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tv   Inside Story  Al Jazeera  January 12, 2015 5:00pm-5:31pm EST

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even secretary of state john kerry. today, white house spokes pern josh earnest acknowledged that was a mistake. "inside story" is next. for the latest head to aljazeera.com. jazeera.com. >> while the world was rivetted for the supports of what was happening in france, nigeria hardly made the headlines. that's "inside story."
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hello i'm ray suarez. for boko haram the al qaeda allied extremist group in nigeria, nothing seems beyond the pale. rapes executions, and kid kidnappings, young girls sent strapped with bombs. aftermath of different murders in paris. millions of people from around the world flooded the streets of paris saturday. waving pens, flags and signs repeating the message: je suis charlie, i am charlie. 40 international dignitaries joined the march linking arms with french president francois hollande walking down washington d.c.'s main arteries in a show of support.
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this week france is still on high alert. 10,000 troops were deployed throughout the country monday, many standing guard at yuba jewish schools. >> translator: this morning when we arrived we recorded at least 20% of students absent which means at least 20% of the students parents have chosen not to bring them to school. this is a huge number. >> and while france was in the middle of its crisis last week after the killing of 17 innocent people by home grown extremists more than 3,000 miles away in nigeria a long known internal threat was unfolding a far more deadly rampage. these people are refugees from the town of baga where militant army boko haram burned down homes and indiscriminately killed an unconfirmed but reportedly huge number of people. nigeria researcher daniel ayer of amnesty international wrote the attack on this area and
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surrounding towns looked like boko haram's most heinous act carried out by the group. the it was reported that the town was generally razed to the ground, and accounts are true, this marks a disturbing escalation of boko haram'sen onslaught against the population. a girl reportedly 10 years old walked into a marketplace and dealt necessitateddetonated a belt and killed her self and about 20 bystanders. >> boko haram ask holding a lot of territory. trying to expand into cameroon,
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using its own military to push back boko haram from those territories. >> last year there was international outcry when boko haram kidnapped 276 school girls. nigeria's president goodluck jonathan. >> i'm ali ali velshi. velshi.
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>> the sun isn't up yet, but david godeski is. godeski has been homeless in washington d.c. for nearly 7 years. last night, like most, he slept outside. with affordable housing getting increasingly scarce here there's been a spike in the number of homeless. churches, food pantries, the city, are all scrambling to meet the demand. at the public library's main branch, homeless individuals rush in when the doors open, some are even dropped off by a shuttle bus from the homeless shelters. once inside, they log onto computers to job hunt or check email. they meet friends or just read protected from the elements. >> for many years we would sort of open our doors and say "okay, we've done our job", because we're providing them a warm place to go if they've got no place else to be. >> now, social worker jean badalamenti will help provide information on homeless services and will "sensitize" staff.
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while government, residents and local businesses argue over the role of the libraries, david godeski is just glad they're here. >> having a place like this where things are controlled, it's a godsend. >> so godeski will be back every day he can. welcome back toing know. guys, this story that i got to do was one of my favourites of the it's using technology changing people's lives. this is a robot that parapledgic people can use to walk again, let's take a look.
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>> i have a big dream mapping. >> these kids from a summer camp near aspen colorado are about to give amanda a life-changing gift, a gift helping her do something she hasn't been able to do sense paralyzed in a ski accident 21 years ago. >> now i want to invite the kids to rip into it. >> reporter: it's a bionic rob robot, a battery powered skeleton giving her legs the power to do this... (count down) and this. >> i'm walking, you guys. >> and even this...
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>> reporter: the technology is so cutting edge that amanda is the first person in the united states to own one. >> the moment she sat up i was amazed. she's been sitting down for 21 years, and the first feeling to stand up, i would have been thrilled to be in that position. >> it was an emotional moment for these kids who spent the last year selling lemonade and raising money from donors to make it happen. >> my most profound moment was when i stood up and tried to see the children's faces and some of them, the little ones, they were in awe. and to have that heart to heart hug. my hug in a wheelchair , there's a disconnect. i get heart to heart hugs when i stand up. >> reporter: do you promise me a standing hug? >> yes.
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>> reporter: okay. amanda took her first steps towards making that dream a reality in 2010. that's when she got a call from the robot's creators, asking her to be a test pilot for new technology, she travelled to headquarters in the san francisco area and took it for a test run. how did it feel to stand and look at people? >> the first time i stood up i went home and i cried hard, in all honesty. these were emotions that i had been dreaming about. i felt so good in my body. i slept hard. i wasn't in pain. total ending steps.
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>> this is exo's headquarters, where the magic is made and pereffected. robots like -- perfected. here robots are put their their paces giving those paralyzed a chance to do what they were told was not possible. nathan is a cofounder and an inventor. it was developed for the battlefield, as a device to help distances. >> there's a problem in the u.s. military with soldiers getting injuries through large loads they carry. we were helping to develop exoskeletons to carry the back back and the weight of a vest. the breakthrough was creating a robot supporting its own weight with the minimum of energy, meaning it could be powered by a battery pack.
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then there's the walking thing. it takes over the muscle function. it can do that completely for a person par leased below the race. or partially for someone who is learning to walk. >> reporter: the only thing i step. >> reporter: like amapped -- amanda, jason is a tester. >> i put it into step. if i stop and don't go to the next position, it stops. i can go forward and lateral. there we go. >> test pilots like amanda and jason - how did they help you guys advance the technology? >> they helped immensely. everything is unpredictable once you introduce a human into the system. i remember being in the room
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with 13 ph.d. s, and they had a different idea of what would be the exact way to control something. without amanda and jason, we'd be at a standstill, because we couldn't test anything. >> reporter: exo pushed the boundaries, but the robot has limitations. it can only be used in a rehabilitative setting with a trained physiotherapist. >> are you ready? >> i'm ready. >> reporter: then there's the price tag, from $110,000-$140,000. exo bionics hopes food and drug price. >> i don't get enough of these heart to heart hugs. >> reporter: if you need another hug, i'm your man. >> all right. >> reporter: all right. . >> the emotional impact of this
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is obvious. other associate health benefits with walking. >> absolutely. all the doctors and patients agree standing up helps the way they digest. the pain, lowers infections. this has a lot of applications. can portions be used for rehabilitation for stroke victims. >> absolutely. that's a recent addition they put in with the technology. it has variable use. one side may be stronger. it's perfect for stroke victims, allowing them to increase the control that they have over it, versus what the robot has. and get people on a solid track. from earthquakes to moss keeto, there has been there has been conversations. check back next week when we
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bring you more from the field. >> "consider this". the news of the day, plus so much more. >> we begin with the growing controversy. >> answers to the questions no one else will ask. >> real perspective. "consider this". monday through thursday, 10:00 eastern. only on al jazeera america. >> in jacmel on haiti's southern coast surfers aren't an unusual sight these days, but just a few months ago, some of these boys couldn't even swim. they're all part of "surf haiti", an ambitious project aimed at bringing tourists and their money to the beaches. joan mamique who runs the camp says surfing here is about more than just catching waves. samson jules, who was one of the first boys to learn to surf here, tells us the project has the potential to change the
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lives of his entire community. the passion from these young haitians is unmistakable and it's the chance to be part of the lives of people like samson that organizers hope will draw surfers to these waves and ultimately help tourism grow. >> i would love for there to be a haitian representation in the international surfing circuit... professional. i would, really, really - 'cause then once they announce "yeah, this kid is from haiti" and he's out there ripping it, then all of a sudden people go "haiti... surfing" and a whole industry kind of pays attention. >> "surf haiti" remains for now a small project with few customers. with waves like this, it's hoped that will soon change.
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>> the sun isn't up yet, but david godeski is. godeski has been homeless in washington d.c. for nearly 7 years. last night, like most, he slept outside. with affordable housing getting increasingly scarce here there's been a spike in the number of homeless. churches, food pantries, the city, are all scrambling to meet the demand. at the public library's main branch, homeless individuals
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rush in when the doors open, some are even dropped off by a shuttle bus from the homeless shelters. once inside, they log onto computers to job hunt or check email. they meet friends or just read protected from the elements. >> for many years we would sort of open our doors and say "okay, we've done our job", because we're providing them a warm place to go if they've got no place else to be. >> now, social worker jean badalamenti will help provide information on homeless services and will "sensitize" staff. while government, residents and local businesses argue over the role of the libraries, david godeski is just glad they're here. >> having a place like this where things are controlled, it's a godsend. >> so godeski will be back every day he can. >> i'm joie chen i'm the host of america tonight,
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we're revolutionary because we're going back to doing best of storytelling. we have an ouportunity to really reach out and really talk to voices that we haven't heard before... i think al jazeera america is a watershed moment for american journalism real reporting that brings you the world. >> this is a pretty dangerous trip. >> security in beirut is tight. >> more reporters. >> they don't have the resources to take the fight to al shabaab. >> more bureaus, more stories. >> this is where the typhoon came ashore. giving you a real global perspective like no other can. >> al jazeera, nairobi. >> on the turkey-syria border. >> venezuela. >> beijing. >> kabul. >> hong kong. >> ukraine. >> the artic. real reporting from around the world. this is what we do. al jazeera america.
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when experts talk about putting on and taking of a suit like the one i'm about to display here, they talk about "ritualizing the process" because you have to make sure that everything is perfect. imagine that i've just come from treating an ebola affixed patient and have gotten blood or other body material onto me. so now i'm going to get out of this suit. i'm going to show you the critical mistake that can get so many aid workers into trouble. they're exhausted, they've seen a lot of blood, they're panicked and they want to get this off. they pull it off. whoa! the fresh air hits their face and their first instinct is to wipe their brow because they're so sweaty. this glove is contaminated and that's where you're getting
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contaminated material into mucus membranes, it drips into the eyes, makes the mistake, that's the moment. the thing to consider here is that for every person that you want in one of these suits out treating people, you're going to need a second person also trained in the use of the suit to get that first person out of it. that buddy system is essential doctors say, in creating the kind of ritualized process that's going to keep me from being infected. >> start with one issue ad guests on all sides of the debate. and a host willing to ask the tough questions and you'll get... the inside story ray suarez hosts inside story weekdays at 5pm et / 2pm pt only on al jazeera america
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haiti, october 2010, at a hospital in a small, rural town north of the capital. these were the first victims of a horrific, unknown disease in a country still reeling from a devastating earthquake. patients were dying in the space of a few hours. children were especially vulnerable. al jazeera was the first news channel on the scene. in the following days and weeks we tracked the epidemic as it ripped across the country.

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