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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  October 21, 2015 7:00am-9:01am EDT

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what i told members is if i can truly be a unifying figure then i will the congressman says he's willing to run for speaker of the house, only if conservative republicans do what he says. breaking overnight, a surprise meeting in moscow. syrian president bashar al-assad
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talks with vladimir putin about the russian air tricks that could help his government gain control of the county. >> searching for an orson. >> the culprits of six fires around st. louis. >> and a shift on mammograms, the cancer society says women should screen later and less often. not everyone agrees. we need to move from an opposition party to being a proposition party. because we think the nation is on the wrong path, we have a duty to show the right one. our next speaker has to be a visionary one well, this morning house republicans are considering their option, paul ryan saying he is open to being speak.
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good morning, welcome to world news. >> i'm paul ryan says he will take the job if every republican caucus backs him. >> this is the only person that can unify a splintered house party. others are pushing back. >> reporter: the question for pauline as he seemingly agreed to serve as speaker to the house is whether or not the house republicans can agree to the request. whether all can be unified at all. in meeting on tuesday, and other republicans, ryan says he is willing to serve the speaker as long as three main demands are met, that he will want a rule change preventing group to vacate the chair, meaning remove the speaker and on top of that
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he wants the freedom caucus to publicly endorse him. this seems unlikely as five members say they are opposed, and daniel webster saying he'll continue his own run as speaker. raul calls the demand for a non-starter. and it's not as if ryan wanted this job in the first place. >> i'm in the job i always wanted here. i came to the conclusion that this is a dire moment, not just for congress, but for our country, and i think it is in need of leadership. >> congressman ryan expressed reluctance to me after the speaker resigned. when i asked him if it's a job he said "it's a know, it's sin ear, and i think people are finally believing what i say." as those among the freedom caucus dwindles, paul ryan may
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have to walk away from a job he never wanted. >> paul ryan has the support of congressman jason dreyfuss. he'll pull his name out of running. >> i'm out and in with paul. >> do you think he's a good endorsement? >> i hope so. i want to lend help and support behind him. i support him for vice president, i think he would be a great president, an exceptional speaker. i really do. >> he is one of two publicly announced candidates to replace john boehner, but failed to get the endorsement of the treated yom caucus, a group of dozens of house republicans. there's speculation with whether joe biden will run for vice president. he is taking jabs, suggesting that he may be getting ready for a run. as david shuster reports that is more complicated. >> reporter: last night in washington vice president joe biden offered no news about a
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possible presidential campaign, the vice president honouring a predecessor. while joe biden did not clarify much against 2016. he made a few remarks. first, joe biden knocked hillary clinton for saying that the first democratic debate that she considers republicans her enemy. biden said "i don't think the chief enemy is the republican party, this is a matter of working things out", and he disputed hillary clinton's account of white house deliberations on the raid on osama bin laden. according to hillary clinton's last book she supported the attack, joe biden did not. joe biden indicated that hillary clinton's position was not clear, and her narrative about his advice to the president is wrong. >> we walked out of the room and upstairs, i told him my opinion. but to follow his own instincts.
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>> reporter: joe biden paid off on his own foreign policies credentials and pointed out that president obama trusted him the most in representing the administration in talks with foreign leaders. >> kerr are is a great krait -- john kerry is a great secretary of state, and hillary clinton is a great secretary of state. there are times when only the vice president, if it's known of his relationship with the president, can speak for the united states when the president can't be there. >> joe biden has been around politics a long time and his own supporters believe the shots at lint are not an accident and joe biden believes he's the air to the president obama legacy. the february is not yet comfortable with joining the 2016 race and has been advised the odds of winning the nomination is slim, yet a decision not to run means the career will come to an end in 15 months. it's not an easy choice. hillary clinton is scheduled to
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testify to congress about benghazi and emails. the top supporters believe the vice president's decision about running for president may not come until after the impact of clinton's testimony is clear. >> stay with us, in 15 minutes we'll talk to our political contribute jobs, jason johnson of canada - on whether he may run for president and dramatic developments on the diplomatic front. secretary of state john kerry will make his way to europe, the first leg of a trip taking hig to israel and high level talks to end the surging violence. and syria's president met with vladimir putin in moscow. it's bashar al-assad's first known trip abroad since the war broke out in syria. vladimir putin has been a strong ally, and russian air strikes are helping government forces retake key areas.
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rory challands has the story. >> this was a trademark vladimir putin piece of political theatre. he does these things so regularly. the traffic in central moscow was at a stand till. many of the main thorough fares blacked off by police. as i cycled over the helicopter a presidential helicopter flue lowdown the river, over my head. it seems likely that it was president bashar al-assad who was was in that helicopter. what did they talk about? we know they discuss the obvious things, the russian air campaign in syria, and how this is supporting bashar al-assad's ground offensive. but the big question remains, how much did vladimir putin push bashar al-assad on a transfer of
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power for him to leave power. now, there are those that have been talking in moscow saying that costco is not particularly -- that moscow is not particularly wedded to bashar al-assad, as long as whatever happens in the political resolution of this conflict, it leaves moscow's interests relatively unscathed and that a leader is in place in syria, that moscow can work with. every time the west has assumed moscow might be about to give up on bashar al-assad, moscow seems to have done the opposite, doubling down, stepping in to prop up its long-time ally. al jazeera's rory challands reporting from moscow canada's new leaders could be causing problems in the fight against i.s.i.l. liberal party leader justin trudeau talking to president obama on tuesday. they spoke about close cooperation on trade and climate
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change, and justin trudeau revealed he'll pull the jets out of the coalition fighting i.s.i.l. jamie mcintyre has more. >> reporter: an i.s.i.l. withdrawal is not all that significantly. they distributed four f/a-18 fighter bombs, and the 11 other countries that contributed bombers will take up the slack. symbolically, politically, it's a blow to the united states, canada has been one of the u.s.'s most reliable partners, and the two countries, which share a common border operate together in the defense of the north america under nor add, one of the few places where american troops are under foreign command. in a phone call with president obama, the newly elected prime minister made it clear that he is going to make good on his promise to end canada's combat mission in iraq and syria. >> we talk d b
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about the engagement as a strong member of the coalition, and i committed that we would engage in a responsible way, but he understands the commitments i have made around ending the combat mission. canada's contribution of war planes to the anti-i.s.i.l. campaign is not the only lose to the united states. canada's newly elected prime minister justin trudeau promised to take canada out of the expensive f-35 joint jet fighter programme, the most expensive programme that the pentagon embarked on. the stealthy planes costing more than $100 million a copy. canada's prime minister says he wants to use the money to rebuild canada's navy and buy cheaper planes that are more geared to defending canada,
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rather than have a stealthy strike capability. that could hurt lockheed martin, which makes the f-35, but could benefit boeing which nation the f18, they may decide that opposing the f18 jamie mcintyre reporting from washington d.c. canada's decision, by the way, to pull the fighter jets in the fight against i.s.i.l. coming hours after a move by the u.s. and russia, agreeing on rules to reduce accidents in the skies above syria. the memorandum of understanding does not include cooperation or sharing of target information overnight violence in the palestinian territories, while the u.n. secretary-general was there calling for peace. a palestinian girl was shot in the west bang, officials say she was carrying two knives, and two palestinian teens killed in
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hebron, the israeli military saying they tried to stab an israeli soldiers. during his meeting mahmoud abbas put blame for the violence on israel's policies. despair of the occupation and the blocked horizon, and in the eyes of the palestinian youth and in addition to daily violations, and acts of humiliation are braving violence. violence is not the way. it will not bring just and lasting peace but will push back the day when palestinians, statehood and both sides will live in peace and stability. -- security. i understand the frustration that comes after years of dashed hopes. the only way to end the violence
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ban ki-moon met with binyamin netanyahu on tuesday. weeks of violence killed 50 palestinians and eight israelis. a military judge is expected to provide information to a guantanamo prisoner who wants to defend himself at trial. he says he has no faith in his defense team, and might want to be his own attorney. reading him a 24 page document on his rights. he is charged for his role in the september it 11th attacks. >> it is promising to be a beautiful day in new york. strong storms move to the south-west. >> let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchell. >> some of these are in places where we need the moisture. if you look across the country, a lot of territory with dry skies through the deep south, mid-atlantic, a couple of disurchess, one through -- disturbances, one through the great lucks, some coming to the north-east. this is concerning, heading to the south-west, moving to the
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southern plains. this history, pinging from about 12 hours ago, yesterday afternoon, it was hale produced. and we have a chance of seeing fire up a bit more today. we have a slight risk for the strong storms, wind and hail, slight tornado risk. there could be heavily rain, in places like the panhandling in texas, this will continue to move from east texas to parts of mississippi, need the moisture, but the flooding, of course and is a concern as we get all of that. >> thank you very much an investigation is under way this morning in new york city after a police officer was shot and killed. officer randall and his partner looked into reports of gunfire in the east harlem neighbourhood. a man shot at the officers head. the suspect was captured a few blocks away with a gunshot wound to his head.
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holder is the fourth n.y.p.d. police officer killed over the last 11 months. >> details are emerging about a fatal police shooting in florida. cory jones was shot dead after his car broke down. a shot was fired by a plain clothed police officers. according to the palm beach gardens police department jones whereas carrying a gun he bought three days earlier. the weapon was pulled before the shooting. the victim's family doesn't believe that. >> i would plead to him to tell the truth. the truth is going to make you tree. you know. and that's the only good things that will set us free. >> we have limited information at this time. as we get more information, and are able to put that out to you, we certainly will investigators say the officer's car was not equipped with a dash cam and police do not wear body cameras
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police in st. louis, federal investigators looking for what they believe may be a lone arsonist to black churnals so far six fires in six weeks. >> reporter: fire department officials in and around st. louis have no doubt the fires burning six churches are the work of an arson. >>. >> they do not start themselves. it was in an odd place, the door. >> this church was set ablaze, the sixth since october 8th. all within three miles of each other. each seeing an entrance set on fire. i would like to see it happen. whomever it is would be caught so they can face justice. >> five of the churches are black. the other is racially mixed, and a leader of the northside church says it does not seem like locals are taking it seriously.
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>> we have phone calls from kentucky, michigan, national media. in st. louis, it's been appo nettic. >> investigators for the bureau of alcohol and firearms, they say they don't have suspects, but it is likely that one person is responsible for the rash of fires. there's a $2,000 ri ward for information leading to arrest. >> it's appalling to thing someone would do something like that, that we'd appreciate any help in resolving this. a new life, another church burnt. dozens came together a day after a fire there, showing amazing grace as they prepare to rebuild. >> i don't want to community to be angry or the churches to be angry. it's in the moments when the character is tested. >> investigators will work to determine if whatever was behind
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this was motivated by religion or race. if either is the case, the area sonnist could be charged with a hate crime >> it's no loss of life. it's not going to be easy to make sure the churches can be rebuilt. >> there has been plenty of property damage adding up to hundreds of thousands. they are promising to rebuild, but the church didn't have insurance this morning the university of the mississippi joining a growing number of southern institutions saying no to symbols. confederacy, the senate voting to stop flying the confederacy nothing. it is now going to the top administrators for approval. >> produce in per im farmers using waste water from fracking to irrigate their crops. >> troops in slovenia are given the power to guard the border. a live look as that country looks to control the influx of refugees.
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you're looking live at washington d.c., part of your world this morning, the sun rising over your nation's capital. promising to be a nice weekend. >> senate democrats blocked a bale cosponsored by two candidates. marco rubio and ted cruz backed the bill calling for prison time for those re-entering the country. it called for grants speaking of politics in washington, some republicans rejecting wisconsin congressman's paul ryan demands for unanimous support before he enters the race for house
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speaker. after resisting pressure, he said he is open for stepping into the role, but only on his terms. ryan will meet with members of the house and has given them until the end of the week to back him. jason johnson is a professor of political science and an al jazeera political contributor and is in atlanta. good morning. >> good morning. >> let's start with paul ryan - will he be able to rein in the freedom caucus, something that so far no one has been able to do. i want to listen to what he said on the issue. >> this is, after all the people's house, we need to do it as a team, and it needs to include fixes that ensure we don't experience constant leader-challenge in crisis. >> if you were a betting man would you say paul ryan will be speaker of the house. >> paul has as much chance being speaker of the house a joe biden of being the president of the
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united states. no neither is likely, he doesn't want this job. so he's laid out a series of conditions that he knows will not be met, and not met by friday, so he can tell himself, look, i tried to take one for the team. in the end he doesn't want the position, he knows it's not a winning position. >> if not paul ryan, who. >> you have to look at how john boehner or others got the job. they were guys that were young, ambitious and they got veered off the leadership track and eventually the republicans came back and said we need a generic consensus person. someone like rochl am from suburban chicago, maybe hinterling from texas, a generic person who never offended anyone, that everyone can relate to, they are the people who tend to be speaker. house. >> joe biden is online. let's talk about the democratic
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part of the house. joe biden not running, but willing to take jabs at hillary clinton. >> i have a lot of friends, i don't think my chief enemy is the republican party, this is a matter of making things work. >> he's referring to comments that republicans were the enemy. you indicate that you don't think joe biden can win. why? >> i don't think joe biden can win. you can't win if you don't run. i think that this long delay that he has been on is an indicator ha his hort is not in it. hose recovering from the loss of a sun. he's in mourning. i was spoking to my colleagues, and people are annoyed. it's not cute. he waited so long, it would be an extreme inconvenience for some political consultants and people on the ground in primary states. i don't think he's going to run. >> jason johnson, never one to hold back and pull punches,
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thank you this morning from atlanta. >> screening shift. >> signs for when to get a mammogram. we look at what has changed. >> beyond a move - texas teen suspended for bringing the clock to school, now packing his bags for a free education overseas.
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>> when i met daisy, it was the best day of my life. when my past caught up with me and made us all pay the price. >> the social worker said, "i'm gonna have to take the baby". they took my family. i don't know how i'm gonna do it but... i need another lawyer. you're gonna have to kill me to take my child.
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>> dozens of migrants out in the rain and cold. slovenias government calling in troops to control the influx of refugees. the country's parliament voting overwhelmingly to allow soldiers to patrol with police along the border. 20,000 migrants were sent into slovenia, taking a path that winds them from serbia to croatia. 12,000 migrants are in serbia, many in that camp we are seeing behind you. what does this mean for their journey? >> croatia is determined to receive the refugees up and down send them towards western europe
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right now. there are about 3,000 people waiting on the serbian side of the border and croatia is going to let them in, transfer them by bus. there are 3,000 people inside this camp and they are waiting to be transferred by train or bus toward slovenia. croatia interior minister said this morning that it's not a nice message and a nice picture if some countries send his troops, army troops and soldiers to the border. he said that some europe borders need to be strengthened and it needs to be done in greece which he sees as the course for the problems and this refugee crisis. he believes in greece there should be more coordinated european action in terms of all this refugees needs to be handled there, because it's the first european union country
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which they are entering. >> we are looking at images of police, conjures up images of the police in the united states in ferguson, missouri. hopeful live the outcome is going to be different. tell us about how the country is handling the crisis. >> the situation is under control, croatia ready to accept half of the people, of 10,000 of them coming daily from the greece direction from macedonia and serbia to croatia and going to send them toward western europe. half of them, 5,000 croatia can accommodate here in this refugee camp, and the other 5,000 needs to be transferred towards european union. now croatia obviously would like to show to the world that it's handling quite well with this situation and it really is.
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the situation is totally under control. i have a list here of 35 or more than 35 in croatia who are going to -- which are going to visit this site with croatian minister. they will visit a camp, which is now constructing in the nearby town, which is nearby to this place. it's a winter camp actually and it will have heated containers and other facilities for the winter time, and it seems that no one expects that this refugee crisis is going to slow down during winter months, so they are preparing for that. >> on the border between serbia and croatia, thank you. >> yesterday, it was raining, it was chilly, it was miserable, thank you very much.
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>> 70 refugees flown to sweden, part of a plan to relocate 160,000 migrants coming in from italy and greece. that plan could fail quickly, because many e.u. nations are balking at taking in their share. today, only 19 people have been relocated. >> a major change in the recommendations for breast cancer screening and the reaction. most women con now start getting mammograms later and less frequently. not everyone agrees with those guidelines. >> for millions of women, it's an annual routine, a mammogram to screen for breast cancer. for years, the american cancer society has recommended screening start at age 40. now new guidelines. >> we know debates are going to continue about the age to start mammography, this guideline makes it so clear that by age 45, all women should begin screening. that's where the benefits
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substantially outweigh the harm. >> those potential harms are false positives, where something suspicious turns out to be nothing but leads to extra tests and treatment and anxiety for women. >> personally, i feel like i would rather have a lifetime of false positives than catch the disease at a much later stage and i'm pretty sure my family would agree with that, too. >> breast cancer survivor tara has a family history of the disease. the new guidelines would not oh ply to her. they are for women who are healthy with an average risk of breast cancer. she said the problem is that many women don't know they are at high risk, so early screening is critical. >> it's confusing to know what doctors should do. as a patient, it's own more confusing when you walk into a doctor's office. i think there's also the uncertainty with regard to insurance companies, whether they will be covering mammograms given at an earlier age or not.
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>> in addition to raising the age for initial screening, the cancer society calls for annual exams only until age 54. after that, it's every two years. they say there's no need for regular breast exams by your doctor. >> this doctor specializes in imaging. she worries about the impact of all the different advice and recommendations. >> that is the biggest problem, is that women will throw up their hands and say nobody knows what to do and forget about it altogether. that's what we really don't want happening. >> there's little disagreement on one thing, under certain circumstances, mammograms can help save lives. >> to try to find common ground on mammograms, the american college of obstetricians and gynecology plans to hold a big conference in january. the american cancer society will be there, so will other groups.
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the hope is that come to a consensus of common agreement on what should be the mammogram guidelines for women. >> lisa stark, al jazeera, washington. >> joining me now here in new york is the founder and president of breast cancer.org. that's a non-profit organization that provides information to millions around the world about breast cancer. dr. weiss, thanks for being here. >> thank you for having me. >> help us understand the significance of these revised guidelines. >> well, everyone wants to help women the most, you know, preserve her benefit from early detection, but also avoid over diagnose and treatment so that's the purpose of the guidelines. we're concerned about this, because most women don't understand their risk very well. basically risk tends to go up over time and these guidelines are aimed at women at average risk, but only about 10% of breast cancers are due to one of the those single genes that produce as high risk.
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most breast cancer doesn't run in families and most don't know their risk. we're concerned that there are women who are at higher than average risk who think that they're at regular risk. >> this is where the confusion lies for me. >> yes. >> i understand and correct me if i'm wrong, 75% of women who get breast cancer aren't predisposed to it and don't have a history in their family. >> that's right. >> you would be consider average if you didn't have risk. >> 90% of breast condition as hers are due to how do you lead your life, reproductive choices, lifestyle and environmental exposure. risk tends to go up over time. our goal is to give each woman the benefit of early detection, high quality mammography together with your doctor's exam, and your exam, correlating the information from all three things. while we're concerned about the risks of a false positive, and overdiagnose and overtreatment,
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that's what the guidelines focused on, women don't want a missed diagnosis. i would rather have a false positive than a false diagnose. i'm a breast cancer survivor and breast cancer doctor. i've been in the hot seat and got that phone call myself about a diagnose of breast cancer. i speak for a lot of women saying we want our best shot at early detection, treating it as early as possible when we can have our best chance of being cured of it, and also to avoid more aggressive treatments like chemo therapies and mastectomies. >> the last guidelines were in 2003. why 12 years until we update what a lot of people say is confusion. >> that's a great point. this has been a controversy, a street fight about who should get mammography and when with that we still recommend at
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breast cancer.org starting at 40 and doing annually after that, together with your doctor's exam and your breast self exam and get that information and share with your doctor on a regular basis what's going on in your family, who's diagnosed, who isn't, because risk tends to go up with time. women need to know how best to take care of themselves, and since breast cancer is the most common cancer to affect women, it is important to try to minimize this maximum risk. >> you can see the graphic on the screen, the 2015 recommendations, the ones from essentially the government agency that put out recommendations in 2009. it seems there is a lot of room in this field for confusion. >> yes, and confusion is a huge thing. people are overwhelmed, confused and don't know what to do. the guidelines are meant to have clarity and tell you what to do. the new guidelines are somewhat
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flexible. you can talk to your doctor about how to apply them to your individual unique situation, but at breast cancer.org, we know each woman is unique. there's no one size fits all. you need to get the mammogram that guidelines together with your doctor and see what does this mean for you specifically. right now, we still recommend annual mammography starting at able 40. if you have a strong family history, you're at higher than average risk or have a gene abnormality, you need to start earlier and do it with regular tests like an m.r.i. or ultrasound. our concern is that most people don't know the risk. risk tends that to go up with time and so we want to make sure that women, each woman gets the benefit of early detection. >> doctor, thank you. >> thank you for having me. >> congress today looking at cell phone tracking technology, how it affects your privacy.
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law enforcement agencies use special deep vices to track and investigate suspects. you sometimes don't know they are doing it, because they do it without a warrant. we have more on today's house oversight committee. >> the devices are easily obtained and easily used. one of them calmed a stingray acts like a fake cell phone tower, capturing information such as the location of every phone on the street corner or at a protest. >> if a string ray only traying a lated one number, then most people would probably not have concerns with it. the problem is that it can only operate in a dragnet fashion, so everyone within range when that stingray is activated has their cell phone data captured. >> police have been buying since 2010, they cost 2400 to $7,500. many tracking devices passively gather radio waves when a cell
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phone is communicating with a cell tower. the f.b.i. has asked local law enforcement agencies not to disclose their use of the technologies. >> i don't wants to do much about that, because i don't want the bad guys to know how we might be able to find them. >> the policies of mentions them in search warrants has two major exceptions, when there's an urgent public safety need and when the need meets exceptional circumstances. private advocacies say the device is often concealed from lawyers, suspects and judges. >> police want to enter a house, they have got to get a search warrant. it would be easier for law enforcement to say we are going to enter everybody's house and look for crime once a week. that would make their job easier and make us a lot safer. we decided that you know what, there are important liberty interests at stake. >> members of the house oversight committee are
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concerned federal and state agencies are not applying uniform standards when it comes to tracking cell phones. al jazeera. >> new concern today about the produce you eat grown in the drought stricken state of california. farmers are getting water however they can and that includes taking what is left over from fracking. as al jazeera's inevery london found out, that could have negative effect on what they grow. >> if you have oranges, games or almond ins your kitchen, it's likely they came from kearn county in california. this is water used to irgate those crops. if you think that black, shiny sheen looks like oil, you are right. the district buys 21 million gallons of it each day from oil company chevron. ninety farmers use it to irrigate their fields. it's been happening more than two decades. as the brought worsens, vial groups ask what's in the water. scott smith, chive scene
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activity with water defense took me on a tour of the irrigation canal. >> from testing we've done, it appears the harmful chemicals are not removed. >> what are those chemicals? >> they include mettle lean chloride and i do know these chemicals in the water are considered toxic, poisonous and cancerous. >> have you tested the crops? >> the preliminary crop testing came back with c20 oh c40 hydrocarbons, diesel range organics, otherwise known as oil. >> we wanted to ask if the level found in test results are harmful, but the state's lead regulatory agency for the oil and gas industry refers all questions on water quality to the water quality control board. that state board told us to talk to the regional board, which declined our request for interview. the california department of public health said more data is
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needed on safety but referred questions to the regional board, as well. california's department of agriculture says they don't have jurisdiction over water related issues, which leaves us with a cooperative managed by local farmers to acquire and divvy up available irrigation water to 90 farms in kearn county. >> this water is very good and very safe to use for irrigation. >> when you go along the canal system, you can smell the oil and a lot of times, there's a little bit of an oil slick. what are the booms there for? >> the booms are there to contain any free oil that may come through. now, this is not a perfect process, there may be some oil that comes through, very small amounts. these booms will contain it so that it doesn't get out into the irrigation system. >> most oil fields produce water. >> chevron didn't return our phone calls or emails but in this promotional video said using so-called produced water
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is safe. public records show that in april, she have ron conducted its own test, which did find elevated levels of acetone. >> the regional board is putting together a technical advisory committee to look into are there other things we should look at to ensure this water is safe. >> why weren't those tests specifically required from the beginning? >> they were not required. >> the issue of using produced water makes farmers skittish and it is not something they want to talk about. we reached out to more than 20, the majority didn't return our phone calls and none which the farmers wanted to be interviewed on camera. the farmers may not want to talk, but shoppers at the farmers market had plenty to say. >> people feel a little helpless when it comes to that kind of stuff. they feel like they don't have control over the crops that they
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consume. >> al jazeera, california. >> we have an update on the texas teen arrested because of the homemade clock he made mistaken for a bomb. ahmed muhammed is moving to qatar. his family says he'll join the young innovators program at the qatar foundation for science and community development. that announcement coming a day after he went to the white house and met the president for as strong my night. our loss is their gain. >> everywhere, people are saying great scott, the future is now. >> today is the day marty mcfly stepped out of a delower rein and hopped on to a had you ever board. >> you've got to figure out how to sell the story, how movie studios rely on trailers to get audiences into their theaters.
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>> i've been asked to keep my voice down cause we are so close
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>> arch asteroid will pass close to earth on halloween, within
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310,000 miles. it poses no threat to the earth. >> skype activities are trying to explain a massive shadow in the united states. >> in the time scientists have had with data from a mission designed to look for earth like planets circling other stars, they've gotten used to certain patterns. they're seeing the same kind of thing over and over again, but suddenly, they've seen something new. basically, around one particular star, there seems to be something causing a dimming and brightening pattern in an ongoing routine. literally, it's like something very large is passing in front of that star and blocking the light from reaching us, like someone's passing their hand over a flashlight.
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there could be a few explanations. it could be a swarm of asteroids that somehow clumped together and is doing that on occasion as they rotate around that sun. one researcher hypothesizes that this could be an alien megastructure going around the sun, maybe a solar panel of some sort. it sounds silly, but researchers here south of san francisco are taking that seriously. they've people have been looking for alien life for a long time. when you say alien megastructure they do not laugh. they have an array north of here to look at that formation and see what they can see. i'll tell you more about that research and what they hope to find later tonight. >> you can watch jake's full report tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern. >> sony agreeing to pay $8 million to employees because they lost personal data in last
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year's hacking scandal. they will pay for losses, and pay for legal fees. employees argued that sony's negligence caused them economic harm. the attack is still blamed on north korea, sake the government was jump set over the fictionallal depiction of king kong unin the movie the interview. >> 26 years ago, marty mcfly and the dock traveling to this day. back to the future two managed to get some pretty fantastic technology right. it had personal drones walking
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dogs and talking pictures. the movie had video conferencing like skype today. marty gets fired during a video chat. that fingerprint recognition we use to unlock our iphones in the film is now being used to unlock front doors, as well. >> back to the future also got a few things wrong, first what's perhaps today's most common technology the internet is notably absent. second, doc extends his life by easily replacing body parts. then there are hover boards. we haven't mastered that yet. >> the chicago cubs winning this year's world series, although it still is possible, last night, though, they did lose to the mets once again 3-0, making it seem unlikely. >> the new star wars movie has broken a record before even being released. the trailer has been watched
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27 million times in less than 36 hours. studios have used movie trailers to draw attention to their films for more than a century. we have the story of how they came about. >> the force awakens has arrived. a heart thumping movie trailer with all the bells and whistles needed to guarantee box office gold. >> it will attack and devour. >> trailers tease and tantalize. more often than not, they can make or break a film. >> it's simple. kim the batman. >> shown now before the opening credits, they originally were featured after the movie, hence the name trailer. the first trailer debuted in 1913 for a short film called the pleasure seekers. just three years later in 1916, they were a hollywood fixture.
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some are classic in their own right. >> how much i still love you. >> take casablanca or psycho, featuring a cameo by the director alfred hitchcock. >> the whole place was -- well it's too horrible to describe. >> all right now, everybody, get in crash positions. >> a few managed to give everything away, and instead of scaring us, they had audiences in stitches. >> johnny, what do you make out of this? >> this? well, i can make a hat or a broach. >> the new star wars trailer is a big budget affair. it's light years away from the franchises first one from 1976. >> saturday, big science and engineering. >> where ships. >> now we go for weeks without water.
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>> techknow's team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> can affect and surprise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> awesome! >> techknow - where technology meets humanity.
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>> vetting church fires around st. louis, police suspect an arsonist maybe targeting predominantly black church.
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>> the future is now, today is the day marty mcfly discovered hover boards and future tech. however we've come and what back to the future two didn't see coming. >> good morning, welcome back. we're following several developments in diplomacy this morning. secretary of state john kerry is traveling to europe today and the long civil war in syria is high on the agenda. >> that is the first leg of a trip that will take him to israel for high level talks there. he is trying to end the surging violence in that region, as well. kerry will meet with leaders from russia to discuss tangible options for a political solution to syria's crisis. that unannounced trip overnight making headlines, as well, this morning, syria's president bashar al assad meeting with
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president vladimir putin in moscow. this is assad's first known trip abroad since war broke out in syria five years ago. putin has been an ally of bashar al assad and russian airstrikes are helping the government retake key areas. we have the details from moscow. >> this was a trademark putin piece of political theater, really. he does these sort of things so regularly that we shouldn't really be surprised by them anymore, but yes, things are now starting to make sense as i was leaving work yesterday. the traffic in central moscow was at an absolute stand still. many main thorough fairs were blocked off by police. as i cycled over the river, a helicopter, presidential helicopter flew very low down the river just over my head. it seems likely from what we economy now that it was president bashar al assad in that h helicopter.
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we know these men discussed the obvious things, the russian air campaign in syria, and how this is supporting bashar al assad's ground offensive, but the big question remains, how much did vladimir putin push president assad on a transfer of power, for him to leave power. there are those talking in moscow saying moscow is not particularly wedded to bashar al assad as long as what happens in the political solution leaves moscow's interests in the region relatively unscathed and that a leader is in place in syria that moscow can work with. but every time the west has assumed the moscow might be just about to give up on president assad, moscow seems to have done the opposite, doubling down to
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prop up its long time ally. >> the u.s. and russia have reached a deal to share the skies over syria. two countries agree to rules aimed at reducing the risk of accidents as fighter jets and drones from both countries fight isil and strike other targets on the ground. the pentagon said the memorandum of understanding does not include actual cooperation or the sharing of target information. one country will soon pull back from the fight against isil. canada's new leader says he plans to call back jets helping with the fight. liberal party leader justin trudeau spoke with president obama tuesday. the white house said they spoke about closer cooperation on trade and climate change. trudeau revealed his plans for the military partnership going forward. we have more. >> militarily, canada's withdrawal from the anti isil bombing campaign is not that significant. canada contributed only four
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fighter bombers to the effort and for in our, the other 11 countries that of contributed bombers will take up the slack, but symbolically, politically, it's a big blow to the united states. canada has been one of the u.s.'s most reliable partners and the two countries which share a common border also operate together in the defense of north america under norad, one of the few places american troops are under foreign command. in a phone call with president obama, the newly elected canadian prime minister made it clear that he is going to make good on his promise to end canada's combat mission in iraq and syria. >> we talked about canada's continued engagement as a strong member of the coalition against isil, and i committed that we would continue to engage in a responsible way that understands
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how important canada has a role to play in the fight against isil, but ends the commitments i've made around ending the combat mission. >> canada's contribution are war planes to the anti isil campaign isn't the only loss to the united states. canada's newly elected prime minister trudeau promised to take canada out of the expensive f35 joint strike fighter program, the most expensive fighter program that the pentagon ever embarked on, those stealth planes cost more than $100 million a copy. canada's prime minister trudeau wants to use the money instead to help rebuild canada's navy and buy cheaper planes more geared to defending canada rather than have a stealthy strike capability. that could hurt lockheed martin which makes the f35 but benefit bowing which makes the f15. canada may decide to buy the f18
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super hornets to replace it's aging jets. >> iran's supreme leader giving the ok with the nuclear deal with the west, ordering the agreement to be put into place. he said the deal had several key weak points, telling rouhani that the u.s. can't be trusted. they also said iran must keep up the pressure to guarantee that the sanctions are lifted. >> some republicans are rejecting paul ryan's late night demands. he says he needs unanimous support from gop members before he will run for house speaker. ryan has been resisting pressure for weeks, but now says he's open to being speaker on his terms. as al jazeera's mike sell sure explains, ryan already has republicans pushing back. >> the question for paul ryan as he agreed to serve as speaker of the house is whether or not the most conservative house
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republicans can agree to his request and whether all house republicans can be unified at all. in meetings tuesday with the conservative house freedom caucus and other republicans, ryan said that he is willing to serve as speaker, as long as three main demands are met, that he will not commit to anything the freedom caucus wants before becoming speaker to a rule change that would prevent any group to vote to vacate the chair, meaning remove the speaker and on top of that, he wants the freedom caucus to publicly endorse him. already this seems unlikely as five freedom caucus members have said they're opposed and daniel webster of florida saying that he will continue his own run for speaker. ryan's demand was called a non-starter. it's not as if he wanted this job in the first place. >> i'm in the job i always wanted here in congress. i came to the conclusion this is a dire moment for the republican
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party and our country. i think our country is in desperate need of leadership. >> he expressed his reluctance to me after speaker boehner resigned. when i asked if he wanted the job, he said it's a number, i'm sincere and i think penal are finally believing what i say. paul ryan may have to walk away from a job he never really wanted. >> paul ryan already has the support of congressman jason chaffetz, saying he is pug his name out of the running for the speaker's job and will support ryan instead. >> i'm out and i'm in with paul. i hope so. i hope so. i want to lend my help and support behind him. i supported him for vice president and i think he'd be a great president, but i think he'd be a great speaker.
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>> another candidate is daniel webster. he failed to get the freedom caucus endorsement. despite being the apparent favorite to succeed boehner, jason johnson, our political contributor saying paul ryan only has about a 50-50 chance of getting the job. >> paul ryan's got about as much chance of being speaker of the house as joe biden being president of the united states. i don't think either is particularly likely. i think his statement yesterday makes it clear, he doesn't want this job, and so he's laid out a series of conditions that he knows won't be met and certainly won't be met by friday so he can tell himself look, i tried to take one for the team but in the end, he doesn't want the position, because he knows it's not a winning position for him to be in. >> if not paul ryan, who? >> well, i think you got to look at how john boehner or hastert got the job. these are guys who were young, ambitious and they kind of got
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veered off the leadership track and eventually, the republicans came back and said look, we just need a generic consensus person. somebody like raxham from suburb chicago, some generic person who's never offended anybody that everybody can rally around, those are who tend to be speaker of the house. >> some criticizing ryan's work on immigration reform. others warn he will be no different than john boehner, tea party conservatives saying ryan is smart but not equalified or conservative enough to lead the house. >> there is growing anticipation about what joe biden is intending to do. last night, the vice president took jabs at democratic front runner hillary clinton, suggesting he may be near a decision, but as al jazeera's david shuster reports, the decision is more complicated than it may seem. >> last night in washington,
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vice president joe biden again offered no new news about a possible presidential campaign. the vice president honored one of his predecessors walter mondale and while he did not clarify about 2016 made a few remarks yesterday that sounded like a candidate gearing up for a race. first, he knocked hillary clinton for saying at the first democratic debate that she considers republicans her enemy. biden said "i don't think my chief enemy is the republican party. this is a matter of working things out." biden disputed hillary clinton's account of internal white house deliberations over the raid on osama bin laden. according to clinton's last book, she supported the attack and biden did not, but biden indicated clinton's position wasn't clear and that clinton's narrative about his advice to the president was wrong. >> as we walked out of the room upstairs, i told them my opinion, i thought he should go,
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but follow his own instincts. >> biden played off his own foreign policy credentials saying president obama trusted him the most in talks with foreign leaders. >> john kerry is a great secretary of state, hillary clinton is a great secretary of state, there were times when only the vice president, if it's known of his relationship with the president, can speak for the united states when the president can't be there. >> joe biden has been around politics a long time and his own supporters believe the shot to clinton is not an accident and believe he is the heir to the obama legacy. he's been advised the odds of winning the nomination may be slim and yet a decision not to run means his political career will end in just 15 months, so it's not an easy choice.
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meanwhile, hillary clinton is scheduled to testify to congress tomorrow about benghazi and her emails. now top biden supporters believe the vice president's decision may not come until after the impact of clinton's testimony is clear. >> they say in washington, the watching game is now on. >> it is indeed. beautiful weather in d.c. and new york this morning but a chance of flooding in the lone star state. >> lake travis, about 75% 85% -- >> texas had a huge turnaround, a lot of it with a big spring and rain that also caused flooding. what we are looking at now is upper low and it's been slowly spinning its way, progressing its way eastward over the next couple of days. this moisture eventually is even going to make it to the gulf coast. right now, we've been worried in places like new mexico and texas where it is right now, not only producing areas of heavy rain but especially yesterday
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afternoon, you can see these spike a little bit. severe storms with that, predominantly hail, high wind reports, as well. we could see that again today. we've and got couple of strong storms this morning. the slight risk moving to mexico and western portion of texas, but it's the heavy rain that's going to be more of a concern for us, especially as this spreads. this is just the next 24 hours, but northern parts have texas, easily places that could get four or five inches pretty widespread. this morning, already in anticipation of that, we have flood watches out and then back into new mexico, you can see the oranges, that's where we already have the potential for strong storms, thunderstorm warnings. this leaves heavy rain. the eastern half of texas is still dry. we could use some of that and more starts to spread into the midwest by friday. texas to mississippi this geese are the dry and drought conditions, but flooding may
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happen. >> this isn't the beginning of el niño yet, is it? >> we've actually been in el niño for a while. we hope for the best prospects from that on the west coast for the winter. >> federal investigators suspect a lone arsonist have been setting fires to black church. >> there are six fires in two weeks. john henry smith has more. >> fire department officials in and around st. louis have no doubt the fires that burned six churches there are the work of an arsonist. >> these don't start by themselves. it is suspicious in nature. >> the new north side missionary baptist church is one set ablaze since october 8. all of within three miles of each other. each has seen an entrance set on fire. >> what i would like to see happening is number one that it would stop and that whom of it is would be caught so that they can face justice. >> five of the churches
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predominantly black, the other is racially mixed, and the leader of the new north side church says it does not seem like locals are taking it seriously. >> gotten phone calls from kentucky, from michigan, media, national media, you know, but yet, in st. louis, it's just been a very apathetic. >> while investigators or the a. st. f. have no suspects, they also say it's likely one person is responsible for the rash of fires. there's a $2,000 reward for any information leading to an arrest. >> it's an appalling to even think that someone would do something like that. we really would appreciate any help in resolving this as quickly as possible. >> a new life missionary baptist, another of the churches bonder, dozens same together after a fire there, showing amazing grace as they prepare to rebuild. >> i don't want the communities to be angry.
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i don't want the churches to be angry. it's in these moments where our character is testified. >> there have been no deaths or injuries largely because the fires happened in the predawn hours. investigators will work to determine if the person or people behind this are motivated by religion or race. if either is found to be the case, the arson or arsonist could be charged with a hate crime. >> is the penalty different for arson if it is a hate crime? >> anyone convicted of offensive face be or trying any religious real property because of race, color or ethnic characteristics can see their sentence increased by 10 or 20 years. >> thank you very much. >> the university of mississippi joining a growing number of southern institutioning saying no to symbols of the confederacy, student senate voting to stop flying the state flag on the campuses.
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that flag features the confederate design. they are going to the top school administrators to sign off for approval. >> we look at how residents are cope i go in trying to find solutions to rising crime. >> a shooting event on a florida highway. the family doesn't believe the official version of events.
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>> executions are on hold today in yet another state, arkansas where the state supreme court halted capital punishment while excuses are challenged in court.
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they are on hold in oklahoma and ohio for similar reasons. an arkansas death penalty opponents challenge a law that prevents the state from disclosing lethal drug providers who mix those cocktails. >> city officials are scrambling for answers. some parts of washington, d.c. report homicide rates double last year's. there's plenty of blame, but some residents, including a 13-year-old victim wants to make sure washington, d.c. does not again become the nation's murder capital. >> the sound of sirens blaring, the sound of a city in crisis, officers racing to the scene of yet another violent crime, the most powerful city in america seems powerless to stop the killing terrorizing the community, destroying families. august 30, this 36-year-old mother of seven came face to
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face with the violence. >> you hear gunshots, i'm thinking like about six, six gunshots. pow pow pow pow. >> lakesha said 13-year-old daughter was sitting on her neighbor's front steps with two other kids when gunfire erupted from a passing car. >> when it got in front of us, the car started shooting. >> i understand you laid down over the little girl to protect her. >> yeah. >> what was going through your head? >> i think it just naturally came to me. >> she may very well have saved the life of her friend, the 8-year-old, but paid a heavy price, gunshot wounds in both legs. >> she is just one of a long list of violent crime victims in the city this year. so far, 124 homicides, a 46%
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jump over last year's 85 murders. while the dramatic rise in the murder rate looks and is a terrible reflection on the city, experts who take a long view warn against reading too much into a single year. developer adrien washington is another washington resident who takes a long view. he lived through the murderous 1990's and decided while politician and police were trying to figure out why crime was happening, he'd help communities mobilize against it. >> it takes the involvement of local business owners, people in the neighborhood to all do small parts. you can't owe open the police can't put a cop on every corner and have him there 24 hours a day. there's not enough resources. we've got to get involved and say it's not just your job to make us safe, but do what we can do. >> the message not lost on this 13-year-old, just two days after she was shot, she found her
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voice, insisting her mom take her to a community meeting at the first district police station. >> i felt like i belonged there. it's a community. i was in the community, something happened upon the community, so i figure i should go to the community meeting, because i don't want it to happen to nobody else. >> you're going to see my entire piece at 10:00 tonight. we get into the clash that's going on now between the mayor and the police chief and police union. recently, the union took a vote of no confidence in the police chief. >> i was there in the 1980's when they called the streets the killing fields. >> also, more than 130 police chiefs and prosecutors across the country expected to launch a new campaign today trying to reduce the number of americans in prison, telling "the new york
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times" that too many people are behind bars that just don't belong there. they want to preliminary nate mandatory prison sentences and build better relationships with communities of color. >> new details are emerging this morning about a fatal police shooting in florida. 31-year-old cory jones was shot dead after his car broke down near interstate 95 sunday morning opinion the shot was fired by a plain clothes police officer. jones was carrying a gun he bought three days earlier. the officer said jones pulled out that weapon minutes before the shooting. his family doesn't believe that. >> i would plead to him to tell the truth. the truth going to make you free. that's the only good thing going to set us free. >> we have limited information at this time, as we get more information, and we're able to put that out to you, we certainly will. >> investigators say the
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officer's car was not equipped with a dash cam and police in palm beach gardens do not wear body cams. >> more violence in the palestinian territories. >> u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon visiting the region calling for calm, his meeting today as secretary of state john kerry gets ready to travel to the very same region. >> what police are doing to track your cell phone, why some in congress are asking today if law enforcement is going too far.
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>> where we are standing right now will be the panama canal. >> this will be flooded. >> we have upgraded for bigger ships. >> now we go for weeks without water. >> techknow's team of experts show you how the miracles of science...
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>> this is what innovation looks like. >> can affect and surprise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> awesome! >> techknow - where technology meets humanity. >> welcome back to your world this morning, time to look at today's top stories. wisconsin congressman paul ryan says he is now willing to become house speaker, but only if all of his fellow republicans unite behind him, giving them until friday to decide. several hard line conservatives saying no to some of ryan's conditions. >> officials in st. louis investigating church arson attacks. six predominantly black church have burned in the last two weeks. in each case, an outside door was set on fire. they do not yet have a suspect
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or motive. >> bashar al assad meeting with strong ally vladimir putin, his first known trip overseas since civil war broke out in syria four years ago. >> moor violence overnight in the palestinian territories, even as the u.n. secretary general was there calling for calm. a paying girl was shot by an israeli army in the west bank. officials say she was carrying two knives. two palestinian teens were killed lately tuesday in hebron. the military said he tried to stab an israeli soldier.
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>> in the eyes of the palestinian youth in addition to the acts of humiliation are breeding violence. >> violence will not prove a just and lasting peace, but only push back the day when palestinians will live in peace and security. i understand the frustration that comes after years of dashed hopes. >> al jazeera was in ramallah as the secretary general arrived. >> the u.n. secretary general has just arrived here in the occupied west bank to meet with the palestinian president abbas. he is bringing a message of peace, calm and how important it is to bring this region back from a very sensitive situation. he will be hearing a very different narrative here than he heard from benjamin netanyahu.
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the palestinian president said two things are on the table. he will ask ban ki-moon for international protection. what that means remains unclear. he told us that it's up to the u.n., the palestinians don't have much power as to what can be done to stop israel from occupying the palestinian territories, but very difficult to see concrete measures that will come out of this meeting that will affect the ground. i think more significantly, also, future diplomacy on the hands of the u.s. secretary of state john kerry meeting with netanyahu with president abbas and the jordanian king abdullah later in the week. it is significant that the u.n. secretary general is here in the sense that it is a message that the international community is extremely concerned about what is happening here. however, ream steps need to be taken in terms of ending the occupation and that needs to translate to the youth on the ground for any kind of calm to be restored in what is at the moment extremely sensitive times. >> many businesses are closed
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today in hebron in protest of the ongoing violence there and they arrested several hamas leaders. >> slovenia calling in the troops trying to control a huge influx of refugees. the country's parliament voting to allow soldiers to join police patrolling the border of the country with croatia. european officials calling an emergency summit to manage the crisis. >> a judge plans to read a 24 page document on his rights. he is charged for an alleged role in the september 11 attacks. >> congress is taking a closer look at cell phone tracking technology and how it affects our privacy. >> law enforcement uses special devices to track suspects often without a warrant. we have more on today's house
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oversight committee hearing. >> the devices are easily obtained and easily used. one of them called a stingray acts like a fake cell phone tower, capturing information such as the location of every phone on the street corner or at a protest. >> if a stingray only triangulated one number, then most people would probably not have concerns with it. the problem is that it can only operate in a dragnet fashion, so everyone within range when that stingray is activated has their intercepted. >> police have been buying since 2010, they cost $2,400 to $7,500. many tracking devices passively gather radio waves when a cell phone is communicating with a cell tower.
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police do not need a search warrant. the f.b.i. has asked local law enforcement agencies not to disclose their use of the technologies. >> i don't want to say too much about that, because i don't want the bad guys to know how we might be able to find them. >> the policies of mentioning them in search warrants has two major exceptions, when there's an urgent public safety need and when the need meets exceptional circumstances. privacy advocacies say the device is often concealed from lawyers, suspects and judges. >> police want to enter a house, they have got to get a search warrant. it would be a lot easier for law enforcement to say we are going to enter everybody's house and look for crime once a week. that would make their job easier and probably make us a lot safer. we decided that you know what, there are important liberty interests at stake. >> members of the house oversight committee are concerned federal and state agencies are not applying uniform standards when it comes to tracking cell phones. >> some states passed their own rules over the use of these tracking devices. others are looking into where
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and when these can be used. >> as the d.o.j. is trying to answer criticism about use are these devices, what have they gotten from privacy advocates. >> they say it's a step forward but doesn't cover state and local agencies, only the federal agencies like the f.b.i. and d.e.a. they also have a problem with the two exceptions, one called exceptional circumstances. they say look, the door can really be opened for these agencies to use these without a warrant. >> safe to say, this is an issue that affects us all. thank you very much. >> there is plenty of reaction this morning to major changes in the recommendation for breast cancer screening. the american cancer society now says most women should be getting mammograms later and less frequently. not everyone agrees with that decision. this morning, a breast cancer survivor and founder of breast cancer.org told me earlier tests help women understand the risks they face.
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we're concerned about this, because most women don't understand their risk very well. basically risk tends to go up over time and these guidelines are aimed at women at average risk, but only about 10% of breast cancers are due to one of the those single genes that produces a high risk. most breast cancer doesn't run in families and most don't know their risk. we're concerned that there are women who are at higher than average risk who think that they're at regular risk. >> this is where the confusion lies for me. >> yes. >> i understand and correct me if i'm wrong, 75% of women who get breast cancer aren't predisposed to it and don't have a history in their family. >> that's right. >> you would be considered average if you didn't have risk. >> 90% of breast condition as
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>> 90% of breast conditions are due to how do you lead your life, reproductive choices, lifestyle and environmental exposure. risk tends to go up over time. our goal is to give each woman the benefit of early detection, high quality mammography together with your doctor's exam, and your exam, correlating the information from all three things. while we're concerned about the risks of a false positive, and overdiagnosis and overtreatment, that's what the guidelines focused on, women don't want a missed diagnosis. i would rather have a false positive than a false diagnose. i'm a breast cancer survivor and breast cancer doctor. i've been in the hot seat and i've got that phone call myself about a diagnosis of breast cancer. i speak for a lot of women saying we want our best shot at early detection, treating it as early as possible when we can have our best chance of being cured of it. >> her organization still
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recommends mammograms beginning at age 40. >> south carolina having a tough flu season, reporting its first flu death. at least four have died from flu related symptoms. flu season usually peaks in february, so health officials say the earlier you get your short, the better. >> there is a rare form of epilepsy detected in just a few hundred people around the world. most are kids. now dozens of their families are getting together, on line and in person to try to change the way research into the illness is done. al jazeera's roxanna met some of the survivors in denver. >> sarah james flew 10,000 miles to meet families with children just like her daughter, jacki. she was diagnosed with a newly discovered genetic disorder. at the time she was only one of 11 known cases in the world. >> i was in the kitchen, and the phone rang. it was in the evening, and it
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was the doctor, i know what's wrong with jacki. she has something called kcncq, a genetic mutation. it causes exactly what she has, which is ceasessures and intellectual disability and out advertisistic behaviors. >> she found support on facebook. it's helped a few families to connect and meet at a summit in denver. >> these families have come to learn more about the rare disorder their children share, making friend ships and finding support. they're working with doctors to push for research in the hopes of finding new treatments and maybe one day a cure. >> families are on the front lines of this, we're doing things like collecting data on our kids. that's not just nice, that's a
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great scientific tool for doctors, drug companies, for medical researchers. it's changing the game. it's changing how it's done. >> tonight we'll introduce you to the parents who helped bring these families together and tell you how they're changing the hand scape of medical research. al jazeera, denver. >> there will be much more on how these families are batsling this rare disease in her full report tonight. >> an alabama judge is being criticized for suggesting that impoverished or poor defendants could donate blood instead of paying a fine. the circuit court judge said they could go to a mobile lab in the parking lot give blood and receive $100 in donation. >> starbucks and fiat ordered to pay $34 million each in back taxes in europe. e.u. officials rejected the tax deal starbucks was getting in
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the netherlands. starbucks will appeal, saying it was following tax laws. the e.u. says fiat owes millions in back taxes to luxembourg after a similar tax deal was rejected. >> living in the future. >> it is a cinema classic that gave and you say sneak peek of life today, but doc brown may have found a very different 2015 than the year we are living in now. >> sony pays up after being hacked. why the company is now paying millions to its employees.
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>> we're descending toward hill valley, california at 4:29 p.m. on wednesday, october 21, 2015. >> 2015? you mean we're in the future. >> [ laughter ] >> it was 26 years ago, marty mcfly and doc brown traveled to this day, october 21, 2015, trying to save the future. the movie version of 2015 is different than the reality that we live in, but back to the future two did predict some pretty fantastic technology. a futuristic regular contributor to publications on emerging tech is in north carolina this morning, mr. aldridge thanks for being with us. a lot of people trying to figure out what the film got right and wrong. let's first talk about the hover board. >> they almost got it right. there are people in canada
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currently working on technology that looks quite similar to the hover board. it's not quite yet here, but i think we can put that down as something that the movie did in fact get right. >> also, al gore had not yet invented the internet, to no mention of internet or cell phones. >> those are the two biggest misses. the cell phone should have been something that the movie producers could predict. they should have been able to project that out, but they missed that. they still have people communicating by fax in 2015. while some people do, most of us don't. the internet, that would have been more difficult for them to predict, but clearly another miss, as well. >> jack, obviously, you're too young to remember when we had those huge brick phones we carried around, but another one they seemed to get right so far was the cubs winning the world series, at least for one more
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day, according to mets fans. >> that's right. i think that that's a wonderful scene in the movie, but what they also have them predicting is that they would be playing a team from miami, and what's interesting about that is back when the movie was brewersed, a team in florida didn't exist, so that was another part they got right, but cub fans don't give up, there's always hope. >> there's another thing they got right, google glasses. >> google glasses, and virtual reality. there's another technology called oculist. there's a scene when he's at the dinner table wearing technology that looks almost identical. that's one that i think that they clearly got right, as well. >> i want to get these last two in before we go, face time, it seems like they actually nailed face time. >> yeah, there's that wonderful
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scene where marty mcfly is caught doing something unethical, fired via video conferencing technology that looks like skype and face time. >> this his the one some surprised me, self tying shoes, are they actually around the corner? >> apparently, according to nike, that they are working on something like that, so the self tying shoes and the self-fitting clothes around yet here, but they could be around the corner, but i think one they did nail and it's hard to see in the movie is there's a drone walking a dog. if you go to you tube, you can see people using drones to walk their dog. >> i live in brooklyn, so you see that all over the place. as a futurist, what can we
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expect to see in 2045? >> i'm hearing winston salem are already printing human organs, so the possibility of radical life extension is going to be a real possibility. >> jack, thank you very much. there was that one prediction that we're still waiting to see it play out, the prediction first in the "u.s.a. today" newspaper that marty is holding there. later on, he realizes that the cubs actually did win the world series. >> in the movie chicago beats miami, but back when the movie was made, miami didn't have a baseball team. there is no explanation of how the cubs swept in five games. >> it's fun to look back to see what they got right and wrong. >> it's amazing that they got anything right. >> i think when they watch star trek, they get everything right. >> if you're banking on the
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cubbies winning, not looking so good. another home run in a 5-2 victory for new york gives the mets a commanding three games to none lead. game four tonight, by the way at wrigley field in chicago. >> residents in the great lakes region are going to have rainy weather to contend with. >> for chicago, only a very slight chance for showers tonight. we do have a bit of a disturbance moving through the great lakes and just on the north side that have, a little cold air can cause some changes. we've had mild weather for the eastern half of the country the last couple days. here's the broad forecast. the big system is what we have in the southwest and southern plains and that chance for rain there. if you look northward, a little rain moving through this direction, as well, here's a closer look at all of this on the radar, and you can see, we've had bans around chicago. not anything particularly heavy for the most part, but kind of in and out through the course of
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the day. as i mentioned, on the north side of this, there's still a little cold air. most temperatures rebounded nicely. chicago and new york this morning, temperatures running as times in the 60's, and upper 50's. right now, versus a couple of days ago especially for portions of the northeast where temperatures were in the 20's and 30's, that's been a big turnaround. here's warmer temperatures for the eastern half of the country, including 83 in memphis. feeling more like summer, but as that next system comes in, northern parts of maine where that cold air is, that moisture could be sleet, maybe flakes overnight tonight. as i said, the really bigger system we're watching, some of that can shoot the moisture up into the midwest as we get into friday, another chance for rain and more of that trekking its way through the south. not looking too bad for the most part, but a couple of areas to watch. >> the meteorologist's got the
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weather predictions 25 years ago via fax. >> they were called wet fax and be in a big clump when you same in in the morning and youth have to sort them out. >> thank you very much. >> a developing story this morning. u.s. officials say a pilot has died in the crash which a u.s. f18 fighter jet in england. the plane went down in eastern england. local police say the plane took off from the air force base seven miles from the crash scene. the cause of the crash under investigation. >> sony pictures agreeing to pay $8 million to its workers for personal data lost last year in the hacking scandal, reimbursing them for loss, preventative measures and pay legal bills. they argued it caused them economic harm. u.s. investigators blame that hack on south korea.
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>> a mystery has space watchers excited. >> images of a distant star are driving speculation about life far from earth.
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>> take a look at this, one of the images trending on line this morning. that is new york city at night. the scene from the international space station. >> the flash which light up in the right hand corner is citi field in queens. the picture was taken during the mets-cubs game on sunday.
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the image has been retweeted more than 3,000 times. >> a massive shadow in outer space has a group of scientists perplexed. is it a mistake in the image or a sign of alien life? al jazeera's jacob ward has been looking into it. >> in the time scientists have had with data from a mission designed to look for earth like planets circling other stars, they've gotten used to certain patterns. they're seeing the same kind of thing over and over again, but suddenly, they've seen something new. basically, around one particular star, there seems to be something causing a dimming and brightening pattern in an ongoing routine. literally, it's like something very large is passing in front of that star and blocking the light from reaching us, like someone's passing their hand
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over a flashlight. there could be a few explanations. it could be a swarm of asteroids that somehow clumped together and is doing that on occasion as they rotate around that sun. one researcher hypothesizes that this could be an alien megastructure going around the sun, maybe a solar panel of some sort. it sounds silly, but researchers here south of san francisco are taking that seriously. they've people have been looking for alien life for a long time. when you say alien megastructure they do not laugh. they have an array north of here to look at that formation and see what they can see. i'll tell you more about that research and what they hope to find later tonight. >> an asteroid will be passing close to earth, 310,000 miles from earth on halloween.
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they say it really doesn't pose an actual threat. nasa usually knows about asteroids a year in advance but say this is in an eccentric orbit. >> the texas teen arrested for a homemade clock mistaken for a bomb is moving to qatar. his family says he will join the young innovators program at the foundation for education, science and community development. the announcement came a day after he visited the white house and met the president for as strong my night. >> we are back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. have a great day. you can check us out 24 hours a
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day at aljazeera.com where the news never stops. >> hello from doha. coming up, ban ki-moon calls for an end to the violence between israelis and palestinians once again, but there's no clear solution on just how to do it. >> syria's president makes an unannounced visit to moscow to meet with vladimir putin. >> we're on patrol with the thai navy, southeast asia dealing with its own refugee

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