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tv   News  Al Jazeera  March 31, 2014 6:00am-9:01am EDT

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deployed across the capital. >> we put all of our global resources behind every story. >> it is a scene of utter devastation. >> and follow it no matter where it leads - all the way to you. al jazeera america, take a new look at news. ♪ mudslide misery, the number of victims is on the rise and the search in washington state slows. sed line day for obamacare, the six-month period to sign up end today and some may have an extension and some may face a fine. north and south korea trade shells and rhetoric and what is behind the outburst. >> diplomatic solutions ought to be the first resort in solving
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international problems. >> deadlock over the crisis in ukraine and john kerry tries to find common ground with his russian counterpart. ♪ they won't be used search dogs today as they are working on the mudslide and they have been given to days off because they say the cold and rain could dell their sense of smell and the death toll is 21 and expected to rise and dry weather is in the forecast after rainfall over the weekend hampered results and we are in arlington and there is
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discrepancies with the death toll and what do we know now? >> 25 people notified and relatives notified and that is the number officially as deceased here and we know four additional bodies have been identified at the slide site but has not been removed. that is a bit of confusion along the way, people taking the two different numbers adding them up and going with the number but they are saying right now 21 dead. we will see the sunshine here today in the river valley and a welcome sight as the search and rescue crews go back to work. for the 10th day workers will go through the med and debris of the huge landslide and 70 feet deep in some places measurements show and still finding bodies and acknowledged many of the victims may never be located in the jumbled mess that was once a rural neighborhood on the river.
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>> houses have been picked up and run through a blender and dropped on the ground and then you have another house the cars are still parked in the garage, the house has been pushed all the way across and not liveable but somewhat intact so you have everything out here. >> reporter: a service road linked over the westbound links west and east side making movement of equipment easier and not open to traffic and there is no official timeline when the state traveled in the mud will be cleared and repaired. >> the thing that is the hardest is weather condition and people are going through waist-deep mud and the rains did not help things at all. >> reporter: they should get a break for the next 48 hours or so with drier weather predicted for the region, making this difficult and gruesome job just a little bit easier as so many families still wait for answers. >> the list of those that are missing remains at 30 and that
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number is the same as it has been and no additional information at this time on that. >> now that break in the weather will be welcome and looking at two days or maybe more when we have just scattered showers or rain showers predicted and that is huge. there was so much rain over the weekend that the river went up about a foot, that of course makes things more difficult at the slide site and up stream where there has been minor flooding but have not heard of serious problems caused by that rise in the river level it will be something they will keep an eye on. >> it's difficult in arlington and thank you. today is the deadline to sign up for insurance under the affordable health act but it's far from over, 6 million people have signed up so far for healthcare coverage and extended to mid april for those that
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started their enrollment application but republicans say the administration's extension is another sign the law is flawed and causing concerning for the mid term elections and randall pinkston is in washington d.c. for us, what is the white house doing to get more sign ups? >> reporter: the white house is using radio and tv and social media to encourage people to sign up and also saying you don't have to just go to the website, you can go to the phone and if your phone number is listed before the deadline you will still be called later and allowed to sign up past the deadline. of the weekend health and human secretary kathleen sebelius was encouraging enrollment and today vice president joe biden will go on tv and appear on the rachel ray show saying to sign up for the affordable care act.
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>> are there signs that the attacks are working and resonating? >> reporter: yes, and no. if you look at the latest polling data it certainly shows that most americans have a negative opinion of obamacare, the affordable care act. but some of those same polls also show most americans want to fix the affordable care act, they don't want to eliminate it. so on perception you have to say the republicans are definitely winning that but on repealing it, something they have been calling for months now, apparently there is not widespread support for repeal, people want some form of health insurance, they just don't want it the way it's being offered to them right now. >> how concerned should democrats be heading into the november mid term elections given this is a key issue even in the early primaries we have seen? >> reporter: absolutely a key issue and republicans and other
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opponents to the affordable care act and po are -- and president obama are using it as a sledgehammer hammer to beat back democrats, in states where they are in tight races like louisiana and states without healthcare exchanges, states where they rejected the medicaid expansion, democrats are in for a rough time. so many of them have been backing away from their support for the affordable care act even though they voted for it. they are not touting it as one of their accomplishments during this last term of congress. >> randall pinkston, thank you. north and south korea exchanging fire and south korea retaliated aiming shots at the north after hundreds of shells landed in the northern sea, northern part of the east china sea and there is
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a new nuclear threat from the north. >> it lasted more than three hours, eight separate sessions of firing, 500 projectiles fired and the south korean say 100 of them fell in their waters and calling this a planned provocation and say they responded with 300 shells of their own fired into north korean waters. must be emphasized none of these projectiles appear to be named at vessels on either side and four south koreans died in this incident but goes to a resent uptick in activity and dozens of short-range rocket launches and range missiles launched last week and talking about a possible new form of nuclear test. no coincidence as well it happened on the same day as an enormous south korean, u.s. and australia joint landing exercise
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which is being carried out on this southeast coast of south korea, on this beach and a couple others and 13,000 troops were involved. we went on board the ship which is in charge of this entire exercise a little earlier and spoke to the senior u.s. marine in the region and said this was simply a matter of it being good timing militarily to carry it and evaluated the risk of seeing this as provocation but thought the advantage was such they have to carry it out at this time. >> with hard which faucet reporting, no shells hit land but residents on five south korean islands are evacuatere as a concern. after four hours of talks it seems that the two sides are not much closer to a resolution. >> nothing concrete came out of
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the meeting and kerry says they consider the actions in crimea illegal and illigitimate. >> the u.s. and russia have differences of opinion about the events that led to this crisis but both of us recognize the importance of finding a diplomatic solution and of simultaneously meeting the needs of the ukrainian people. >> reporter: in paris secretary of state john kerry met with sergei fedorov for hours and nothing came out of it, the russian troops on the borders are having a climate of fear and intimidation and not helping the situation. >> any real progress in ukraine must include a pull-back of the very large russian force that is
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currently along the ukraine's borders. >> reporter: united states will continue to support the people of ukraine's right to choose their own future and in a somewhat surprising concession russia agreed. >> foreign minister sergei fedorov said russia wants to respect the right of ukrainians to make that choice. >> reporter: both sides made suggestions on ways to deescalate the heightened security around ukraine. sergei fedorov said they will work with the people to address concerns over minority and language rights but when it comes to recognizing the new ukrainian government both sides agreed to disagree. they consider ukraine government illigitimate and the u.s. will not budge. >> not a path forward where the legitimate government of ukraine is not at the table. >> reporter: they insisted the u.s. is consulting with ukraine
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in every step of the process, u.s. and eu have economic sanctions on them. >> it was impromptu and last-minute. >> reporter: on the heels of a phone call on friday that russian friday vladimir putin put in to president barack obama and spoke for an hour on the phone about discussing diplomatic ideas and solutions for ukraine. of course at this point still not that much closer to that, but it seemed like they are trying to get there. >> trying to make sure the interim government is part of the talks. baltic states that border russia are watching the troop build up closely. 8:15 eastern we will talk of the former president of lithunian.
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and we have nicole mitchell to tell us about the blizzard. >> we have blizzard warnings in effect and not the blizzard conditions yet but this almost sounds like an april fools joke and it's not, i wish it were. this is from yesterday and parts of the central united states, rapid city, 58, fargo, 50, and minneapolis 60 and lovely weekend day and then we get to today. a brewing storm system and heavy snow in portions of north dakota. temperatures are falling and the winds are really starting to kick up. rain on the south side of this but it is the snow that is definitely the most memorable as this continues along through the day today and anywhere from the dakota and maybe michigan and a foot of snow in the core of this and the reason we have a blizzard warning in effect is
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because the winds are already starting to crank up and in some cases gusting to 30 miles per hour range and it reduces the visibility so with reduced visibility and the high winds for three hours, that is what you technically need to be a blizzard but because of potential we are under a blizzard warning for a large chunk of south and north dakota and more being monitored into minnesota as this moves along. this is kind of a cruel, you know, in like a lion and out like a lion for many sections of the country. minneapolis today still in the warmer air and rain but some could convert to snow overnight and remember the 60 degrees yesterday, in the 30s in the day tomorrow and chilly temperatures starting off the day tomorrow so this is doing a number on the temperatures as well. that is not the only system we have been watching. it was a soggy weekend for the east coast and some of the rain is starting to clear out and you can see the storm smm moving off
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the coastline as we continue and dry on places that rain is left will be limited to this morning and the west coast, a drier break for the northwest is good news but we have a fair amount of rain for portions of california that could one of our opening baseball games impact that, but the rain is needed here in california, back to you. pakistan's army has been charged with high treason and the first military rule tore be formally indicted, pakistan court charged him with unlawfully suspending the constitution and imposing emergency rule in 2007. former president has denied all the charges. and he was one of pakistan's longest rulers and faces death penalty if convicted and he has been found guilty in a bribery trial and accused of paying off construction officials in a massive real estate project when he served as jerusalem mayor ten years ago.
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a series of corruption allegations led him to resign as prime minister in 2009 and being called one of the worst fraud schemes in israel history. turkey prime minister is claiming victory for his party in local elections, 97% of votes have been counted and they are in the lead and they have support despite a number of corruption allegations. >> reporter: thousands of prime minister supporters gathered outside his party's headquarters on a bitterly cold night to celebrate victory in key local elections seen as a referendum on erdogan's popularity and stronger than when he entered the race and the vote was held against the back drop of corruption allegations directed at the government, accusations that erdogan was leading toward authoritarian rule and with the
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memory of getty's park still fresh in people's minds and erdogan said they were plotted by enemies to topple him from power and now he says the people of turkey have spoken. >> translator: the people have given a message to the world, today's bold results, what did they say? they said we are here. and people do not bow. turkey does not bow. >> reporter: however the opposition people's republican party or chp remain despite the defeats and the turnout in elections was significantly high with close to 90% of turks casting their ballots but while erdogan and party may have won the election they still face challenges of bridging the gap in what is a significantly divided society. >> the public does not give, by
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the claim of it because somebody would easily claim they are supporting it and that is a criticism and will follow what has been done previously and this policy is kind of institutionalizing turkey. >> reporter: they will take to the polls once again to choose a new president a few months after that they will elect a new parliament. supporters of the justice and departmental party will hope it's the first in the society of elections that will further empower the prime minister erdogan and the governing party. i'm with al jazeera. in the run up to old shuns the turkey government blocked twitter and youtube and social media was spreading miss
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information about him and the political party. voters in paris made history and elected the first female mayor and deputy mayor of paris for 13 years and party was dealt a blow nationally with many cities sighting with the conservative right and it was seen as a referendum on president france uland. recall is expanding saying they knew that ignition switches did not meet specifications. an out break of a deadly virus has fears of a pandemic and people around the world are feeling the squeeze.
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>> nicole: ♪ . >> stephanie: welcome back to al jazeera america and gm's new ceo on the capitol hill hot seat and what temperatures we will see across the nation and metrologist nicole mitchell is back. >> nicole: we have a couple changes in store and mild air this morning, um and down the east coast 40 and 30s and it keeps the temperatures day and night stable and adds
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installation and the midsection of the country where you see the greens versus the blues around that that is really warm air and the weather system we were talking about bringing posable blizzard conditions in the northern midwest and ahead of the system as cold as the air is on the backside of this there is a warm southeasterly flow on the front side of that system and that has been cranking up temperatures and even this morning temperatures are in the 60s as far south as look at that lincoln 65, des moines 58 and a mild morning as you head out the door. but there is a cold side of that and billings is 35 degrees as the high for today. and the temperatures in places like minneapolis at 58 will be dropping into the 30s once that front comes through, back to you. >> stephanie: gm's new ceo will face congress on tuesday over the ignition switch recall and want to know why it took more than a decade for if company to flag the deadly program and the
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hearing comes as gm adds more calls to the recall list. >> reporter: ceo mary will face tough questioning from lawmakers and they have been going through thousands of pages of documents from gm and nhtsa. house and senate investigators want to know how executives at the nation's biggest auto maker say they knew nothing about the ignition problem and why they waited more than a decade to respond. congress is also wondering what the national highway traffic safety administration which analyzes crash data knew about the problem that date back more than a decade and what they did about it. a memo released sunday by house investigators indicates the highway safety regulators declined to open a formal investigation into the gm ignition even after receiving complaints and field reports about the problems. the memo also reveals that the ignition system supplier told gm in 2002 before any of the
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vehicles hit the road that the system did not meet auto making specs and general motors say top executives knew nothing about the defective switches until january 31st of this year yet the company did not issue the first recall of nearly 620,000 vehicles until february 10th, two weeks later it recalled an additional 748,000 vehicles and on friday it added another 424,000 and bringing the total number of vehicles to more than 2 billion and they released this statement about the company's latest recall. trying to locate several thousand switches in a population of 2.2 million vehicles and distributed to thousands of retailers is impractical and we are going to provide customers with a peace of mind they deserve and expect by getting the new switches in all the vehicles and gm is feeling the heat from federal prosecutors and they are examining whether gm is
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criminally liable for failing to disclose problems with vehicles, all this amid concerns that gm federal bail out protected the auto maker from civil suits. i'm with al jazeera. >> stephanie: it has added measures to prevent fires in the electric powered cars and they will begin installing a titanium plate in model s vehicles and it is in response to a four-month probe of what started fires and it is with cars built march 6 and they will add them to existing cars. wall street is getting set to wrap up a volatile first quarter and futures up and s&p 1857 and nasdaq 4155 and asia ended higher and rising 1% and investigators hope they take new
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steps to spur economic growth. one strategist said the chie no -- china slow down is a worry. >> it's growing but historically for 30 years the growth is double digit and they have resource countries like brazil and new zeeland and those are the countries and now it's cutting back on imports and all other supply countries are beginning to suffer. >> stephanie: european is lower and apple and samsung are in court and saying they ripped off designs and features and samsung said it stole two ideas to use on iphone and ipad and the trial is less than two years after a federal jury found samsung was infringing on apple patents, mcdonald's giving away free
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coffee for two weeks during normal breakfast hour during the morning and trying to fight off competition which has taken a bite out of the segment and they rolled out ads to promote the new menu. a new search area and promise, the lawmaker who is vowing everything will be done to find the airliner that vanished three weeks ago and sounding the alarm talking about a catastrophe worldwide. >> reporter: i'm john henry smith and kentucky and michigan will have one of the spots and it came down to the final seconds. >> stephanie: as we head to the break, take agree live look at the brooklyn bridge in new york city, there are string temperatures in most parts of the country. we will be right back after a quick break.
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. >> stephanie: welcome back to al jazeera america, i'm stephanie sy and these are top stories at this hour, search crews hope drier weather this week will aid in the recovery effort in the washington state mudslide and the number of people killed and rose to 21 over the weekend but the number of missing people dropped from 90 to 30. tensions flaring between north and south korea over an ocean boundary and fired 500 artillery rounds in the sea and responded with 300 rounds of its own and the islands have been forced to evacuate as a precaution. today is the deadline to sign up for the affordable care act, 6 million people have already enrolled in obamacare and the white house extended the deadline for applications that stalled on the website but for millions of americans buying healthcare is still out of reach. and casey shows free clinics are their only option. >> reporter: once a month for
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four months diane has come to the free clinic in virginia hoping to get care. >> this is it for anyone who doesn't have medical insurance and can't afford it. this clinic is the only way. and unfortunately it is the only one here in our area. >> reporter: the clinic serves 1700 people but had to turn away hundreds more so it holds a monthly lottery to pick about two dozen new patients. >> hopefully today i'm praying i will get the lottery and i will be accepted. >> reporter: brown is too young for medicare and without a disability or dependent children she doesn't qualify for medicate. and virginia has the fourth toughest eligibility requirements in the country and caught in the coverage gap. >> every place i called about obamacare they talk about is $2, $3, $400 a month so the free clientic is the only chance of receiving medication. >> reporter: if she made more
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she could qualify for federal subsidies but obama administration wanted an expended program to cover her but they let the state decide whether or not to grow the program and they want to expand medicaid but the republican-controlled state house is fighting it, citing long-term costs. so the arlington free clinic is busy as ever. >> most people have families and jobs and many have one, two, three jobs. what they lack is health insurance. >> reporter: jody steiner kellie directs clinical administration waiting to see if he will be chosen arlington resident mr. jackson. >> i got here early this morning so i can get some of this healthcare assistance. like i say i'm trying to take care of my health today and, you know, hopefully i will be the winner. >> reporter: some are lucky. >> n 1.
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>> yeah. yeah. >> very exciting. the last ticket and i finally got in. >> reporter: others are not. >> didn't go well today but i'm glad for those who did get in, got numbers and can be treated. >> reporter: she will be back next month because it's her only option. >> i have my head up and positive and looking forward and motivated and i'm just going to keep coming because one day i'm going to get that number, i'm going to get it. >> reporter: the affordable deadline may be here but visitors to the free clinic are more concerned about another date, the clinic's next lottery. i'm with al jazeera. >> stephanie: free clinic in virginia serve 75,000 people in 2012 and expect the numbers to rise despite the affordable care act. australia prime minister says there is no time limit for the search of missing malaysia flight 370 and they are stepping up efforts to help find the missing plane and australian ship equipped with a u.s. navy
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black box detector is heading out to the search area and confirm sunday that debris collected in the indian ocean search area is not part of flight 370 but just fishing debris and other things. at a press conference they described the meeting with victims' families. >> the one message they delivered to me again and again is not to give up hope. and i promised the families that malaysia, working with our international premise, will not give up hope. >> stephanie: hussein is the defense minister is heading to hawaii to meet with u.s. officials and will discuss availability of additional u.s. military assets for deep sea search and recovery efforts and we will talk to the aviation analyst in fort lauderdale this morning and thanks for being with us and it has been 23 days and let's talk about the black box detector, can it be much good without an identified
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debris field? >> well, stephanie, you are absolutely correct. they don't want to put that detector into the water in a random place because it's range is limited. they want to first find parts of the wreckage at least in order to say well perhaps the main wreckage is somewhere nearby. this device they will be lowering into the water has to be within 1-2 miles of the black box or it won't receive the signal. >> stephanie: what is that shift in the search location that we saw late last week tell us and tell you? >> well, i was encouraged by it because the company that came up with this mathematical model that took us to the waters off of australia were refining the data that they have, the assumptions that they used in order to make this mathematics work. what concerns me now is that at
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this new location they are still not finding anything and therefore i expect the company will need to make further adjustments to their measurements. there are a number of reasons for this. when the aircraft was flying westbound, first, went off course, the question is when did it begin to turn south? that makes a big difference in this mathematical model. the second would be what speed and altitude did it actually fly? again, that makes a difference. and then finally when the aircraft descended towards the water, was the pilot flying or the auto pilot. that alone can change the touchdown point by 100 miles or more. >> stephanie: what you're saying is even with the data it's still pretty much a guesstimate. there are currently ten aircraft in seven countries including the u.s. navy poseiden and how long do you think it will be before
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the search is scaled down? >> they will continue the search wherever it seems most likely the plane is located because you have these desperate families and many in route to malaysia as we speak and want answers and all of us want answers, it's a terrible tragedy and embarrassment to the aviation community that it's so difficult to find. and they will not give up soon but slowly but surely they will have to be deployed. >> stephanie: how much time do they have before it sinks or too dispersed for to be an identifiable debris field? >> i don't think they will give up and they will search and it will become more quiet. the black boxes only have about another week before we expect the batteries to be dead. however, they will continue to search as they did in the air
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france disaster and locate it. it took two years to find the black boxes in that instance. >> stephanie: al jazeera america and jay thanks for being with us this morning. today marks a u.s. deadline for syrian diplomates to leave the country. embassy operations are suspended in washington with copy conflicts in texas and michigan and they killed three soldiers and left four others injured and we are in beirut and good morning and let's start with the attack on the lebanese, are there concerns of more attacks of this nature? >> yes, this did highlight dangers for lebanese security and the army will battle terrorism in lebanon with all efforts yes it hasn't been able despite a few weeks campaign to go after these groups, to stop
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and end attacks against lebanese army and in lebanon they made it clear the lebanese army has become a target for them because they perceive the army as trying to help assad in going after the rebels who fled syria and go to lebanon. >> stephanie: any word from syria about getting the syrian diplomates out of this country? >> the line we have been getting from damascus is this is an air trarry measure and accused the united states of actually violated the convention that governs relations and believe it's just an extension, a demonstration of hostile u.s. policies toward syria and it will hurt syrian people living in the united states. >> stephanie: an international panel opcw turned down syria proposal to remove chemical weapon, how does that effect syria ability to meet the june
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30 deadline to get rid of the weapons that had been agreed upon? >> well, the syrian government justifies the delays due to logistics because of the security in the country and say they are committed and want to implement the plan to destroy all of syria's chemical weapons but it's hard to implement it in the current circumstances. the u.s. says it believes and john kerry the u.s. secretary of state beliefs had damascus wanted it could have accelerated the process and met the deadline but thinks it's deliberate and say it's due to circumstances. they acknowledge the risk and acknowledge it's a very hard mission and the challenges on the ground are, enormous and getting opposition and there has been acceleration in the efforts to try to deliver as much as
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toxic weapons outside and to the u.n. group and to destroy whatever is left in the country, much more than what we have seen before. >> stephanie: reporting from beirut and thank you. presidential elections in egypt are set for the end of may and it will happen on may 26 and 27 and that is 10 months after president mohamed morsi was removed from power and days ago abdel-fattah el-sissi resigned from the army and said he will run for president. a university student was killed on sunday after violence broke out between protesters and police in cairo and supporting students arrested or suspended for backing former president mohamed morsi and five people including an egypt journalist were killed in clashes in the capitol and it is 93 days that three al jazeera journalists have been held by the egyptian government, peter greste and producers may home fahmy and baher mohamed are in court and
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al jazeera rejects charges against our staff and continues to call for their release. march madness basketball is reaching a fever pitch, and john henry smith has more on which schools are heading to the final four, i can't believe it's here already. >> the brackets are all busted but it's okay, it has been a tremendous tournament from 68 teams we are now down to the financial four and the young cast from kentucky were trying to get there with an all freshman starting line up and in the way was the last school to reach the final four and you remember the fab five and played for michigan. this game was tied at 72 with two seconds to play and freshman ha hard -- harass son and the win and got 12 points and brother had 8 and one problem there was 3 seconds left. from the exact same spot in indy where gordon almost won the 2010 title, kentucky is heading to
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the third final four in the last four seasons and the 16th all-time trip to the final four. >> they were not going to go away and neither were we and whoever had the ball last will win it. >> i hate to say it they play better when they are down and i don't know why. they played fearless. they play aggressive and they get emotion and blow their neck and want to win and have a weld to win. >> in the regionals napier put on a show for uconn and looking to get michigan state for 25 points and assist two and broke the press as well as spartan hearts and uconn win and the coach gives credit to his seniors. >> they knew what it was about then and 2011 championship and used to being on top and going through what they went through without them doing anything.
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>> we did a tremendous job and we play for each other and the coach and the whole university in that program. it's great to see it. >> so the final four in arlington, texas is next saturday and will have top seed florida against the last team to beat them, 7th seeded uconn at 6:09. and kentucky against second seed wisconsin and the championship game is monday. a college hoops score is one and done, university of kansas has a news conference to announce the freshman star wiggins will go to the nba and had 17.1 points per game and pulled down 5.9 rebounds for game and he was a big 12 freshman of the year and all conference selection and jay hawks knocked out of the tourn nment the third round by stanford. it's basement for 25 major baseball teams and today is opening day but this is not
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baseball's opening day, the dodgers and diamond backs played two games and dodgers and padre's played real live baseball and castor getting the start for the padre and the job of brian wilson is to finish by bay area said smith took the bearded one to ride it out of the park and 1-0 was a 1-1 tie. same score later in the 8th, wilson had more trouble. men on second and third, and single to center, and cabrera and they win 3-1 and here is the hero, smith. >> obviously opening night to be out here and to be able to play this game, it's fun just to be here and to do something like that, it makes it definitely more special and it has been a great ride and i'm happy to be here with this group of guys that work hard and come to the park ready to play and have a goal and a common goal and everybody is trying to get to
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the same place. >> tennis anyone, dall taking on yanokivich and the first game and he hits the winner and takes the break, second set and up 3-2 and gets the cross court back hand winner and later he is up 5-3 and championship point, and he moves up to the net and nadal hits and he hits the ground and holler and takes the fourth title beating nadal 6-3-6-3. and picked up the 25th victory after beating jimmie johnson at martinville speedway and that is a look at sports. >> that is great for him, john henry smith thank you. u.n. warning of food shortages, drought and extinction of species if nothing is done to stop global warming and all will be touched by the impacts of climate change and the risks are
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big and small and says water supply will be an issue and food production hit hard, dry goods and fish supplies and may lead to higher prices and millions of people going hungry and oceans will rise and become acid and threatening to kill marine species. the deadly ebola is spreading and confirmed two new cases in liberia and 70 people have already died from the virus in guinea and closing the border and there is no treatment or vaccine. they are looking at two dozen skeletons on earth last year and say the remains could reveal information about the black plague which wiped out more than half the population in the 14th century. >> reporter: this is during construction of a new rail line are providing some answers to the questions about the black
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death. scientists say dna tests confirm what many originally thought that the poor souls died as a result of the plague that killed tens of millions in europe 600 years ago and studying how they died is revealing information on their lives. >> they suffered from malnutrition and stress and disease during their childhood years. >> reporter: scientists say studying the bones of plague victims can play a role in learning more about deadly disease and fighting them. >> we can look at infectious disease and reurging diseases and new emerging diseases to try and help us understand what form they will take, how they will evolve. >> reporter: but according to some public health researchers the evidence from the bones may also change the view of how the plague was spread. originally thought to have been transmitted to humans by rats and fleas and say it must have
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been airborne infected the lungs of malnourished and spread by coughing and sneezing allowing it to kill so many so fast but right now that is still just a theory and the future of these 25 excavated skeletons has yet to be decided. i'm carlos with al jazeera. >> stephanie: the plague is one of the oldst identifiable diseases known to man. the fruit that is now being called green gold, why disease and bad weather are sending the price of limes sky rocketing and one country's fight to band whale and the court comes up with its big decision.
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borderland only on al jazeera america >> this is the real deal man... ♪ a look here at the capitol building as daybreaks on this monday morning in our nation's capitol and welcome back to al jazeera america and straight
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ahead we will tell you what is behind the world's massive lime shortage but let's see where the snow and rain may fall across the country and nicole mitchell is back. >> you may need it for a margarita, if you cannot beat it join it. heavy bands of snow like. in d, on the south side of this it has been warm, the warm air ahead of the system and that is rain. but as this moves through the day some places could get over a foot of snow in places like northern minnesota. okay, as we head to the east coast it was soggy and clearing up and the last couple of frames i want to point out the colors are rein and not norms and a problem with how the intensity is showing on some radars in the country this morning especially in this area and the other place we have been watching closely is the northwest and more of a break today and more of the rain will be centered over portions of california but that is a
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drought area and that is where where this rain is beneficial and back to you. >> stephanie: limes are an essential ingredient in mexico and bright end up guacamali and margarita and why the lime business is feeling the squeeze. >> reporter: it's hard to think of life without limes and this is a stable of daily living and limed used to use in food and ward off illness and taste with drinks and without it they would be lost. >> translator: i put lime on everything and everything i don't put on it is milk because i can't and salad is not good if there is not like and not good taquila and it's part of our lives tradition and culture. >> reporter: it's an expensive luxury item and prices have
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soared and consumers are deeply unhappy and in some places it has tripled in resent weeks reaching historic highs. >> customers ask how much for limes and you tell them and call you crazy and leave. >> reporter: the lime groves have been hit by disease and bad weather. last year's hurricane in the major lime growing area of mexico did not help and something called yellow dragon plague means they are producing less fruit and talk of farmers sell hoarding the crops and e sell it when the price is up but they are just making the best of a bad situation and depictions of a nation craving items and is a way of getting through the crisis. >> translator: we laugh about things that worry us. maybe that is not that important but it definitely has an impact on the economy and our families and there are other things that people cannot afford but we laugh at all of it.
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it's how we cope. >> reporter: mexico producing most of the limes the impact of shortage is global and he hoped prices will fall with another growing season approaching, at a time being high-priced limes are leading a bitter taste and i'm with al jazeera. >> stephanie: 98% of the limes in the u.s. comes from mexico and a single lime is 20 cents and now it's 50 cents. millions of americans rely on food stamps to get by and changing rules to make sure that people with food stamps are not doing drugs and georgia has 2 million people on food stamps and requiring tests for people in the program if there is reasonable suspicion they are using drugs, florida, missouri and utah have similar laws in place. the international court of justice in the hague making a landmark ruling on whale hunting and a case against japan assay despite a worldwide ban of catching whales japan has
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continued to hunt in the antarctica and say it's for scientific research but the court ruled that they are violating the moratorium. >> we simply do not need to kill whales for science and we can conserve the whales through nonlethal methods. >> stephanie: they were hunting whales long before that was in place in 1986, and 10,000 whales have been killed. all sees on a mother bald eagle and this is a web cam at the pennsylvania web commission and believe it's 250 years since they last vested on the rivers and have been a few close calls and the camera was rolling as a raccoon tried to steal from the nest and one baby hatched on friday and the sibling should be hatching soon and we have a look at the stories we are following for the next hour. >> they have to be a steeler's fans and not eagles fans in
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pittsburgh. deadline for affordable healthcare act as it's coming to an end and claiming from the massive mudslide in washington state and the medical officers confirming 21 people are dead, the search for the victims has slowed as they give rescue dogs a few days off to rest. exchange of fire, north and south korea trading sells in the ae and moved to emergency shelter z as a precaution and in our next hour we will look at the next round of challenges facing the affordable care act as the white house now tries to move forward and military forces in braville looking to cleanup crime in the streets of the world cup and residence saying it's all just a show. >> nicole: and march came in with a lion and going out the same way, details on the spring storm that could bring blizzard condition and al jazeera morning news continues and del and i are back with you in 2 1/2 minutes
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and i'm stephanie sy in new york and i hope you will keep watching. >> these protestors have decided that today they will be arrested >> these people have chased a president from power, they've torn down a state... >> what's clear is that people don't just need protection, they need assistance.
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primetime news. >> i'm john seigenthaler in new york. >> stories that impact the world, affect the nation and touch your life. >> it's like a brawl here in the waters around monterey. >> only on al jazeera america. >> health care deadline, the obama administration is making a final push to get americans onboard as the clock is ticking for people to sign up for coverage under the affordable care act. >> death toll rise in the mud slide you know now at 21, crews looking to get back to work after weekend rain hampered recovery efforts. >> shots fired, north and south korea exchanging artillery fire after the force raises the possibility of a nuclear threat.
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>> you stay in the house being abused, not being fed, not being paid. >> the new report focusing on the issue of domestic abuse in the u.k., a form of modern day slavery. >> good morning, welcome to al jazeera america. i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm del walters. >> today is the deadline to sign up for health insurance under the affordable care act. some americans given a little extra time, a week to get covered. >> the white house extended the deadline for those who start the enrollment application by the end of the day. 6 million people have signed up so far. >> it also says another 2 million americans visited healtvisitedhealthcare.gov over.
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there's still confusion over what the plan covers and doesn't. we have the story. >> i think the only thing i really know about obamacare is what i've seen on "saturday night live." >> the affordable care act also known as obamacare continues to confuse many americans. >> it's enormously complex. what happens in one state is different mom another. the other problem we've had is this disastrous rollout that complicated things further. >> we did fumble the ball. what i'm going to do is make sure we get it fix. >> there are pros and cons to the plan. >> the law does protect people who fall ill from being dropped by their provider and that he is with preexisting conditions like cancer or mental illness can't be denied coverage. there are no annual or lifetime limits. low american americans are eligible for coverage, tax credit and rebates and children
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can stay on parents health plan until 26. >> it does not control the cost of health care. even supporters see that as a problem. >> nationwide, premiums have continued to rise, though how much of that is because of obamacare is the subject of heated debate. up to 30 million americans lost private health insurance because policies didn't meet the law's requirements. opponents called that a broken promise, but the administration says those plans were substandard, in some cases offering little coverage for a lot of money. also now, companies with 50 or more employees must provide health benefits or pay a penalty. americans who don't sign up for health insurance will be fined 1% of their income in 2014 and the fines increase every year. all told, the changes are part of a 10 year plan. the measures rolled out now are the key parts of the law, but it is likely to be several years before their full impact can
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truly be measured. >> randall pinkston is in washington with us for more on today's deadline. what is the white house doing to get more sign ups last minute. >> the white house is continuing its non-stop publicity campaign to get more people to sign up. vice president joe biden is appearing on a national talk show, the rachael ray show to encourage more enrollment. over the weekend, kathleen sebelius made the rounds in texas and florida, make the of the last-minute pitch for enrolledment. the deadline is motivating more americans to sign up before midnight. there were long lines at state-run health care exchanges, call centers that were overloaded. a lot of people came into those health care exchanges in person, because they couldn't access the website or the phone system just kept them on hold, so anyone who
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has begun the process of applying either on line, on the phone, or in person will be given the opportunity to complete their applications later, as late as april 7. the key is to get started before midnight. >> let's hope that silent doesn't crash again. republicans are ramping up their attacks on obamacare. is there any sign that is working. >> yes and no. if you look at the latest polls, they definitely show that a vast majority of americans are opposed to obamacare. actually, the polls also show that fewer are opposed if it's called the affordable care act, in the perception angle, certainly the gop with negative campaigning, it has been taking an effect but on the other hand, most americans say they want the affordable care act to be changed. they don't want it eliminated. on that score, the republicans aren't winning. >> randall pinkston for us in
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washington, thank you. >> rescue teams won't use search dogs today as they continue to look for victims of that washington state mud slide. the dogs are given the days off because it is worried the cold and rain will dull their sense of smell. the death toll is 21. the number of people unaccounted for has been reduced. we have the latest on the latest recovery work there. there's confusion about the numbers released rewarding the missing and the dead. what are you hearing? >> there has been confusion all along. they're being very careful. that 21 that you've heard about, those are people found at the site, removed, processed and identified by the medical examiner, their families notified. we do understand that there are more bodies at the site, or in the process of identification and that number absolutely will
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go up. it's going to go up substantially, we're told by officials over the last couple days, but we haven't gotten that final number at all. they're now saying many people may never be found. one thing that search and rescue crews should have on their side today is this, there are stars still out now. that means they may actually see sunshine as they go back to work. >> for the 10th day, emergency workers will slog through the mud and debris of the huge landslide, 70 feet deep in places, new measurements show. they are still finding bodies and now acknowledge many victims may never be located in the jumbled mess that was once a rural neighborhood. >> what you have out here is houses that have been picket up and like run through a blender and dropped through the ground. you have other houses that the cars are still parked in the garage. it's not livable, but somewhat
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intact. you have everything out here. >> a service road finished over the weekend links the east and west sides of the debris field, making the movement of personnel and equipment easier. it's not open to public traffic and there is no official time line for when the state highway, buried in the mud, will be cleared and radar. >> the thing that makes it the hardest is the weather conditions. the people are wading through in some places waist-deep mud. >> they should get a break for the next 48 hours or so with dryer weather predicted for the region, making this difficult and gruesome job just a little bit easier, as so many families still wait for answers. >> the list of those that are missing still remains at 30 and that number is the same as it has been and there is no additional information at this time on that. >> one of the important things they are paying attention to now is just safety for the workers who are out on that very dangerous site. the rains over the weekend made
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things very slick, very difficult, made movement very difficult and created large pools in the sort of clay like sub structure or this slide that they've had to pump out. it's a very dangerous site. the people sending those crews in are saying they don't want to make things worth getting people hurt on the job. they will be paying more and more attention to worker safety as they have been all along. it will be more and more important as they move forward from here. >> reporting live from arlington, washington this morning, thank you very much. >> pakistan's former army chief has been charged with high treason, the first military ruler to be form ally indicted. a pakistanie court charged him with imposing military rule en2007. musharraf was one of pakistaned longest leaders. he faces the death penalty if
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convicted. >> >> a series of corruption allegations against a former mayor of israeli is being called one of the worst fraud schemes in israel's history. >> north and south korea exchanging fire over a disputed sea border. artillery shots were aimed at the north after hundreds of shells landed in the yellow sea. the exchange follows a new nuclear threat from the north. >> it lasted for more than three hours, say separate sessions of firing, 500 projectiles fired and the south careens saying a hundred of those fell in their waters. the south koreans are calling this a planned provocation. it must be emphasized none of
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these projectiles were aimed at vessels. it does go to recent uptick in north korean activity with dozens of short range rockets launched, a couple of mid range missiles as well launched last week. sunday, north korea talking about a possible new form of nuclear tests. i think no coincidence, as well, that it happened on the same day as an enormous south screen u.s. and australian joint amphibious landing exercise, which has been carried out on this southeastern coast of south korea on this beach and a couple of others in which 13,000 troops were involved. we went onboard the ship, which is in charge of this entire exercise, a little earlier spoke to the most send you're u.s. marine in the region. he said this is a matter of it being a good time militarily to carry this out, they have evaluated the potential risk of
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north korea seeing this as a pro occasion but felt the advantage was such that they had to carry it out at this time. >> south korea have said no shells have hit land but residents on five islands were evacuated as a precaution. >> despite an intense search for missing flight 370, nothing has been found. several orange items spotted by a search plane turned out to be fishing equipment. they are moving to a new search area in the southern indian ocean where the plane probably ran out of fuel. the jet disappeared march 8. australia's prime minister promising to step up efforts. >> we owe it to everyone to do whatever we reasonably can and we can seep kevining for quite some time to come and we will keep searching for quite some time to come. the intensity of our search and magnitude is increasing, not
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decreasing. >> some relatives refusing to accept malaysia's accounts. several dozen relatives demanding answers from the government. >> secretary of state john kerry met with foreign minister sergey lavrov to discuss ukraine. >> they talked for four hours, but it seems the two sides are no closer to a diplomatic solution. >> nothing concrete came out of this meeting, but they did agree on one thing, to work toward "a diplomatic settlement of the situation in ukraine." >> the u.s. and russia have differences of opinion about the events that led to this cries, but both of us recognize the importance of finding a diplomatic solution and of simultaneously meeting the needs of the ukrainian people. >> in paris, secretary of state john kerry met with his russian
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counterpart, sergey lavrov for hours. despite the lengthy meeting, no tangible solutions to the ukraine crisis came out of it. kerry said russia's rising troop levels nearing 40,000 soldiers are creating a climate of fear and intimidation that is not helping the situation. >> any real progress in ukraine must include a pullback of the very large russian force that is currently massing along ukraine's borders. >> kerry reiterated ukraine would retain the right to choose its own future and russia great. >> foreign minister lavrov indicated russia wants to respect the right of ukrainians to make that chase. >> both sides made suggestions on ways to deheighten the situation. lavrov said russia will work with the ukrainian people to
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address concerns over minority and language rights. when it comes to recognizing the new ukrainian government both sides essentially agreed to disagree. the russians consider the ukrainian government illegitimate and kerry said that is one sticking point with which the u.s. will not budge. >> we will not accept a path forward where the legitimate government of ukraine is not at the table. >> kerry insists the u.s. is consulting with ukraine at every step of the process. the sunday meeting happened on the heels of a friday phone call from president putin to president obama. >> at least they're still talking. thank you. >> a lot of the baltic states that border russia right now are watching that build up of russian troops closely. 40,000 are poised there. later this morning, we'll talk to the former penalty of lithuania who took over that country after lithuania's independence from the former soviet union in 1990. >> the u.n. is warning of food
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shortages, drought and the possible extinction of species if global warming is not stopped. all couldn't tents will be touched by the impacts of climate change, risks both big and small. the report predicts water supply will be a big issue with flooding a and drought. food will be affected, lead to go higher prices and millions of people going hungry. oceans are likely to rise and become more acidic, killing a large number of marine species. >> heavy rain soaking streets in massachusetts over the weekend, a number of roads closed and swollen rivers in the region may not recede until early tomorrow. >> people in the northeast deal with rain and by all the way, some snow out there in new york today, parts of the midwest of dealing with blizzard conditions today. >> it is snowing outside, nicole mitchell, good morning, our meteorologist. >> good morning, it's that same system the east coast has been dealing with through the weekend. this morning, temperatures have
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gotten just low enough that as the system continues to pull out, you can see the last couple frames with the bright pink. a little bit that have is making it as snow. the system is moving out. anything that you see out there is pretty light, but yes, a couple flakes are going by and this will be clearing through the rest of the day. anyone that was has has midwest, you have the snow and we don't, not so much. we're going to see this was yesterday, temperatures 76 in omaha, 50 degrees in fargo. today is really going to be a change. not only are temperatures going to drop, but the next weather system has come in, already bringing snow in some places, like north dakota. moving across minnesota, michigan, some places could get over a foot of snow with all of this. the winds have been cranking up into the 30-mile per hour range. this track still into tuesday morning, dealing with this before it moves out. temperatures continue to drop
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and already another system pulling out of the rockies and very wet over portions of snort dakota over the next couple days. the went gusts i was mentioned with the one system accounted go into the 50-mile per hour range. we're worried about potential blizzard conditions. when you get the snow blowing so much you can't see, very treacherous on the road. >> i swear to goodness we're having groundhog for dinner this week. it is snowing right now. >> it's light at least in the northeast. >> that is not an april fool's joke by all the way. >> that is down the street, madisomadison square garden ande says those are going away in a calm hours. >> evidence of the spill has now been located hundreds of miles away. that oil was spotted by plane on sunday near north padre island and mustangized. those areas are 200 miles southwest of the original site. marine biologies are concerned that the oil spill in the galveston bay could have
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effects, poisoning fish. >> angry protests in albuquerque new mexico, hundreds of people clashing with police in riot gear. they demand justice over police shootings including the death of a homeless man. there have been 37 police shootings since 2010, 23 have them were fatal. >> they are beefing up security ahead of the world cup in brazil. we talked to residents who say it is nothing more than a show of action. >> an outbreak of the ebola virus spreading. where health officials say it has been found now. >> $5.1 billion, that is our big number of the day in the fast food industry, a sign of a major shake up at the top of the chicken business.
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>> today's big number is not finger-licking good news for the colonel. 5.1 billion is the sales for
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chicchick fill a. >> welcome back to aljazeera america. brazil is looking to crack down on crime ahead of the world cup. >> your husband a big fan is concerned, as well? >> he is excited to head there. he does have concern about the readiness of the venues. >> brass still is stepping up security ahead of the world cup, police storming a slum in rio de janeiro. they are trying to stop the rising drug violence there. critics say more action is needed. >> >> the operation began before dawn. 1,000 military police and marines in armor road vehicles entered the complex of slums near rio's airport.
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special police units armed with automatic weapons patrolled the narrow alleys and rubbish-strewn streets. it is an interconnected group of shanty towns. it is notorious for its violent drug gangs. early they are month, a series of fire bomb attacks and police posts in other areas led politician to say demand a tough response. however, police say the plans to pacify the area were formulated weeks before the attacks. despite the presence of heavily armed police, people are going about their dilly routines, the area appearing calm. the consensus is that the criminals have left the areas days ago. several people were arrested for minor crimes and police say they found a small amount of drugs and guns, but there was no resistance and no shots fired.
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most residents see the operation as a public relations effort. football's world cup kicks off in brazil in june and hundreds of thousands of foreign visitors will converge on the country. the government wants to project an image of being tough on security and ready to host the cup. >> it's all just for show. if they really wanted to help us, give our kids an education, and not come in here with guns drawn. >> police will set up pacification posts and hand over control to the all the way in the coming days. the army is then expected to stay at least until after the world cup is finished. >> the world cup kicks off in 12 cities cruise brazil. rio de janeiro, the site of the 2016 summer olympics as well. >> wall street set to wrap up a rough first quarter. the dow starts the day at 16323,
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the s&p at 1857, the nasdaq at 4155. asian markets ending mostly higher, make key rising 1%. investors in asia hoping japan and china take new steps to spur economic growth and european markets are mostly lower. >> amazon workers in germany are striking over wages. the union says that it is staging a short-term warning strike to get management back to the negotiating table. three german distribution centers were hit by stoppages before christmas. amazon employs 9,000 workers in the country. >> in cuba, lawmakers aimed at making the island more attractive to foreign investors. new investors are exempt from paying taxes for the first eight years. the changes are vein as vital for the island's struggling economy. the cuban economy first opened the island to foreign capitol in
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1995. >> apple and samsung headed back to court today on patent loud. the i-phone maker is suing its rival for ripping off its designs and features. sack sung claims apple stole two of its ideas to use on iphones and ipads. a federal jury found samsung was infringing on apple patents. >> it is deadline day to sign up for health insurance under the affordable care act. the challenges the program still faces. >> secretary of state john kerry holding weekend talks with his russian counterpart, trying to did he escalate the crisis in ukraine. >> workers coming to a new country to improve their lives finding themselves subject to abuse by their employers. the conditions they are facing and what's being done about it. >> football and hockey around the only sports dogged by safety
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concerns, baseball has a new rule to deal with a major safety issue of its own.
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>> good morning, welcome to al jazeera america. i'm del walters. >> i'm stephanie sy. human rights activists are sounding the alarm over possible abuses of workers in the u.k. >> also ahead, we talk to the former president of lithuania about the first independence from the soviet union they had back in 1990. we're going to talk to him about the crisis in ukraine. >> today is deadline day for americans to sign up for health insurance under the affordable care act. the white house says 6 million people have now signed up, shy of the 7 million goal. the administration is making one
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last push to get americans insured. >> without health insurance, you can face fines and big medical bills and then you'll have to dress up like a pizza. >> a massive marketing push has been underway for a month to get the deadline out to sign up for health insurance under the affordable care act. >> we're on t.v., radio, bill boards, print ads. all our advertising right now is reminding people march 31 is the last day to enroll. >> here in chicago, get covered illinois, the state run organization charged with helping people sign up has been going door to door looking for uninsured people. it has not been a completely smooth process for many, like 27-year-old single mother jacqueline diaz. >> i called the number, never got a phone call back. i left a number, never got anything back. we went back on. i had a reapply through the whole application again. >> today's deadline is a soft
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one for those who have already gun the process. >> a conditional extension was issued as long as participants say they started the application before or on march 31, they could avoid presidents and have until mid april to start the process. >> the extension comes amidst concerns that the early enrollment goal was looking less achievable. >> we are getting mixed signals is the deadline for real march 31 or is there wiggle room. what penalty into i really face if i don't follow through and get insurance. is that really going to be enforceable. >> is there ultimately an individual mandate that means anything. >> according to a kaiser family foundation tracking poll, only 39% of people surveyed could correctly answer when the sign up deadline was and half plan to remain uninsured. ramal young decided to meet with a personal and a half great or. >> i found out about it today,
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actually, as i was walking down the street, one guy told me you need to apply. >> there are various exemptions under the affordable care act that would allow some more time to sign up. a major life change, like having a baby or losing a job. without an exemption, the financial penalties could be $95 or 1% of yourly income, whichever is higher. >> on average in illinois, there may be 30 different plan options. you don't want to wait until the last minute. >> missing the deadline completely would mean a wait until the next open enrollment in november. aljazeera, chicago. >> i don't know if you've heard the reports that i'm seeing already that healthcare.gov is having problems and some getting
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a message saying the site is temporarily unavailable. i just tried the site and was able to come on. is this going to be an uhoh moment for the obama add innings. >> they don't want to end all the way they began this process. they have ramped up the tech and software, and since october, i mean, they've seen tremendous success in serving more people. now what they're experiencing is a big surge of these lately comers, people who procrastinated waiting for a long time are now as you get close to the final deadline signing up, so hopefully they certainly hope they can fix this and move on. the fact could get on is a good sign, but i guess we'll have to see if the website can handle all this late minute traffic. >> let's talk about this deadline extension. how many people do we think will benefit from this extension into april? >> i don't think they have any hard numbers, but they think if you had, maybe a million people who in the very beginning of
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this process had a lot of trouble getting on, that this gives them kind of a lifeline, an extra extension, some more time to do this right, because they want to get to 7 million, to the high six mommies, because of course the idea is the more people you have, the more diverse and healthy the people are, the lower the premiums will be next year. you won't see as big an increase. that's what they're banking on. >> republicans are crying foul on this last minute change, but so are insurance companies, i understand. what's the impact of the deadline extension for them? >> well, insurers feel if they don't have this hard deadline, then people can kind of get insured when they get sick. that's always the fear in the insurance industry. the administration said april 15 is absolutely the final day. i think from their perspective, if you get those young people who they're reaching out to now, if you still get them in, again, that's good for the stability of
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the marketplace over the long run. >> this is an interesting poll by the kaiser family foundation, on the forefront of research for the a.t.a. 18% of those surveyed think the affordable care act should be repealed or moved, 59% feel it should be repealed or removed. howard zone didn't agree with all the points, where do you think the law could and should be improved? >> well, i think the biggest area is certainly the cost control provisions. this law makes some important in-roads in making sure we change all the way health care is delivered so that you kind of bring the costs down, but you could always do more in that reward. i think moving forward, that's really where congress needs to focus, to make sure that over the long term, you kind of start bending that cost curve and you don't see those huge increases that we've seen year after year. >> i just want to ask you a quick question about how this is going to work. after this deadline, tax
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penalties will kick in for a lot of folks who don't have insurance. that's how it's supposed to work. how is the government going to know if you didn't sign up or are uninsured. isn't this an honor system? >> you kind of check your box and say i had trouble in the beginning, give me extra time. when it comes to the. thes, that goes through your taxes. i think there, the i.r.s. is going to know and it's going to be treated in that fashion. >> managing he had door of think progress, have a good day. >> reporting reports of bad behavior by a member of the president's security detail. a marine assigned to protect the president during his overseas trip to the netherlands might have talked about his job and passed around his credentials while drinking at a nightclub. he was first identified by a dutch newspaper. officials say he's still on duty. they are checking to see if he violated any rules. >> lawmakers walking for tighter
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security at new york's world trade center. new york senator schumer saying the department of home land security needs to take measures to protect the construction site. daredevils have twice sneaked to the top of the building in recent months. schumer now proposing increased security. >> we are falling down in protecting the construction silent of one of the most important and prized landmarks in new york city, and in the world. >> both breaches have involved the same lack of security, a hole in the fence and distracted guards. the to your security chief resigned friday. >> the secret service says a man is in custody after climbing a fence at the white house. it happened after the man was -- and the man was immediately placed into arrest. the white house went into lockdown. no word on the man's identity or charges he'll face.
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the president returned to washington sunday after a trip in the middle east and europe. >> twos" of ebola blamed for 70 deaths. senegal saying border crosses into guinea would be closed. it is highly contagious, no treatment or vaccine. >> secretary of state john kerry is traveling to the middle east today days after israel released its will not release a group of palestinian prisoners. israel was schedule would to free the prisoners this weekend. the israel prime minister netanyahu said that will not happen. a framework would extend negotiations until the end of the year. >> secretary of state john kerry and soaring lot of meeting. nothing has changed since that meeting.
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>> i think there were hopes that after john kerry's dramatic decision to change his flight back from saudi arabia to washington and divert to paris so he could hold these late night talks with the russian foreign minister sergey lavrov, there was hopes something would come out of this meeting. after four hours, they emerged and basically are about as far away as they've ever been in this crisis over ukraine and crimea. the sticking point seems to be now the presence of these russian troops. u.s. intelligence is saying 35-40,000 russian troops are now poised on the border with eastern ukraine. ner not involved in any sort of exercise, they are just poised there. it would appear that they have become -- their presence has become a bargaining chip for the russians as these talks seem to flounder. lavrov said he was prepared to talk to ukraine. he put up proposals that would
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call for a constitutional reform and also plans for possibly a federation, but this is going nowhere with those troops still on the border and crimea, of course, still part of russia and will remain part of russia no matter what ukraine thinks about it. only in the last few ours, we've herd the russian foreign minister medvedev has arrived in crimea, visiting the new addition to russia. he'll be holding talks there on social and economic plans for their new territory. >> meanwhile, as we have reported, russia outlining a series of conditions that the u.s. says are not acceptable. the director of the american institute in ukraine, good morning, anthony for being with us this morning. after that meeting, secretary of state john kerry came out, i want you to listen to what they had to say. >> the u.s. and russia have
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differences of opinion about the events that led to this crisis. both of us recognize the importance of finding a diplomatic solution and of simultaneously immediating the needs of the ukrainian people. >> ahead of that meeting, russia wanted federations set up across ukraine. was that a deal breaker? >> that's the essence of what russia wants. that's what they want to talk about, ok, so they've got their forces massed on the east herb border of ukraine, saying the solution to the problem of ukraine and ukraine has a kind of bone of contention between the easement and west is the constitutional question of med really ism, will they go that way. that's what they want. they want it written into the constitution that ukraine will be a neutral state, not aligned, not innate toe, and that's what the russians are after here. >> now, did we see vladimir
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putin blink, because the president was in saudi arabia, gets a phone call from vladimir putin, vladimir putin has said the sanctions didn't work. weaver seen the ruble devalid, the russian stock exchange have difficulty. was this an indication there might have been a crack in vladimir putinar mother. >> i see talking as a way to avoid certain sanctions as that certainly being the case. >> and it is stall tactic? >> putin would rather not move troops into ukraine. he would like to get an agreement on fecallization. the russians have seen what happened in ukraine where twice a government came to power, it was thrown out in the orange
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revolution, then again in 2010, it was just thrown out last february. in other words, what seems to be moscows concern is that east ukraine seems to be -- the message seems to be that east ukraine has no power to exercise power within ukraine and east ukraine will be treated as second class citizen within the republic. >> the white house has said all along that as far as its concerned, russia has to pull troops back and recognize ukraine. if the white house starts to company pit late on its demands before new sanctions are imposed, is this another one of those movable lines in the sand that the white house has been accused of in other places, such as syria? >> it could be. i think that's the issue. if the u.s. demands that russia pull back its troops and move back from the border before talks take place, that's going to be hard for the russians to do. the russians i think are driving
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a fairly hard bargain there, the troops are there, we want the federalization on the agenda, kerry saying that's an issue for the ukrainians to decide, but the fact that moscow is not talking to ukraine is an impasse. it's good, talking is positive. let's just see what happens here. >> 40,000 troops on the border. even though they're talking and moscow says those troops are there for military exercises, it is very tense and nobody believes that they are there just for exercises. >> it is tense and obviously part of the motive in having those troops on the border is to exercise psychological effect and to pave all the way for negotiations, pave an atmosphere -- >> should the white house do anything or hold fast? >> in terms of -- look, they've got to go back to the ukrainians and say this is the situation we
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face. we have plenty of influence in kiev in theory. this is the testing time for washington. we helped create this new government in kiev, very much behind the appeal gorbachev drove him from office. can we go back and deliver and get them to go along with what needs to be done here. >> executive director of the american institute in ukraine, thank you. >> we're going to be talking to the former president of lithuania, the first president after that country's independence from the soviet union back in 1990. we'll be talking about this very issue. >> looking forward that. put ago stop to modern day slavery in the u.k., failing to protect workers from abuse. ♪ ♪ >> helping victims of the boston marathon bombing heal through
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music, students lending their voices to a new song. >> as the new baseball season gets underway, the big change put in place to protect players protecting home plate. >> this is a live look at the brooklyn bridge in new york city on a gray and snowy monday morning.
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only on al jazeera america ♪ ♪ >> eighth graders in massachusetts raising their voices a year after the boston marathon bombing, singing "i will run again" to be played at this year's race. >> the songwriter was inspired when she met a malaysia airline.
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>> welcome to al jazeera america. we're going to tell you about a new report bringing attention to domestic abuse in the u.k. >> first let's look at where the rain and snow are falling today. >> definitely looking at a major storm system into the midsection of the country, and i'll have more on that, including places that can see over a foot of snow. we want to hit a couple of other places. first of all, there was just snow within the last hour falling in new york. you can see how quickly that is moving out. that's part of the same thing that brought us rain over the weekend for so many placen in term of some of the sport winding up today, still a few clouds, but looking good for the game in new york and sunshine for baltimore. heading toward the northwest, drier skies for the recovery efforts still going on in washington state, but that's not the whole west coast. you can already see moisture
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pushing in no northern california. that's our wet spot for a couple of days ahead and where w. that, that will impact one of our games going on at oakland today. we could see a chance for rain and wind in that forecast. i'll have more coming up in a little bit. >> today is opening day for many major league table teams and there is a major change to how part of the game is played. >> we'll tell you about a rule change designed to keep the players safe at home. >> a sure sign is birds flying back north, baseball is back. on this opening day, much will be familiar from flyballs to close plays at first, but one familiar thing, something that's been a part of baseball from the beginning will be noticeably absent, home plate collisions. as we report, tradition has given way to safety. >> it's been called the most
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sacred part of the game, home plate, where every hitter and baserunner want to end up and the spot every catcher protects in ernest. a new rule has been added to protect the protector of home plate. >> anytime we can protect young kids, we're better because of it. i think you look at the different sports, football, hockey, they're all taking measures to protect these guys, and not just now, but in the long term. >> with support from boesch, a former catcher. the rule states a baserunner may not run out of direct line to the plate in order to initiate contact with the catcher and the catcher may not block the pathway of a runner trying to score unless he has possession of the ball. >> i think it's going to obviously take some aggressiveness away from what a crash can do and baserunner do, changing the dynamics of the play. it's a different base, it's not
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first, second or third, it's home and means a run. that's why it evolved from 120 years like that. >> nothing has changed. it's consistent with every other base on the field and you can't block the plate without the ball in their possession. the in tent of the rule is in the right place. it's to avoid injury. >> the main thing it does is that it eliminates the malicious collision, you know, if the catcher's not set up right on top of the plate, it doesn't allow the runner to run through him. >> home plate collisions have been a part of the game. back in may, 2011. the issue tack center stage when a young star absorbed a crushing blow on this plate. he suffered a fractured leg and missed the rest of the season. his manager said this new rule is not on posey. >> i don't want to put this on buster. he doesn't want to be the guy that's responsible for this. we don't have the gear to absorb
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the blow they're getting hit with and they've done scientific studies that have proven that. >> concussions of a potential byproduct of home plate collisions and with the recent lawsuit the nfl has endured, it seems though major league baseball is looking to get ahead of its problem. >> now we have everything we know about concussions. you see a lot more guys probably a little more cautious. >> if you wash me walk, you'll say man, it looks like he took some home plate collision, back issues, knee issues, hip. it's time to make some adjustments. >> one adjustment teams are making is to discourage baserunners from hiding head first into home plate, causing injuries to the runners and catchers. that's sports for this hour. >> some like that violent collision type stuff. >> there is controversy around it. some people would like to see
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the game remain the same. >> marital bliss, probably good for your heart, new discovery discovering married couples are 5% less likely to develop cardiovascular diseases than their counter parts. data analyzed on more than 3.5 million people. >> a new report by human rights watchers revealing a form of modern day slavery in the united kingdom. thousands of migrants item every year. they can't change employers once here in the country. many workers are abused and deprived of their salaries. >> the extended of modern day slavery in the u.k. has shocked many. filipino workers come to work with wealthy sponsors. the system has been known to allow employers to abuse staff, seize their passports effectively enslaving them. this woman ended up taking an
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overdose. >> i too pills and went to the bedroom. my employer came to see me. she said are you crazy? what you did was dangerous. i said i want to die. >> what's most extraordinary about this is the slavery seems to be happening in the wealthiest parts of central london. very rich arabs from the gulf who employ the domestic servitude at home have simply transported their rules and staff to london on the assumption that they can get away with it just as easily here. >> it isn't the only thing said to be behind this, rulings put in place by the home office two years ago to cut down on immigration tied the visas together of worker and employer. it means filipino staff are left with no rights. >> with this law, you don't have any chance to change employer, so what will happen is you can stay in the house being abused,
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not being fed, not being paid, because you know that if you go, if you run away from your employer, you will become undocumented. >> the home office is standing by its visa rules, abusive overseas domestic workers is unacceptable they said, but they have action protection under laws and are provided with a letter in forming them of their rights and where to get help if needed. >> human rights watch said the system simply isn't working. >> there's no mechanism to track on domestic workers once in the u.k. some people we spoke to told us their employers have told them to lie in their applications for the visa, for example saying in the visa application, we're going to pay our worker 1,000 pounds a month and in fact they pay them 200 pounds a month that they send to the philippines, so the worker doesn't see that money, telling them they have a day off. they have no days off in the u.k. >> new laws will come soon,
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billed as the biggest push to stop slavery in the u.k. but will not cover abuse of domestic staff. their rights seem to be solely in the hands of their employers with few checks on their welfare. >> britain has proposed a bill to help tackle labor abuse, but human rights watch says it doesn't go far enough. >> we have a look at the stories we'll follow for the next hour. >> today is the deadline to sign up for health insurance under the affordable care act. the obama administration making a final push to get sign ups. >> the death toll in the washington mud slide climbing to 31. search efforts slowed as rescue dogs are given a rest period. >> north and south korea launching artillery shells following life drills. there have been no reports of any injuries. >> russia's troop build up near the border of ukraine sparking fear in baltic states.
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we'll talk to the former president of lithuania, the first nation to break away from the soviet union back in the 1990's. >> the aljazeera morning news continues. del is back with you in two minutes. have a great morning. >> stories that impact the world, affect the nation and touch your life. >> it's like a brawl here in the waters around monterey. >> only on al jazeera america. al jazeera america gives you the total news experience anytime, anywhere. more on every screen. digital, mobile, social. visit aljazeera.com. follow @ajam on twitter. and like aljazeera america on facebook for more stories, more access, more conversations. so you don't just stay on top of the news, go deeper and get more perspectives on every issue. al jazeera america.
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>> the people are resilient, ready to do what they can to help and the move on from here. >> a community coming together in the face of catastrophe, but the weather not helping that mid slide recovery mission. >> face-to-face on the crisis in ukraine, the united states and russia sitting down for diplomacy, why the two sides are very far apart. >> i want you to know that we are completely focused on the problem at the highest levels of the company and putting the customer first and that is
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guiding every decision we make. >> the head of general motors apologizing last week for that deadly defect, but now she's about to face a new fire storm on capitol hill. >> it is always confidence-shaking and disappointing when people that you trust let you down. >> new jerseys governor chris christie passing the buck on the so-called bridge gate scandal and that's not all the outspoken governor had to say. >> you have to kind of grab and say you're tired, it's time to take a break. they just want to push through because they are committed to this community. >> recovery workers feeling the mental and physical pain from days of digging through that natural disaster, as the official death toll from the washington state mud slide climbs once again. welcome to al jazeera america.
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i'm del walters. the official death toll at 21 and expected to rise higher. rescue teams won't use search dogs today. the dogs have been given two days off because authorities are now concerned that the cold and rain could dull their sense of smell. dry weather in the forecast after weekend rain hampered search efforts. we have the latest on what has become a daunting recovery effort. there's been confusion about the numbers released rewarding the missing and dead. clarify what you're hearing. there has been at times, but now we understand there are 21 confirmed dead. what that means is they were found at the site, bodies removed, processed by the medical examiner, relatives of the deceased notified and then listed as dead. there are still people identified out of the site, diseased who haven't been
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processed through all those officials steps. we know that that number is going to go up. pitch dark out here now. there will have been some minor work a the road clearing and site preparation out of the site of the mud slide overnight. they are still working very minor crews through the nighttime hours. search and rescue can be though, as soon as the sun goes up will be back out on that mud slide and getting back to work. >> for the 10th day, emergency workers will go through the debris of the huge landslide, 70 feet deep in places. they are still finding bodies and acknowledge many victims may never be located in the jumbled mess that was once a rural neighborhood on the river. >> what you have out here is houses that have been picked up and sort of run through a blender and dumped back on the ground. you have other houses that still have cars in the garage. the house is pushed, not livable, but somewhat intact, so
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you have everything out here. >> a it was road links the east and west sides of the debris field, making the movement of personnel and equipment easier. it's not open to public traffic, though and there is no official time line for when the state highway, buried in the mud, will be cleared and radar. >> the thing that makes it the rewardest is weather conditions. the people are wading through in some places waist-deep mud. >> they should get a break for the next 48 hours with dryer weather predicted for the region, making this difficult and gruesome job just a little bit easier, as so many families wait for answers. >> the list of those missing remains at 30 and that number is the same as it has been and there is no additional information at this time on that. >> we have seen stars out this morning and that is great news for search and rescue crews. they might get a chance to see the sunshine today and that
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should make their very difficult job a little less miserable on this monday, on their 10th day of searching at the site. >> live in war ling to know, washington, thank you very much. >> today is deadline day to sign up for the affordable care act. a last minute dash may prevent people from signing up. anyone heading to healthcare.gov is seeing a warning that says the site is down for maintenance. it is said to be a software bug and being radar. the white house saying 2 million americans visited healthcare.gov over the weekend. randall pinkston is live in washington, d.c. with more on today's deadline. what do we know about the site going down? >> formally, they do routine maintenance overnight and normally done by early morning. of course, we don't know the nature of the bug and they're trying to deal with it as quickly as they can, because there is a last minute crush, if
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you go there, you will see the site is down. it will also tell you that you should leave your email address and you will be contacted later. last fall, that site, you may recall malfunctioned so badly that it caused the whole system to be shut down for about two months. the white house today is continuing its nonstop publicly push on that over the weekend, kathleen sebelius was on the road. people are being asked to join the affordable care act program. people in long lines at health care offices in states with health care exchanges, some people saying that their state websites and phone lines were jammed up, so they came to apply in person. del. >> randall, thank you very much. >> secretary of state john kerry meeting with russian foreign minister sergey lavrov in paris
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to discuss the issue of ukraine. after four hours of talks, it seems the two sides still far apart. >> no solid solutions came out of this meeting you, but they did agree to work toward a diplomatic settlement of the situation in ukraine. >> the u.s. and russia have differences of opinion about the events that led to this crisis, but both of us recognize the importance of finding a diplomatic solution and of simultaneously meeting the needs of the ukrainian people. >> in paris, secretary of state john kerry met with his russian counter part, sergey lavrov, for hours. no tangible solutions to the ukraine crisis came out of the meeting. kerry said rising troop levels on ukraine's borders are creating a climate of fear and intimidation that is not helping the situation. >> any real progress in ukraine
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must include a pull back of the very large russian force that is currently massing along ukraine's borders. >> kerry reiterated the united states will continue to support the people of ukraine's right to choose their own future and russia agreed. >> foreign minister lavrov indicated that russia wants the respect, the right of ukrainians to make that choice. >> both sides made suggestions on ways to deescalate the heightened security around ukraine. >> lavrov said russia will work with the ukrainian people to address concerns over minority and language rights. when it comes to recognizing the new ukrainian government, both sides essentially agreed to disagree. the russians consider the ukrainian government i will legitimate and kerry said that is one sticking point with which the u.s. government will not budge. >> we will not accept a path
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forward where the legitimate government of ukraine is not at the table. >> kerry insists the u.s. is consulting with ukraine at every step of the process and a sunday meeting happened on the heels of a friday phone call between president putin and president obama. >> they talked for an hour. >> in just a few moments, we will be joined by the former president of lithuania, the first president after lithuania declared independence from the soviet union. we'll talk about the events unfolding in ukraine. >> prime minister tony abbot saying his country is stepping up efforts to find the missing malaysian airlines jet. authorities confirmed sunday that debris collected in the indian ocean is not part of the missing flight, but fishing
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debris and other flotsam. >> the one message delivered again and again is not to give up hope. i promise the families that malaysia, working with our international partners will not give up hope. >> pakistan's former president and army chief musharraf has been charged with high treason, a pakistani court charged him with unlawfully suspending the constitution and in pose be military rule. he was a long serving leader and faces the death penalty. >> former israel prime minister
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has been found guilty in his bribery trial. he was accused of paying off construction workers in a massive real estate project when he served as the mayor of jerusalem 10 years ago. a series of corruption allegations led him to resign as prime minister in 2009, called one of the worst fraud schemes in israel's history. >> today marking a u.s. government deadline for syrian diplomats to leave the country, embassy operations suspended in washington along with consulates in michiganen and texas. a suicide take in a lebanese border down killed soldiers and left others injured. an international panel has rejected syria's plan to ship the rest of its stockpile. >> there has been another nuclear thought from north korea, south korea saying it
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retaliated, aimingar tilly shells in the north after hundred was shells landed in the sea. this exercise is not designed to react to any political situation. it's not designed to send a message. this is something that we have to do to be ail to operate with our allies. >> sunday, north korea threatened to carry out a new form of nuclear tests. south korea said no shells had lined. five islands were evacuated just in case. >> general motors new c.e.o. faces congress tuesday after the ignition switch recall. lawmakers want to know why it tack more than a decade to flag that problem. the hearing comes as g.m. adds more cars to its recall list. >> general motors c.e.-pill face
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tough questions be from lawmakers. house and senate investigators want to know how executives at the nation's biggest automakers can say they knew nothing about ignition problems and waited more than a decade to respond. congress is also wondering what the ntsb knew about the problems that date back more than a decade and what they did about it. a memo released sunday by house investigators indicates that the highway safety regulators declined to open a formal investigation into the g.m. ignition even after receiving complaints and field reports about the problems. the ignition supplier told g.m. in 2002 before any of the vehicles hit the road that the system did not meet automakers specks. general motors said barra and other top executives new nothing
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until january 31 of this year, yet the company didn't issue its first recall of nearly 120,000 vehicles until february 10. two weeks later, it recalled an additional 748,000 vehicles. friday, it added another 824,000, bringing the total to more than 2 million. barra released this statement about the company's latest recall, trying to locate several thousands switches in a boplation of 2.2 million vehicles and distributed to thousands of retailers isn't practical. we are going to provide our customers with the peace of mind they deserve and expect by getting the new switches into all the vehicles. g.m. is also feeling the heat from federal prosecutors. the justice democratic is now examining whether general motors is criminally liable for failing to disclose problems with its vehicle, all this amid concerns that g.m.s federal bailout protected the automakers from civil suits.
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aljazeera. >> those defective ignition switches have been linked to 13 deaths in 31 separate crashes. >> russia's military build up near the borders of ukraine sparking fears in baltic states. lithuania broke away from the soviet union in 1990, its president joins us next. >> viruses sparking fierce of a pandemic. where the ebola view of us has been detected. >> a sky diver falls to his death. the simple mistake he made just before a midair disaster.
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>> the united states is consulting with ukraine at every step of this process, and we will not accept a path forward where the legitimate government of ukraine is not at the table. >> that is secretary of state john kerry talking after his meeting with russian counter port sergey lavrov in paris, both sides agreeing there needs to be a diplomatic solution in
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ukraine, but nothing concrete has changed since that meeting on sunday. the baltic states bordering russia watching the build up of 50,000 russian troops closely, trying to figure out what implications it might have for them. lithuania's first president after it's independence from the soviet union is now a member of the european parliament and joins us from lithuania. mr. president, thank you for being with us. i want to play more of what the secretary of state had to say following that meeting. >> the u.s. and russia have differences of opinion about the events that led to this crisis, but both of us recognize the importance of finding a diplomatic solution and of simultaneously meeting the needs of the ukrainian people. >> so mr. president, again, thank you for being with us this morning. with that as a backdrop, are you
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optimistic that a diplomatic solution to this crisis can be found? >> i'm not optimistic. my greatest concern is a frustration and apparent weakness being unprepared for such an unexpected attack against the u.n. type world order, u.n. chart we are all its principles. nobody asks openly, mr. putin, is this your true decision to leave the united nations? is your illegitimate government of russia also for that? >> so you say it is weakness. what exactly is the weakness unidentified? put a finger on it, call weakness, weakness, who's weak? >> i see that this lack of
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consistency, if russia is an aggressor and an exciter, it is not taken properly. they are now undergoing negotiations, how to accept what was done. >> so i want to make sure that i have heard what you are saying correctly. you believe that the united nations should act to kick russia out of the u.n. >> not to kick, but to state that by such a decision, and action, russia stays beside the united states. this is decision of russia itself. nobody is kicking out. they want out. >> what do you believe -- this
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is the question everybody seems to be asking, what do you believe vladimir putin's end game to be, what do you think that he really wants? >> what you wants is you better ask him or them. now they are giving promises to stop further invasion, but you can't trust them anymore. just see how they are involving the opponent in conditionalities. that means that russia's promises are of zero value. they simply are using the chance to get the right of force, to dictate all europe until it agrees to it and continues to live in the shade of an exciting strategic partner. >> what do you think the west and the united states needs to do to stop russian aggression if that is what you think this is?
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>> i would like to see more consistency in policies of both europeans and united states. because if first reaction was strong and clear, and now diplomacy of russia succeeded to involve talks about secondary issues which are not proved, allegations against ukrainians, if ukrainian is in war with russia. it is nonsense. it is russia in war against ukraine ukraine does not attack russia. >> i want to play a little bit of what the russian penalty had to say. he has been accusing the west of
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supporting a too day at a. listen to what he said to that joint session of the russian parliament just for a second. >> i remember very well the explanation given by russian president about two years ago in an open interview to nation, when a boy asked him mr. president, in my classmates, two boys are meeting each other, who is guilty and president gave a lesson for all in the world. one was beaten then was guilty. so now ukrainians are beaten, they are guilty. everybody in europe may be beaten and guilty. >> 50,000 troops now on the ukrainian border, the russian president has govern teed the west that this is a military
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exercise that he has no intention was invading ukraine. do you believe him? >> they used to say it before, the same words, which have not been compelled, so wants to believe, one can believe to be miss guided. mr. putin underlined -- >> let me use the vernacular -- >> mr. putin. >> do you believe the russian president is lying when he says he has no intentions to in void ukraine with those 50,000 troops that are poised on the border of ukraine? >> russian politics, even of the highest rank are usually lying
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in very easy manner. i remember when it was openness at the president medved, you should be not a liar, you promised that you withdraw your troops from georgia and now you are doing nothing, don't be a liar. they were open words, and in the press. >> are you, mr. president, saying that russian president vladimir putin is lying when he says those troops that are on the border are not part of any incursion, but simply there for military exercises, yes or no? >> i am sure that he keeps for himself many options, also to step forward and then become liar for highest goals. >> is this personally painful
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for you to watch what's happening in ukraine after knowing what happened in lithuania? >> it is still not in lithuania, but every neighbor of russia may expect the same as the prom of restoration of an empire was proclaimed years ago. >> so you believe that what he said when he said one of the darkest moments in russian history was the breakup of the soviet empire, you believe that he now wants to brick by brick, block by block, put that empire back together. >> mr. putin has said it at a very beginning of his president's year, he said did not compare me with gorbachev. he dismissed, he dissolved, he
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lost, i will collect them back. they are words. >> now defending the annexation of crimea, the russian penalty said that he is supporting russian speaking people in the region, calling the people that overthrew the government in ukraine a coup d'etat. listen to what he had to say. we have that now. >> millions of russians will leave in ukraine russian speaking people. russia will always protect their interests, using political diplomatic legal means. >> where do you stand on the issue of russia protecting russian in the region? >> russians in the region are not attacked. they are not oppressed. they don't need this defense and protection. they even sent many petitions from the eastern ukraine, petitions of russians to
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president of russia, we are russians, but please, don't protect us. >> but i want to make sure -- >> listen to this. >> i want to make sure we have this correct before you go. your message to the west to president obama, to the european union, to the united nations would be do not trust vladimir putin or take him at his word. >> indeed so, because he was confusing all them so many times, and nobody can say that finally, now, he is sincere. >> the first president after lithuania declared independence from the soviet union, now a member of the european parliament, mr. president, thank you for being with us this morning. >> thank you very much for this opportunity. >> still ahead, if you have not already signed up for health
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insurance, you may be forced to pay for it. it's deadline day to register under the affordable care act but for many americans, insurance is still out of reach. >> protestors had taken over one of the largest and more important cities in venezuela. now the government there is pushing back. >> we're calling down and protecting the construction site of one of the most important and prized landmarks in new york city, and in the world. >> a do you live action a not one, but two security breaches in the new world trade center site. chuck schumer now demanding things change.
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>> welcome to al jazeera america. i'm del walters. these are the stories we're following this hour. search crews hope that drier weather will aid in the recovery
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effort in washington state. the number of people killed rising to 21 over the weekend but the number of missing people dropping from 90 to 30. >> tensions flair between north and south korea over a disputed ocean boundary, the north firing 500 artillery rounds into the yellow sea, the south responding with its own. islands crack waited as a precaution. >> today is the deadline to sign up for the october october. more than 6 million have enrolled, but not everyone heading to healthcare.gov is seeing positive signs. they're seeing a message down for mainly nance. health and human services officials saying it is a software bug being radar. >> a loft push to get americans insured through the affordable care act, but for millions buying health care is financially out of reach. for some, free clinics are the only option. >> once a month for four months, diane brown has come to the
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arlington free clinic in virginia hope to go get care. >> this is it for anyone who doesn't have medical insurance and can't afford it, this clinic is the only way and unfortunately, it is the only one here in our area. >> the clinic saw 1700 people but turned away more. it holds a monthly lottery to pick more patients. >> hopefully today, i'm praying that i will get the lottery and i'll be accepted. >> brown is too young for medicare and without a disability or dependent children, doesn't qualify for medicaid. virginia has the fourth toughest eligibility requirements in the country. she's caught in a coverage gap. >> every place i called, obamacare is $200, $300, $400 a month. if you only get $900 a month, you can't afford that. the free clinic is my only chance at receiving medication. >> if she made more money, she
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could qualify for federal subs decease. the obama administration intended an expanded medicaid program to cover people like her, but the supreme court led the states decide whether to grow the program. the governor wants to expand, but the republican controlled house is fighting it, citing long term costs, so the clinic is as busy as ever. >> most people have families, some have one, two, three jobs. what they lack is health insurance. >> jodie kelly directs clinical adding. waiting to see if he'll be chosen, resident jackson. >> i came this morning. i can't get health care. i'm trying to take care of my health today, and, you know, hopefully, i'll be the winner. >> some are lucky.
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>> yea! >> very excited! the last ticket and i finally got in. [ laughter ] >> others are not. >> didn't go well today, but i'm glad for those who did got in, they can be treated. >> diane brown said she'll be back next month, because it's her only option. >> got my head up, look and i'm positive. i'm looking forward, motivated, i'm just going to keep coming, because one day i'm going to get that number. i'm going to get it. >> the affordable care act deadline may be here, but visitors to the clinic are more concerned with the clinic's next lottery. >> free clinics in virginia serve 75,000 people in 2012. they expect numbers to go up even with the affordable care act. >> at least one lawmaker calling for tighter security at new york's one trade center, chuck schumer saying the department of homeland security needs to protect the freedom tower construction site, daredevils twice sneaking in in recent
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months. early they are month, a keep ager slipped past security and reached the top of the spire to take pictures. back in september, three sky divers are that arrested after base jumping off the roof. schumer is proposing increased security patrols and review of the performance of the guards. >> these most recent incidents suggest a tremendous loophole in security. thereof been two safety breaches at the number one terrorist target in the country. both may have been involved in the same lax security aba hole in the fence. >> the company that mansion the building said the chief resigned friday. >> governor chris christie it putting his staff under the microscope, speaking in las vegas to the republican jewish coalition sunday. he says in the future web plans to question his staff instead of being so trusting. >> very clear signals as i said during the speech to not only
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the people who you serve, but to the people who serve with you that certain conducts and action are acceptable and certain are completely unacceptable. >> christie also telling the audience that he is not in favor of legalizizing marijuana in any capacity. >> i don't favor legalization. i don't favor recreational use, i don't favor decriminalization and i don't favor the use of marijuana as medicine. >> new jersey already legalized the use of marijuana for medical purposes, signed into law before he became governor of new jersey. >> a sky diving instructor was killed in a midair collision with at sigh diver. the body was spotted in the monthens 50 minutes after the accident. the owner of sky dive san diego who says the victim was in his 20's said he collided with his jump partners knee or leg while
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practicing a midair maneuver. >> he was unable to deploy his par chute. when it was obvious we were not able to find him, we called the sheriffs search and rescue, which found him. >> the second jumper who survived the collision was using a par chute equipped with an automatic activation device. it deploys if the chute senses any problems. he survived despite blacking out following that same collision. the other man was not equipped with that device. >> heavy rain soaking massachusetts over the weekend, roads closed, swollen rivers may not recede until tomorrow. in florida, they're cleaning up after a small tornado hit the center of the state. no one was hurt but trees were knocked down and power lines were also knocked down, as well. phone and internet services expected to be out for quite some time. >> these images of the brooklyn
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bridge, above those clouds right now, snow has been falling on and off for the last hour. there is a blizzard sweeping across the northern plains and yes, this is the last day of march. here's our meteorologist, nicole mitchell with a look at your forecast. good morning, nicole. >> good morning. no, del is not april fooling you, we do have that snow heading for the midwest. yesterday, look at these phenomenal temperatures. for march, far dough at 53, omaha at 76. you're having a lovely last day of the weekend, and then this came in. we're all right dealing with heavy snow in persians of central, north dakota already. to the south of this are areas of rain, iowa, you're seeing that, possibly des moines taking a little longer in that commute in the morning. this is what we expect moving across the northern tier of minnesota, some places could get over a foot of snow. it's not just the snow, this is a potent system with wind with it.
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back of that and the wind drives the snow, it reduces the visibility, we have blizzard warnings in effect. winds are gusting 30 miles an hour, in some cases 40-50-mile per hour range. whether or not we're techy a blizzard or blizzard like, it's going to be a slow go. watch for that especially high profile vehicles. warming temperatures, right now, lincoln at 64 degrees, but when you add in that warm air from the south and the winds i was just talking about, that dries everything out. kansas city, around that region, we have fire danger today because of the hot and dry wind ahead of the system. this system's causing a lot of different problems with it. it moves through today. even into tomorrow morning, as i said, the u.p. of michigan could be seeing snow out there. already today, the east coast clears out of the moisture.
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that's good, but we have another system behind in the west that's going to keep parts of california moist with moisture we need. watch temperatures drop. for minneapolis into the 50's today, 30's tomorrow as that system starts to come in. we'll have more in just a little bit. back to you. >> the venezuelan army retaking control of a western city, anti-government demonstrators flooding the streets for months protesting high crime, inflation and widespread shortages of food and other supplies. we report as the government clears the streets. >> taking back the center of venezuela's unrest, the venezuelan national guard regains control of the most important barricades in the city with bulldozers and armed vehicles. they met no opposition in a city that had been blockaded for over a month and a half.
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>> we recovered this area that had been under threat, often by armed thugs who would kidnap people, denying them the freedom of their city. we did it under the man date of president nicholas meduro. >> it started with hand grenades and tear gas that filled the air. protestors responded with rocks. one waived an old shotgun but could only retreat as the government forces overwhelmed them. >> they are entering into people's houses, abusing people and throwing tear gas into homes. >> normal life here that come to a grinding halt when students started protesting rising crime, food shortages and skyrocketing inflation. student protestors have been joined by support from all walks of life since the troubles began
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in mid february. middle class doctors, teachers and businessman have helped with food, money or preparing molotov cocktails. this man runs a shop in town and hasn't worked for two months but says he can't leave the students without support. >> it's our neighbors who are dying. it's our students in the streets risking their lives. i have two young girls who need to work, but we are a community now. we've become stronger and we are resisting together. we can't stop now. >> today appears to have been a setback for the protectors, however the demonstrators say they will rebuild what has been destroyed but with the military sending in more soldiers, many are start to go wonder just for how long they'll be ail to resist. >> 39 people have died in clashes between protestors and police since demonstrations began in early february. >> the ebola virus is spreading
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in africa, two cases in liberia. authorities believe 70 others died in guinea, senegal closing it's borders as a precaution. ebola highly contagious and there is no treatment vaccine. >> the u.n. warning of food shortages, drought and extinctions if nothing is done by global warming, the report predicting -- flooding and frequent droughts. food production will be hit hard lead to go higher prices and millions going hungry. the oceans will rice, becoming for acidic, threatening to kill a large number of species. the dangers are only going to get worse and no one is i am none said the report. >> we live in a world where impact of climate changes that have occurred are widespread and consequential. there's no question that we live
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in a world that's already altered by climate change. >> the report says what can be down mitigate the problem, reducing carbon pollution and changing building construction methods. >> more than a decade after the american military invaded iraq, the country now struggling to regain stability. sectarian attacks are common. as rereport, that's turned many into reef gees inside their own country. >> no what ther the circumstances, children will always find a way to play. here north of baghdad are 191,000 people registered as internally displaced and they live like this. internally displaced is the official term. perhaps a better description would be refugees within their own country. along with others, she left an bar province in january.
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>> on one side, the iraqi army was shelling into town, the other side, the rebels firing back. it was living hell. i was afraid for my life. we fled as soon as we could. i was afraid we were not going to make it out alive. it's safer here, but a different kind of hell. >> the amount of people arriving from anbar province has placed a tremendous strain here. >> everything where are people waiting for aid, 300,000 residents of this town, 191,000 people fleeing from anbar province. it's clear there is a problem. the people are housed anywhere that they can in disused, schools, cabins and emt i homes. local officials are struggling to cope.
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>> this man provides aid and logistics. >> we are rapidly reaching our threshold. the town population struggles and i don't know how we will he cope. the international aid groups need to do more. the government needs to help us. we received some help, but it's not enough. >> so far, it's been private aid distributed in places like this mosque that has helped in a small way. a much bigger effort is needed, but most important is a resolution to the conflict in anbar province allowing these people to go home. with neither side backing down, that won't happen soon. >> iraq is home to about a million internally displaced citizens and hosts 200,000 syrians, as well. >> if you like mark ritas, you're not going to like this. >> i put lime on everything, the only thing i don't put lime on is milk, because i can't, otherwise i would.
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>> but there is a shortage that could soon leave a sour taste in the mouths of lime lovers around the world. >> and then there were four, kentucky and michigan played a classic to decide one of the final four spots. it came down to the final seconds.
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al jazeera america. we open up your world. >> here on america tonight, an opportunity for all of america to be heard. >> our shows explore the issues that shape our lives. >> new questions are raised about the american intervention. >> from unexpected viewpoints to live changing innovations, dollars and cents to powerful storytelling. >> we are at a tipping point in america's history! >> al jazeera america. there's more to it.
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>> a hail storm causing problems in hong kong at this mall where windows were shattered. water started pour in. the storm produced lightning and thunderstorms. welcome to al jazeera america. opening day for major league baseball in just a moment, but first, here's nicole mitchell with a look at your forecast this morning. good morning. >> hope everyone's off to a good monday. that video could have been something you saw through the
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south and up the east coast of that last storm, bringing a lot flooding rain. recovery going on into the east coast, we're going to continue to see that we had this morning almost off the coastline, a lot of places are already dry, so limited to this morning, if you're still even seeing any precipitation with that. the other place we're watching and there's a big storm system in the midwest, but drier for the northwest where we still have mud slide recovery, it is going to be northern california getting more rain. catch for that, but it's really needed in this drought area. to the midwest, blizzard warnings in effect. not only the snow, but areas of high wind, march going out like a lion, just like it came in. >> limes, a essential ingredient in mexico freshen everything from guacamole to margueritas, there is a shortage and prices
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are start to go sore. why the lime business is feeling the squeeze. >> in mexico, it's hard to think of life without limes. this little citrus is a staple of daily living, used to flavor food, ward off illness and adorn drinks. for many, it's the taste of a nation and without it, they'd be lost. >> i put time on everything. the only thing i don't put lime on is milk, because i can't, otherwise i would. a salad is not as good without lime. there is not good tequila without lime. it is part of our tradition and culture. >> limes are now an expensive luxury item. prices have soared, production down and consumers are deeply unhappy. the price has more than tripled in recent weeks, reaching historic highs. >> customers ask how much for limes and you tell them and they call you crazy and leave. >> the problem is mexico's lime groves have been hit by disease and bat weather. last year's hurricane in the
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major lime growing area of mexico didn't help and something called yellow dragon playing means these groves are producing less fruit. there is talk of farmers only selling limes when the price goes up. some are just making the best of a bad situation. a nation craving limes are seen my millions in his cartoons. >> we mexicans laugh about things that worry us. maybe this is not that important but affects our economy and families. there are other things people can't afford, but somehow we laugh at all of it. it's how we cope. >> with mexico producing most of the world's limes, the impact is global. while it's hoped prices will fall with another growing season approaching, for the time being, high priced limes are leaving a bitter taste. >> that means get ready to pay
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$5 for your beer, $10 for the lime. opening day, baseball season now here. good morning john henry smith. >> good morning, del. today is opening day, but technically, this is not baseball's opening day. two games have been played that counted in australia. sunday night, real live baseball was played, andrew cashner getting the opening day start for the padres. deep to right and out of the park, suddenly a 1-0 game was a 1-1 tie. same score later in the eighth, wilson in more trouble. on second and third, denorfia singles to center. padres win 3-1. >> major league baseball has expanded instant replay reviews in terms of the number of
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eligible plays and challenges managers have, a maximum of two per game. a rule is now in place to reduce the number of home plate collisions. this will be the final season for the man who signed off on both rules, commissioner bud selig will retire after this season. >> from 68 teams, now down to the final four. those young cats from kentucky are trying to get there with an all freshman starting lineup. in their way was the last to reach the final four, you remember the fab five, they played for michigan. tied at 72, harrison going for three and the win, racked up 12 points while his twin brother eight, under three seconds left, from the exact same spot in indy where gordon hayward almost won the 2010 title, not quite as close. kentucky heading to its third final four in the last six
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seasons. >> they weren't going to go away and neither were we and whoever had the ball last was going to win it. they play better when they're down and i don't know why. they play fearless, aggressive, they get emotion, they bow their neck and they want to win, they have a will to win. >> in the east, napier put on a show for uconn, huskies looking to knock off michigan state, shabbat had a game high. u conn pulls away to win it, punching their ticket into the final four. huskies coach gives credit to his seniors. >> the final four in arlington, texas is set for next saturday, the early game will feature top seed florida against the last team to beat them this year, seven seeded u conn. then the late game pits eighth seeded kentucky against seventh seeded wisconsin.
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the championship game is monday. >> another college hoop star is one and down. the university of kansas has scheduled a news conference today to announce that its freshman star andrew wiggins will head to the nba. he led kansas in scoring with 17.1 points per game this season. he pulled down 5.9 rebounds per game. he was the big 10 treasure man of the year and first team all conference. >> a canadian big man. kentucky fans still celebrating at this hour. celebrations last night after that huge win, fans pouring out into the streets after the wildcats defeated michigan. with that last second three-pointer, kentucky now securing its 16th trip to the final four. they bleed basketball in the bluegrass state. that will do it for this edition of aljazeera america. i'm del walters in new york. thanks for watching. we leave you with this picture of the brooklyn bridge, where it is snowing on this, the final
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day of march. that is not an april fool's joke or march madness, that is just the reality of opening day in new york city, where the snow will fall and the baseball will flies and beer will be poured. >> i mean, i don't know who's illegal, who's not illegal... al jazeera america presents a breakthrough television event. borderland a first hand look at the crisis on the border... >> i'm already afraid just being here >> six strangers, with different points of view take a closer look at the ongoing conflict. gary, a farmer, who hires many migrent workers... >> people say immigrants are stealing our jobs, it's not true... >> and allison, a born again christian, republican... >> let's just send them back to mexico and let their goverment handle it. >> they re-live the fatal quest of a young boy named omar... >> do you think that omar was way too young to make that trip accross the dessert? >> you just can't keep being strong... >> where will this path lead them? >> just because they make it to the u.s., doesn't mean good
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things are gonna happen to them. >> experience illegal immigration... up close, and personal. >> the only way to find out, is to see it yourselves. on... borderland only on al jazeera america
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[♪ music ] >> hello from al jazeera's head quarters in doha. this is the news hour. coming up in the next 60 minutes. ma sharif pleads not guilty in court. scientists say global warm something driving

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