona's ball. the replay used a bit in the college game. two seconds on the clock. inbound. shoots at the buzzer. wisconsin 64-63 much the badgers head to the final four, a bitter lose. >> meanwhile florida in its fourth straight elite eight. ending dayton's cinderella run. scotty wilson with the point. florida taking control. the gaiter won 30 in a row - are you kidding me. 62-52 is your final. now it's on to the final four. >> i was probably thinking about how i wanted to do this again. i want to do whatever i can to help the team reach the ultimate goal that we set at the beginning of the i don't remember.
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>> moving to the n.b.a. records are made to be broken. the philadelphia 76ers had a brutal season. they were staring down the barrel of n.b.a. infamy. it sets a record. 17,000 fans calm out dispute the struggles, and left happy, philly leaving no doubt. the 76ers shot 76 from the fooled. virtually wired a wire. snapping their skin at 26. setting the longest losing track. >> one other n.b.a. the spurs picked up a 17th consecutive win. >> mark, speaking of the n.c.a.a. march madness turned to mayhem in tucson where ten were arrested. that was all after the university of arizona failed to
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make the final four. police used pepper spray and rubber bullets to disperse the crowd and the group of students chanted police brutality after a man looked at them. police say the crowds threw beer bottles and firecrackers, no injuries were reported. >> a prisoner swap threatening to derail peace swaps. a deadline missed. >> while the peace talks teater on the brink of collapse. we talk to a man next.
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>> protests broke out as
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palestinians marked land day. marking the confiscation of land in gala laya. the palestinians are threatening to walk away from peace talks after israel missed a deadline to release prisoners. we take a look at the conflict from the eyes of two families. if >> in the face of a man he never met avi sees himself. avi is 32 and that is the man me was named for, his uncle avi, kidnapped and killed. i was born a year after his murder. i bear his name. >> 30 minutes down the road this lady looks at photos of her son kareem. 32 years ago he killed avi's
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uncle. he's serving a life sentence. this weekend israel was supposed to release him. the deadline came and went. >> translation: there's nothing dearer than a son, not a brother or father. no one in the world can replace a second. her son and victim's fates are linked. they may determine the fate of the current middle east peace talks. when the talks began, israelis great to free prisoners. palestinians agreed not to seek unrecognition. so long as kareem and the final round of prisoners are not free. the palestinians are threatening to walk away. karim's mother supports that. >> we'll talk before the prisoners are released. they must come home. >> for his rail they are unpopular. avi helps to lead protests against them and accuses the government of betrayal.
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>> the negotiations are painful for the bereaved families. we are talking about a knife stabbed in the heart time and again. israel's government is not willing to face the anger unless the palestinians agree to extend the peace talks. palestinians argue that israel needs to uphold its commitment to release the prisoners. >> i now support palestine president pursuing the israelis in the united nations. my brother will not be the price that obstructs this. >> kareem's family opposes the palestinians giving in to israel's demand, even if it means furniture bought for a homecoming stays wrapped. avi's family fights the release, even if it means the peace process false. as both sides dig in, the more likely the u.s. sponsored peace
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talks will collapse. >> our next guest shows the struggle of bringing israelis and palestinians together. a ball room champion and an educator co-founded dancing classrooms, a program that builds confidence in children. his work was the bass of "take the lead", starring antonio banderus. >> it's history in the picking. >> he'll fulfil a dream to teach children to dance together. it's the subject of a documentary called "dancing in jafa." >> joining us this morning for
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the weekend conversation is pei area dulane. it's a pleasure to have you here with us. >> it's a great pleasure for me. >> how did you bring the kids together, and what were the challenges? >> i can't believe i did it. i'm up for a challenge. i'm half palestine. i speakera bike, which was really open the window and trying to convince the palestine-israeli families was the biggest challenge to begin with. >> how did their parents react? >> afterwards, with all due respect, i smiled a lot. i hit children with my tie and slapped with my tie. we had a lot of fun. this is what opened up the idea that it was not about chancing together. in the muslim religion, boys and girls if you were conservative
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would not dance. >> it's about confidence and self-esteem. in israel. when you are living in israel, that is a very, very big thing. if you can give me an example. give me an example of the process of transformation, attitudes. or attitudes of the families. >> the attitude of kids in the world covered their hand, didn't want to do it at the same time. they had to go all on mass. it becomes made to do it. eventually he does it. it takes about 10-12 lessons before the back is broken. it becomes accepted to what they are doing. dancing with a girl, dancing with a boy and dancing with the enemy. that's the big thing. from the jewish families, they
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were not convinced they wanted the children to do it. dancing with the enemy, they are powerful words. i understand you use in the 12 lessons something called the dulane method. it's six principles. >> yes, first and foremost there must be respect and compassion, for me as a teacher i have to be present, give fun, joy and humour, have command and control of the situation, and giving them a safe space, and because i speak languages, that helps, with my body language, that goes a long way. >> briefly, before we go, what is the most important thing you want our audiences to take away from the film? >> to feel good about another person. don't prejudge, have compassion, you don't know what the other person feels like. what a great sunday morning thing to leave us. >> acclaimed international ball
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room champion, thank you for joining us. >> that will do it for this edition of al jazeera america. i'm morgan radford live in new york city. as always, thank you so much for watching.
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whole lot of money. >> you are one of the voices of this show. >> i think you've offended everyone with that kathy.
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>> hold on, there's some room to offend people, i'm here. >> we have a right to know what's in our food and monsanto do not have the right to hide it from us. >> so join the conversation and make it your own. >> watch the stream. >> and join the conversation online @ajamstream. >> this is the news hour on aljazeera. under pressure of a corruption allegation and crackdown on social plead, turkey's prime minister faces a test. >> count it out, oh first senses in 30 years doesn't include muslims. >> territory in the south china see, confrontation between china

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