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peace of mind in what are uncertain times. al jazeera, gaza. now i know you have not forgotten but just in case the al jazeera website is where you can keep right up to date with all the top stories and the developing stories and lots of extra detail as well. ♪ shifting the balance of power in the arctic, president obama calls for more u.s. shifts in arctic waters, the controversial hedge against the growing power of china and russia. new details in the killing of a houston area police officer, suspect appears in court as his lawyers reveal his history of mental illness. [chanting] and refugees stranded in hungry tried desperately to get on
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trains bound for germany, the migrant crisis dividing europe. ♪ this is al jazeera america, live from new york city, i'm john henry smith, president obama will walk on a glaser later today, part of his trip to alaska and there to talk about climate change and push for a stronger u.s. presence in the region. the president will ask congress to speed up construction of new ice breakers in an effort to compete against russia and china in strategic arctic waters. right now the u.s. only has two worker ice breakers compared to moscow's 40 and first on the president's agenda the warming arctic waters and the urgent need for action, libby casey has more from anchorage. >> reporter: president obama delivering a warning at the
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beginning of alaska trip that human activity is warming the planet and called it stark and is not a problem in the far off future, it's a problem here and it's a problem happening now. he said it's already impacting infrastructure, and community, health and the future. >> if those trend lines continue the way they are, there is not going to be a nation on this earth that is not impacted negatively. people will suffer. economies will suffer. entire nations will find themselves under severe, severe problems. >> the president will use the back drop of alaska over the next two days to highlight the issue of climate change, visiting a glazier and learning
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the way of life because this is ground zero for climate change. >> the leading edge of climate change, leading indicator of what the entire planet faces. arctic temperatures are rising about twice as fast as the global average. over the past 60 years alaska has warmed about twice as fast as the rest of the united states. last year was alaska's warmest year on record. just as it was for the rest of the world. >> reporter: even as president obama is delivering a warning about climate change he is catching criticism from environmentalists and concerned about his recent decision for exploratory oil drilling off alaska's arctic coast and say it will contribute to more of problems of fossil fuels but president obama defending the decision saying it was a process started back in the bush administration and believes it
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can be done safely and that won't stop an increased push to try to develop clean and renewable energieenergies. >> the state department overnight released another trove of hillary clinton's e-mails. these are the messages she stored on a private e-mail server while serving as secretary of state. the state department published 4,000 of clinton's messages, these e-mails are ones she sent in 2009 and 2010. this one is one of the messages that was redacted possibly after it was written. michael schurr has more. >> reporter: the state department released over 7,000 pages of hillary clinton's e-mails while she was secretary of state. of course the attention focused on clinton because of the fact that she had her own server in her home. 150 e-mails were redacted meaning they have been classified since they were released. now that doesn't mean or they have been classified and doesn't mean she was sending classified
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information, the state department is saying those 150 e-mails could have been classified since that information that was not classified at that time could now be classified. of course the cumulative effect of this on hillary clinton is not great with a constant release of e-mails and people go scurrying through them and trying to find out if there is a smoking gun e-mail in there and have not yet found that but the reward of course being there has not been that smoking gun. the problem is back in another three or four weeks from now there are going to be more e-mails that come out. what helps hillary clinton in this case though is a lot of e-mails show a personal side, a funny and natural side to hillary clinton talking about television shows and talking about her shoe falling off at the palace and while hillary clinton is not delighted with having to deal with this earlier this week she called it a big mistake to have this server in her home. some e-mails in effect they are not revealing anything about her that is problematic can only
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make that campaign and hillary clinton herself feel a bit of relief so they are trying to get away from this but still the e-mails keep coming. >> michael in san francisco, clinton set to testify before congress on the 22nd on use of private e-mail server. white supremacist could face the death penalty after being convicted of murdering three people last year and glen cross who goes by the name frazier glenn miller killed three people at jewish centers in over land park, cast -- kansas and he gave a white power salute after the jury read its first guilty verdict and the funeral is set friday for a texas deputy shot and killed at a gas station and appeared in court for the first time monday where his lawyer revealed that shannon miles has a history of mental ill answer and shed light on what happened during the execution-style
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shooting and robert ray has more from houston. >> reporter: gruesome language from the prosecutor in court on monday as she described what happened last friday to officer deputy dairn goforth, 47 years old, ten years on the force, his family was in the first row of the court while she described the fact he was shot 15 times, execution style, from behind and died in a pool of blood at a gas station. flags outside the district court in houston flew at half staff on monday honoring 47-year-old depu deputy darren-goforth shot and kimmed at a gas station on friday and a shackled shannon miles was arraigned on a capitol murder charge and did not enter a plea and being held without bond. >> they found deputy face down in the parking lot near his patrol car and clearly had been shot multiple times with a
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firearm and he was dead. >> reporter: prosecutors say they reviewed surveillance video from the gas station and showed that deputy goforth had come out of the convenience store after filling up his vehicle and a man stepped out of a truck and fired at his head and continued to shoot 14 rounds after the deputy was face down on the ground. >> our assumption is he was a target because he wore a uniform. >> reporter: on saturday the harris sheriff called it cold blooded and brought race into the discussion. >> we heard black lives matter and cops lives matter too and drop the qualifier and just say lives matter and take that to the bank. >> reporter: shannon miles is no stranger to troubles with the law and has been in jail for minor convictions over the past ten years. >> everybody should would like to know the motive and love to know where and when he got the gun. >> reporter: meanwhile hundreds of people of all races marched over the weekend to honor the
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slain deputy. based upon what the sheriff of harris county has said about black lives matter the discussion will certainly continue as to the racial divide in america and certainly the amp temperature of what we see between police and that group black lives matter, we should also note the president of the united states called the widow of darren-goforth and don't have details of the conversation but they did have a discussion. >> robert ray reporting from houston. a second person arrested in connection with last month's deadly bombing in bangkok and prime minister said the man is a foreigner and picked up at a check point on the cambodian border and the second foreigner picked up in connection with the explosion at a religious shrine, 20 people died in the blasts, the motive is still not clear. hungry is taking a bold step this morning to stop thousands of refugees from boarding trains to western europe.
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[cheers] refugees outside the budapest train station protested the decision to clear the area and stop all trains from leaving the terminal. hundreds of refugees managed to leave on monday, riding into austria and andrew simmons is at the terminal in budapest. >> reporter: from what we are seeing here as you can see there is quite a long line of police stopping any access by refugees into the station here. there isn't any really massively dangerous situations arising here. the crowd is annoyed, angry, frustrated but from the faces you will see here in the foreground people sitting down, they are utterly exhausted and really quite desperate. many of them bought tickets at massive cost to large families and large families are paying well over 1,000 euros for their tickets, whether they will get
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to use them they are not sure and have not been given any information about what is happening. the hungarian rail service said that the police came in and shut off the whole entrance in the early hours of tuesday morning. subsequently they had to actually close the station completely. what happened on monday a sequence of events where al jazeera was told by the government's spokesperson that categorically no refugees who don't have european visas would be allowed out of the country. then within a matter of hours trains were rolling. now whether it was coincidental but talks were taking place between hungry and germany is another matter because germany and france have been putting out a signal that the european ideal of free borders has to be respected. >> that is andrew simmons in budapest. the european union will hold an emergency summit on september 14th to address the refugee
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crisis and we asked mary a member of the european parliament from malta if that meeting is too late. >> it is too late because i believe on 14th of september we will see more tragedies unfolding before our eyes. this is not the first time we are speaking about these tragedies. it's something that has been repeated over and over again. and i would say everyday that we are losing it's something that is keeping us away from trying to address the situation sooner rather than later. i'm afraid that europe was very slow in taking action. i wouldn't even say size of action, taking any action whatsoever. i remember tragedies happening in ofover 2013 and had these same diagnosiss in -- discussions in libya where 800 were feared dead. and after that we had european agenda on migration and yet here
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we are today, august speaking all over again about these tragedies that are happening. i would say that is rather done the european union was closing in and i would say that is some government and some leaders in the european union were reluctant taking any action whatsoever. >> reporter: hungry says germany's approach to accepting refugees has caused the large influx of migrants and germany disagrees with that and they so far declined to send refugee back as eu rules require. puerto rico debt crisis putting pressure on people struggling to live there, how the high cost of electricity is leaving many without the basics. ♪
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welcome back to al jazeera america, it is 7:45 in the morning eastern standard time and take agree -- taking a look at the stories and he will stay out of jail and supreme court granted him a stay on monday until his appeals are exhausted. he was sentenced in january to two years in prison for taking more than $100,000 in bribes. there has been another huge explosion at a chemical factory in eastern china. one person was reportedly killed in monday night's blast and people in charge of the factory have been detained by police. china has seen several factory explosions in the last few weeks and one that killed nearly 160 people and pope francis this morning announced he is giving priests the ability to forgive women who had abortions part of
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the catholic church's up coming holy year and in a letter published today the pope describes the quote moral ordeal for many women and church teach rs as such a grave sin that people are automatically ex communicated. they will pay off the $72 billion debt and the proposal was originally due today but issued related to tropical storm erica pushed back the deadline and it will be an additional hardship for puerto rico people struggling to pay the bills. >> translator: to survive he says he has to keep his market in the dark. he has turned off half tell lights, unplugged the freezers, even then he says his monthly electric bill is approaching $200 $2000. it's at the center of the crisis
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and electric rates here are twice as high as the u.s. average. >> too much, very high. >> reporter: u.s. territory $70 billion government debt, $9 billion is owed by the state controlled utility prepa. puerto rico's power system relies on oil which is expensive and must be shipped in, instead of using resources already here like the wind or sun. only 1% of the island's power comes from renewable sources compared to places like hawaii which pays more but more aggressive on cutting reliance on oil. >> we have sun, we have wind, we have bio mass. we need to embrace other energy forms and they don't want to do that. >> reporter: but he says the problems go much further from ancient power plants to years of wasteful spending and kronism. >> and what drives decision making process is not the needs
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of the people, it's who gets the contract. >> reporter: he says he saw when he managed one of san juan's projects of which were started and never finished. >> they get the politicians out. >> reporter: another concern is that many are not paying their share. up to a third of the customers get a discount if they pay at all. local governments, public housing complexes, churches, even hotels all get a break on their electric bills costing the government more than $300 million a year. even the island's top energy official admits it's a problem. >> for us it's not fair. >> reporter: lawmakers are now considering overhauling those subsidies and common wealth have hired experts to restructures utility and everyone deserves
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some blame. >> and we conserve electricity like we have to pay for it and now we are saying oh, why, we are paying all these rates. >> a lot opeople say it's unfair to blame the citizens on this. >> we are part of the problem and people don't like it. >> reporter: people are consumer are as little as possible with little relief and he speaks for many when he says he may have to move. for now he is one of many struggling to keep his doors open and the lights on. onthan betz, al jazeera, san juan, puerto rico. attack on professors and holy sites resigned and stepped down after he was criticized of writing the treason of professors, a group of 40 u.s. law professors worked with quote islamic organizations and should be targeted as enemy combatants and they carried the article and said it was a mistake to publish
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it. tens of thousands of people facing hidden medical costs from charity hospitals and finds out what they are being charged for. ♪
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>> follow correspondent roxana saberi on a personal journey. >> this is the first time in 20 years i've been back to my mother's homeland. >> a special in-depth look at japan. the legacy of the atomic bomb. controversial american military bases. and the country's evolving identity. nonprofit hospitals receive major tax breaks for providing free care to low-income people, still tens of thousands of nonprofit hospital patients all over the country keep getting bills and ali-velshi reports. >> i was getting rouhounded at k it was bad. >> i went in a panic attack.
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>> reporter: relentless tax collection and wage garnishment waged by nonprofit hospitals throughout the country. >> i'm so nervous. i didn't sleep. >> reporter: 44-year-old lopez spend many sleepless nights in seattle and a number of anxious days, unable to afford an attorney he is representing himself. >> so today i'm going in confident that the legal system, the judicial system will do right by me. >> reporter: the tech support worker is being sued by seattle based virginia mason hospital. in 2014 the nonprofit hospital approved charity care for lopez to treat his diabetes. >> i believe this is an unfair and unjust lawsuit against me. >> reporter: lopez believed that 100% coverage of his medical cost men exactly that so he was shocked to later learn that the hospital was suing him
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for over a thousand dollars. >> my diabetes was really bad and my eyes started to get blurry and i couldn't see. i was having a lot of issues and therefore they needed to give me glasses. >> reporter: that is right, the hospital sued lopez over a pair of glasses. [chanting] consumer advocacy groups like washington can say many nonprofit hospitals are not doing enough to reach out and service low-income patients. >> we have actually seen hospital executives be compensated based on their ability to squeeze dollars out of every single patient. >> reporter: many non-profits are in fact more profitable than for profit hospitals and critics say they is because they enjoy tax breaks for providing charity care with little oversight and across the country in charlotte, north carolina, 58-year-old karen roberson envys lopez in one aspect, he was getting his
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day in court. >> i was upset that they could even do this without even letting me know. >> reporter: in 2012 the home health aid was treated for stage three breast cancer at carolina's healthcare system. later she found out she had been successfully sued for over $44,000 by the nonprofit hospital. >> i'm trying to tell myself you can't get even more upset because i'm still trying to, you know, fight with the chemo. >> reporter: meanwhile back in seattle. >> it's daunting not having an attorney. >> reporter: lopez doesn't have all the correct paperwork so the judge decides his case will be postponed for another month. despite the setback he remains optimistic. >> i think i made a lot of difference for me to be there, to show up, to stand up, to fight. >> reporter: ali-velshi, al jazeera. the hospital is mentioned in
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the report declines to be interviewed but one week after we connected virginia nation hospital they told lopez they were dropping the suit against him. new data out today shows more and more college students are smoking pot. in fact, the number of students lighting up is the most in more than three decades. a university of michigan study shows nearly 6% of college students reported using pot daily or near daily in 2014, almost twice as much as in 2007 but it's actually less than the 7.2% recorded in 1980. thank you so much for joining us, i'm john henry smith and ronald pinkston is back in a few minutes with more morning news. ♪
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♪ climate is changing faster than our efforts to address it. >> president obama challenges world leaders to do more to stop climate change and also calling for his stepped up u.s. presence on his trip to alaska. e-mails made public from former secretary of state hillary clinton's private server and some deemed to contain classified information. [chanting] and hundreds of migrants in
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hungry try to board trains for germany but armed guards are now stopping them. ♪ this is al jazeera america, good morning live from new york city, i'm randall pinkston and president obama will walk on a glaser on his trip to alaska to talk about climate change and push for stronger presence in the region and includes ice breakers and will ask congress to speed up construction of new ice breakers in an effort to compete against russia and china in strategic arctic waters and right now the u.s. only has two worker ice breakers compared to moscow's 40 but first on the president's agenda the warming arctic waters and urgent need for action and libby casey has more from anchorage.
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>> delivering a warning at the alaska trip that human activity is warming the planet and called the science stark and climate change is not a problem in the far off future, it's a problem here and it's a problem happening now and he said it's already impacting infrastructure of communities, health and the future. >> if those trend lines continue the way they are, there is not going to be a nation on this earth that is not impacted negative negatively. people will suffer, economies will suffer. entire nations will find themselves under severe, severe problems. >> the president will use the back drop of alaska over the next two days to highlight the issue of climate change. visiting a glacier because this
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is climate change. >> it's the leading edge of climate change and our leading indicator of what the entire planet faces. arctic temperatures are rising about twice as fast as the global average. over the past 60 years alaska has warmed about twice as fast as the rest of the united states. last year was alaska's warmest year on record, just as it was for the rest of the world. >> even as president president is delivering a warning about climate change he is catching criticism from environmentalists and they are concerned about his resent decision to allow expl e exploratory oil drilling off alaska's arctic coast and say that will just contribute more to problems of fossil fuels but president obama defending the decision saying that it was a process started back during the bush administration and that he
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believes it can be done safely and that that won't stop an increased push to try to develop clean and renewable energies. libby casey in anchorage, president to the top of the world is highlighting the growing significance of the arctic ngo politics and critics fear the u.s. is losing ground there and patricia explains. >> the polar is heating up as countries try to stake the claims to waterways and rich resources and according to the gee logical survey 13% of undiscovered oil and gas are in the arctic and most of it under the ocean, that is nearly a quarter of the world's hydrocarbon reserves and not all that is at stake and the fish and mineral deposits while melting ice is opening up new sea lanes to dramatically cut times and cost between asia and
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european markets and who will reap this and eight countries have territories in the arctic circle but the five major players are russia, the united states, canada, norway and den mark through its territory in greenland and a treaty gives them resources of the 200 nautical of coastline and they have not ratified leaving it at a disadvantage but russia is pressing ahead and august laid claim to additional 463,000 miles of arctic territory, the high seas grab was telegraphed in 2007 when russia planted a flag on the seabed of the north pole and moscow is increasingly flexing its military muscle in the arctic ramping up air patrols and bolstering air defenses and holding unannounced war games and reopening soviet military basis and the united states sees the developments as
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provocative but not to bolster the military presence which combined with nato allies is significant and begs the question is the investment worth it and given the 50% falling oil prices over the year oil plays may not be worth it now but as a long-term play moscow is clearly betting that top of the world will pay off. >> we are reporting, the state department overnight released another trove of hillary clinton's e-mails. these are the messages she stored on a private e-mail server while she served as secretary of state. the state department published more than 4,000 of those messages, e-mails she sent in 2009 and 2010. this is one of the messages that was redacted, possibly after it was written. michael schurr has more. >> reporter: the state department released over 7,000 pages of hillary clinton's e-mails while she was secretary of state and of course the
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attention focused on clinton because of the fact that she had her own server in her home. 150 of those e-mails were redacted, meaning that they have been classified since they were released. now, that doesn't mean or they have been classified since they were sent and doesn't mean of course that hillary clinton was sending classified information, they are saying the 150 e-mails could have been classified since the information that was not classified at that time could now be classified and of course the cumulative effect on hillary clinton is not great with a constant release of e-mails and people go scurrying through them and trying to find out if there is a smoking gun e-mail in there and has not found that. reward of course being there has not been that smoking gun. the problem is back three or four weeks from now there will be more e-mails that come out. what helps hillary clinton in the case is e-mails show a personal side and funny and natural side of hillary clinton
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talking about television shows and talking about her shoe falling off at the palace and so while hillary clinton is not delighted to deal with in this week she called it a big mistake to have this server in her home. some of the e-mails in the fact they are not revealing anything about her that is problematic can only make that campaign and hillary clinton herself feel a bit of relief and trying to get away from this but still the e-mails keep coming. >> michael schurr in san francisco. clinton set to testify before congress october 22nd about her use of her private e-mail server. funeral services scheduled today for adam ward, one of two journalists fatally shot last week on live television, his family hosted a memorial on monday in salem, virginia and those attended were asked to wear the colors of salem high or virginia tech in ward's honor, the 27-year-old camera man was killed along with his colleague alison parker last week. a kansas jury will decided to if
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self proclaimed white supremacist will face the death penalty, frazier glen cross convicted on monday of killing three people outside two jewish centers near kansas last year. john henry smith is here, john, what do we know about his background? >> randall cross is a former grand dragon of the ku klux klan and after verdict announced on monday he gave a nazi salute in open court. >> we the jury find the defendant guilty of capitol murder in count one. >> just the same. >> reporter: frazier glen cross, aka frazier glenn miller was convicted monday for the shooting deaths of william and under wood and terry lamono last spring and he gunned the victims down in the parking lots of a suburban community center and a nearby retirement home and claimed he did it to protect the white race from jews. none of the people he killed
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though were actually jewish. cross represented himself during the trial, testing the patience of the judge who repeatedly threatened to throw him out of court. now the same jury that convicted him will decide if cross will receive the death penalty. kansas has not executed a prisoner since 1965. the families of the victims so far have not commented about the conviction, mindy the mother of under wood and daughter of william corbin was in court and left without talking to reporters, randall. >> thank you john henry. the second person has now been arrested in connection with last monday's deadly bombing in bangkok, thai prime minister says he is a foreigner and picked up at a check point at the cambodian border and the second foreigner arrested in connection with the explosion at a religious shrine, 20 people died in the blast, the motive still not clear. hungry is taking a bold step
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this morning to stop thousands of refugees from boarding trains to western europe. we have live pictures out of budapest where refugees are protesting outside the train station, the decision to clear the area and stop all trains from leaving the terminal, hundreds of refugees managed to leave on monday and ride into austria and andrew simmons is in budapest. >> reporter: hundreds of refugees were getting on international trains here, more than 3500 getting through austria and on to germany and but now the police are acting as guards stopping them from getting them in the station even and they are sprawled all over and some demonstrating and some are just lying on the floor exhausted and many have tickets, valid tickets and families paying up to 1,000 euro and whether they will get their money back is open to question and in the past they got on trains and did not get their
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money back after buying tickets. this is a crisis without really any explanation at all. the government has not explains to the people and ngos have not explained to the people nor the police. the rail way company has said the police have closed the station eventually because they couldn't operate about 9:00 on tuesday morning and now we are seeing rail ways staff allowing other passengers into the station but the police are resolved to stop the refugees from getting in. many of them are insistent they will stay here until they are allowed into the station and on board trains. >> that is andrew simmons in budapest. afghan taliban leaders say they covered up omar's death for two years as part of a military strategy. the rebel group published a document online revealing the date of omar's death of april 23, 2013. the document was intended to provide more information about the appointment of his successor
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mansur as the new taliban leader. mean while nato backing has taking this on and this summer marked the first fighting since u.s. and other nato forces withdrew last year and for the taliban it mostly has been a season of gains and john reports. >> reporter: afghanistan's southern province has been the scene of heavy fighting as afghan troops with air support from nato try to check advances, the area has been a battleground strategic and symbolic since the u.s. invasion in 2001. it's a long-time taliban stronghold and an opium rich drug trafficking hub where u.s. and british troops lost their lives before most foreign forces left and that tug of war forced tens of thousands of people out of their homes.
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taliban efforts to take control of the region intensified after the withdrawal of u.s. led coalition forces last year, about 10,000 american troops now remain, mostly to train and advice. afghan forces have stood their grand but struggled with disorganize nations, low low moral and drug dependence and they saw the taliban make gains in northern parts of the country and helmar and in july they pushed afghan forces out and last week a bloody victory in the victim once a key nato picket with struggling routes and that win was short lived with the backing of u.s. air power afghan forces took him back over the weekend. the afghan government had hoped for a weakening of the taliban after the group announced last month that high ranking leader
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omar was dead and his passing kept under wraps for nearly two years. any hopes that a leadership vacuum would lead to debilitating in-fighting have so far been dashed. john with al jazeera. new satellite images confirming the disruption of a historic religious building in palmyra, syria and i.s.i.l. destroyed the bell temple that dates back to 30 ad and considered one of most important religious buildings of the first century and seized palmyra in may and a few days ago fighters said they blew up another 2000-year-old temple nearby. asking the supreme court to step in to stop an execution in missouri and nunly is charged with kidnapping and rape and stabbing death of a teenage girl two decades ago. the family of a murdered california woman will sue state and federal officials today and she was killed in july by an undocumented immigrant who had
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previously been deported from the u.s. multiple times. and the city council in los angeles is poised to vote on 2024 olympic plan today after boston's bid for the games collapsed. staying with the boy scouts, the mormon church continues supporting the organization despite objecting to gay leaders. we will speak with an openly gay eagle scout who is mormon about the decision and new details about the man accused of killing a tks -- texas deputy and his history of mental illness.
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♪ welcome back to al jazeera america, it's 8:18 eastern time and looking at the top stories pope francis this morning will allow priests to forgive women who have had abortions through the holy year. in a letter published today by the vatican the pope describes the moral ordeal for many women catholic teachings call abortion such a grave sin that women who have the procedure or perform it are automatically ex
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communicated. six football player charged with hazing and sexually assaulting teammates at a high school in new jersey have been sentenced to probation. the judge also ordered community service but the teens will not have to register as sex offenders. a 7th suspect is awaiting trial. a suburban atlanta police officer in critical condition today after being shot while responding to reports of a burglary. the officer had gone to the wrong home, the homeowner and a dog were also shot. officials are investigating what happened. a funeral is set for friday for a texas deputy shot and killed at a gas station, the suspect appeared in court for the first time on monday where his lawyer revealed that shannon miles has a history of mental illness. authorities also shed light on what happened during the execution-style shooting, robert ray reports from houston. >> reporter: flags outside the district court in houston flew at half staff on monday honoring
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47-year-old deputy who was shot and killed at a gas station on friday. inside the court a shackled 30-year-old shannon miles was arraigned on capitol murder charge, he did not enter a plea and is being held without bond. >> when deputies arrived they found deputy goforth face down in the parking lot near his patrol car and shot multiple times with a firearm, he was dead. >> reporter: devin anderson said they reviewed surveillance video from the station and came out of the store after filling out his vehicle when a man stepped out of a red truck and fired at his head and then continued shooting, 14 rounds after the deputy was face down on the ground. >> our assumption is he was a target because he wore a uniform. >> reporter: on saturday the harris county sheriff called the killing cold blooded and brought race into the discussion. >> we've heard black lives
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matter and cop's lives matter too and let's drop the qualifier and say lives matter and take that to the bank. >> reporter: shannon miles is no stranger with the law and has been in jail for minor convictions over the past ten years. >> everybody would sure like to know the motive and where and when he got the gun. >> reporter: meanwhile hundreds of people of all races marched over the weekend to honor the slain deputy. >> that is robin ray reporting. we learned that a kentucky clerk has denied a marriage license to a gay couple despite a u.s. supreme court decision, the court on monday denied a request from davis to issue a stay while she appealed a lower court ruling. about ten minutes ago when the office opened she again denied licenses to two couples and now she faces fines or possibly jail time and she says her religious beliefs for bid her from issuing the licenses. her attorney says davis is at work today to quote face
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whatever she has to face. more on our story we have been following closely, supporters of the boy scouts of america will stay part of the movement despite a dispute with appointing gay leaders and they voted in july to lift the nationwide ban on openly gay scout leaders but gave local troops the ability to accept or reject leaders based on their own local criteria. at the time the church of latter day saints called it troubling and believe it's a sin and leaders say quote the church will go forward as a chartering organization of bfa and as in the past will appoint scout leaders and volunteers to uphold and with the doctorate, values and standards and todd richardson is a mormon and eagle scout and is openly gay and the senior vice president of affirmation, a group that supports lbgt mormons and their
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families. now the church said it would uphold the church values but here is the question, does that mean they can't be gay? >> that is a big question. the church came out the day after the boy scouts of america changed their policy saying being hopefully gay is not consistent with church doctrine. obviously you can have someone who is gay also serve in that capacity but probably not in an open way. >> so there was the possibility that the church would just split off completely from the boy scouts, right, now how significant would that have been for the boy scouts because apparently the mormon church is one of the largest sponsor of boy scout troops? >> it would have been very difficult for the boy scouts of america because it's a large contributor and very difficult for youth in the lds church in the united states. it's very integrated in our church so it would have been difficult and as a former eagle scout it would have been really
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disheartening to have that happen. >> tell me about your personal journey. so you are a scout and eagle scout and you are gay and you are a mormon. >> correct. >> how did you keep your presence in the church and in the scouts? >> so it's difficult so i was not out as a child and so growing up in the scouts i was not openly gay and i've only been openly gay for a few years and kind of move a delicate balance through the church because i'm still active in the church. obviously as an eagle scout it is sad because i wouldn't be able to be a scout leader now in my faith. >> but you were when you were. >> i was an eagle scout and never a scout leader. >> okay, do you know from personal experience or anecdotal experience if there were mormon leaders that were gay? >> i don't know if any were
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openly gay and have not heard stories about that but there are certainly eligible people lbgq and it's too bad we miss out to use them in this way. >> does the church have what amounts to the old military doctrine of don't ask, don't tell with respect to being gay and being a mormon and in the scouts? >> i would imagine that that would probably be the case. it's hard to say. you know, the lds church we kind of say we are the same no matter where you go in the world, if you go to an lds church it would feel very similar no matter where you are. reality is it's a lay ministry and there are local leaders who act very differently toward lbgtq folks and there are more progressive congregations and less progressive ones. >> how do you counsel young scouts who are mormons and want to come out and want to be honest about who they are but on the other hand they want to be a scout and want to remain in the church, what do you tell them?
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>> it's actually great, the lds church, our church came out several months ago and said it didn't mat matter if you were gay and a scout, that it did not matter your sexual orientation if you were a scout yourself. the real question now is how do we accept as lds faith scout leaders and the church says if you are openly gay you cannot participate as a leader but scouting as a youth the church has been open and says it doesn't matter your sexual orientation and you can still be a scout which is positive. >> explain for us how it happens that the mormon church is one of the largest sponsors of boy scouts, who is the nexus and connection between the two? >> i do not know how it started unfortunately i probably should but growing up it's very integrated so as a young man in the mormon church i went to church and was in classes and sunday school with all the members of my scout troop and every week during the week we
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would meet at the church as a scout troop and we would go on scouting events and trips with leaders and it's very integrated and it would have been very sad should we have parted ways with boy scouts of america and i personally am glad we did not. it was really important in my formative years and i think it's a positive organization. >> todd richardson and thank you for joining us on al jazeera and sharing your points of view and insight and being gay and mormon and possibly a scout leader some day, lbgt mormons and families and friends thank you sir. president obama is in alaska today calling for action on climate change but many of the states native community is feeling the devastating effects on their lives and livelihoods. >> i'm in san francisco and medical science in the form of this little drug has done away with the threat of death by heroin overdose. now the question is will politics and popular opinion let it get out into the world?
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welcome back to al jazeera, the time now is 8:30, eastern and taking a look at the top stories, funeral set today for adam ward one of two join lists shot last week on live television, his family hosted a memorial for the camera man monday in salem, virginia, the 27-year-old was killed along with his colleague alison parker. getting a look this morning at thousands more e-mails from hillary clinton's time as secretary of state, they are messages she stored on a private e-mail server. around 150 of the e-mails are redacted and are now considered
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classified. and president obama will walk on a glacier later today on the unprecedented trip to alaska and pushing for a stronger u.s. presence in the region. on monday the president took on the issue of climate change. >> my understanding of can climate change advances each day. human activity is disrupting the climate. in many ways faster than we previously thought. the science is stark. it is sharpening. it proves that this once distant threat is now very much in the presence. >> reporter: president obama has been criticized for his resent decision to allow oil exploration and drilling off alaska's arctic coast and the white house says the president believes it can be done safely. jane any sims hip heads up the indigenous food and agricultural initiative at the university arkansas school of law and she
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is the founder of the usda's office of tribal relations and a former senior advisor to secretary of agricultural thomas vilsac and joins us via skype from arkansas and many are maritime communities and rely on water, how are they affected by climate change? >> i will tell you the affects of these communities by climate change at this point is very real. it has been noticeable to our elders in our communities that live in very remote alaskan villages and i would say since the 80s or maybe before. those people, native villagers who live on the land in the very remote communities have been seeing the changes for decades but i would have to tell you that in my constantly keeping in touch with my alaska brothers
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and sisters they will tell you that the more recent changes are even more profound, affecting their food services and affecting their ability to meet the needs of their family. >> give me one example that you can draw a direct link between their food availability and the climate. >> yeah, i recall can and there is good data in this arena. the alaska has instituted food policy counsel and really is digging deeply into the issues of food and food access and healthy food access. many of these remote communities have what we would consider to be and what they call a s substancice diet which focuses on marine life as well as animal life on land as well as plants
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indigenous to the area. and because they live so remotely and many of them we would think of as being almost off grid they are very tied to those specific sources of food. some of the data reflects that of the $2 billion a year in alaska food purchases, 95% of those food purchases are imported into the state of alaska. as you start to think about that when you are talking about or trying to conceptualize very high supply chain costs in terms of air, barge or trucks to get food in remote places. i know of communities where the only way you can get inside food into those communities are air or barge. >> sorry to interrupt you because we will run out of time in a minute and my question is this a matter of them choosing
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to become like many americans are purchasers of food as opposed to those who grow their food, is it the climate that is reflecting their turn towards importation of food or just personal decision making where people don't want to farm or fish anymore? >> no, it is absolute necessity. the migration patterns of the animals that exist on land have fundamentally changed. the fishery patterns have changed. you also are seeing a high incidents of zoonic diseases for food services in the water and outside the water. and when you think about those food sources literally not being there anymore because the migration patterns had changed or the fisheries themselves have changed then you are talking about that is not a matter of personal choice. that is a matter of looking outside your door and realizing
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that your foods are no longer there. so those importation are response but not sustainable in the communities. >> sorry to interrupt you again but seeing president obama focusing on climate change they say he is doing something that is counter intuitive and allowing exploration of drilling and that will have a direct impact on increasing climate change. if you had the president's ear, what would you urge that he do in a nutshell to counter climate change and to provide food, security for alaskans and everyone really? >> well, i will tell you that regardless of the energy issues which can be quite political i'm very much focused on improving food access and healthy food access. our initiative here is launching a project today, september is hunger action month and we are
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taking action and we are helping native communities all across the u.s. to develop food policies with the support of the jewish hunger action organization as well as the leadership of the community. but if i had the president's ear i would have him focus on building the infrastructure necessary for those communities to actually continue to access food and in new ways but i would also tell you that the bringing our young people into this conversation is critical. we have to have young people who see that there is light at the end of the tunnel and the president spoke of that yesterday when he was speaking to the climate conference in alaska that native people are already dealing with these issues around the globe and if i
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had his ear i would have him focus specifically on building a food infrastructure so that we do not have continued food insecurity issues among native communities in alaska which is a problem throughout the u.s. as well. >> jamie sims-hip director of food and agricultural initiative at the arkansas school of law, thank you for joining us on al jazeera america. >> thank you very having me. native alaskans have been pushing for the change for a long time but today there is growing backlash over president obama's decision to rename alaska's mount mckinley mount denali and some members are congress are not happy about it. >> william mckinley never visited alaska and never saw this natural wonder towering over the tundra but they heard
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he was republican nominee for president and named it after him and it stuck and he won the white house and in 1917, 16 years after he was assassinated, the government formally recognized the name mt. mckinley, trouble is it already had a name. >> for generations alaskans have known this majestic mountain as the great one and today we are officially able to recognize the mountain as denali, i would like to thank the president for working with us to achieve this significant change to show honor, respect and gratitude to the alaskan people of alaska. >> reporter: not everyone is thanking president obama especially not politicians from mckinley's home state of ohio. ohio senator rob portman said he was a proud person from ohio and named after him in the way to remember his rich legacy after his assassination. speaker of the house john
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boehner also from ohio said the name is a testament to his legacy as a politician and soldier and served with distinction in the army and i'm deeply disappointed in this decision. department of interior said it meant no respect to the 25th president that the move to restore the sacred name is what most alaskans wanted. the state of alaska actually started calling the mountain denali back in 1975 and since 1980 the area surrounding it has been named denali national park and preserve but the peek was still mt. mckinley. in 2008 then candidate obama vowed to improve relations between native americans and the federal government as part of this trip president obama is expanding government support for native groups in alaska including a program to promote, quote, an arctic way of life, a way of life that now includes a new old name for and ancient
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american landmark, paul in new york. donald trump has weighed in saying president obama wants to change the name of mt. mckinley to denali after 100 years and great insult to ohio, i will change back. other controversy with the trip to alaska and drilling the the arctic and decided to allow royal dutch shell to drill for oil off of the northwest coast and critics say that is a real danger, extreme weather conditions in the state would make drilling dealing with an oil spill very difficult. tech no's phil spend two weeks in the arctic working with scientists on ways to prevent that kind of problem. >> a lot of projects going on here, what do you think is the most exciting one? >> the isotope sniffer and can do interesting things and this can be an alert and replace assets doing patrols.
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intake that we have for our continuous atmospheric sampling. >> reporter: this on the bow is the nose of the isotope sniffer and every second it sends it down to analyzers in a makeshift lab below. if you wonder why they are strapped down. >> we are in the front of the ship and making noise and hitting ice and crashing through ice which is why we have this strapped down. >> reporter: it's being tested by jeff walker and eric kline both scientists for awareness center at the university of alaska, anchorage. >> when we are here we are getting the air in and to us it's misty air but you don't see the compositions that will change depending how much sea ice is there, the humidity, the temperature. >> reporter: contamination will also change the isotopic composition of the air like oil. >> like shell in the arctic here we want to make sure we are well aware of any mishaps that might
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occur very early while our vision is to take this device, put it inside a noah noaa buoy and circle for guardians of the habitat and the buoys surrounding the platform can give immediate warning that something has happened and we need to do something now. >> it may be two years before the technology is ready to be deployed but there is one big reason for it, the drilling that shell is to begin here is on everyone's mind. >> you can see phil's complete report on the arctic next monday, september 7th at 6:30 p.m. eastern. protesters in hungry where hundreds of refugees are trying to get on trains to germany. you are looking live in budapest where demonstrators are chanting after police shut down the main train station more than 300,000 people have crossed the mediterranean this year trying to get to europe and often been fleeing syria and aratria and
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iraq. australia dealing with its own refugee situation and government funded detention center is under close scrutiny under amid allegations of sexual and child abuse and other criminal conduct and andrew thomas reports. >> reporter: three years ago al jazeera filmed what would become naru detention center as australia's army built it but since detainees have been held in what has in effect been a prison the media is not allowed in and conditions that should change because where there is secrecy there can be abuse. the report detailed some of what is alleged, self harm by traumatized children, sexual abuse of detainees by guards and even water boarding. though the credibility of the former guard making that accusation was questioned at the inquiry. >> no, i have not personally witnessed the actual event but i have witnessed what i firmly
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believe to be the actions after. >> so you've seen people with water on them come from a building? >> and water coming out of their mouth, coughing up water. >> reporter: the report says conditions at the present are not adequate, appropriate or safe. it calls for a full order to the allegations of abuse. >> there are 67 allegations of both physical and sexual abuse against children and includes 30 concerning deten civ center staff. >> reporter: the reports recommendations include faster processing of refugee claims and removal of children from the prison. >> the minister has acknowledged this morning for the first time that things are not okay inside the naru detention camp and that talk is cheap. the minister needs to act. >> reporter: australia's government accepts that sending its refugees to camps in other countries is tough but as a deterrent it works and boats of
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asylum seekers as these stopped coming to australia and the policy is attracting international criticism. >> they said what is going on in naru is tantamount to torture in some cases. >> look it's brutal stuff, no question about it but seen as a deterrence and a lot of you and governments are actually looking to the australian model. >> reporter: no plans to close the camp, the company running it was on monday given a five-year contract to continue doing so. naru is tiny in the pacific and the millions it's given to host what is an australian prison is a sizable part of the economy. but it is kept hidden just applying to a visa for naru journalists pay $6,000 with no guaranty of getting one and no access to the detention center even if they do. what this report makes clear is that in such a dark place dark things are happening. andrew thomas, al jazeera,
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sidney. california is one step closer to providing equal pay for women. they ban employers paying differing wages to people doing the same work and bans retaliation if workers ask to see what their colleagues earn and governor jerry brown indicated he will sign that bill in law. a california woman is suing c p chipolte claim saying gee i'm over it and misleading customers because despite the slogan there are gmos in some of its products and they say they have disclaimers on the website saying some foods contain gmo and plans to fight the lawsuit. 40,000 americans die every year of overdoses when it comes to heroin uses and police reported success in saving lives with the drug narcan but using it comes with some controversy and we explain. >> that is my friend ariel, she
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and i were friends and worked together. >> reporter: she runs the drug overdose prevention and education program in oakland, california. the work is very hard and very personal. >> we sat outside for a long time and she said i don't know what i'm doing. i'll get my beep together and i don't know, it's just a blip, you know. and she died that night. >> reporter: she may not get users into treatment but can make sure they have access to a miracle drug narcan. an overdose causes the body to forget to breathe. narcan literally knocks opiates off the brain sobering up the user instantly and heroin and opioid abuse has risen since 2007 and 2013 which complete information is available about 16,000 people died of an overdose of prescription op of
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oxycodone and heroin and in the year wheeler's group helped conduct an narcan and reverses overdoses at least 8,000 times meaning in theory the 8,000 people would be dead as well. narcan is arguably the safest drug in the world. if a paramedic gives them sugar water, if they are in the wrong alcohol stupor it could kill them but this is safe to administer to anybody in any condition and why this stuff is available not just to emergency personnel but normal people, you and me. >> we take the cap off here. >> reporter: paramedics traditionally administered narcan and police carry it in 29 states as well but according to the study drug users saved each other over 80% of the time. that's why wheeler says they must have narcan too.
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>> for me the priority has to get it in the hands of people who use drugs, they are the most people to witness an overdose. >> patrick who uses heroin would be dead if he had to wait for an officer or an emt he says. >> what happened is that while i was many minneapolis i acquired heroin out there that was a lot stronger than what i was used to in san francisco so when i used it i basically oded and i didn't have time to prepare or save myself to do anything and my girlfriend luckily had the training in how to use it and had access to it, saw i was unconscious and not breathing and came to me and inserted it you can do it through the nose which is how she did it and revived me within about 5-10 minutes. >> reporter: al jazeera, san francisco. smoking rate in the u.s. hit a new low, the c.d.c. released the numbers this morning showing that only 17% of american adults now smoke cigarettes that rate has been falling for decades.
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experts say it is mainly because of antismoking ads, smoking bans, taxes and alternatives such as e-cigs. stolen artifacts worth millions and the country setting a new standard for bringing back plundered history. ♪
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welcome back to al jazeera america, it's 8:53 eastern time and look at today's stop -- top stories, 141 people and most officers are still in the hospital, a grenade as people protested monday over a measure
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that gives pro-russian separatists greater autonomy and one suspect is in custody. there has been another huge explosion at a chemical factory in eastern china. one person reportedly killed in monday night's blast and people in charge of the factory have been detained by police and china seen several factory explosions in the past three weeks including one that killed nearly 160 people. and growing condemnation this morning of the turkish government after it detained two british journalists and a translator working with the news organization, vice, and jake and phillip and mohamed were filming in the south when police arrested him. turkey says they were helping i.s.i.l. and vice denies charges. outrage this morning over misting stations at ouswitz and supposed to help during the heat
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wave and now compared to nazi gas chambers and millions were killed in them but they added the midsters to keep visitors safe. an investigation started when a u.s. officer was caught with a precious artifact and now thousands of pieces looted from peru and ecuador are headed home. and we report from buenos aires. >> reporter: these are thousands of archeological artifacts which are being sent back to their country of origin. [whistle] there are around 4500 of them. they come from peru on ecuador and recently recovered in buenos aires after a ten-year investigation. >> translator: investigation started when a u.s. professor was caught at the airport with one of the pieces and i went to some of the raids and in some cases we found entire book shelves filled with
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archeological pieces. >> among the pieces there are glasses, statutes and other elements traditionally used for religious festivities in peru and ecuador. >> translator: this is after 1300 after the birth of christ and empire. >> reporter: we are told they were stolen from archeological sites and this is the neighborhood filled with antique stores are the help of anthropologists and launched several raids, some in this area to recover the pieces. interpoll headquarters an expert in finding stolen antiques and in charge of the operation and says what happened with the archeological artifacts was not an exception. >> translator: south america is a region that provide this and some come from argentina and taken somewhere else, that is
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how trafficking happens and it's a multi million dollar industry. >> reporter: argentina is trying to set a precedent about what to do with recovered antiques, that is why it is offered to send the pieces to the original owners. >> translator: when you go to museums around the world you see they are filled with stolen pieces from around the country and it's a type of colonialism and that is why argentina is sending all these pieces back. >> reporter: antique trafficking has become a major business around the world and at least this time these artifacts are heading to where they belong. al jazeera, buenos aires. there is new evidence today about the origins of probably the most performed song ever, librarian at the university of louisville discovered a 19th century manuscript of happy birthday and it could have a huge impact on a court case
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challenging the copyright of that famous song, that sit from new york and i'm randall pinkston and keep up to date on al jazeera.com. ♪
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>> top architect david adjaye. >> for architecture to be emotionally relevant, there has to be a connection. >> talks about the pressures of his biggest projects... >> everything i was passionate about was about to be tested. >> and improving the world through buildings. >> architecture does inspire social change. >> every tuesday night. >> i lived that character. >> go one on one with america's movers and shakers. >> we will be able to see change. >> gripping. inspiring. entertaining. talk to al jazeera.
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♪ >> announcer: this is al jazeera. ♪ hello and welcome to the news hour, i'm live from al jazeera headquarters in doha and here is what is coming up, in the next 60 minutes. [chanting] hungarian police block hundreds of refugees from boarding trains in budapest. protesters from the you stink movement stormed the ministry in beirut. calls for australia to remove children f

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