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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  October 27, 2015 7:00am-9:01am EDT

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thousands are feared trapped beneath the rubble after a massive earthquake kills more than 300 people in afghanistan and pakistan. south china sea at show down and beijing has a formal protest against the u.s. after the u.s. navy directly challenges china's territorial claims in the region. classroom confrontation and outrage after this disturbing video surfaces and seen throwing a girl to the ground. so called ferguson effect, the head of the f.b.i. says the protests against excessive police force have changed the way police do business but the president challenges that notion. ♪
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the search and rescue efforts in after georg afghanistan and pakistan and focusing on remote areas where the impact of the monday's 7.5 magnitude earthquake are unclear. >> 340 have been killed, most of those who died were in northern pakistan, india, iran and forces in afghanistan all of them offering to help but so far local authorities have not requested any assistance. good morning, welcome to your world this morning i'm del walters. >> and i'm stephanie sy and rushing to deliver aid to quake victims and thousands spent the night outdoors in near freezing temperatures afraid to sleep inside because of the potential for aftershocks. al jazeera's jennifer glasse is in kabul. jennifer talk to us about some of the challenges in this search and rescue effort there. >> reporter: stephanie really one of the biggest challenges is
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the scope of the operation here, the earthquake effected people in 11 of afghanistans 34 provinces, nearly a third of the country and terribly remote and villages you can get to on dirt trashi tracks or foot or donky and people trying to help each other and hearing horrible stories coming out in eastern afghanistan there was a wedding going on when 24 hours ago this earthquake hit and a wall collapsed on many of the children playing at that wedding, 23 injured there and kunar province the hardest hit where 42 died, 11 people died in one instance when a rock fell down on their home. rock slides are going to be a problem. we know some highways have been blocked, logisticings very difficult across afghanistan and the government doing what it can
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to help those injured. >> jennifer you also mentioned that taliban control some of these areas, talk about that and also how survivors there are dealing with the aftermath of the quake. >> reporter: that is right, the taliban do control some areas of the remote regions and is another challenge because government officials can't get there with no go areas and taliban issued its own statement calling on afghans and aid organizations to help those in need to provide medical care, shelter and food. it also told its fighters to help aid organizations but it is a complicated and makes things much more come kapted than in these remote areas and not controlled by the government. president ashraf ghani has a council to coordinate aid and asking local councils to do the same and an effort spread out over a long area and nato force as we understand are helping the government plan casualty evacuations and plan
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distribution and offering intelligence to the afghan government by this is a very complicated effort stephanie and not simple. we will be hearing stories of what happened and really kind of getting the true sense of the extent of the damage for the next couple of days. >> do you anticipate the afghan government will receive some international assistance that is being offered? >> reporter: i think right now they are trying to figure out what they need, where it's needed and how to get it where it's needed. again, because it's such a large area and because it's just so spread out nobody even really knows how many people have been effected. more than 4500 buildings around afghanistan have been damaged or destroyed by the earthquake. we know that 83 people dead and 373 injured but as people from the remote areas manage to make their way into more populated areas or to medical areas then we will kind of get a sense of what is needed. the most serious injured may now
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they can maybe start thinking about medically evacuating them from the more remote hospitals to bigger hospitals to get them help and right now everyone is just kind of evaluating what kind of aid is needed and don't forget winter is setting in and snowed in some of the mountains and has been a very cold night for thousands of people who had to stay outside. so i think right now the government is evaluating what it needs and what they will accept as international aid. >> jennifer glasse in kabul, thank you. reaching a budget deal with the white house to end the government shut down for the rest of president obama's term and details still being worked out and what we know so far, it will increase federal spending by about $80 billion over the next two years and evenly splitting that between defense and domestic problems and some paid for cuts by social security disability benefits and agreeing
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to lift the debt ceiling until march of 2017. central bankers meeting to decide to raise interest rates and federal reserve leaving the interest rates untouched in september and janet yellen saying it's because of global uncertainty and rates could rise by the end of year. china objecting to a u.s. war ship sailing inside waters it has claimed as chinese territory and a guided missile destroyer sailed around the islands in the south china sea overnight. the u.s. views the area as part of international waters. al jazeera's rob mcbride has the latest from beijing. >> reporter: the chinese have condemned this patrol as a provocative act, the foreign minister urging the americans not to undertake what he calls any reckless actions. they see these islands as being very much chinese sovereign territory and say they claim to them evening though they are
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hundreds of kilometers to the coast and the americans have always asserted that these are international waters and that they will within their rights sail within 12 nautical miles of these disputed territories. we are expecting more reaction from the chinese side as we go through the day and also waiting to find out what the chinese military has been doing in response to this, whether, in fact, they have also been shadowing this patrol with their own vessels or their own aircraft and whether that now becomes a new normal in the south china sea and almost cold war style of encounters between military forces from the two sides. >> rob mcbride reporting from beijing, countries have overlapping claims over the south china see including vietnam, malaysia and stay with
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us in our next half hour, we will speak with former nato allied commander admiral james about the rising tensions in the south china sea. just a few hours the u.n. general assembly will hold a vote on the economic embargo against cuba, just an advisory vote the u.s. could abstain and president obama repeatedly said he would like to see those sanctions lifted, only congress has the power to do so. a sheriff's deputy in south carolina is on administrative leave this morning all of this following a violent run in with a student and it was caught on cell phone video, the question know what led up to this? al jazeera's john henry smith has our story. >> reporter: witnesses say deputy ben fields went to the classroom at spring valley high school in columbia, south carolina when a teacher complained that a student would not get off her cell phone. >> the student was asked to leave the class several times by the instructor at the school, assistant principal was there as well and the officer was called on scene to actually have the student removed from that
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location. the student refused and the officer acted that you see on the video. >> come with me or i'll make you. >> reporter: on one version of the video fields is heard ordering the girl to stand. when she refuses he grabs her, flipping the girl over and throwing her to the ground. now a county sheriff says that deputy should never be assigned to work as a school resource officer again and according to a spokesman the sheriff was, quote, very disturbed by what he saw. >> of course we will look at what happened to led up to it, that incident that took place and what happened afterwards and all of that will take part in what the sheriff decides. >> reporter: in a statement south carolina district says the district is deeply concerned about an incident that occurred at spring valley high school today and goes on to say the district will not tolerate any actions that jeopardize the safety of our students. deputy ben fields is a 11-year veteran of the sheriff's office and has been the subject of allegations before. in 2007 he was sued for false
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arrest and excessive force but a jury found in his favor. the girl in the video and a friend who protested her treatment were charged with disturbing schools. now that friend says she was just standing up for her classmate. just last year deputy fields received the rich land school district culture of excellence award, at the time the sheriff called fields a good role model. once again did not take that long for this particular video to go viral on social media but what are friends and classmates saying? >> a lot of people saw this thing, a lot of students and apparently she doesn't have a lot of friends because she is new to the school according to most accounts and very, very quiet in that classroom but as far as the officers and some defending the officer and one wrote he is a cool dude and not a racist. another tweeted that the girl provoked what happened by not getting up when she was asked. others dispute that. one says the girl was sitting
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quietly at her desk and if you noticed in the video none of the classmates seem to react to what is happening. one student posted he was afraid if he said anything he would get arrested just like the person who defended her. >> it's odd to see the students just looking down at their computers as if nothing is happening. >> you have to imagine they had to be pretty shocked at what they were seeing. >> john henry smith thank you. timely video because the videos like the one in south carolina put police under new scrutiny and a topic when president obama today addresses a group of police chiefs from around the world and as mike reports f.b.i. director komec spoken monday and talked about the so called ferguson effect. >> reporter: james comey says the resent increase in crime nationwide may be in part because police officers are under increased scrutiny. >> black lives matter. >> reporter: and he also points a finger at the national debate over the black lives matter movement.
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>> when they interpret hash tag black lives matter as antilaw enforcement one line moves away and each time someone interprets hash tag police lives matter as antiblack the other line moves away and maybe in some places maybe because those lines are arcing away from each other we have a crisis of violent crime in some of our major cities in this country. >> reporter: monday he spoke to n.o.w.s of police chiefs and top law enforcement in chicago and he talked about the so called ferguson effect, the idea that police across the country have pulled back, slowed down law enforceme enforcement. in response to the protest of the shooting of michael brown in 2014 and he said he couldn't be sure that is happening but he said he was common sense. amnesty international usa director reacted saying assertions by the director are outrageous and by his own admission the statements are not backed up by data and are mixed reports of levels of crime since the heightened scrutiny of
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officers began in ferguson and obama administration agrees and dismissed the f.b.i. director's theory. >> the available evidence at this point does not support the notion that law enforcement officers in the country are shying away from fulfilling their responsibilities. >> reporter: this was the second time in a week that he spoke about the concern that police officers are under the microscope. >> in many cities across the country violence is the same as last year and in some places thank goodness even lower but in many others we are seeing an explosion of senseless violence. we must stare at this problem to figure out why it's happening and what we can do about it. >> reporter: mike with al jazeera, washington. and we will bring you president obama's speech to the chiefs association that is this afternoon at 3:15 p.m. eastern. details this morning about an oklahoma woman accused of driving in a crowd at a home coming parade and sheriff was in
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court on monday and held on a million bond and investigators say she told them she was suicidal when she drove in the crowd killing four people and injuring dozens more and family members confirm she does have a history of mental illness an ordered a psychiatric evaluation. major weather system is moving north and heavy rains and strong winds reaching michigan by this evening and get ready and the pictures are from last night and louisiana and alabama and parts of the south getting a foot of rain, no deaths or major destruction reported but that storm did knock out power for thousands so how will it effect things up north and as always we turn to nicole mitchell. >> more momentum instead of sitting and barely moving and being able to dump more moisture and still has a lot of moisture but as it moves a little bit more quickly it won't be able to dump as much in one given place before it moves on. so you can see the core of this and places like north carolina
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into tennessee in the meantime and even though we had a lot of flooding look at the drought for the area and from especially east texas through arkansas, louisiana, mississippi, we have had drought conditions even if a couple place in exceptional drought so there is a good side to this, the next one that comes out just a couple days from now we will see how all of that factors in and moving north and connecticut a lot of that state in a drought condition and some places will get a benefit out of this rain so into the day today and into tomorrow this continues to lift northward. by tomorrow we are looking at more of the coastline and up into the northeast and the wrap around so the circulation wrapping around that moisture into portions of the midwest, combining with another little piece of energy that is coming from the west coast, that could even be wednesday into thursday, a little bit of snow because that is the cold side of the system, the side that draws in the air from canada and then finally it looks like a little
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bit more clearing as we get for thursday into friday. so a couple days left to deal with this and as i said there are some pluses. >> nicole thank you very much. still ahead following the desperate journey of hundreds of thousands of refugees. >> an aerial view and the impact on the cities accepting those fleeing their homeland. in alabama where state officials have been criticized for closing dozens of driver's licenses offices and civil rights activists say it's an attempt to suppress black voters. not so fast and tell you why new york attorney general is asking several internet providers to prove their service is really as fast as they say.
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the death toll is rising in afghanistan and pakistan this morning, as a result of that powerful earthquake that hit south asia, the most powerful in more than a decade magnitude 7.4 tremor centered in the hindu curb mountains in northern afghanistan and 340 people have been confirmed dead, another 2000 have been injured, rescue crews are still trying to reach remote areas. abdul is the disaster management director for the afghanistan red crescent and joining us by phone by kabul and thanks for being with us this morning. give us a sense of the scale of this earthquake and the aftermath and how concerned are you that the death toll is going to rise? >> yeah, as you mentioned it was very powerful and hit afghanistan in the resent history and affected rural area
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of afghanistan in the villages in the northeast of afghanistan and east of afghanistan and center part of afghanistan but in the north, northeast and east part of afghanistan including jalalabad and surrounding provinces and the damage as the village and some areas are insecure and tools are activa d activated. and assisting and providing immediate assistance to that community. >> what are the figures? what are the numbers you are being given in terms of the dead and injured, what are the latest numbers? >> in society the numbers until
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now we have, as i just said and the number of the dead are 90 persons. it is increasing. and the number of injuries is 300 have been reported to afghanist afghanistan. this is not the only figure and the figures may beyond that. >> our reporter on the scene said many of the areas you need to get in to are controlled by the taliban, are you having any difficulties reaching some of the victims because of that? >> right now insecurity in the areas and towns and villages and the possibility has been given to the person and talked about
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the principal of neutrality and impartiality and accepted and are operating in that area. >> thanks for being with us this morning. >> del images of migrants trying to make their way through europe have been dramatic particularly images from the air, this is drone footage from over slovania and hundreds crossing farmland on foot and slovania say 10,000 migrants entered the country in the weekend and 75,000 arrived over the past two weeks and details the latest trends in migration and international organization for migration said there were 740 million internally displaced people and as many as 230 million refugees around the world and eu foreign ministers are meeting this morning on how to deal with the influx of refugees into europe. for now police have been sent in to help keep order and al jazeera's robin and walker reports from the
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slovania-croatia border. >> promise of 400 extra police from the eu to manage this unparalleled scale of migration may come as a relief for the slovania authorities but relief for the refugees i try to ask people how they spend the last night, not enough water said this man. they had been waiting for hours. finally somewhere now to leave for an austria-bound train and members of this family had been left behind. >> one of my brothers and my sister's husbands can't. they didn't let them come out. >> reporter: hopefully they made it on to the next train. by the afternoon the camp was ready for more arrivals. this is just the latest batch of hundreds of refugees to arrive at this holding facility. the police seem to be doing very good job at crowd control but the humanitarian effort from
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what we have seen isn't quite as adequate. aid agencies such as this say more resources are needed though they stress in the slovania authorities are operating closely with them but they say they have been obstructed from getting food and support to where it's needed. >> to be disallowed to hand blankets to people when we have sufficient to get to the children and family i mean this is disgusting before you even get to the food issues or the restriction of medical aid to those who need it. >> the civil protection agency says volunteers need to register with recognized organizations but the police are stopping everybody from going in there, this is what is happening. >> i think i'm not from the police but i think that is for their security. >> swamped by up to 15,000
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hungry and exhausted new arrivals a day help for them and for the authorities cannot come soon enough, robin walker, al jazeera, duba on the slovania-kro asia border. iran will execute a thousand people this year for those who study the human rights record says the u.n. also seems to be more willing to talk about the issue. and we are going to present a report to the u.n. general assembly tomorrow and he sat down first with al jazeera's roxanne. >> the under lying facts remain the same which i document very carefully but i point out two differences, this time around, one is the willingness of iran to engage with me and other mechanisms which i welcome as, you know, as a pray of hope for the future and benefitting from the ground and engagement in the wake of the nuclear agreement reached this summer, these two
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opportunities i highlight in any report that perhaps there is a basis for better engagement in the future but i quickly point out there is cause for concern over the death penalty and many other rights violations existing which justifies serious concern of what is happening in the country. and also told roxanne that human rights violators should be named and targeted with sanctions such as a travel ban, you can see more of this interview tonight at 9:00 eastern here on al jazeera america. back in the country topping trump, ben carson widens his lead over the one time frontrunner at least in iowa. >> carson has become the leading contender in the race for president. plus it is one naughty comment, this is spewing alcohol and sugar throughout the solar system.
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>> these people have decided that today they will be arrested. >> i know that i'm being surveilled. >> people are not getting the care that they need. >> this is a crime against humanity. >> hands up... >> don't shoot. >> hands up... >> don't shoot. >> what do we want? >> justice. >> when do we want it? >> now. >> explosions going on... we're not quite sure - >> is that an i.e.d.? sneaking through the city of venice in northeastern italy a unesco world heritage site. >> welcome to your world and it's 8:29 p
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and this was a violent encounter with a student and the officer is scene on video throwing the student to the ground after she refused his order to stand up and issued a statement saying it won't tolerate actions jeopardizing students. [switching captioners]
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>> it's unclear if iran is going to participate president the state department has not ruled that out. there is new video showing isil's advance inside syria. they can be seen taking control of a major checkpoint cutting off a main supply route into aleppo. >> violence in syria has chased tens of thousands of people in aleppo from their homes. that city is seeing one of the worst humanitarian crisis of syria's five year civil war. we have this report. >> she i said to carry her youngest child into and actual home. now this is where they live. the mother of seven prepares what she can for her kids.
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today, inside this dark, dingy instructish is potatoes. >> our livelihood is gone. our livelihood is gone. our land is gone. our homes are destroyed. >> the family is just one of the thousands of newly displaced in syria since the beginning of russia's air campaign in late december. according to the u.n., an increase in fighting has resulted in 35,000 new i.d.p.'s on the outskirts of aleppo. >> this is a hellish life. we've reached our lowest point. we were sleeping under americans as they attacked. now we have nopes else to go and there is suffering all around. >> in southern aleppo, it's not simply the war raining misery on the newly displaced. as winter approaches, conditions will only worsen.
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already, keeping warm is a struggle. aid workers are doing what they can, but in this makeshift camp, there are only so many tents to go around. >> abdullah said tens of thousands of families are now displaced in aleppo and more are arriving every day. >> somebody sick from natural causes can't go to a hospital. how can you help somebody with an emergency. somebody maybe injured by a russianar syrian air strike. there aren't even ambulances to help the wounded. >> the children still play, even during these tough times. it's the parents who can barely keep the agony at bay. >> we left our home because of all the death. there was nothing but death all around us. that's why we're here now. hopefully, we won't have airstrikes happening here. we have nothing now.
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>> nothing but a reality that is harsh and cold. al jazeera. >> joining me now to talk about the civil war that is leading to these continuing humanitarian crises is former nato supreme allied commander. he is also the author of a book called "the accidental admiral." admiral, good morning and thank you for your time. you wrote a year ago that to battle isil, the u.s. should put 10,000 troops in iraq to train and assist. what should the battle plan be today, with the russian factor in syria and would you add vote for a western ground force there? >> i think we need to begin by prioritizing the fight against the islamic state. that means my recommendation stands. i think it's about 10,000 u.s.
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troops, probably 5,000 to 8,000 allied troops centered in iraq, pushing north against the islamic state. we ought to arm the kurds so they can push from the north against the islamic state, and then we ought to amp up the bombing campaign against the islamic state. we can only solve the islamic state through military activity. in terms of what's happening in the west, different approach. we're going to need a political solution that what's going on with the assad regime. i think that is a second priority after going against the islamic state. >> how do the facts on the battlefield in syria to your second point change the fine mix of potential diplomacy talks between russia and the u.s. and syria? >> i think the russian military advance there is not helpful. let's face the fact that they are supporting an illegal reprehensible regime in the assad regime.
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they have used barrel bombs, torture, they used chemical weapons against their own people, not helpful supporting a regime like that. the fact is that it strengthens the hand which assad and it will lead us more toward a political solution, a diplomatic solution, because of the balance of forces between the assad regime energized by russia and the moderate syrians, who are backed by the united states. >> i want to pitch have the to another issue that you have written pretty extensively about, the south china sea. as you know overnight, the u.s. navy destroyer entered a part of that sea that the u.s. considers international waters, china has understands it is its territory. it is obviously sending a message, but how significant do you view this development? >> i think it's very significant. it's part of an ongoing campaign that's been conducted for decades by the united states to establish freedom of navigation
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and international waters around the world. let's be clear. china claims this area as territorial seas. no other nation supports that, not vietnam, not malaysia, not vietnam, not the philippines, not south korea, not japan, no one else in asia believe that is china has some historical territorial right to the south china sea. these are international waters under international law and the united states will continue to demonstrate the ability to sale through them. it's a significant move by the united states. >> you predicted that this would be part of the strategy to make that point for the u.s. admiral, thank you so much for your in sights this morning. >> ben car con surging past donald trump in the new nationwide poll, this pole just released by cbs and new york times showing that carson now has 26% of the support around the country. donald trump who had been at the top of that poll since july now
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22%. carson's lead is bigger in iowa. al jazeera's david shuster is taking a closer look at ben carson in his new role as front runner. >> we're a long cry away from what we were supposed to be. >> he is soft pone and seems low energy, but growing up in detroit, ben carson was not always so calm. >> as a teenager, i would go after people with rocks and sticks and baseball hats and hammers. many know the story when itself 14 and i stride to stab someone. fortunately, my life has been changed and i'm a very different person now. >> now that young man who discovered the bible and became a neurosurgeon is a leading presidential candidate. in iowa, a poll suggestion carson leads donald frump 28% to
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19%. a poll shows him ahead 28% to 20%. 84% said they have a favorable opinion of carson with just 10% unfavorable. >> it really shows the power of social media and of word of mouth, because as you know, you know, a lot of the media has it in for me, but, you know, if people listen to them, i woulding polling atlas than zero. >> carson is known for a blunt style and strong anti-government conservatism. >> i have a strong desire to get rid of programs that create dependency in able bodied people. >> he's a master of attack lines. carson gone his rise two years ago at a prayer breakfast by hammering president obama's health reform law as the president sat a few feet away. since then, carson had ad this. >> obamacare is the worst thing
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that happened to this country since slavery. what if the obligationists had said you know, i don't believe in slavery? i think it's wrong, but you guys do whatever you want to do. where would we be? >> carson caught fire in the christian evangelicals that it usually counts for 60% of the vote. carson is a political outsider, like trump. he's never held elected office. >> neither one of us probably is going to be somebody who is going to be managed by handlers,
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because that's not who we are. >> he is now filling the airwaves in iowa, new hampshire with television adds. >> washington is broken, the political class broke it. together, we can drain the swamp and protect our children's future. >> it all adds up to momentum, and while iowa is different from the contents that follow, a win in the hawk eye state can catapult a newcomer into contention for the nomination. david shuster, al jazeera. >> civil rights groups say alabama is deliberately suppressing black voters by closing dozens of veteran offices that issue i.d.'s in the rural part of the state. the state says they can be obtained in other offices. critics say there is more to the decision. andy gallagher reports. >> it's the picture of southern charm, but activists say union springs in rural alabama is part of a new battleground in a decades-old fight. in small towns across the state,
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dozens of driver's license offices have closed. voters need them to cast their ballots. >> hello. >> residents like evelyn smart say it's a reminder that voter rights is still an issue. >> we've come a long ways but still have a long way to come. we're still fighting for that right we earned years and years ago and we shouldn't have to fight now. >> civil rights activists say it's not so much to driver's licenses offices are closing, but where they're closing. it's rural and black communities losing their facilities and critics say that's nothing short of an attempt to affect the african-american vote. >> officials claim budget cuts gave them no choice. alabama governor said voter discrimination is simply untrue. >> we will go to people's houses to have their picture made if
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they don't have a photo i.d. in the state of alabama. we are not going to do anything in the state of alabama to keep people from voting. to jump to a conclusion like that is politics at its worse. >> it's a big barrier in many of these rural counties, people don't have transportation. >> the campaigners say the closures combined with the introduction of voter i.d. laws are part of a long and ugly discrimination. >> here we are 50 years later, on the year, 50 years after the voting rights act, and we're again suppressing the rights of black voters in alabama. >> officials say the closures will save the state millions of dollars. civil rights campaigners are more concerned about the potential cost on democracy. andy gallagher, al jazeera, union springs, alabama. >> university of mississippi no longer flying the state flag on its campus us, in recent weeks faculty and students called for
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the flag to be removed. last week the student body voted to take the flag down. it is the only remaining state flag that still has that confederate symbol on it, georgia adopting a new one in 2003. >> a kentucky couple will continue their lawsuit against county clerk kim davis. april miller and carrol roberts were married months after davis refused to issue them a license. that was in defiance of court orders. the license was issued while davis was in jail for contempt. >> a new study finds doctors are making mistakes when they administer medications to patients on the operating table. harvard researchers looked at 300 surgeries and found error ins nearly half of them. two thirds of the mistakes were serious, some even life threatens. 80% of considered preventable. medical officials called the findings disturbing, but not surprising. >> st. louis county residents are furious over a landfill fire
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that's been burke there for years. it is dangerously close to a nuclear waste dump. people complained they're getting mixed messages from the government. >> 300 people turned out at this meeting just north of st. louis to find if they might be living next to a potential disaster. an underground fire has been burning at a landfill for the past five years, and it sits 1,000 feet from a nuclear waste dump. the attorney general is suing the owner, saying it's a safety hazard, but the e.p.a. said it isn't. residents ask if they really are in danger. >> how big is the fire, how hot is it, is there air monitoring up there? >> we don't know who to trust, who to believe. we don't know anything. i mean, this is scary. >> now an official with the e.p.a. it is the fire in the landfill is contained and it is not a danger to the community. >> while there may be some
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movement that there isn't this rapid movement in any one direction near the site. it seems to be contained in the same general location that it was before, based on the data our scientists look at. >> coming up tonight, we'll tell you what the e.p.a. plans to do about the situation here north of st. louis. al jazeera, st. louis county. >> you will be talking about this story this morning, the middle east could become too hot for human life within the next century. there's a new study out by m.i.t. that says if carbon dikes side emissions continue, we are talking about 165-170-degree heat for six hours a day. researchers once thought it would take 200 years to get to those temperatures. research said that is going to happen much sooner than first thought. >> a storm system today will bring a mixed bag of weather to this part of the country. let's bring in nicole mitchell for that. >> we have areas we've been
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watching. the system pulling up through the east, but behind that, an area anywhere from the rockies through the midwest and behind that, you can see that next cloud cluster off the west coast, our next system in the offing. we've gotten a little bit more active recently. now the first one, i was talking about in the northern tier of the country, we do have winter weather advisories in place like montana, idaho. you can see more widespread with that fog this morning making the driving difficult. i was able to find one higher elevation report of snow, at least at the moment, and that's in wyoming, larva mountain, higher elevation again, but those could get one or two inches, most of the rest of the region, some light areas of rain. a system behind that more of that rain comes into the day tomorrow, so this is tomorrow's forecast, but pretty widespread, even northern parts of california. that's a good thing, because most of this area is under those dry or drought conditions, some
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places even exceptional drought, so that is beneficial rain. in the meantime with all these little systems going through, it's keeping temperatures a little bit more consistent, no wild swings, but you'll see little ups and downs, so place like minneapolis, 59 is above average, but we see things dip a little bit below average, average this time of year is 53, and today, though, could be even a little bit warmer than somewhere like atlanta under all that rain. >> nicole, thank you very much. >> it's called the lovejoy common. it is giving away tons of alcohol in space, the equivalent of at least 500 bottles of wine every second. this is the first time that ethyl alcohol, the time used in alcohol has been observed in a comet. nasa said the comet is releasing large amounts of sugar as it flies through the solar system. >> that comet thinks it's on spring break. >> the rock and roll band in a
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battle over words. >> it has been speaking out about racism but the federal government said its name is part of its problem. of its problem.
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>> kansas city will be the center of the sports world tonight, that is where the hometown royals will take on the new york mets in game one of the world series. this is the royals second consecutive trip to the world series. the mets have not won the world series since 1986. the royals won their lone world series in 1985, the mets won it the following year. >> internet users upset about slow speeds will find if complaints of justified. new york's attorney general is investigating three major internet service providers to see if they deliver at advertised. the three companies, verizon, cable vision and time warner all
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issuing statements saying they are confident their services do what they say they will do. >> walmart wants to start using drones, it filed a request to test the devices for home delivers and curbside pick up. both are tarting to test those drones. the f.a.a. is expect to set new rules for drones in the coming months. >> a band named the slant is trying to change opinions at trademark office. >> a museum dedicated to the internment camps of world war ii. an unusual place for rock and roll. >> we're going to roll. camera and action. >> the music video being shot here is about keeping this history alive. it's about being asian in america. the band, the self proclaimed
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first all asian american rock dance band who call themselves. >> the slants, yeah. ♪ >> the slants, playing what they call chinatown rock, embracing what could be seen as a racial slur. >> we can choose to perpetuate or reclaim it and give it a positive association instead. >> cast and crew working on the video shoot shrug it off. >> they came up with it, they love it. it's them. >> maybe. the name has landed the band in court where they're fighting the federal government for a right to trademark the slants. the u.s. patent and trademark office turned them down, saying the name is disparaging to asians, especially when backed by asian imagery. >> they're basically saying if people see our website and it it
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is the slants and then see a picture with asians in it, which of course would be us because we're a band, they think people will automatically assume the racial slur and no other possible definition. in the right have fighting racism, they're denying me rights based on my race. that seems incredibly unjust. >> the cause has been taken public, giving ted x talks about racism, appearing at colleges, high schools, even law schools. forty to 50 speaking engagements a year. in virginia, he connects by talking about bullying, about his music and his mission to change one of the meanings of one word. >> we're asian. even though sometimes we don't have slant eyes, we set it. it's a part of us. >> simon tam points to some simple victories. >> whenever you google slam or slants, the top hits for the
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first four pages were white supremacist websites and now it's to a rock and roll band that probably shares its heritage. i think that is super cool. >> super cool and with a new video and greatest hits album coming out, they will be back on the road. they can't legally own it, but they'll still use the name and continue to be the slants. al jazeera, portland, oregon. >> ricky gervais will host the golden globes again. he won praise and criticism for his no holds barred approach. it will be his fourth time hosting. the ceremony takes place january 10 june hollywood is talking about the newest james bond premier. even some of the royal family was at specter's first public screening in london monday night. the james bond series is one of
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the most successful in history. specter is the 24th bond film. there are even more books, 39 by six different authors. the movies have been nominated for a combined 14 academy awards and won four of them. >> a u.s. navy destroyer sails in waters past china's man made islands there. americans applaud the move, but beijing's crying foul. >> a violent arrest at a south carolina school, details about the sheriffs deputy who is now on administrative leave. >> we are back in two minutes with more of your world this morning morning >> drilling in the arctic. >> rapid change is always an alarming thing to see. >> as the ice caps recede... and the ocean opens up... how can we protect our natural resources? >> this is what innovation looks like. >> scientists reveal cutting-edge technologies... >> you can look beyond the
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horizon and extend your reach. >> that could avert disaster while helping save the planet. >> i feel like i have a front row seat for some very dramatic changes.
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june the dispute in the south cline in a sea, beijing protesting after a u.s. navy destroying passes man made islands there. >> hundreds dead, thousands missing, the search and rescue efforts one day after a powerful earthquake in afghanistan and pakistan. >> sheriff's deputy throwing a young girl to the ground when she refused his orders. >> congress considers how to protect personal information on line. critics worry the new rules sacrifice privacy and could help
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the hackers. >> good morning, welcome to your world this morning. china is responding with strong words this morning after a u.s. navy warship sailed past disputed islands in the south china sea overnight. >> beijing saying the area around the spratley islands is china's territory, also saying the u.s. warship threatened its sovereignty. the u.s. considers the area international waters. >> the chinese have condemned this patrol as a provocative act. the foreign minister urging the americans not to undertake what he calls any reckless actions. they see these islands as being very much chinese sovereign territory, saying there are claims to them, even though they are hundreds of kilometers south
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of the south china coast, go back hundred was years to prefers chinese dynasties. the americans asserted these are international waters and that they will within their rights sale within 12 nautical miles of these disputed territories. we are expecting more reaction from the chinese side as we go through the day, and also waiting to find out what the chinese military has been doing in response to this, whether in fact they have also been shadowing this patrol with their own vessels or their own aircraft. whether that now becomes a new normal in the south china sea, an almost cold war style of encounters between military force the from the two sides. >> rob mcbride reporting from beijing. the former nato supreme allied commander told us that the united states wants to demonstrate to china that beijing does not have control of those waters. >> i think it's very significant. it's part of an ongoing campaign
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that's been conducted for decades by the united states to establish dry follow of navigation in international waters around the world. let's be clear. china claims this area as territorial seas. no other nation supports that, not vietnam, not malaysia, not vietnam, not the philippines, not south korea, not japan. no one else in asia believes china has shhistorical territorial right to the south china sea. these are international waters under international law and the united states will continue to demonstrate the ability to sale through them. it's a significant move by the united states. >> the philippines president supports the u.s. military move in the south china sea, saying he welcomes a balance of power in the disputed regions. several countries have made overlapping claims, including the fill teens, vietnam and malaysia. there are hundreds of islands in
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this sea, the once in contention are the straitlies and parisol islands. >> expanding search and rescue efforts to find more victims from afghanistan's earthquake. they are trying to deliver aid to the remote areas where the full effects of that 7.5 magnitude earthquake still not clear. most dead are in northbound pakistan, indian, iran and u.s. forces in afghanistan, all of them offering to help, but jennifer glass says so far local authorities have not accepted their assistance. >> massive challenges here in afghanistan 24 hours after the earthquake. the problem is it's affected such a large area of the country, people in 11 provinces of having a's 34 provinces have been affected by this massive earthquake. that's about a third of the country spread over some very
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difficult terrain. some villages are very remote. there really are only dirt tracks, you have to walk or go by donkey. those are the people trying to assess the damage and see how bad it was. some villages 150 miles north of the capital kabul where i am, another thing complicating relieve efforts, areas are controlled by the taliban so government officials won't be able to get in there. we are hearing stories of what happened when the earthquake occurred, about 23 children injured during a wedding that was going on when a wall collapsed on them. the worst province affected, 42 people died, 11 people died when a giant rock fell on a building they were in. we do know that rock slides have been a problem, blocking roads and hampering relief efforts. this is going to be a slow,
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difficult, determined effort. the afghan government has been offered international help from the united states, from iran, the nato forces here's, which of course, is one of the biggest resources here's have offered their help. they say they are helping the afghan government plan casualty evacuations and distribution of aid, and they say they are already providing reconnaissance and intelligence to the afghan government. this will be a complicated effort spread out over a long area. the afghan government now really trying to otherwise its relief efforts. the taliban has issued a statement, calling on its fighters to help aid workers and calling on afghans and relief workers to help those in need, medical care, food, and shelter, the biggest needs now. >> jennifer glass in kabul. there has been confusion whether or not the taliban would welcome international aid. they are now issuing a statement saying they welcome that international assistance. >> as we mentioned dell, the biggest impact of the quake with neighboring pakistan and some
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remote villages there have been turned to absolutely rubble. we are in the valley hard hit by the quake. >> rescue efforts are already underway, although for the most part, it is on self help basis, because the locals are now trying to dig out the valuables from under the rubble. however, the strong earthquake has left a trail of destruction. you see the wall on my right is swaying badly. it can come down anytime. the government authorities are already warning of aftershocks. they have closed the schools and the valley, as well as across the country, just to be on the safe side. the important thing right now is for a proper reconnaissance of the far flung areas. the military said they have already started that and the people here are now waiting to see what kind of relief and help they will get from their government. the important thing also is to
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treat the medical emergencies, because the hospital is already overwhelmed. there are over 200 people who are in that hospital. they need help and the government will have to gear up in order to ensure that help reaches to these far flung areas where it is needed most. >> the prime minister is expected to tour the damage today after cutting short a trip to london. >> the organization doctors without borders saying saudi airstrikes hit one of its hospitals in yemen, the group tweeting that the facility was hit by several airstrikes last night with patients and staff inside the facility. there are records of several injuries. earlier this month, u.s. forces bombed a doctors without borders hospital in afghanistan. thirty people were killed there. >> in a few hours, the u.n. general assembly will vote on the economic embargo against cuba. it's just an advisory vote. the u.s. could abstain, but
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president obama has said he'd like to see sanctions lifted. only congress has the power to do that. >> we're getting a first look at that tentative budget deal between house republicans and the white house, the agreement reached late last night is aimed at avoiding a government shut down. the agreement would raise federal spending by $80 billion over the next two years, evenly splitting that increase between defense and domestic programs. some of that would be paid for by cuts to medicare and social security benefits. negotiators agreed to lift the debt ceiling until marsh of 2017. johjohn boehner wants the fill house to vote on it tomorrow. >> some groups want back drugs for death penalty. states have been struggling to get execution drugs after
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several european manufacturers refused to provide the drugs for that purpose. >> a sheriffs deputy in south carolina is on administrative leave after a violent run-in with a student. >> the question is now did that officer use excessive force. we have the story. >> witnesses say deputy ben fields went to the classroom at spring valley high school in colombia south carolina when a teacher complained that a student would not get off her cell phone. >> the student was asked to leave the class several times by the instructor at the school. assistant principle was there, as well. the officer was called on scene to actually have the student removed from that location. the student refused, and the officer acted as you see on the video. >> on one version of the video, fields is heard ordering the girl to stand. when she refuses, he grabs her, flipping the girl over and throwing her to the ground.
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now the county sheriff says that deputy should never be assigned to work as a school resource officer again and according to a spokesman, the sheriff was "very disturbed" by what he saw. >> we've got to look at what happened leading to it and what happened afterwards. all of that is going to take part in what the sheriff decides. >> the school district is deeply concerned about an incident that occurred at spring valley high school today, and goes on to say the district will not tolerate any actions that jeopardize the safety of our students. deputy ben fields is an 11 year veteran of the sheriffs office and has been the subject of allegations before. in 2007, he was sued for false arrest and excessive force, but a jury found in his fair. the girl in the video and a friend who protested her treatment were charged with disturbing schools. >> that friend says she was just standing up for her classmate.
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just last year, deputy fields received the richland school district culture have excellence award. at the time the sheriff called fields a good role model. >> what has his actual role been at this school. >> since 2008, officer fields has been a school resource officer at the school. since then, he has risen to the level of senior school resource officer. there is video of him on you tube benching 600 pounds. >> that may be playing into the excessive force allegation. >> the video in south carolina just the latest that has police around the country saying they are under the microscope. that could be an issue when president obama addresses police chiefs this afternoon.
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mike viqueira reports those videos and the rise of crime were some things talked about. >> james comey said the recent increase in crime nationwide may be in part because police officers are under increased scrutiny. he also points a finger at the national debate over the black lives matter movement. >> each time somebody interprets black lives matter as anti law enforcement, one line moves away. maybe, just maybe in some places because those lines are arcing away from each other, we have a crise of violent crime in some of our major cities in this country. >> monday, comey spoke to thousands of police chiefs and top law enforcement in chicago and talked about the so-called ferguson effect, the idea that police across the country have pulled back, slowed down law enforcement in response to the protests over the shooting of
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michael brown in 2014. >> comey said he couldn't be sure that's happening but said it was common sense. the obama administration appears to agree, white house spokesman josh ernest dismissed the f.b.i. directors theory. >> the available evidence at building point does not support the notion that law enforcement officers around the country are shying away from full figure their respondents. >> this was the second time in a week that comey spoke about the concern that police officers are under the microscope. >> in many cities, violence is the same at last year and in some places thank goodness even lower. in many others, we are seeing an explosion of senseless violence. we must stair at this problem to
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figure out why it's happening and what we can do about it. >> mike viqueira, al jazeera, washington. >> we'll bring you the president's speech to the chief's association. it is airing this afternoon at 3:15 eastern time. >> new details with the oklahoma woman accused of driving into a crowd at a homecoming parade. prosecutors say 25-year-old chambers ran a red light then went around a barricade before driving over a police motorcycle and crashing into the spectators. 14 were killed, dozens of others injured. investigators say she told them she was suicidal at the time. >> the search continues this morning for a missing person in that deadly boat accident off the coast of british colombia. five tourists died when their vessel sank over the weekend. the tour boat operator still doesn't know what caused texas. >> this particular boat has done
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this exact same trip for 20 years twice a day. it's between two islands. there's a bit of a current going through there. it does build a bit of a sea in there a little more than say just outside of i have the, but there was no occasions yesterday that would say that it was any different than any other tour that happens in either the spring or the fall like now. >> one of the 24 passengers onboard saying a rogue wave may have caused the vessel to capsize before it sank sunday afternoon. >> a major weather system that drinked the south is headed north today. rain and strong winds should reach michigan this evening. these images are from last night in louisiana and alabama. parts of the southeast received nearly a foot of rain. this storm knocked out power for thousands of people. >> flooding could get worse as
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it moves north. let's go to nicole mitchell for the details. >> there are still some chances for flooding. this is barely moving, so it was able to dump a lot. now we have a little bit more momentum, so it's not staying in one place as long. that means the moisture is becoming more widespread and definitely a rainy day for a lot of place, but a little less likely to have those flood concerns. the flooding problematic with major floods in parts of texas back in may, and that ate away at some of the drought, but since then, it's come back for the eastern part of the state and anywhere, arkansas, louisiana, mississippi all dealing with that, as well. this is what we had before this, the next result will come out on thursday. we'll see how that chooed away at drought sentence. >> a lot of the east coast will be seeing this, but more into the northeast around the great
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lakes, also some dry areas here, like the state of connecticut under drought conditions opinion this is beneficial rain. it's going to make for a couple of gray days before we clear out more for thursday and friday. in the meantime, temperatures running on the cool side with all that moisture and cloud cover, not a lot of sunshine getting through. temperatures around six for both d.c. and around atlanta. we could be warmer, believe it or not in seattle, than we are in some of the places with the rain. >> could be a soggy all hallow's eve. >> john kerry's closed door testimony on capitol hill could determine the next steps in the middle east. >> the white house moved to limit testing being praised and criticized. is a divisive issue in our countries classrooms.
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don't be left in the dark. get proactive alerts 24/7. comcast business. built for business. >> you can't both fight and save islamic state.
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it's very hard to see a long term sustainable solution in syria that includes assad as part of that solution. if the russians reallyified islamic state, i would welcome it. the problem is that the russians apparently are also bombing what i would call the moderate opposition and that's exactly why the russian presence in syria will not stop the bloodshed but will prolong the conflict. >> ground troops will eventually be needed the to fight isil in his opinion. >> the washington post said the national security advices recommend moving ground troops in iraq. ash carter saying for a while now that the military needs to deliver new options for the
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fight against isil, admitting the u.s. plan to train moderate rebels did not deliver the results expected. >> thousands of migrants have been flooding into europe for weeks. nearly 10,000 refugees entered clove over the weekend. the true scope of the migration can best be seen from the air. >> from high above the fields, a river of humanity, a drone captures the overwhelming scope which the refugee crisis. from the air, thousands of men, women and children walk through a vast countryside, streaming from one camp to another. this footage is near the border of croatia and slovenia. the picture are powerful and the numbers keep thyming. more than 43 million people are displaced, the most in decades. millions are from air i can't, flooding into europe.
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some of met with open arms. many were not. we've seen the images of children, crawling under fences, of police turning water cannons on migrants, of guards tossing food to the desperate, of the body of a young boy cradled on the sea shore. this weekend, european leaders agreed on a 17-point plan to address the refugee in flux, walking for new and larger reception centers, providing better shelter, stepping up efforts to reduce trafficking and smuggling. the world can only help it will be fulfilled. >> turkish police with dozens of raised. on monday, turkish police stormed a home used by suspected
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isil cell. seven people and two police officers were killed. >> iran is on track to execute more than 1,000 people this year. the man who studies tehran's human rights record for the u.n. said the nation also seems more willing to engage on the issue these days. he will present his report to the u.n. general assembly tomorrow. he sat down with al jazeera. >> the underlying facts remain the same, which i document carefully, but i point out two differences this time around. one is the willingness of iran to engage with me and other u.n. mechanisms, which i welcome as a ray of hope for the future. the other of course is the possibility of benefiting from iran's engagement in the wake of the nuclear agreement reached this summer. these two opportunities i highlight in my report as evidence perhaps there is a base for better engagement in the future, but i quickly point out that there is very few discourse
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for concern and there are many other rights violations persisting, which justifies concern over what is happening in the country. >> he also suggestion human rights violators in iran should be named and have sanctions such as a travel ban. you can watch more of the interview tonight on al jazeera america. >> there are concerns the government may use hacking threats to expand government spying. >> teachers may be onboard to limit standardized tests. will fewer tests make a difference?
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>> a funeral of a palestinian man in hebron, afterward were clashes between israeli security forces and protestors, protests into their third week. >> starting to look like a war zone there. welcome back. taking a look at today's top stories. china is protest ago after a u.s. navy warship sailed around
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the disputed slaty islands in the south china sea. it happened overnight. the bam map administration considers the area international waters. search and rescue teams out began this morning in afghanistan and pakistan after the earthquake on monday. crews are focusing on remote mountain areas where the effects of the quake of being tallied. the majority died in northern pakistan. >> a south carolina sheriffs deputy on administrative leave this morning after this, a violent encounter with a student. the officer is seen throwing the student to the ground after she refused his order to stand up. the district issued a statement saying it will not tolerate actions that jeopardize students. >> the senate taking up a controversial bill aimed at preventing cyber attention. it has the backing of the white house and homeland security. some of the countries taj evident tech companies say it in
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fringes on personal privacy. >> there is little doubt cyber security threats are real and growing. target and sony have been hacked, so was the federal government. supporters of the cyber security information sharing act say it will help. passing on early signs of corporate attacks to the department of homeland security. >> because the private sector really does control to a greater extent the use of the internet and development and advance of the internet, they have to be our partners and we are very committed to that model. >> opponents who have taken their campaign to you tube eight it would grant immunity. >> a company can promise to keep your data private, break that promise, leaving you with no
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legal resource. >> data can be transferred to the f.b.i., v.i.a., n.s.a. >> critics worry that vitals privacy rights and could allow the government to spy on americans, something supporters of legislation deny. >> the bill has also been carefully examined by senators of both parties and contained important measures to protect civil liberties and individual privacy. >> some tech companies, like facebook have not come out with a position on fifa. others, including twitter, yelp and apple openly oppose it. in a recent statement, apple wrote the trust of our customers means everything to us, and we don't believe security should come at expense of their privacy. the bill has already passed the house, the senate today is considering a number of amendments that could tighten privacy protections and the information that companies can share. lisa stark, al jazeera,
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washington. >> on the eve of the next republican presidential debate, ben carson has leaped past donald trump in a nationwide poll showing carson with 26% support around the country, donald trump now has 22%. none of the other gop contenders have more than 8%. >> those polls showing that carson's lead is bigger in iowa. al jazeera's david shuster taking a closer look at ben carson. >> we are a long try away from what we are supposed to be. >> he is soft spoken and seems low energy, but growing up in detroit, ben carson was not always so calm. >> as a teenager, i would go after people with rocks and sticks and baseball hats and hammers.
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many know the story when i was 14 and i stride to stab someone. fortunately, my life has been changed and i'm a very different person now. >> now that young man who discovered the bible and became a neurosurgeon is a leading presidential candidate. in iowa, a poll suggests carson leads donald trump 28% to 19%. a poll shows him ahead 28% to 20%. 84% said they have a favorable opinion of carson with just 10% unfavorable. >> it really shows the power of social media and of word of mouth, because as you know, you know, a lot of the media has it in for me, but, you know, if people listen to them, i
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be polling atlas than zero. >> carson is known for a blunt style and strong anti-government conservatism. >> i have a strong desire to get rid of programs that create dependency in able bodied people. >> he's a master of attack lines. carson's rise two years ago at a prayer breakfast by hammering president obama's health reform law as the president sat a few feet away. since then, carson has added this. >> obamacare is the worst thing that happened to this country since slavery. >> carson compared abortion rights to slavery and said he would outlaw the procedure. >> during slavery, slave owners thought they had the right to do whatever they wanted to that slave, anything that they chose to do, and, you know, what if the obligationists had said, you know, i don't believe in slavery. i think it's wrong, but you guys do whatever you want to do. where would we be? >> carson's rhetoric has caught
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fire with christian evangelicals in the iowa caucuses, a group that usually accounts for 60% of the vote. like donald trump, carson is a political outsider. he's never held elected office. >> neither one of us probably is going to be somebody who's going to be managed by handlers, because that's not who we are. >> to bolster his message, he fills the airwaves with television ads. >> washington is broken. the political class broke it. together, we can drain the swamp and protect our children's future. >> it all adds up to momentum, and while iowa is different from the contest that follow a win in the hawk eye state can catapult a newcomer into contention for the nomination. david shuster, al jazeera. >> also this morning, anyone looking for health insurance on healthcare.gov can look at what it will cost you next year.
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many premiums, the white house says they will increase. how much though dependency on where you live. minnesota are looking at double digit increases, but california says their costs will only go up 2%. >> a big discussion in schools this week is over standards testing and the new white house proposal to reduce it. president obama met with teachers monday to discuss his new initiative that would limit tests that students take in schools. al jazeera has the story. >> i've got a pop quiz for parents and teachers cross the country. >> president obama and the department of education launched a new initiative to end overtesting. >> i hear from parents who rightly worry about too much testing and teachers who feel so much pressure to teach to a test that it takes the joy out of teaches and learning. >> on average, students take 112 tests between pro k and 12t
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12th grade. the new plan includes limiting testing to 2% have class time and also taking into account classroom work. >> we're going to work with states, school districts, teachers and parents to make sure that we're not obsessing about testing. >> a standardized test is one of the weakest ways to assess student learning and student knowledge. >> there have been protests and boy cots, too. earlier this year, 95% of students at a seattle high school refused to take an exam to measure progress. >> when we stood up against the test here at garfield high school, we didn't plan it, but we had amazing support. >> some educators say the tests work. >> i am for standardized testing mostly because it gives us a common understanding of the skill level that students need to meet or exceed per grade
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level. >> 12 million students in half the states took those tests. >> robert is a teacher at democracy prep public schools, charter schools in harlem, new york and joins us to discuss this. good morning, thank you for your time. you wrote an article about this, and you start it by saying the president's pledge to reduce school tests is meaningless. why do you say that? >> it's really not the tests. anybody paying close attention realizes it has what the tests are for. once you attach accountability, whether through schools or increasingly individual teachers to test results, it's just human nature and logic that teachers are going to spend most of their time preparing kids for those tests. the number of tests matters less than the pressure that is placed on teachers and schools to
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perform well on those tests. >> who is responsible for that connection between teacher and school accountability and standardized testing? did that start with no child left behind? in the department of education fact sheet on this, the obama administration takes some of the responsibility and say they contributed to the problem of over emphasis on testing. >> they certainly did through no child left behind waivers and the race to the top competition. no child left behind probably made this a permanent feature of american education for good or ill. i say for good, because you have to be clear eyed about this, there has been some good. without the data that comes from standardized tests we would not have the demand for charter schools and school choice. we wouldn't understand how they are educating low income kids of color in this country. it creates pressure that keeps those things moving forward. the problem is we joust don't have what i would argue is the
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correct relationship with testing, a test that's supposed to be a diagnostic, the data from testing is important, but once you make it the alpha and omega of a child's schooling, then the tail wags the dog so to speak sue it's important that you pointed out the civil rights issues that originally played into the reason for these tests and accountability of schools that were failing their students, frankly. congress is in the midst of rewriting material education law. how could it write legislation to address some issues that you are bringing up? >> one of the other great miss noelers here and why its unusual for the obama administration to take a position on this is that it's a small number of tests that are mandated by the federal government. the vast majority of tests that children take are driven by the state district and even school level. under federal law right now if you're a child in third through eighth grade, you take two tests, one math and one english.
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most testing demand or use is driven not by the federal government by by local schools and districts. >> schools and districts, are they starting to realizes that this testing culture is not only perhaps not improving education, but it's really stressing out parents and students and teachers? >> yeah, i mean the argument can be made that nobody is forcing local governments to have this extreme overreaction to testing. i mean that's one point of view, but we have had this testing regime now for a decade or more and at some point, i think those of us who look at policy like this have to take ownership of this and say we are creating conditions that whether this reaction was expect, it is what it is. i think parents are correct in looking at what's going on. they don't care frankly whether the test is a state or federal or local test, owl they know is their kids are asked to take a lot of tests and it is materially changing their
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experience at school, so something has to be done. >> thank you. >> the pentagon expected today to announce plans to upgrade the air force. 2/3 of the planes are more than three decades old. the cost of those changes could lead to a battle in congress. >> the u.s. air force is expected to pick the company that will develop its next generation bomber. bowing and lockheed martin have joined bids in what is build as the most highly anticipated defense contract in years. the winner is going to get the privilege of selling 80-100 long-range bombers to the u.s. air force at $550 million appease. these will enter service in 2020 and eventually replace the outdated b1 and we're still flying the b52. the current fleet has been around for a long time. the average u.s. long-range bomber is 39 years old. the new plane will fly alongside
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the stealth, the b2 fighter jets. the difference is new bombers are expect to be convenient more stealthy. if you wonder what that means, that's not entirely clear. i guess it's not supposed to be entirely clear. the specific plans are top secret. the bombers are likely going to include new high tech senators. they'll have jamming capabilities to surprise enemy radar and communication systems that are capable of surveying a nuclear blast. the first version is going to be flown by pilots and carry conventional weapons but eventually could fly as drones and store a nuclear pay load. all of this is not coming cheap, it's an $80 billion contract. these don't always stay within budget, in fact rarely do. senators in both parties expressed concern over how much this whole project will actually cost, so these planes might see a bit of a battle in congress before they see battle in the air. >> you can see more have ally's
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reporting on ali velshi on target that airs 10:30 p.m. eastern time. >> getting a voter i.d. in alabama. >> the state shuts down i.d. offices, but says it is not trying to stop people getting to the polls. some claim it's causing inequality at the ballot box.
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this is not your typical roller coaster ride.
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setting a world record for the most neighborhood coaster rider. >> if it was a word record, it's fine. it was for a good cause. the park did fall for short. they did however manage to raise $15,000 for a cancer charity. >> you should see what we didn't show. >> it looks like it could get messy. they say we don't have fun here. >> police in l.a. trying to protect the owner of a drone that flew into a power line. dozens of phones were left without power monday. it caused wires to fall to the ground, accident causing traffic jams. several blocks of traffic lights switched off because of that power outage. >> all of a sudden, we just see a flash like a boom and sparks and you could see the drone drop to the ground, landed right here in the middle of the intersection on sunset. it was smoking in the middle of
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the street. it was a pretty crazy scene. >> st. louis county residents are furious over an underground landfill fire that has been burning for years. it is close to a nuclear waste dump. people complained they're getting mixed messages from the government. >> about 300 people turned out at this meeting north of st. louis to find if they might be living next to a potential disaster. an underground fire has been burke at a landfill and sits 1,000 feet from a nuclear waste dump. >> how hot is it, is there air monitoring up there. >> we don't know who to trust. we don't know who to believe.
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we don't know anything. this is scary. >> an official with the e.p.a. says the fire in the landfill is contained and it is not a danger to the community. there isn't rapid movement in any one direction near the site. it seems to be contained in the same general location as before based on the data our scientists look at. >> coming up tonight, we'll tell you what the e.p.a. plans to do about the situation here north of st. louis. al jazeera, st. louis county. >> the western half of the u.s. is bracing as a number of storms begin to roll in. nicole mitchell has an update on that but first i want her commentary on the neighborhood ride. >> i knew she couldn't let it go. >> at all times we want things unrestrained, roller coaster would not be on the list. >> heading out today, we have a couple different weather systems on the west coast, one moving through the rockies has snow on
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the way for higher elevation, one or two inches and fog this morning, it's a bit of a tricky go, as we get to the coastline, you can see moisture moving in, a little bit more of that into the forecast for tomorrow. still some winter weather advisories, montana, idaho and washing wyoming, i've seen snow there mostly through this morning. then getting through tomorrow, this is tomorrow's forecast, more widespread moisture with the next system, and this includes really down into northern parts of california, the entire coastline is under dry drought cbs, some places in the exceptional category. this is pretty much beneficial across the board and we hope as we get more into winter and el niño, we see more systems that aren't the crushing ones, as well. speaking of systems causing problems be the one lifting out of the south moving more quickly, so spreading the rain through a lot of the eastern third of the country, but much
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less probability for the flooding now that's moving faster. >> nicole, the middle east we are told could become too hot for human life within the next century. a new study shows if carbon dioxide emissions, the region will be 165-170-degree heat. an earlier study said it would take 200 years to get there, but a new study shows we will get there much sooner. >> a high school football coach defending religious freedom. >> he threatens to take legal action so he can pray with his players. >> three cities defending their right to keep the nfl from moving their teams to l.a.
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>> an update on a couple of stories we've been talking about a lot, that high school football coach in washington state threatens legal action because he prayed with his players. he is the assistant coach. he has been leading post game prayers for nine years. earlier this month, the school district asked him to stop, threatening to fire him. kennedy will file a lawsuit against the school to keep his job. >> university of mississippi no longer flying the state through. the students and faculty have called for it to be removed. last week, the student body
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voted overwhelmingly to take it down. it is the last remaining state flag that still has a federal symbol on it. >> civil rights groups say alabama is such perezing block voters by closing government offices that issue i.d.'s in rural parts of the state. the state argues i.d.'s can be obtained in other county offices, but critics question their real intent. >> it's the picture of southern southern charm, but activists say union springs in rural alabama is part of a new battleground in a decades-old fight. in small towns across the state, dozens of driver's license offices have closed. voters need them to cast their ballots. >> hello. >> residents like evelyn smart say it's a reminder that voter rights here is still an issue. >> we've come a long ways but
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still have a long way to go. we're still fighting for that right we earned years and years ago and we shouldn't have to fight now. >> civil rights activists say it's not so much that driver's licenses offices are closing, but where they're closing. it's rural and black communities losing their facilities and critics say that's nothing short of an attempt to suppress the african-american vote. >> officials claim budget cuts gave them no choice. alabama governor said voter discrimination is simply untrue. >> we will go to people's houses to have their picture made if they don't have a photo i.d. in the state of alabama. we are not ever going to do anything in the state of alabama to keep people from voting. to jump to a conclusion like that is politics at its worst. >> it's a big barrier in many of these rural counties, people don't have transportation. >> the campaigners say the closures combined with the introduction of voter i.d. laws
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are part of a long and ugly history of discrimination. >> here we are 50 years later, on the year, 50 years after the voting rights act, and we're again suppressing the rights of black voters in alabama. >> officials say the closures will save the state millions of dollars. civil rights campaigners are more concerned about the potential cost on democracy. andy gallagher, al jazeera, union springs, alabama. >> the nfl formerly file its appeal over deflate gate arguing an appeals court judge was wrong. brady had been penalized for his alleged role in deflating balls in a playoff game in january. >> the nfl begins town meetings in three cities to talk about moving their teams. the st. louis rams, san diego chargers and oakland raiders thinking about a move to l.a.
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the city could be home to one or two of them by next season. the first city is st. louis tonight to get a hearing. >> kansas city is where the hometown royals will take on the new york mets in game one of the world series. the mets have not won the world series since 1986. in either case, this winter will end three decades of championship futility. the royals won their lone world series in 1985. the mets won it the following year. that's it for us here in new york. >> coming up next from doha, more on the desperate journey, thousands of refugees fleeing the war in syria and the new effort this morning that could end that war. >> your world this morning is back tomorrow, beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern. have a great day.
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>> hello there, well come to the news hour live from doha. coming up in the next 60 minutes, the fighting in syria rages on, france hosts a meeting on the conflict with western and arab allies. >> a hospital in yemen run by doctors without borders has been hit by saudi-led coalition air strikes. combing through the rubble of the earthquake, rescuers russia to get that those in need.

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