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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  October 23, 2015 7:00am-9:01am EDT

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that's our show for today. ♪ i've lost more sleep than all of you put together. >> marathon testimony hillary clinton is questioned for more than 11 hours about the benghazi attacks, the former secretary of state revealing few new details about what happened. breaking overnight one person is killed and three others injured at a shooting at a tennessee college and that campus is still on lock down. daring mission in iraq ending with a u.s. soldier death and the first u.s. service member to die in the fight against i.s.i.l. potentially catastrophic category five and the mexico pacific coast in the cross hairs of hurricane patricia and overnight it became the strongest ever recorded in the western hemisphere. ♪
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hillary clinton is back on the campaign trail this morning hours after a marathon capitol hill hearing that lasted late into the evening and she was there to answer questions about the 2012 benghazi attack which left four americans dead, by most accounts the hearing produced little new information and welcome to your world this morning i'm stephanie sy. >> and i'm delve walters and clinton answering about the diplomatic out post and at times those asking questions turned on each other for the very reasons of the hearing itself. >> make sure the entire record is correct. >> that is exactly what i want to do. >> go ahead. >> i'm about to tell you i move that we put into the record the entire transcript of sidney blumenthal, we will release the e-mails, let's do the transcript. that way the world can see it. >> a motion. >> the motion is i second it. >> we are not going to take that
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up at a hearing. >> reporter: al jazeera's libby casey was on capitol hill as the former secretary of state answered those questions for hours. >> reporter: hillary clinton appeared just before 10:00 a.m. with the date with the republican led committee and in testimony lasting all day and into the night defended her actions before and after the benghazi attacks and clinton recounted the night when american ambassador chris stevens and three others lost their lives in benghazi. >> thought things would be safe once they took refuge in the cia-a in, income nnex. >> reporter: after three members of the party claimed the probe was merely an attempt to damage clinton's presidential campaign republicans began by making the attack in benghazi not clinton herself the focus but it didn't last. >> wouldn't you fire someone, what action would you have done differently and what do you own as a result of this? >> they accuse her leaving the
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compound vulnerable for attack when asked for security beefed up after several attacks. >> no one came to me and said we should shut down our compound in benghazi. >> i'm not saying shut it down, i'm saying protect it. >> reporter: another key moment questions about an e-mail clinton wrote to a family member on the night of attack and the note began two of our officers we killed by an al-qaeda like group and pounced on al-qaeda and after the attack top officials blamed an anti-muslim video as a cause of a protest that escalated into violence and as they have for three years since they acute clinton of putting out a false narrative on the eve of 2012 elections. >> you can live with a protest of the video, they want hurt you but a terrorist attack will and you cannot be square with the american people. tell your family it's a terrorist attack and not the
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american people. >> i wrote a whole chapter about this in my book hard choices. i would be glad to send it to you congressman because i think the insinuations you are making do a grave disservice. >> reporter: another point of contention sidney blumenthal a friend who sent clinton e-mails offering opinions and advice on the situation in libya. >> blumenthal could not get hired by our government, didn't pass any background check at all, had no role with our government, had never been to libya and no expertise in libya and madam secretary he had unfettered access to you. >> i don't know what this line of questioning does to help us get to the bottom of the deaths of four americans. >> i'll be happy to help you understand that madam secretary. >> reporter: democrats led by maryland cummings battled back defending clinton and cast the hearings as a partisan exercises. >> do we want to badger you over and over until you'll get tired
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and get the gotcha moment he is talking about? we are better than that. we are so much better. we are better country. and we are better than using taxpayer dollars to try to destroy a campaign, that's not what america is all about. >> it is deeply unfortunate that something as serious as what happened in benghazi could ever be used for partisan political purposes. >> reporter: throughout the day and into the evening clinton tried to bring the focus back to the americans who died in benghazi and hit back at republicans. >> i would imagine i thought more about what happened than all of you put together. i've lost more sleep than all of you put together. i have been racking my brain about what more could have been
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done or should have been done. >> reporter: a key committee member democrat adam ship of california said earlier this week that democrats could walk away from the committee after the former secretary of state testified, democrats are concerned that the committee is so focused on politics that it has moved far away from the question of what actually happened in benghazi. now at the same time democrats say they have their own role in the committee hearing and in this process by providing a counter point to republicans so everyone is thinking about politics. that is al jazeera libby casey reporting for us from capitol hill, straight ahead we will be talking to a former clinton aid about the lengthy benghazi hearing and what it all means for her presidential campaign. following a developing story out of tennessee and one person was fatally shot and three women injured overnight on the campus of tennessee state university in nashville, local police say the shooting was part of an apparent dispute over a dice game.
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the campus is still under lock down this morning as police search for the shooter. and the university has cancelled classes for the day. the obama administration is defending a decision that led to the death of american soldier in iraq. the first u.s. service member to die in the fight against i.s.i.l. and we have exclusive details of what the pentagon described as a rescue mission in an i.s.i.s. prison in northern iraq. >> reporter: request for transport helicopters and support from kurdish peshmerga forces, one of america's most effective and reliable partners in the war against i.s.i.l. the kurds believe some of their fighters were being held by i.s.i.l. in a walled prison compound west of kirkook and were about to be executed. they appealed to the u.s. for help to launch a desperate and daring rescue mission. defense secretary ash carter signed off on the plan under the assist authority of the u.s.
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train and assist mission. after being convinced i.s.i.l. was on the verge of mass murder. >> we had discovered the presence of mass graves at this compound, freshly dug mass graves at the compound and we since learned the hostages had been told by other captiors they would be executed and placed in the graves after morning prayers today. >> reporter: a u.s. military spokesman in baghdad in an exclusive skype interview with al jazeera provided a detailed tick stock on how the raid went down, four u.s. helicopters, to shonook and two blackhawks land near the i.s.i.l. compound with peshmerga commander and u.s. forces and u.s. troops stayed back with the helicopters as the others attack the prison compound and pinned down by fierce fire and taking casualties u.s. special forces come to the aid of the kurdish troops, a u.s. soldier is
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killed, four peshmerga are wounded. the discovery of far more prisoners than expected up to 70 requires a fifth ch 47 shnook helicopter to get everyone out safely and the colonel warren says if the u.s. forces commander had not intervened the mission would likely have failed. >> in the heat of battle while their partners were being wounded and pinned down and being wounded, these commanders on the ground made a decision and decided to come to the aid of those who they were advising and assisting. they were positioned properly where they could maneuver and eliminate the gunfire that had to pin down and because of that the peshmerga were able to get through the breach then finish clearing the objective. >> reporter: it turned out no kurds were among the roughly 70 prisoners who were free but 22 members of iraqi security forces among the captives and five
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i.s.i.l. fighters were captured and more than 20 i.s.i.l. were reportedly killed, al jazeera the pentagon. last night congressman paul ryan making it official he is running for speaker of the house and wisconsin republicans submitting a formal letter thursday writing i never thought i would be a speaker but if i'm a unifying significant i would serve and go all in and ryan giving republicans until today to unite behind him and received support from the far right wing caucus and did not get the group's full endorsement. democrat president chafee may soon be ending his campaign and stormformer senator and he tweeted he will address my future in the campaign. chafee polling at less than 1% and only raised about $30,000. this morning mexico bracing for the strongest hurricane on record in the western hem steer
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and patricia exploded into a category five storm and the winds are nearly 200 miles per hour and part of mexico is now under state of emergency people along the pacific coast prepare for the worst. >> better to prevents than regret because i have windows i put in wood panels, the truth is i don't know how the hurricane will hit. >> reporter: the bustling of port city near porta-vilarta is in the direct path of patricia and many villages evacuated and schools and ports are closed. >> we have direct insight into these type of storms and have flown into category five and talking about a monster storm moving up the mexico coast. >> it's intense and especially this one i would say being a rapidly intensifying storm you tend to get more dynamics, more up lift with more turbulence in a storm and lightning and hail you would not see and hurricane center allotted my colleagues
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for the hurricane hunters for flying intoit and recording the data because this is a record setting storm and pressure 880 millie bars which is lower than wilma which sets the record for the atlantic and you can see a very defined eye wall so all signs of what an intense storm this is but actual measurements showing that this has winds 200 miles per hour and sustained and wind gusts higher. widespread area under hurricane warnings, that is the red and the blue is the tropical storm warnings. the wind field extends 40-50 miles out across the storm in terms of hurricane force winds and it's going to be that right front side that will get the most damage because you get the combination as this moves in land of both the momentum of the storm and the momentum of the circulation on that side and all right reporting high surf but it will come in this afternoon or evening and do a lot of damage and it hits the mountains and not just the wind we are concerned about but heavy rain,
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widespread could be a foot but in the mountains it rings out more. >> a chance of being a category five storm can reform over the gulf and threaten the main land u.s. >> over the the mountains and shred it apart and what we have going on in the central united states and i'll talk more about that coming up. >> nicole thank you very much. a town hall meeting is scheduled today to discuss the death of a florida man shot by police. the family of korey jones says he never fired his gun during a roadside encounter with an under cover police officer, the officer fired his weapon six times and we are at the palm beach garden police department and there was a rally on thursday, what is the latest? >> that rally was peaceful one and held right here next to the police station and on thursday we heard for the first time from the immediate family members of corey jones since his death and they tell us they have more
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questions than answers. they are leaning on a community here to support them during this difficult time. [chanting] we want answers. >> reporter: no chants coming from hundredss who gathered thursday for korey jones. ♪ how great the 31-year-old drummer was fatally shot by a plain clothes officer early sunday morning after his car broke down on the side of the road and know core re-jones family says new details of the confrontation of jones and the officer raised even more troubling questions about the deadly encounter. >> i need to nknow why, why my son is gone today. why? >> reporter: the family met privately on thursday with the state attorney's office and said his body was found 80-100 feet from his car and he did not use his handgun. >> korey jones never fired his
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weapon, never fired his weapon, that is confirmed. >> reporter: police are offering little information about what happened when officer stopped to investigate what looked like abandon car and palm beach garden police say he was confronted by an armed subject, lawyers for the family said he shot at jones six times and three of the bullets hit him and say the state attorney said he did not properly identify himself and that jones may not have realized that he was dealing with a police officer. >> why didn't he identify himself, why didn't he show the badge? >> reporter: jones' death being investigated by the palm beach county sheriff office as well as state attorney's office and his brother insists the shooting goes beyond race. >> all lives do matter. [applause] going forward what do you want to see happen? >> we want justice. we want transparency. i miss him. i miss him so much. i miss him so much.
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alive. >> reporter: and the community is looking for more answers. that i hope they hope to get some at the town hall meeting town and the lawyer will be there and the family says everything they have been told so far from the state attorney's office comes from the statements that the officer made to investigators after the shooting and they say what is so frustrating about this is they have so many questions but without a dash cam and without a body camera at the scene the only version of events they have is from the officer, stef. >> ands from the investigation it's not clear when the family might get more? >> well, it could take weeks, up to a month for the sheriff's ufs ooffice to conclude their investigation and still waiting for toxicology report and they also have to corroborate the forensic evidence from the state of the officer and as far as the state office is concerned they
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could file charges in the feature and have to decide that. >> and that is the latest in palm beach gardens, florida and thank you. palm beach on the minds of a lot of people and president obama defending the black lives matter movement, you may recall it arose out of police shootings of african/american men and teens. >> the reason that the organizers used the phrase black lives matters was not because they were suggesting nobody's lives matter rather what they are suggesting is there is a specific problem that is happening in the african/american community that is not happening in other communities. the african/american communities are not made it up and not being politicized, it's real. >> meeting with law enforcement and said it cannot just be on police officers and say they risk their lives to keep cities safe and the criminal justice system needs to be overhauled itself and arson investigators
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looking for a church fire in and around st. louis at the directory of a catholic church and it followed the same pattern as the six prior ones but they say the latest fire happening at a mostly white church, the other churches that were targeted had largely black congregations, this fire was also in a different neighborhood. diplomatic moves trying to end the war in syria. >> john kerry meets the counterpart in vienna and could they be forced to look at moscow after all. a bus and a truck colliding leaving more than 40 people dead. ♪ the only way to get better is to challenge yourself,
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and that's what we're doing at xfinity. we are challenging ourselves to improve every aspect of your experience. and this includes our commitment to being on time. every time.
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that's why if we're ever late for an appointment, we'll credit your account $20. it's our promise to you. we're doing everything we can to give you the best experience possible. because we should fit into your life. not the other way around. ♪ on behalf of the men and women of the department of defense we
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offer our sincere condolence to the family of the u.s. service member who was killed in this operation. the u.s. and our coalition will continue to work with iraqky partners to degrade and defeat i.s.i.l. and return iraq to the full control of its people. >> learning new details this morning about the first u.s. soldier to die in the fight against i.s.i.l., happened during what the pentagon is describing as a hostage rescue mission in northern iraq. >> the operation freed at least 70 prisoners held by i.s.i.l. and i want to go to a former member of the navy special operations unit and taught for years at the navy survival school and good morning and welcome for your time and based on what a pentagon spokesperson told al jazeera america they saw the peshmerga fighters get in trouble and were firing and left the position in the back by the helicopter and went in to help them, what are your initial thoughts on those details and on this cam arc ndo raid? >> this is an exceptionally bold
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raid to fall down into southwest of kirkook and north of baghdad but when we were in iraq it was a place that al-qaeda and groups that became i.s.i.s. would go for vacations so it was a hot, widely held zone by i.s.i.s. and fly in with the peshmerga and land right on to their compound and go out and rescue these hostages is a very bold mission. >> this these circumstances with staying back by the helicopters for the u.s. special forces on the ground was that a choice or did they have to go in? >> well, for the first part it depends on the tackle call situation and if they had to clear the area of detraction and support to the peshmerga and see peshmerga getting bogged down they felt it was them to go in and break the deadlock and clearly did this as there were four peshmerga wounded and
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unfortunately an american soldier wounded and succumbed to his wounds. >> and the pentagon this morning in a statement said there are no american boots on the ground, are we talking about semantics or are these raids happening all the time and we are hearing about it this because a u.s. soldier died? >> they are happening all the time and in support of other operations and we carry out missions that are penetrateing from iraq to syria and using the term boots on the ground it's a matter of semantics but talking at a foot print the way we had it in iraq for almost eight years which is almost 125,000 men living, breathing everyday in iraq and in this case these are small pinpoint operations which are very precise, which have very specific mission perimeters and they don't lay on the ground for the most part. again we were helping the peshmerga allies in this operation. >> and i want to ask you one more because you also have an intelligence background, those that were freed in this operation have been described by
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the pentagon as hostages but they were not peshmerga fighters the team thought they were rescuing, is that an intelligence failure in your view? >> well, only in the sense that the very specific bodies that you may have been looking for were not there. as an intelligence professional i can tell you there is a fog of everything that goes on in the world. you may have images and you may have drone video and agents who have penetrated in there, you may have members of i.s.i.s. and in this instance we probably did members of i.s.i.s. who got away from the compound and were talking that we have 20, 30 kurds in there with a bunch of iraqi security forces and we are going to kill them. well the kurdish regional government requested united states support for that mission to get out their people but the end we you'ielded a far number greater captives and i.s.i.l.
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who was captives and will give us intelligence. >> we will have to leave it there but thank you for your expertise on this issue. breaking story we are following overnight and 42 people have died in southwest france after a tour bus and truck collided and taking place by a village 30 miles east of bordeau and most passengers elderly and tourist on a day trip and bus and car caught fire and this is france's worst road accident in more than 30 years, john kerry is in vienna this morning talking about the war in syria and meeting with russian counterparts and sergei fedorov and talking about military options there and days ago vladimir putin meeting with bashar al-assad and they think it is giving them the upper hand
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in the war and can you tell us more about this morning's meeting meetings? >> reporter: well, we had four foreign ministers here, john kerry, sergei fedorov and their counterparts from turkey and saudi arabia. of course you have three of those, turkey, saudi arabia and the americans are vow deponents of president assad of syria and all of them suspicious of motives and intervention on the ground in syria, proportly they say it's fighting terrorism and i.s.i.l. but the interpretation of the americans is that the majority of russian air strikes have been against other opponents of president assad. nonetheless the reality is that russia's actions in syria have been bold and decisive whether the americans have been over the years now and russia believes it has put itself in a position
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where it is the key piece broker in syria. so i would imagine in the talks this morning there would have been a lot of interrogation of russia, what exactly are its motives, what under takings has president assad given to putin and remember the two men met in that extraordinary meeting in moscow a couple days ago. >> live in veenna and thank you very much. a show down over federal funding. president making good on a veto of a bill and his reasons for saying he did so. >> we wants consumers to know this is considering all the options. >> a deadly airbag defect by the largest recall in u.s. history could get even larger.
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>> welcome back. it is 7:30 eastern. warnings are up along mexico's pacific coast at residents prepare for hurricane patricia, a category five storm, the strongest ever recorded in the western hemisphere. winds are nearly 200 miles an hour. the track has it hitting the port city south of puerta
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vallarta. >> a u.s. soldier was left dead in iraq after a rescue of prisoners held by isil. seventy prisoners were rescued. >> hillary clinton answered questions about the 2012 benghazi attack that left four americans dead. the questions at times turned angry. >> do you have a skiff in your home. >> yes, i did. >> who was was at your home? were you alone? >> i was alone, yes. >> the whole night. >> well yes, the whole night. [ laughter ] >> i don't know why that's funny. did you have any in-person briefings? i don't find it funny at all. >> i'm sorry, a little note of levity at 7:15. >> the hearings produced little new information about the
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attacks. a former senior advisor for hillary clinton, joins us. the number that keeps being repeated over and over again, 11, 11 hours of testimony and little in the way of any new information. the ranking members said it was nothing more than a witchhunt. was he right? >> correct. one wonders why we spend almost $5 million on this most recent round have vehicles, more than it took to investigate katrina. i don't understand what new could have been gleaned, but she handled it masterfully, in my mind. >> did the republicans do themselves a disservice? we are talking about the democratic front runner on stage for 11 hours in hearings that were probably watched by millions of americans, most of them political minds, it being
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said there is no such thing at bat publicity. can it backfire. >> it i think it already has. the republicans looked out for blood, tried to impugn her character and her record at the state department. whatever you may disagree with hillary clinton on, i don't think that the american public saw anything new here, except they saw republicans repeatedly go after her and she kept her cool. >> one thing the public does say about hillary clinton is they don't believe that she is trustworthy. did she do anything yesterday to change that perception? >> she answered her questions clearly and concisely and again she answered questions in the same way she has over the last couple of years since this incident took place, and in terms of what actually happened and the stream of information that came out from that attack, as it was taking place, i think you saw and heard is that she was getting information over time and what the chairman failed to recognize is that even if the information may not have
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been correct initially, she was continually briefing people over time. when leading in a time of uproar and sun certainty about what was happening, she seemed to be on top of it the entire time. >> hillary clinton got emotional three times, each time when she was talking about the death of ambassador stevens and the others. does that hurt or help a candidate, especially when you're running for president of the united states. >> one thing that was clear is that she took responsibility. i think that was very important. if you'ring looking for someone to lead, she has said i lead, i have been a leader of the state department. i take responsibility. she said she doesn't really use emails. she has phone conversations and meetings with her top senior staff members. again, in that reward, she was taking responsibility. >> several democrats now saying they are going to walk from the
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committee, alan shif, comings may do the same. >> i want to see them there to hold the line and push back against the republicans on the committee, you heard elijah cummins calling for more transparency. i want to see that exchange to make sure there is balance, but if they feel there is nothing that can be done, i understand. >> thank you. >> president obama vetoed a major defense bill, saying it's full of flaws. the $612 billion measure would boost defense spending without increasing domestic spending. it could prevent the obama administration from closing guantanamo bay. mike viqueira has more from washington. >> good morning, on thursday, president obama wanted to make a point, inviting the president into the oval office not to watch him sign a bill into law,
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but to veto one. the $612 billion defense measure is a fight over domestic spending. president obama wants to undo the so-called sequester, the result of a 2011 budget agreement with republicans that cuts spending on both the military side and domestic side. the trouble with this defense bill as far as the president is concerned, it boosts defense spending, but does nothing to boost spending on the domestic side. those cuts remain in place. also, the president upset about a measure involving guantanamo bay, the republicans would block him from closing it, something he's been trying to do since his first day in office. >> guantanamo is one of the premier mechanisms for jihadists to recruit. it's time for us to close it. it is outdated, expensive, it's been there for years and we can do better in terms of keeping our people safe while making sure that we are consistent with hour values. >> the administration is looking at alternate sites within the united states where they can
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move guantanamo bay prison. while civil liberties groups like the aclu applaud the the president's veto, they also want to see an end to indefinite detention. back to you. >> thank you, mike viqueira reporting. this is only the fifth veto of president obama's time in office. >> there was more violence today in israel. the military saying a palestinian man stabbed a soldier in the occupied west bank. the man was shot by troops but was not killed, the soldier is said to be ok. secretary of state john kerry going to that region tomorrow, trying to deescalate the violence there, situations. >> a bombing at a mosque in nigeria leaving 18 people dead, this one happening in a northeastern city. it is clear there who was behind it. there appears to be just one suicide bomber. >> we are getting pictures from south africa. thousands of students, look at this crowd. they have been protesting plans to raise fees at their schools. in the past hour, these protests have turned violent. the students have been clashing with police, who you see in the
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foreground here. they have been trying to full down fences surrounding south african president jacob zuma's offices. we'll continue to follow that story. >> volkswagen is warning it may have to recall more cars connected with faulty emissions tests. the german automakers said cheat software may have been installed in more models. the company says they believe the number with the software is relatively small, some 11 million cars are already believed to have the cheat software. >> the federal government may recall more vehicles with defective airbags, so far eight deaths and dozens of injuries have been linked to exploding airbags. lisa stark has more on what is already the largest out totitive recall in u.s. history. >> we've seen the horrific effects from defect i have takata airbags when the air bag explodes with too much force, shards of metal fly out. people have been badly cut, lost
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their eyesight and even their lives. now for the first time, a dramatic look at an inflator coming apart. the government test video has been slowed down, and you cannot hear the extremely loud bang, but you can see why this is so deadly. >> our goal is a safe air bag in every american vehicle as quickly as possible. >> that's a huge task. nearly 24 million driver and passenger airbags have been recalled in some 19 million cars. the bulk of those vehicles come from five manufacturers, bmw, fiat chrysler, ford, mazda and honda. nationwide, fewer of a quarter of the recalled airbags have now been replaced. in states with hot, humid climates, conditions that help trigger the failures, fewer than a third of the air bags have been changed out. at a public meeting on the massive recall, nitsa will
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decide whether to force automakers to recall airbags more quickly and may have to broaden the recall to include side airbags. >> we want consumers to know we are considering all the options to speed things up. >> of greatest concern, airbags at least five years old that have spent the most time in those hot, high humidity states. elliot drives a ford mustang with a recalled air bag. he drove up from georgia for the meeting. >> why did you come all the way to bar washington, d.c.? i am annoyed and tired of being jerked around. >> he said he received his recall notice in july and headed to his local ford dealer. i asked what am i supposed to do? you won't give me a loaner car, you can't tell me when i'm going to get a replacement for it. the service advisor told me i'm safe because my air bag light is not on. >> that is not true.
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the air bag warning light has nothing to do with this defect. this misinformation underscoring the confusion consumers are facing. he has parked his mustang for now, said he is lucky enough to be able to afford another car. that's his ride back to georgia and for the foreseeable future. >> members of the u.a.w., the united auto workers union ratifying a new contract with fiat chrysler for the new deal, which is the company's second offer, passed with 77% of the vote. it includes the first raises for veteran workers in 10 years. it is going to help close the pay gap between those with evenerty and two tier workers, employees hired by the company. >> that could serve as a model for negotiations with the other big three. >> we are talking about heavy rain moving through the southern plains causing flooding concerns. let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchell again. good morning. >> good morning.
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we've been talking about this for a couple of days. we've also this morning been talks hurricane patricia. this is the water vapor being measured, the brighter green. you can see part of that cloud field from patricia is making its way toward the united states. we're not going to get the brunt of the storm, but a little extra moisture with what we already have is not beneficial. widespread areas under watches, but occasionally a warning when you get more heavy rain coming through. here's the system. you can kind of still see that spin into the atmosphere, now with a trailing front, but there will still be low pressure around that. this already had moisture even before we haded a little in from the the hurricane and more is coming from the gulf. that's the main source of moisture from this storm. more of this has lifted up into minnesota, getting that rain, it will move into the great lakes
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later into today. we're closer to all the moisture sources, texas, louisiana, chances for heavy rain as this moves along. over the next couple of days, making its way to the east coast, as well. you can see the core of moisture staying caughtward. we had a front go through yesterday to the very northeast. that touchdown temperatures 10 or 20 degrees. >> more questions today for the environmental protection agency over a toxic spill that turned rivers yellow for a time in three states. the interior democratic said the e.p.a. led to the spill in august. the e.p.a. knew the mine was at risk of a blowout and that it was preventable. estimates put the cost of containing the mess in the billions of dollars. >> the state of oregon going after g.n.c., supplier of diet
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supplements, saying it knew it sold the suppplements spiked with two controversial drugs. >> state attorney general accuses g.n.c. of eye lating oregon state allow by selling natural dietary suppplements containing two ingredients. one is a sin they goetic drug sold in the old soviet union in the 1960s. it is still available foy prescription in russia and a few other countries, the second is a powerful stimulant not unlike methamphetamine included in weight loss products. neither of those is approved for sale in the united states. these are synthetic drugs, not natural ingredients being sold unlabeled and unidentified to thousands of customers, according to the lawsuit, which also says g.n.c. new about the
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products years ago but continued to sell both. when that lawsuit was announced, the company released a two sentence statement, reading in part: >> the company also says in response to notification from the f.d.a. and the state of oregon they have pulled all products that contain those two ingredients. this is not the first time that n.g.c. has run into legal problems involving products it sells. earlier this year, the state attorney general of new york sent out cease and desist orders to g.n.c., walmart, walgreens and target for selling herbal suppplements that lab nationals showed did not contain what was
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depicted on the label. >> the oregon lawsuit alleges 4,000 separate violations of the state's fair trade practices act, a maximum penalty for each $25,000. multiplication, it adds up to $100 million. al jazeera, seattle. >> it's going to cost prisoners less to make a telephone call starting next year, capping the rates for inmate calls. the calls that used to cost about $14 are now going to cost less than two. the f.c.c. saying reducing the cost of these calls measurably increases the amount of contact between inmates and their loved ones, making an important contribution to the criminal justice reform that is sweeping the nation. >> 22 people are under arrest this morning after police uncovered a secret tunnel connecting mexico and the u.s. it's believed to be one of the longest r. found. it is about 2400 feet long and 30 feet deep, well lit,
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ventilated and equipped with a rail system. u.s. and mexican authorities confiscated 12 tons of marijuana when they raided the tunnel on both sides of the border. >> we want to look at the huge protests taking place at this hour in south africa. thousands of students are demonstrating against higher fees at their schools. police as you can see, it is a very, very chaotic situation. they have been firing stun grenades into the crowd. the crowds are there surrounding the offices of the south african president douma. students say they can't afford to pay the increased university fees, those fees going up 12%. >> these are described as the largest student protests in south africa since the end of apartheid in the 1980's, so this has been going on for weeks. students are now being arrested and you can see clashes as these protests turn violent. >> the students are becoming more and more agitated, which is something we did not see in the first shot. >> honoring the monuments men.
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>> the people who safeguarded europe's cultural heritage on the brink of being destroyed. they are now getting a treasure of their own. >> it is called alphabet. how google's geek factor made its way into the stock buy back.
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>> this is a college football game this ended early because the players started fighting. it happened right before half time at the east mississippi community college. a garbage can tossed on to the field, the fans joining in. it's unclear what led to the brawl, but east mississippi was winning 48-0 when the fists started flying. >> a football game in washington state won't be about what wins or losing, but what the coach does after the game ends. >> he has been told not to lead any prayers anymore. john henry smith has the story.
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>> for nine years running, bremerton high school football coach joe kennedy has been leading his players in post game prayers. when he continued that tradition last friday night, he was violating an order from the district that said talks with students may not include religious expression, including prayer. >> i don't want to break the law and i don't want to set a bad example for our kids and i never want to jeopardize the program that we've set up, and the taxpayers end up paying for it if something goes hoarably wrong and they get sued. that's not what coaching staffs are supposed to be doing. >> players and parents support him. >> he could lose his job for what he practices at the end of the game. >> the school district has said it has no plans to fire kennedy, writing in a statement, at this time, mr. kennedy's employment status with the school district remains unchanged. the district continues to hope that the district and
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mr. kennedy can arrive at common understandings. the conservative liberty institute, a legal defense fund, is backing the coach. in a letter to the school district, it says kennedy hat constitutional right to lead post game prayers. >> private citizens on their own time have a right to practice their faith and we think it's very important at liberty institute to protect that constitutional right. >> i'm not establishing region, not preaching with anything. >> many haved the problem with the prayers sessions is players may feel forced to participate. the coach said he's never required any of his athletes in prayer. they do so because they want to. >> the school district is not banning prayers at all events, is that right? >> you are correct. they have no problem with anyone operating an their own time, but this is a publicly funded high school and the district says it's improper to otherwise and
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lead such prayer sessions. >> stock of goingles new parent company alphabet is expected to open way up this morning. the revenue and profits last quarter were above expectations. the company got a boost from mobile and video advertising. apple announced a stock buy back. the exact dollar value was the square root of 26, the number which letters in the alphabet, multiplied by a billion. >> we didn't have knows numbers when i was in school, by the way. >> a group known as the monuments men risked their lives to recover more than 5 million stolen artifacts across europe. it was made into a movie. they are now receiving america's highest honor. >> a great part of the art treasure stolen by the nazis. >> beware a likely bunch,
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scholars, not soldiers. it was their job to find and save some of the world's greatest works of art during and after world war ii. adolf hitler was keen to take as many treasures as possible. when he was defeated, it was up to the monuments men to track them down. one was jewish, born in germany who left for the u.s.a. in 1938. drafted to the army, he helped return what had been looted. >> we did not take it. i did not see to it that it was sent to -- i saw to in my case, we had quite a number of paintings that belonged to the museum. >> they have been awarded america's highest civilian honor. >> it shows our children what
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they can be, no task is more treasures than that, no award is great are than this. so for the monuments men, the united states has struck a congressional gold medal. >> this involved men and women from 40 nations around the world. they often went into where the bullets were flying and in the end recovered almost 5 million pieces of art and literature. among the treasures, rembrandt's portrait and works by davinci. the work was hugely significant. >> works of art define who we are as a people. i've heard over and over again from people around the world, americans don't tend to think about this quite as much, but around the world, their works of art and treasures belong to them. >> one survivor said his heart breaks when he sees the continuing destruction of important artifacts.
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>> i just wish they could do it where isis is, where they're destroying these monuments. it's pitiful what's going on. >> al jazeera, washington. >> it does have special significance, given what isil's been doing in palmyra. >> hurricane patricia bears down with 200-mile per hour winds. the category five hurricane is the strongest on record in the western hemisphere. >> a marathon hearing on the 2012 attacks in benghazi, but did the committee learn anything? stay with us.
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>> welcome to al jazeera america. more reporters, more stories, more perspective. >> from our award-winning news teams across america and beyond. >> we've got global news covered.
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>> governments secretly paying ransoms. >> we were told never to disclose that they actually paid. >> are they saving lives or putting more at risk?
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>> hurricane patricia exploding into the western hemisphere's strongest hurricane of, mexico bracing for a powerful cat five storm. it could be catastrophic. >> secretary of state john kerry meets with his russian counterpart, the latest effort to find a resolution to the syrian conflict. >> i have been racking my brain about what more could have been done.
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>> hillary clinton questioned late into the night about the benghazi attacks, but the interrogation reveals few new details about any possible security failures. >> it's official. he is running for house speaker. paul ryan's request for more family time renews the debate, is there a double standard. >> welcome to your world this morning. >> mexico in the crosshairs of a monster hurricane this morning, hurricane patricia is a category five storm, the strongest on record in the western hemisphere. >> the storm exploded in strength overnight. part of mexico is now under a state of emergency as people along the pacific coast prepare for the worst. al jazeera's gerald tan has more. >> taking no chance, mexicans living along the pacific coast prepare their homes and
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businesses for what forecasters warn could be a catastrophic storm. >> it's better to prevent than regret, because i have windows, i put in wood panels. the truth is i don't know how the hurricane will hit. >> hurricane patricia is sweeping across the pacific with winds topping 260 kilometers an hour. it's quickly grown into the highest category five storm, expected to make landfall friday afternoon. >> given the situation and the reports presented by the national emergency commission, the secretary of the interior instructed the emergency declare reaction in three states of the country and 10 municipalities. >> the port city is in the direct path of pass rush sha, but not everyone is worried. >> as a preventative measures,
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we decided to buy basic goods. in case roads are closed, we'll have the essentials at home. >> we didn't buy that much, because they regularly say a hurricane will come. normally they don't hurt. that's why the majority don't participate that much. >> many areas are evacuated and ports and schools closed. government leaders are bracing for what is threatening to become the most intense hurricane to hit mexico's pacific coast. al jazeera. >> nicole mitchell says this is what we should be looking at, it is that compact eye of the storm now more than 200 miles an hour. cities getting slammed a year ago facing the storm. >> latest advisory came out and still with those sustained winds at 200 miles per hour, that means gusts are even higher, and a lot of times, these storms turn out to sea. it's a little bit more unique
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that they turn inland. that is why some people don't prepare. when you look at the symmetry of the storm and definition of the eye wall, those are signs of intensification. we've had aircraft inside measuring data and all that goes into different forecasts and models. look how concise to where this storm will hit. port view quarter at a are in the direct path. the hurricane force winds extend about 40 to 50 miles across the storm. the tropical storm force winds even more than that. that wells up the water. there's already high surf reported, but then on top of that, you look at what we call the right front side of the storm, the combination of the
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rotation, and the momentum of the storm itself, so the right side of the storm tends to get the brunt of this, and that's where we're going to look for some of the highest sea rise, for example, but on top of this, we're expecting a lot of moisture. this is going to bring in places that could easily see a foot of rain just in general, but as this goes into mountains, that tends to wring it out even more and what we are expecting with that is serious flooding and the potential for mudslides and landslides that could be devastating. >> what are the odds that it makes landfall as a cat five? >> they are fairly decent, if not a cat four. at a certain point, you've already generated the energy to turn up the ocean, even if it loses intensity, so you are still talking the same major impacts. >> nicole mitchell, thank you. >> secretary of state john kerry is in vienna where he's talking about the war in syria. kerry is meeting with his russian counter part. the two are likely to discuss russia's military operations in
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syria. days ago, president vladimir putin met with syrian president bashar al assad and there is acknowledgment that the russian campaign is giving bashar al assad the upper hand in the war. >> there were a series of meetings behind me. john kerry representing the united states with his turkish and saudi arabian counterparts all suspicious of russia's motive. verge laugh, the russian prime minister flee here to explain what exactly russia is doing in syria and what its end objectives are, what undertakings might have been given by president assad of syria to president putin of russia when they met in moscow a couple of days ago. is it possible for these four countries, all of which are militarily engaged in syria in different ways to reach some sort of common purpose, can they reach an agreement for example
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on a transition that would see president assad step down. if so, how quickly, and do they trust each other enough to make such a plan stick. all of those, a lot of doubt whether they can be realized or not, but at least at the moment, four key players involved in the syrian disaster are actually talking to each other, and that in itself is good news. >> barnaby phillips for us in vienna. russia's involvement in syria is its first military campaign outside the soviet union since its occupation of afghanistan in 1979. >> hillary clinton is back to being a presidential candidate today after recalling her time at secretary of state. she was questioned all day thursday and well into thursday flight about the 2012 benghazi attacks that left four americans dead. as al jazeera reports, that hearing produced little in the way of new information. >> it is the second time hillary clinton has appeared before a congressional committee to answer questions about what
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happened in 2012 in benghazi, libya, when four americans died. the head of the committee insists this line of questioning is different. >> these questions lingered because those previous investigations were narrow in scope, and either incapable or unwilling to access the facts and evidence necessary. >> the former secretary of state is defending her actions. >> i've lost more sleep than all of you put together. i have been racking my brain about what more could have been done. >> this is the ninth investigation in more than 17 months. four and a half million dollars have been spent but turned up few new details. democrats charge the true motivation of the congressional committee is to destroy clinton's presidential ambitions. >> republicans are squandering millions of taxpayer dollars on this abusive effort to derail as hsecretary continue tons
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presidential campaign. >> defending why she didn't see or personally respond to hundred was emails requesting additional security, including one from the ambassador who ultimately lost his life. >> how come not a single person lost a single paycheck? >> he took those requests where they belonged, to the security professionals. >> the combative hearing went on for hours. at one point, clinton looking on bewildered as the top democratic bickered. >> i move we put into the record the entire transcript of sidney blumenthal. if we release the emails, lets do the transcript so the whole world can see. >> it was the witness herself under attack who appealed to feuding politicians to work together. >> i would like us to get back to those times, canning man, beirut we lost far mother americans not once but twice within a year. there was no partisan effort.
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people rose above politics, a democratic congress worked with a republican administration. >> the committee says its work is not yet complete. it will be interviewing more witnesses in the weeks to come, issuing a final report in 2016. al jazeera, washington. >> tennessee state university is on lockdown this morning. police are still searching for the shooter there. overnight one person was fatally shot and three injured in the campus in nashville. the shooting was part of an apparent dispute over a dice game. classes at the university have been canceled for the day. >> thousands of angry african students on the streets at this hour protesting plans to raise their fees when they go to college, crowds gathering outside the offices of south african president jacob zuma in pretoria, police firing stun
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grenades using water cannons on protestors. you can see the protestors firing stones back at police. they say a 12% increase would make education out of reach for thousands of students. >> the obama administration is defending a decision to led to the death of an american soldier in iraq, the first u.s. service member to die in the fight against isil. al jazeera has exclusive details of a rescue mission at an isil prison in northern iraq. >> the u.s. was responding to an urgent request for transport helicopters and combat support from kurdish peshmerga forces, one of america's most effective and reliable partners in the war against isil. the kurds believe some fighters were held by isil in a walled prison compound west of kirkuk, and were about to be executed. they appealed to the u.s. for help to launch a desperate daring rescue mission. ash carter signed off on the
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plan under the assist authority of the u.s. train and assess mission after convinced isil was on the verge of mass murder. >> we discovered the presence of mass graves as this compound, freshly dug mass graves. we've since learned that the hostages had been told by their captors they would be executed and placed into those mass graves after morning prayers today. >> army colonel steve warren spoke in baghdad in an exclusive skype interview with al jazeera, provide a detailed tick-tock on how the raid went down. four u.s. helicopters, two chinook transports and two blackhawks landed near the compound, carrying kurdish peshmerga commandos and u.s. special operations forces. u.s. troops stayed back with the helicopters while peshmerga command dose attacked the compound. pinned down by fierce fire and taking casualties, u.s. special
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forces come to the aid of the kurdish troops. a u.s. soldier is killed, four peshmerga are wounded. the discovery of far more prisoners than expected, up to 70, requires a fifth c.h.47 chinook helicopter to get everyone out safely. colonel warren said if the u.s. special commando forces had not intervened, the mission likely would have failed. >> in heated battle while partners were pinned down and being wounded, these commandos on the ground decided to come to the aid of those who they were advising and assessing. they were positioned properly where they could maneuver and eliminate the gunfire that had the peshmerga pinned down and because that have, the peshmerga were able to get through the breach and then finish clearing the objective. >> it turned out no kurds were among the roughly 70 prisoners who were freed, but there were at least 22 members of the iraqi
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security forces among the captives. five isil fighters were captured, more than 20 isil forces were reportedly killed. jami macintyre, al jazeera, the pentagon. >> these freed in the mission have been described by the pentagon as hostages, but they were not the peshmerga fighters that the team thought they were there to rescue. former navy special ops officer said that doesn't necessarily amount to an in tell failure. >> only in the sense that the very specific bodies that you may have been looking for weren't there. i mean as an intelligence professional, i can tell that you there's a thought that everything that goes on within the world. you may have imagery, you may have drone video, you may have actual agents who have penetrated in there. you may have members of isis and in this instance, we probably did have members of isis who got away from that compound and were talking that hey, we've got 20, 30 kurds in there with iraqi security forces and we're going to kill them.
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the kurdish regional government requested united states support for that mission to get out there people. in the end, we yielded a far greater number of captives, and gave us members of isis who were themselves captive, who will give us an enormous quantity of intelligence. >> officials say they recovered important in tell from the raid but have not given out details. >> we are watching a developing story out of new jersey. a school bus collided with a tractor trailer. the driver of the truck fled the scene. the bus driver is still trapped inside. those are the firefighters on the scene trying to rescue that driver. there were no children and this may be the good news, onboard that bus at the time. >> we are following another bus accident, a breaking story overnight. 42 people have died in southwest france after a tour bus and a truck collided. the collision took place near a village about 30 miles east of
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bordeaux. the bus passengers were mostly elderly tourists on a day trip. both vehicles caught fire after the collision. >> we address the families and share our grief and shed light on this accident and bring the rescue team, because that is still necessary. >> it is france's worst road accident in more than 30 years. >> we're learning new details about the fatal stabbing at a school in sweden. police now say it may have been a hate crime. the school is located in an area with a lot of newly arrived asylum seekers. a teacher and a student died after being slashed by a man wearing a costume and armed with a sword. he was shot by police. two students and another teacher were injured. >> there is a seventh church fire in the st. louis area. police say it followed the same pattern as six earlier church
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burnings, but this latest fire happened at a mostly white church. the others had mostly black congregations. >> a florida church will hold a town hall meeting to discuss the death of a black man shot by police. the family saying he never fired his gun during that roadside encounter with an undercover police officer in an unmarked car. the officer fired his weapon six times. we are live at the palm beach gardens police department. i understand you talked to the family of cory jones. what did they have to say? >> that's right. we spoke to the god marry and aunt of cory jones who told us they were close. she had just had lunch with him last week. she said she can't believe he is not here anymore. the family said they have more questions than answers about his death and they are leaning on a community here to support them during this time.
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>> those chants coming from hundreds who gathered at a rally thursday for cory jones. ♪ >> the 31-year-old drummer was fatally shot by a plain clothes officer after his car broke down on the side of the road. now his family says new details about the confrontation between jones and the officer raised even more troubling questions about the deadly encounter. >> i need to know why, why my son is gone today. why. >> the family met privately on thursday with the state attorneys office. they say they were told cories body was found 80 to 100 feet from his car and that he did not use his handgun. >> cory jones never fired his weapon. never fired his weapon. that is confirmed. >> police are offering little information about what happened when the officer stopped to investigate what looked like an
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abandoned car. palm beach gardens police have said the officer was confronted by an armed subject. lawyers for the family say the officer shot at jones six times and three bullets hit him. the state attorney office told him the officer did not properly identify himself and jones may not have realized he was dealing with a police officer. >> why didn't he identify himself, show his badge? >> the death is being investigated by the county office and state attorneys office. >> all lives do matter. >> going forward, what do you want to see happen? >> we want justice. we want transparency. i miss him. i miss him so much. >> the community is hoping to get more answers at that town
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hall meeting scheduled for tonight. the lawyer for the family will be at that meeting and the family says everything that they have been told so far from the state attorneys offers comes from statements that the officer made to investigators after the shooting. they say they are frustrated because they have so many questions and without a dash cam, the officer didn't have a body camera on him. without that, they only have the version from the officer. >> we are talking about an area that is literally divided by railroad tracks. what's next in the investigation of this case? >> the sheriff's offers is handling the investigation. it could be weeks or months, up to a month before that's settled. they have to corroborate the forensic evidence with the statements that the officer made. they are still waiting for a toxicology report, autopsy report and then the state attorney office will have to decide whether they press charges against the officer. >> thank you very much. >> wikileaks released a second set of documents from c.i.a.
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director john brennan's personal email, including a list of his contacts and files related to a draft report by the senate select committee on intelligence. wikileaks has released other documents taken from his email, including a security clearance application that had his wife's social security number on it. >> powell ryan says he will run for house speaker, but something he won't do is getting a lot of attention. >> the fine line between family time and doing your job, and whether there is a double standard for men and women. >> president obama says no to a $600 billion defense bill. he says guantanamo bay is a major reason why.
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>> democratic presidential candidate lincoln chafee could be dropping out of the race. he tweeted that he would quote address my future in the campaign. he has been polling atlas than 1%. he has only raised about $30,000 so far. >> congressman paul ryan is moving closer to becoming the next speaker of the house. he officially announced his bid for the job after winning over some of his right wing colleagues. as speaker, ryan could be in for a bumpy ride. >> while many republicans were pushing ryan to enter the race, he resisted, saying it required too much travel and less time with his family. this week, he amended that, saying he would run if the house republican conference united behind him. paul ryan had been the subject
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of speculation for weeks. >> i know that paul is a committee guy. he likes when the committees are allowed to work. i think he's already sort of mentally committed to many of the same things that we want. i think we can deliver an overwhelming majority. >> the senator rose to the top of the list after kevin mccarthy dropped a bombshell by bough out of the race earlier this month. he lost support almost immediately by publicly implying that the house benghazi investigation was designed to damage hillary clinton's presidential chances. it cost mccarthy any hope of support from the hard line conservative house members known os the freedom cause. >> i can't unit everybody, better to find somebody who can. >> in a letter, ryan said:
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>> that unity may still be he is he will elusive. while he won the backing of the study committee and tuesday group, he failed to get an actual endorsement from the freedom caucus. many members say ryan is too willing to compromise. >> i think he'd be a great messenger. he'll talk to us. i think our group will be favorable toward him, but we are not there yet. >> he instantly becomes the front runner for the post powerful position in congress. >> president obama sending back to congress a major defense bill that he says is full of flaws. he voluntary tote the bill that could prevent the obama administration from closing guantanamo bay. >> began to know mow is one of the premier mechanisms for jihadists to recruit. it's time for us to close it. it is outdated, expensive, it's been there for years and we can
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do better in terms of keeping our people safe while making sure that we are consistent with our values. >> he also vowed as candidate obama to close it. he wants a deal that would address mandatory cuts and spending. >> it does appear the house has the votes to sustain the veto. >> the conflict in syria has displaced millions of people. >> wall europe is struggling to handle an influx of refugees, there's a detroit community that may have the answer for syrians looking for a new home. >> paul ryan announces he wants to be speaker of the house, but is his promise to stay focused on his home an unfair request. going on, not just in this country, but around the world. getting the news from the people who are affected. >> people need to demand reform... >> ali velshi on target weeknights 10:30p et
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>> where we are standing right now will be the panama canal. >> this will be flooded. >> we have upgraded for bigger ships. >> now we go for weeks without water. >> techknow's team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> can affect and surprise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> awesome! >> techknow - where technology meets humanity. >> welcome back. taking a look at today's top stories. the democratic presidential candidate lincoln chafee has dropped out of the race. he polled atlas than 1%. he raised $30,000. >> warnings are up along mexico's pacific coast as residents prepare for hurricane patricia, a category five storm,
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the strongest hurricane ever recorded in the western hemisphere. winds are nearly 200 miles an hour. the track has it hitting south of puerta vallarta. >> hillary clinton wrapping up an 11 hour capitol hill hearing. she answered questions about the 2012 benghazi attack. little new information was revealed. >> secretary of state john kerry is holding talks today with his russian counterpart in vienna and the big topic is syria. he will sit down one-on-one with sergey lavrov. there is growing acknowledgment that the syrian government is getting the upper hand in the war against u.s. backed remembers. mine displaced by the syrian war of part of this sea of people who made their way to the serbian-croatian border overnight. they are trying to keep warm as temperatures plum melt. >> the u.s. has taken only a small fraction of syrian
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refugees. the governor of michigan, home to one of the biggest middle eastern population in the country said his state should take more. not everyone agrees. al jazeera's bisi onile-ere reports. >> muhammed moved to metro detroit with his wife, mortgage and four children in july. the family's life today is much different than it used to be. >> we were facing danger on a daily base. where we lived, there were continuous daily clashes, our lives were a constant threat. >> when the civil war broke out more than four years ago, the family fled to turkey and lived at a syrian refugee camp for three years before admitted to the u.s. >> after we crossed borders to turkey, i sat down and went. i started looking at my village. i cried for an hour.
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>> we're a country founded on immigrants. >> sean is with loose ran social receives of measure, a non-profit that helped resettle some of the 100 syrian refugees that of arrived in the states so far this year. >> what we've seen historically and in research is that refugee resettlement and immigration can add to economic growth, producing significantly. congresswoman lawrence is vocal about her concern of terrorism and the threat posed to u.s. security. >> i continuously say we need plan to vet that, and we need to be sensitive to that. right now, it's not we're choosing, it's a crisis and we're just getting a mass of people who want to come to the united states. >> the government says that it can take up to two years to review the backgrounds of
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refugees like muhammed and his family. >> we will have a future here, but our children's future is far more important than ours. >> it's unclear at this point how many syrians will resettle in michigan, but he feels fortunate that he and his family are here, and able to rebuild a life torn apart by war. >> the arab american institute is kicking off its leadership conference this morning in the building behind me. the syrian refugee crisis will be a major topic of conversation. >> do we know what michigan's capacity is to take in more refugees? >> sean with the lutheran social services of michigan said the state can absorb between 5,000 and 10,000 syrian refugees over the next couple of years. >> that would be the entirety of what the obama administration has committed to. thank you.
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>> it's going to cost prisoners less to make a telephone call beginning next year, the f.c.c. voting to cap the rate for local and state inmate calls, costing now less than $2. reducing the cost of these calls measurably increases the contact between inmates and their loved ones. >> members of the united auto workers union ratified a new four year contract with fiat chrysler. newt deal passed with 77% of the vote. it includes the first raises for veteran union worker ins 10 years. it will help close the wage gap between those with seniority and tear two workers hired by the company in 2177.
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>> the federal government may recall more vehicles with defective airbags, so far eight deaths and dozens of injuries have been linked to exploding airbags. lisa stark has more on what is already the largest automotive recall in u.s. history. >> we've seen the horrific effects from defect i have takata airbags when the air bag explodes with too much force, shards of metal fly out. people have been badly cut, lost their eyesight and even their lives. now for the first time, a dramatic look at an inflator coming apart. the government test video has been slowed down, and you cannot hear the extremely loud bang, but you can see why this is so deadly. >> our goal is a safe air bag in every american vehicle as quickly as possible. >> that's a huge task. nearly 24 million driver and passenger airbags have been recalled in some 19 million cars. the bulk of those vehicles come from five manufacturers, bmw, fiat chrysler, ford, mazda and honda.
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nationwide, fewer than a quarter of the recalled airbags have now been replaced. in states with hot, humid climates, conditions that help trigger the failures, fewer than a third of the air bags have been changed out. at a public meeting on the massive recall, nitsa will decide whether to force automakers to recall airbags more quickly and may have to broaden the recall to include side airbags. >> we want consumers to know we are considering all the options we can think of to speed things up. >> of greatest concern, airbags at least five years old that have spent the most time in those hot, high humidity states. elliot drives a ford mustang with a recalled air bag. he drove up from georgia for the meeting. >> why did you come all the way to washington, d.c.? >> because i am annoyed and tired of being jerked around. >> he said he received his recall notice in july and headed to his local ford dealer.
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>> i asked what am i supposed to do? you won't give me a loaner car, you can't tell me when i'm going to get a replacement for it. the service advisor told me i'm safe because my air bag light is not on. >> that is not true. the air bag warning light has nothing to do with this defect. this misinformation underscoring the confusion consumers are facing. he has parked his mustang for now, said he is lucky enough to be able to afford another car. that's his ride back to georgia and for the foreseeable future. >> wisconsin congressman paul ryan made it official, he is running for speaker of the house. his candidacy came with several conditions, including one he called a personal request. >> i cannot and i will not give up my family time. i may not be on the road as often as previous speakers, but
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i pledge to try and make up for it with more time communicating our vision, our message. >> ryan's conditions were met with strong reactions of praise and criticism. he may or may not have intended to, but he added fuel to the debate over traditional gender roles, family leave and who should get it when they say they want it. >> a website about family and work life cater that is dads, simon a personal friend of mine joins us. good to see you. >> good morning, thank you. >> i want to start with massachusetts senator lit beth warren who tweeted this: family time should not be a periphery served for speaker of the house. you deserve it and so does everyone else. does the average american man feel like he can do what ryan did and say i need family time, without risking his stature. >> putting aside ryan's politics and some of his beliefs on work life balance as it pertains to policy.
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this is something that should be celebrated. americans overall are struggle, fathers in particular, who are showing up at home and with their kids as care takers and decision makers around the house want to be spending more time. this is a tough decision, and powell ryan stepping out is something that a lot of fathers can't do. >> it helps with the stigma and yet he's being criticized as being a hypocrite in some ways. is that fair criticism? >> he's certainly not breaching what he's practicing in that sense, so, you know, one can sort of look at that and say yes, he's hypocritical. on the other side, this is very, very important. across the american workforce, there's the mommy tax and daddy tax often taken when somebody does decide to take more leave, spend more time, be a coach at their child -- for their filed's soccer team. as a result, those people pursuing high power crease don't take as much leave and spent as
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much time to their family and that is coming at a cost to everybody. >> there has been a female speaker of the house, nancy pelosi, would a woman be able to stand up and say what paul ryan did and in the be punished in some way? >> i would hope so. if you take 160 of the top world leaders in the united states across academics, politics, business, an elsewhere, only 14% of them are mothers. that is to say, you know, there's a big gap in mothers serving at leaders and what we're talking about is a big part of that gap. >> author cheryl sandberg had this to say, she praised him, saying we need work to work for parents and having leaders who waiver responsibilities at fathers as much as their
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responsibility to say their jobs show all of us what is possible. she seems to take that positive view, but she got slammed as a hypocrite on social media. what is that about? >> across the workforce, we're overworked. across the most developed countries in the world, the 36 countries, the u.s. ranks 32 in workplace balance. after you put the kids down, most people are responding to emails and doing more work and email is increasing 15% in terms of our volume. >> we're all working too much. >> that's right. i think that's part of what it's about. on the other hand, there's a real desire amongst the american workforce, amongst dads and moms to be able to spend more time with their kids. we need to create policy's that address that, and it can't just be left to facebook and yahoo. it needs to be far more broad. >> because we need help. >> we certainly do. >> mothers need help.
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>> good to see you, thank you. >> thank you. >> spend two years at the state department working under hillary clinton, since then, she has decided to put her family first. she talked to al jazeera about how people reacted to that decision in washington. >> foreign policy heavy weight, scholar, wife, mother, by any measure, an marie slaughter is a role model, a mantel that made her a lightning rod for criticism when she turned down a high powered promotion at the state department to devote more time to her teenage sons. >> i very deliberately said we have two teening a boys at home, the last years they'll be at home and my husband and i both want to be here. when i say that, i could see myself falling in the estimation of the person i was talking to. i could literally watch them
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thinking oh, she put her family first. i guess either she didn't do well in washington, or she just isn't as ambitious, she's not as much of a player as i thought she was. >> so she fought back, penning one of the most widely read articles in the history of atlantic monthly and now a book, unfinished business, which argues for a workplace policy overhaul to allow women and men flexibility to care for family. >> 50% of men find it somewhat or very difficult to fit work and family together. 56% of women. what you are really talking about is a 21st century workforce and w we have a 20th 20th -- mid 20th currently workplace, leave it to believer workplace that assumes there is a full time woman at home. i want to say you are 50 years out of date, you are losing
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talented, you are stressing your workforce. you are not making room for the actual reality of your workers lives. >> patricia sobga, al jazeera. >> as the father of two daughters, i am glad we are having this debate for their sake. it's not just women affected. >> hopefully they won't have to grapple with the same hard choices. >> a major drug bust on both sides of the mexican border. >> how a tunnel was used by drug cartels. >> a band lost in the debate for identity. suing to keep a name many call racist.
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>> the founder of china's confuse peace prize is defending the winner. the zimbabwe president is the winner. >> other finalists were bill gates and ban ki-moon. zimbabwe said economy is in the toilet. >> human rights groups wondering how he could receive such an honor. >> 22 people under arrest after police uncovered a secret tunnel connecting mexico and the u.s. the tunnel is 2400 feet long,
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30 feet deep. it was lit, ventilated and equipped with a rail system. authorities confiscated 12 tons of marijuana. >> we want to go to nicole mitchell. we have been tracking hurricane patricia throughout the morning, everybody reporting this is a very nasty, major storm. >> this did rapid intensification, getting very intense very quickly. intensity is the hard evident thing of hurricanes to forecast. it is always a challenge. this is kind of a tight buzz saw, that eye that you see is 10 miles across, and they rarely sustain that high intensity for a long period of time, but because this is supposed to make landfall within the next 12 hours, it could still be a cat five when it does that. that is exceptionally rare. regardless if it does lose intensity, it churns up energy. this is going to be devastating. making that landfall later today, kind of in that puerta
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vallarta area where we're watching it and in terms of the united states, we are seeing a little moisture feed into what we already had going on. a lot of the state of texas under going. the next couple of days, still tracking that, because we have so much moisture in the south. we did have a front move through the northeast yesterday. that dropped temperatures 10-20 degrees. >> this time yesterday, that was a cat one storm. >> it just exploded pretty much yesterday. >> thank you very much. >> president obama is defending the black lives matter movement that arose out of the police shootings of unarmed
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african-american men and teens. >> the reason that the organizers use the phrase black lives matter was not because they said they were suggesting nobody else's lives matter. rather, what they were suggesting was there is a specific problem that is happening in the african-american community that is not happening in other communities. the african-american community is not just making this up. it's not just something being politicized. it's real. >> the president made those comments during a meeting with law enforcement, but he also said the focus cannot just be on police officers who risk their lives to keep communities safe, saying the criminal justice system needs overhauling. >> there's an asian american rock star famous or his talks against racism also drawing attention to his band name, the slant. he has been fighting to trademark the name, but is told no. >> we are behind the scenes of a music video shoot in the oregon
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legacy center in a hall featuring the photographs of a photographer who has taken pictures of the days of internment camps in world war ii, found the principle pals in those photographs, found them in the modern day and told their story, what has happened to them since, showing current generations of history and what their forefathers went through. >> some of the worst things in history have happened to these people and they've moved on, and no matter what happens, there's not much you can do to control those outside forces, but you can control how you react to it. there's a term in japanese that means things are as they are and you just go on. >> the band shooting the music video is also very interested in those same themes. they want all of us to have what the band founder calls an
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uncomfortable conversation about race and racism. we'll tell you more about the band and its mission and huge legal squabble they're in with the u.s. government. they want to trademark their name and if he said say they can't because it's racist. the name of the band, the slants. we'll have their story tonight. al jazeera, portland, oregon. >> you can see alan's full story at 8:00 eastern time. >> i'm sure you want to know my opinion about this as an asian american. >> i do. >> i think probably they're trying to reclaim and repurpose a term that has been derogatory against asian americans. i look forward to seeing the story tonight. >> why a school says a coach has to stop praying with players.
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>> a football game in washington state tonight is going to be about what the coach does after the game. >> he has been told not to lead prayers anymore. >> for nine years running, bremerton high school football coach joe kennedy has been leading his players in post game prayers. when he continued that tradition last friday night, he was violating an order from the
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district that said, "talks with students may not include religious expression, including prayer." >> i don't want to break the law and i don't want to set a bad example for our kids and i never want to jeopardize the program that we've set up, and the taxpayers end up paying for it if something goes horribly wrong and they get sued. that's not what coaching staffs are supposed to be doing. >> many players and parents say they support him. >> the school district has said it has no plans to fire kennedy, writing in a statement, at this time, mr. kennedy's employment status with the school district remains unchanged. the district continues to hope that the district and mr. kennedy can arrive at common understandings. the conservative liberty institute, a legal defense fund, is backing the coach. in a letter to the school
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district, it says kennedy has the constitutional right to lead post game prayers. >> private citizens on their own time have a right to practice their faith and we think it's very important at liberty institute to protect that constitutional right. >> i don't understand how this could be wrong, i'm not establishing region, not preaching with anything. >> many have said the problem with the prayers sessions is players may feel forced to participate. the coach said he's never required any of his athletes in prayer. they do so because they want to. >> why does the coach say he is leading the prayers? >> he was inspired when i a movie, 2006 movie called facing the giants, the story of a high school football coach who inspired a losing teach to win by telling them their first goal was to serve god. >> a lot of protest about that. john henry smith, thank you. >> stock of alphabet expected to open up this morning. the company came up with a math
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joke to show us how well it is doing. profits last quarter were well above wall street expectations. they got a boost from advertising. here's the math. the exact dollar value of the $5.1 billion stock buy back equals the square root of 26. that is the number of letters in the alphabet multiplied by 1 billion. >> you need a calculator. >> you've got to carry the one. that's it for us here in new york. >> coming up next from doha, much more on the protest happening in south africa. students are very upset over rising tuition costs. they have had violent clashes with police. >> they say the tuition cost going up 12%. have a great day. >> great weekend.
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>> from al jazeera headquarters in doha, this is the news hour. coming up in the next 60 minutes: >> police in south africa fire stun grenades and tear gas at thousands of students protesting university fee rises. >> israel lifts restrictions on access to the al aqsa mosque compound in jerusalem. >> hunkering down, people

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