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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  October 29, 2015 7:00am-9:01am EDT

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>> a new era on capitol hill, paul ripe becoming speaker of the house. >> deputy dismissed, the officer who flipped that high school student out of her chair loses his job. >> i don't know how many times i've been to jail. i never try to keep up with that. >> a notorious jewel thief with a long arrest history is back behind bars.
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>> we're bringing corporate taxes down, bringing money back, corporate in versions. >> you want a 10% flat tax where the numbers add up. i rolled out my tax plan today at ted cruz.org. >> competing tax plans, positions on in totalments and ambitious plans was all part of the debate last night in bolder, colorado. >> i'm stephanie sy. less head to mike sell sure live in balledder. you covered the debate. what were some of the big
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takeaway's? >> people focused on ben cash son. being that it was economic, issues of business, not really quite in his wheelhouse that they would go after him. not the case. what we saw last night was trump and ben carson sort of to the side, but we did see jeb bush and jeb bush didn't have one of the nights that he wanted to remember. he tried to get on marco rubio for not having made enough votes in the senate. let's listen to this. >> a jeb, i don't remember -- well let me tell you, i don't remember you of complaining about john mccain vote record. the only reason you're doing it now is we're rung for the senate position. my campaign is going to be about the future of america, not about attacking anyone else on the stage. i will continue to have tremendous admiration and respect for governor bush.
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i'm not rung against gone bush. i'm not rung against anyone on the stage, i'm running for penalty. >> this is not one of the nights jeb bush wanted to remember. jeb bush even afterwards, surrogates were fielding answers about whether or not he would stay in the race. >> rubio, do you think there were any clear winners in this debate, because a lot of people are saying it was rubio. >> there are a lot of people and i spoke to writers last night, i didn't see it exactly that way but what people she saying about marco rubio having done so well is he came in knowing he was going to have to defend his record on votes, knowing that he would have to defend his finances, the fact that how much money he made from his book, and some of the student loans that he's had to pay. they thought marco rubio was going to have to deal with the fact that, you know, people were going to come after him, bush was going to come after him because of an article written in the newspaper in florida.
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bush did that, but marco rubio was ready, his defenses were excellent. last night, you saw some of the substantive side, and it looked to me like ted cruz and even ohio governor john kasich had answers and ideas. i think kasich was one of the winners last night. >> we need somebody who can lead. we need somebody who can balance budgets, cut taxes and frankly, i did it in washington, ohio and i will do it again in washington if i'm president to get this country moving again. >> so many people on stage, it's hard to stand out, but john kasich came out on fire. ted cruz got his tax plan out, even mike huckabee made some points. >> some of the biggest applause i noticed came when ted cruz, a harvard debater came out and attacked the media. >> yeah, the media has always been the scapegoat at some of these republican debates.
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yeah, you talk about ted cruz being a great die baiter. he showed his skills last night. whenever he honed his skills, they came out. he stopped the debate and made it turn. a lot of the questions came after every admonished the panel listen, you've got to do a better job than this, but the media always a really god target when you hear republican debates. marco rubio called the media hillary clinton's super pac. >> michael shure, live for us in boulder, thank you. >> all 10 candidates trying to show how they differed and stood on the various issues, each making claims about themselves and their competitors. >> david shuster filters through those with this fact check. >> this stuff is fantasy, just like getting rid of medicare and medicaid. >> ohio governor john kasich blasted away at his republican rivals and while it is true that ben carson once second the government get rid of medicare,
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carson said position has changed. with kasich firing away, donald trump hit back hard. >> this is the man that was a managing general partner at lehman brothers when it went down the tubes and almost took every one of us with us, including ben and myself, because i was there and i watched what happened and lehman brothers started it all. he was on the board and he was a managing general partner. >> when you talk about me being on the board of lehman brothers, i wasn't on the board of lehman brothers, i was a banker and i was proud of it. >> kasich is correct, he was not on the board, he was a managing director, one of hundreds at the organization. former neurosurgeon ben carson disputed an assertion made about his past. he denied being anything more than a paid spokesman for a controversial supplement company. >> i didn't have an involvement with them. that is total propaganda and that is what happens in our society, i did speeches for them, i did other speeches, paid
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speeches. it is absolutely, sudden to say that i had any kind of relationship with them. >> five years, be a car on credited that company with funding a multi-million dollars endowment in his honor. >> it requires two and a half million dollars to do an endowed chair and i'm proud to say that part of that two and a half million dollars came from manichek. >> there were sharp visions under social security. >> yes, we've stolen and lied to the american people. >> while mike huck and donald trump want to protect the entitlement, governor chris christie wants to cut the social security program and justified it this way. >> all that's in that trust fund is a pile of i.o.u. says and they've stolen from you, because now they know they cannot pay these benefits, because social security is going to be in solvent in eight years. >> it will not be in solvent for
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20 years and would still be able to pay partial benefits. actually the i.o.u.s are u.s. treasury notes, bonds considered the safest bet in the world. several republicans hammered president obama's economic policies. >> for the first time in 35 years, we have more businesses closing than starting. >> in fact, according to census bureau data, that trend started at the end of the bush administration. carly fiorina attacked with this. >> 92% of the jobs lost during barack obama's first term belonged to women. >> u.s. labor statistics say that's not true, and to her overall point, employment was actually higher for women and men at the end of president obama's first term than when he took office. fact check groups say the debate featured more than 20 questionable claims. >> my apologies, i'm sorry. >> somebody is doing some bad fact checking. >> a conservative political
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pundit who once ran for congress joins us live from pittsburgh. thanks for being with us. did the american public gain anything from this debate? >> absolutely. i think they are starting to get a better idea of who you can take seriously within the gop field and who is the -- >> who can they take seriously? >> i think marco rubio is a serious candidate. the republicans may have their opportunity to have their lightning in a bottle moment with marco rubio. he is showing himself to be a leader amongst his field. i think that's somebody people need to pay very much attention to. i think somebody like a jeb bush is starting to look more and more like mitt romney from 2011 with lackluster performances during the debate. i think that republicans went along with it romney because they were told he could win a general election in 2012. he didn't. i don't know if they're willing
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to go along for the same exact ride with jeb bush four years later. if he continues to look more like romney, jeb bush may not get to florida. >> who would the not serious candidates be? >> i don't know how serious dr. ben carson is. i think he's at the top of the polls but he crips to show a very shallow knowledge of the in-depth issues people want strong and focused solutions to. i think donald trump should have dominated this debate. it was an economic debate that became a food fight with the commentators. i think he will continue to crest in the polls and drop in the polls. if there was one thing he should have dominated with in the debate, it was the economy. he did none of that. as a matter of fact, he disappeared during much of the debate. that is very bad for the damaged. >> what does it say about the pros when the people who seem to get the most notice last night are getting attention because they went after the media. it was ted cruz who said the
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debate should be about issues so on the issues who appeared to be the most knowledgable? >> i think that you look at mark rook. i think he did extremely well. i think chris christie did very well for himself last night. there are plenty of republicans that said hey, this was the chris christie we wanted to run in 2012. this is why we were trying to push him into the race. he did better for himself than anticipated. i think carly fiorina did well for herself, as well. john kasich is showing himself as somebody on the second tier that shows a lot of in depth knowledge, something that you might want to take into consideration that if he doesn't win and doesn't become the guy, he might be the number two at the b.p. capped date that could bring in ohio.
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>> these are men and women that have to go face-to-face with vladimir putin of russia. who do you think did a good job? >> ted cruz showed a lot more mettle than he had done previously. i think kasich and huckabee did some good things with themselves again. you start looking at the two outsiders at the top of the polls, they should have done a lot more than they did, carson because he's the front runner and front because this was an economic debate and neither one of them shined last night the way they needed to and i think that's problematic for them. they'll continue to raise the money and get a fourth or fifth of the electorate but that's not to carry you through past south carolina. >> mr. mcallister, thank you very much. >> thank you, god bless. >> now to a very busy day ahead
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on capitol hill. the senate begins debate on the budget, the bipartisan plan pads the house wednesday. it funds the government for the next two years and extends the debt limit. on the house side, republicans are about to take to the floor to begin selecting their new speaker. lilibby casey is live on capitol hill. let's start with the budget. >> the senate is expected to pass this budget deal. that's because both leadersship on the republican side of the aisle and democratic side of the i'll support it. the key is the timing. the nation hits the debt ceiling on tuesday, so it does need to get moving here. the senate can be a deliberate, slow body. that passage is anticipated, will help calm the market and assure the nation that it will be done. >> there were republicans who voted against it. what did they not like about the
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plan? >> 2/3 of the republicans voted against this deal. some said the process was done behind closed doors with just leadership, it was secretive. others fundamentally don't like the idea of raising or suspending the debt limit. now remember, this is money that's already been spent, but they don't like this idea of just spending. there are also concerns about increasing the budget. this bill would increase spending by $80 billion over two years and some of that is in non-defense spending. we will see some dissent over in the senate this week, as they move forward, just like we saw some concerns and grumbling in the house, rand paul last night, and other presidentical candidates don't like the deal. rand paul wants to filibuster it, but that would only slow things down, not totally stop the process. >> that's the first time we've heard mention of rand paul thus far in my show. let's turn back to the speaker
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vote. what is happening there? >> we do anticipate the entire house together this morning and elect speaker of the house. paul ryan got the nod behind closed doors yesterday. that was a secret vote, people could cast a ballot in private. he got about 200 republicans in his support. there were some who voted for a much more conservative, i guess you could say, although really, paul ryan is conservative, as well, more hard line tea party type candidate, but it is anticipated today that all those republicans will stand behind paul ryan and he should get the 218 votes he needs. we talked to jim jordan last night head of the freedom caucus and he said i'm going to support paul ryan. watch for them to become the house speaker and we'll hear from john boehner, who can be emotional at times. we anticipate he will give his last speech on the floor as he prepares to wrap up his career. >> live for us on capitol hill,
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good to do so you, casey. >> dennis hastert facing six months in jail pleading guilty to trying to evade federal banking laws, admitting that he withdrew money in small increments, trying to avoid reported withdrawals, the $3.5 million going to a former student. it was allegedly hush money to hide undisclosed misconduct. he will be sentenced in february. >> it will be a month before the fed considers raising interest rates. the central bank deciding to keep rates near zero. in a statement, it said that rates could go up in december during its last meeting of the year. that decision sparked a rally on wall street, but this morning, stock futures are mixed. >> the south carolina sheriff said deputy fired for throwing a student to the ground said he will cooperate with the investigation, but his lawyer insists the deputy ben fields' actions were justified. the f.b.i. and justice department are now looking into what fields did in that classroom and the sheriff said it broke the department's rules.
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>> he picked a student up and threw the student across the room. that is not a proper technique and should not be used in law enforcement and based on that, that is a violation of our policy and approximately 20 minutes ago, school resource officer ben fields was terminated. >> the linebacker for the student said she is recovering from a broken arm and other injuries. >> thousands of students in illinois are out of school again this morning. their teachers have been on strike for nearly a month, al jazeera's diane esterbrook reports that it's a community that can ill afford this standoff. >> east st. louis teachers walked out of their classrooms october 1, furious over a tentative contract that would have nearly doubled the time it takes them to reach the top salary scales from 11 years to 21. >> there's been an atmosphere since this strike began of the
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administration telling the teachers what to do. we expect you to go back and vote on something you already voted down. >> east st. louis is one of illinois' poor evident communities. half its residents live below the poverty line. the state took over the school district four years ago because of poor performance. district spokeswoman kelly hawk said teachers salaries need to be reigned in to avoid potential layoffs and program cuts. >> we're not in a position to raise the taxes for the community, and we already are experiencing challenges keeping up with taxes which are higher than our surrounding areas. we want to make sure that again we're making a decision that is best first for our students, for the teachers of the district and we have to consider the entire community. >> the students probably won't miss that much time in the classroom, because the school year will be extended. the problem is, they may not be as well prepared for standardized achievement tests
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in the spring. >> community organizations like the christian activity center are filling the void, tutoring kids in math, reading and other subjects. still, high school junior said the strike has taken a toll on her and her friends. >> i don't think i'm going to be as motivated, because like -- because the school is like -- like, no offense, people think of it as a filing system, so it's like -- i don't think school is taken seriously. >> some teachers say students could be the big losers in the long run if they give in to the district's demands. >> my fear is that our district will not be able to retain teachers, because it's going to take them too long to -- they'll crawl to the finish line. >> the teachers thought they were close to resolving the dispute tuesday night, but talks broke off. they'll resume again thursday. diane esterbrook, al jazeera, east st. louis, illinois.
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>> general motors and the united auto workers union now close to a contract agreement, the union signed off, it now goes for the rank and file. the deal calls for wage increases, signing bonuses and improved health care. there are 52,000e.a.w. members at g.m. >> when we come back, desperate scenes. >> move! move! move! >> chaos and confusion in greece after a boat carrying more than 200 refugees sinks. >> sandy, three years later. we go back to a community that still hasn't fully recovered. >> there are calls to help developing nations as tuberculosis passes h.i.v. on the list of most infectious diseases.
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>> china is ending it's one-child policy. families will be allowed to have two children each, part of the efforts to manage china's slowing economy. china's one-child policy has been in place now for more than 30 years. >> in the greek islands, zebs may still be missing after a boat capsized carrying refugees. the greek coast guard rescue the nearly 250 people, but several others, including two the boys, drowned. we have more. >> the fishing boats emerged
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from the darkness, racing into port with no time to lose. huddled on the dock wrappedding blankets, tarps and anything else the crew could find, survivors of yet another tragic sinking in the aegean. they looked unable to decide whether to smile or wop. then the volunteers, medics spraining into action. >> ok, here we go. >> a young child was among the first to be passed ashore, apparently unharmed, but shocked into silence. many were much, much worse. in the darkness, it was transformed into an emergency triage center, strewn with blankets. volunteers tended to the survivors who looked to be suffering severe hypothermia and shock.
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some appeared to be slipping away, despite the best efforts of specialist medics. >> i'm checking for a pulse. >> wait, wait, wait. >> here, move! move! >> a child wrapped in blankets are the transported to hospital in the arms of a paramedic. other survivors were able to walk. the small greek island of lesbos has been receiving 5,000, 6,000, 7,000 migrants every day this summer. this is not the first sinking tragedy here. the residents are deeply affected by it. >> babies are drowning. i am 67 years old and i can't hold back my tears. of course, it is a big state that must help. because we are small and unable to do so, we can't do the job. the people drowning are our own blood. yes, we are sorry, but what else
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can we do? shame. >> more boats arrived with more survivors, these in apparently better condition. like so many sinkings this year, the true total of fatalities from this latest tragedy may never be known. paul brennan, al jazeera. >> germany is criticizing austrias latest plan to control the flow of migrants with a fence. they intend to build the structure along slovenia. 10,000 people a day have crossed that border. the fence would be the first between two members of europe's passport free zone. more than 700,000 refugees have arrived in europe this year. >> more violence in hebron, a palestinian man shot and killed. police say he stabbed an israeli soldier in the head. that soldier is expected to survive. at least 65 palestinians and nine israelis have died in this violence that began just last month. >> seeking a solution to the war in syria. >> john kerry joins world leaders, including from iran, os
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talks begin to end the fighting. what has scientists worried about el niño and should some cities be better prepared for what's to come.
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>> a live look this morning at the cathedral in croatia, the tallest building in the country. 12:30 right now, just after lunch. >> taking a look at today's top stories. the republican presidential candidates are back on the campaign trail after their debate. the candidates confronted each other and the mad raters. this morning, most political observers say marco rubio emerged as the big winner. >> the house is expected to choose paul rake to be the next speaker. he was nominated to replace john boehner. he is the chairman of the ways and means committee. >> the south carolina police officer fired after a video showed him throwing a student to the ground has promised to cooperate with the investigation. the f.b.i. is now looking into ben fields for possible civil
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rights violations. his lawyer insists the deputy's actions were justified. >> this morning, there's a new effort underway to end the war in syria. secretary of state john kerry is in vienna this morning opinion he and other world leaders are going to be holding talks and for the first time iran is going to take part. al jazeera is live in vienna. wednesday, kerry saying finding a political solution to this crise is like charting a course ouch hell. with that as a backdrop, what do the word leaders hope to accomplish? >> these world leaders are trying to come together and get past their differences and affect some kind of a political solution for the war in syria. this has been extremely difficult. every time in the past four years when world leaders, when diplomats have gotten together, it has been most of the time a
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deadlock, because different powers back different factions of the syrian civil war. now this time, it's different, because iran is going to be there for the first time tomorrow, as you mentioned. the fact is today, you have a setting of the stage for what's going to happen tomorrow. let's not forget, though, that about 40 months ago in 2012, accords were reached in geneva to try to come up with a political solution, a transition of power, political pros going forward in syria, and even though that agreement was reached, it still hasn't yielded anything, any type of change on the ground in syria. just when month alone because of increased fighting, including airstrikes by the russians, there have been at least 120,000 newly internally displaced people in parts of syria. even though these talks are on going now, you have this humanitarian crisis that is
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still continue to go spiral out of control on the ground there in syria. >> much of this debate, much of this conflict is sectarian in nature, sunni versus shia, so what can iran bring to the conversation? >> it's rear big deal that iran hob invited here, showing the shift especially after the nuke dole was reached just a few months back. now the u.s. is happy to the iranians are coming along easier. the fact is that doesn't mean it's not going to be contentious. you have the iranians and saudis that are going to be here. saudi arabia is going to be here. it is going to be a big bridge that they are going to have to try to overcome when it comes to
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syria. the fact that you have the u.s., the turks here and the saudis backing the syrian opposition and iranians and russians, the primary sponsors of the regime of bashar al assad. since it's been announced that iran would partake in these discussions for the first time, it seems to have yielded some type of softening in tones from the americans as far as if they would be ok with syrian president bashar al assad perhaps continuing in power if some sort of transitional government were reached, some sort of an agreement for a transitional government, still, these are going to be very tough discussions. this is an important moment as far as diplomacy for the syrian civil war, but it's going to be very difficult to get all those various parties and delegations to come to one type of agreement, and even if an agreement is reached, how can it be implemented and how will that yield any type of result in syria where it has just continued to get so much worse
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every day and every year since that civil war began. >> which is why secretary of state john kerry said it is charting a course out of hell. muhammed, as always, thank you very much. >> as world leaders try to get diplomacy back object track, i want to turn back to the plight of syrian refugees. a correspondent traveled with refugees over seven countries and wrote about it for the huffington post and joins us now from istanbul. your series is called 1,000 miles in their shoes. how many miles did you walk with them and was the journey as perilous as you feared? several months ago, they were walking the entire journey, it was thousands of miles long and they walked the entire route. when i did it in august, most of by train or bus. we would walk a dozen miles at a time, several miles here and there, but even then, it was
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incredibly difficult. it was difficult for me and people with young children and the elderly and it was indeed perilous. >> it strikes me how young the children are. two of the children that died in the boat has capsized last night in the aegean were toddlers, you wrote about a family with a baby 15 days old, as somebody that carried a newborn in her arms. how do the mothers manage? they have to manage. they don't have anything behind them. they have to keep going. they carry these babies and hope that they will have a better future ahead of them, even if that means risking death. i met so many people with young children, the children often really didn't understand, but they were so brave. i met many women who were pregnant, eight and 90 months pregnant who made this journey in hopes they could give birth in a german or swedish hospital. >> this is a tougher question. i know you met some former free
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syrian army fighters. did you encounter rebel fighters who were al-qaeda or isil affiliate and do you suspect they are among those entering europe? >> i did not meet any. i met one man who said he was originally f.s.a. in syria. i'm sure there were people who either agreed with isis or al-qaeda. i did not meet them, but i've heard rumors of them. there are people with many different believes making this trip and many people were pro revolution or anti assad, but some people expressed doubt whether or not the revolution was worth it. they said look, we have to leave our home, we have nothing anymore, was it worth it. >> some of the more heart neck moments you reported on are the volunteers in greece that are greeting these refugees. where do they come from and what is driving them? >> a lot of them are locals. a lot live there, especially on
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the greek islands and they see these rubber dingies coming in every day. now, there are dozens of people, or dozens of boats and thousands of people coming every day. they are people who own hotels and cafes who say look, we can't sit and do nothing. these people come here desperate. now they have hypothermia. there's a good chance they may die on the beach because it's so cold on the water at night now. others are tourists who came during the summer and saw these refugees and actually extended their stays. i met lots of people on the way. others, i met people who said their greek grandparents actually went to syria when they were young, and they remember that, and they have to give back, because they sacrificed. >> the human side of this story with sofia jones, thank you. >> two examples of how powerful reporting can change the equation in this case, talking about the refugees and that piece that we saw from paul
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brennan just a short while ago. >> military officials this morning trying to figure out how you a blimp broke loose from moorings and caused serious damage in the u.s. it floated away in maryland, drifting 150 miles. it knocked down power lines, causing power outages for tens of thousands of people. finally, it landed in this field in pennsylvania. that blimp is one of two set up to detect missile attacks. both are now grounded. >> the top national aviation industry banning shipments of batteries on passenger planes. some batteries can stop in-flight fires. it is up to quiche country whether to follow the recommend is as. the u.s., rush and china as well as airline pilots and aircraft manufacturers have voted in favor of that ban. >> it was three years ago today that super storm candy swept across new york, new jersey and connecticut, devastating several
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communities. it has become the costliest storm in u.s. history. three years later, many people are still waiting to rebuild their homes. al jazeera is live this morning on staten island, one of the places worst hit by that storm. what's it been like for the people you talked to there? >> well, steph, they're telling me it's been a long process, i'm standing on an empty lot where houses used to stand. the water came up to about eight feet along this whole block and you can see right behind me some homes that have yet to be demolished. those properties are sold to the government to convert into wetlands. many homeowners decided to keep their properties and we spoke to one couple who say they are still waiting for their house to be rebuilt. >> this was our living, dining room, which is now a big storage unit. >> the rebuilding of allison and claire watson's home hasn't started yet. >> the water line was about five feet. that was just the water line.
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>> the couple escaped through this bedroom window. when they came back, this is what the inside looked like once the water receded. >> it's a nightmare. >> it's been quite a roller coaster. >> is this something you think about every day? >> every day, because i'm making a phone call or checking an email. >> with the help of volunteers, they cloned out their home, started repairs on the house, gutting the inside. that stopped the day fema told them they had to elevate they're entire home or built a new one higher up. >> three years later and you're going to demolish this. >> right. >> and build a new one. >> it will be like day one, this is what we should have done from the first day. >> rebuild has been a struggle for them and hundreds of other families. new york city estimates nearly 1200 of the ruthly 1900 construction projects begun over the last year have been completed, and about 60% of families who applied for reimbursements received their money. >> for years to come, we're going to working on resiliency,
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but a lot of folks have finally been served and their lives getting better and we will not stop until every family is served. >> claire and allison certainly hope so. they expect to wait another year before their home is rebuilt. >> do you blame anyone? >> anyone? there's so much to go around. there's no one person to blame, no one organization. there's no one piece of government. it's a shared blame all around. >> on the third anniversary of sandy, they're still waiting and hoping to reclaim what they knew before the storm. >> it's a day to commemorate, memorialize to people that we lost and we are grateful to have our lives, but it's still another reminder we are still not whole yet. we are living with pieces. stuff of ours is here and there and everywhere and we're not together like it should be. >> the residents tell me part of the delays have had to do with not just the amount of paperwork they've had to fill out, the agencies they've had to deal with but also the new
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regulations for rebuilding. many houses have to be up five to seven feet, elevated and rebuilt with new materials, so there's a whole new set have codes. >> the question of future prevention, what type of protection is being built along the shoreline to protect water from coming in the way it did during sandy? >> well, the army corps of engineers is expected to build a sea wall that's going to be a buried sea wall, some 20 feet high. it's going to cost up to $600 million, but that construction isn't expect to start until 2018. it will last three years. it is expected to add some protection around this area, though. >> reporting from staten island, thank you. >> forecasters are saying we in the middle of the worst el niño season on record. los angeles is getting ready for flooding and mudslides. as jennifer london reports, not everyone agrees on the best way to get ready. >> this is where i cannot get
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across to go home. >> i've never seen this before. >> this is southern california after just one brief storm, a warm up for what scientists are calling a godzilla el niño. >> i was thinking about i was going to go out of the sun roof to get on top of the vehicle. >> roads closed, homes swamped with mud, cars swept away, a deadly storm forecasters say should be a warning. >> mod did you say on that randy for el niño is floods, mudslides and general mayhem. >> it is predicted this winter's el niño, ocean warming that typically brings wetter, stronger storms could break records these drainage basins were cleaned out. four of los angeles county's 14
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flood control dams have excessive amounts of dirt and debris that have built up behind them from past rains, putting cities like pasadena at risk. >> pasadena is home to the rose bowl, a sporting event. it was built as a flood control channel. if el niño brings more rain than the channel can handle, the stadium and 500 homes downstream will be in the direct path of potential flooding. >> devil gate dam feeds into that flood control channel. the county wanted to remove more than 2 million cubic yards of sediment, enough to fill more than 600 olympic size swimming pools, but environmental groups sued, saying bringing in heavy equipment and dump trucks would increase pollution and disturb neighborhoods and wildlife. downstream, at these stables. >> i think in this case, we
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should have done something. if we can avoid a disaster. we have 110 horses here, and it's going to be quite a difficult task to get them all situated. >> it's too late to do anything, because el niño's right around the corner. >> the irony with this possible godzilla el niño, for years, californians have been wishing for rain, now too much of a good thing could swamp the state in a matter of months. jennifer london, al jazeera, los angeles. >> almost on cue, there's a major storm system moving across the country raising flood concerns again. nicole mitchell, good morning. >> good morning. we will see another storm in the northwest in a couple days, but we've also had flood concerns, although pretty minor especially along the coast where the wind and the rain are combining to cause problems, turning up some of those ocean waters, but a lot of rain moved through, getting on the backside of that, still
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wrapping around, though, northern parts of minnesota, cold enough air now, there's snow in the arrowhead and high winds are in effect for a lot of today. where you see the areas of brown and tacker oranges, we could see gusts in the 20-30-mile per hour range, gusting up to 50 miles per hour. there's a very big contrast of where that front has gone through. it has almost made it to the coastline, but not yet. ahead of that, temperatures in the 70s, if you have the 70's today, watch a 15-20-degree drop for tomorrow. that's one system. the other, we've had one pull through the west coast and another one is on its heels. washington state over the next three days, possibly a foot of rain. this one that is now pulling over the rockies is going to get us another concern. this gets reorganized on the other side of the mountain, gets the gulf moisture and this could bring more rain to texas. not like last week and this past
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weekend, but when you're talking three or four widespread inches and we're already saturated, that could be a problem. heading forward, this is where that lines up for halloween, so you might want to cover some of those kiddies before you send them out the door. >> thank you. keeping on the theme of rain, one of the world's dryest landscapes has burst into bloom. a desert in chile has that done a transformation. >> a carpet of color off an arid land. the desert has sprung to life, the most spectacular growth seen in two decades. >> we've not had such large flowering in the past 18 years. in 2010, we had a large flowering, but this year has passed all the previous ones. >> this life comes from this tragedy, torrential storms devastated northern chile in
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august. because mudslides and rivers were so swollen, they burst their banks. 28 people died. the rains have watered the seeds of more than 200 different exotic plants lying dormant for years. they in turn have attracted birds, in sects, lizards, and rodents. for some locals, like ramon cortez, it's an unforgettable experience. >> for us, it was a miracle, because i'd never seen what the grass looks like until now. >> it's fascinating tourists. >> it's unusual, surreal. wove come from having breakfast with the flowers. >> the flowers will eventually die as the intense dry heat soaks up the remaining ground water. until then, the desert is bursting with life. al jazeera. >> hmm. pretty. >> doris payne, remember her? her latest brush with the law.
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>> she's the 85-year-old spending decades stealing high end jewelry. here's the question. did she come out of retirement? >> the one simple diet change doctors say can yield enormous benefits for children in just days.
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>> more evidence cutting back on sugar can affect your health. obese who cut sugar in take had better blood pressure and cholesterol in just 10 days. sugary foods contribute to type two diabetes and metabolic diseases. >> tuberculosis passing aids as the number one cause of death according to the world health organization. they say it's not because of more cases, just better reporting. 9.6 million case worldwide, health experts say there is a
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lack of access to care, even here in the u.s. driving up those infections. >> one of the things that was being proposed so president obama, his administration had rolled out a plan to address antibiotic resistant bacteria in march, and another plan to focus on t.b. unfortunately, the adding pulled back on that. they aren't with him to commit the resources and political will to move forward with that. >> the world health organization now asking for $3 billion for improved research for treatment into tuberculosis. >> there is a recall for injectors. the concern is that they might not deliver the right amount of a life saving drug. >> this morning, she is back in jail again. ate 5-year-old doris payne, one
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of the most prolific jewel thieves in history is again charged with stealing from an that he didn't jewelry store. >> when doris payne was 83, she promised to retire for good. on friday, the nor tore i couldn't say jewel they've, now 85 allegedly broke her promise and once again broke the law. >> court orders specifically say you cannot be in sak's fifth avenue. >> you can't be in this mall. >> she stole earrings from a different store. she was charged with shoplifting and held in jail. >> she's a thief. she has got a nice way about her, a nice mapper. >> the grandmother has been stealing jewels for six decades. >> well, a notorious jewel thief has struck again. >> if you know the jewelry robbery world, she certainly would be in the hall of fame. >> after jailed in 2005 in las
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vegas, payne declared she was done. in 2010, she was caught again. >> i'm accused of walking out of macy's department store with a diamond ring, a carat and a half, $8,000. >> she was convicted and sent to jail, but after her release in 2013, doris payne was arrested and jailed for stealing a $22,000 ring in san diego. she was reds in 2014. she's made no attempt to shun the spotlight. in 2013, she participated in a documentary called the life and times of doris payne. >> jailed for doris is just part of her business. >> i don't really know how many times i've been to jail. i know i never went to jail and stayed. >> this time it might be different. >> she is a character.
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not even fiction could make that up. >> it looks like the royals are back in command of the world series, they won, shutting down the mets, taking a two game to none lead. the night belonged to royals starter johnny cueto. he threw a complete game as the royals crossed to a 7-1 win. game three will be in new york on friday. >> paul ryan will become the next speaker of the house. he wants to change the process, but he may have a tough time holding his appeared together. >> presidential hope was sparring over the economy and the records, but was everything they said truthful? stephanie and irback in two minute witness more news of your word this morning. this morning. >> tough that the country gave up on me. >> look at the trauma... every day is torture. >> this is our home. >> nobody should have to live
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like this. >> we made a promise to these heroes... this is one promise americans need to keep.
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>> many republicans came out against the spending measure this morning. the gop appears united in their choice for house speaker. libby casey is live on cap hill. paul ryan's spokesman calls this a new day. is today's vote just a formality. >> because the republican caucus is fractured, nothing is a done
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deal until the, inc. is dry. we are getting a clear signal from the conservative republicans who pushed back against paul ryan that they will support him today. you can expect him to become the 62nd speaker of the house. >> congressman paul ryan may not have sought the job but by wednesday afternoon was sounding like the next speaker of the house. >> we are turning the page. we are not going to have a house that looks like it looked the last few years. we are going to move forward. >> republicans voted behind closed doors in a secret ballot wednesday, coo choosing to mom night ryan at speaker with 200 in favor. daniel webster of florida was far behind with fewer votes. three weeks ago, ryan said he wouldn't run for speaker. >> are you going to run for speaker? >> republicans pressed him to
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step up after majority leader kevin mccarthy dropped his bid for speaker, sending the caucus into disarray. ryan agreed, but on his own terms. >> i cannot and will not give up my family time i may not be on the road as much as other speakers, but i pledge to make up for it with a clear path for our visions. >> he has a run for vice president under a romney ticket under his belt. ryan worked across party lines two years ago with democratic senator patty murray on a budget deal and some in the
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conservative freedom caucus worry he's too similar to john boehner. boehner pushed for a bipartisan deal on the budget and debt ceiling, hoping to give paul ryan a fresh start. >> i made it clear a month ago when i announced that i was leaving that i wanted to do my best to clean the barn. i didn't want him to walk into a dirty barn full of you know what. i did my best to try to clean it up. >> ryan complained about the budget negotiating pros but ultimately said he would support the deal. even with a clean barn, ryan has a tough job ahead. he inherits the same fractured republican caucus that pushed john boehner to step down and a charged political climate heading into the 2016 elections. >> we are essential hearing the republican candidates for president push and criticize congress. ryan will have to deal with that, as well as some other big battles, even though a lot of the national focus is on the campaign trail, there are still some key items that have to be dealt with over the next few
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months. they will be on paul ryan's plate. >> the question is how clean really is the barn. back to this budget deal we're talking about, that a lot of republicans had problems with it. what were some of their issues and are problems expected when the senate votes? >> two thirds of house republicans voted against the budget deal, saying they didn't like how it was done behind closed doors. they don't like that it lifts or suspends the debt limit for two years and they also have concerns about additional spending on non-defense items. despite that concern, we do expect it to get through the senate, because the republican leadership in the senate as well as the democratic leadership support this. the senate can be a deliberate slow body with you bedo anticipate passage, which is key, because the nation hits its debt limit next week. >> live for us on capitol hill, thank you. >> that race for the white house, republican presidential
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canned daylights on the trail again. >> personal rivalries were also on display. jonathan betz takes a look at some of the biggest moments. >> the night began with the undercard featuring four candidates trying to break out of lower tier status and maybe make it to the main stage. it boiled down to who would best be suited to take on hillary clinton in a general election. >> i am trying to solve a problem and win an election. i am tired of losing. good god, look who we're running against, the number one candidate on the other side thought she was flat broke after her and her husband were in the white house for eight years. the number two guy went to the soviet union on his honeymoon and i don't think he ever came back. >> the focus was economics and finance, but disagreements over the moderator's question dominated the night. >> is this a comic book version? >> it's not. >> when pressed about his attendance record in the senate,
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marco rubio called out one mad rater or buys. >> in 2008, barack obama missed 60 or 70% of the vote. this is an example of the double standard that exists between the mainstream media. >> in a discussion over rejecting a democratic compromise that would raise the nation's debt limit and prevent a government shutdown, senator ted cruz went on the attack, his sentiments echoed by the audience. >> this is not a cage match. if you look at the questions, donald trump, are you a comic book villain. can you do math, john kasich, how about talking about the substantive issues people care about. >> in a question about whether or not fantasy sports should be considered gambling. >> we have 90 there trillion dollars in debt, people out of work, we have isis and al-qaeda attacking us and we're talking about fantasy football? >> aside from very heated moments between moderators and
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candidates, the gop main stage zeroed in on their top rival, hillary clinton. >> it is the height of hypocrisy for mrs. clinton to talk about being the first woman president when every single policy she espouses and every single policy of president obama has been demonstrably bad for women. >> on climate change, christie positioned himself as the best person to favors against clinton. >> what we don't do is do what hillary clinton and john kerry and barack obama want to do, put more taxes on it, give more money to washington, d.c. and then they'll fix it. >> one of the more interesting exchanges of the night occurred between january kasich and donald trump, the discussion over how trump would solve the nation's budget crise and ben carson's tax plan. >> you can't do it with empty promises. you know, these plans would put us trillions and trill yobs of dollars in debt, folks, we got to wake up.
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we cannot elect somebody that doesn't know how to do the job. you've got to pick somebody who has experience, somebody who has the know how, the discipline. >> both trump and carson have repeatedly been challenged about their lack of experience. trump responded with this. >> he was so nice, he was such a nice guy, and he said oh, i'm never going to talk, but then his poll numbers tank, that's why he's on the end, and he got nasty. >> the next gop debate will be in just a few weeks in milwaukee, wisconsin, another chance for the candidates to contrast themselves from one another and prove why they should be the nominee. jonathan betz, al jazeera. >> al jazeera's political correspondent michael shure is live for us in boulder, colorado this morning and yes, those are bags under his eyes. michael, there were heated moments last night, who had the most to prove? >> i guess i have the most to prove. i would say the heated moments last night did come from jeb bush and from marco rubio as to
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who had the most to prove. a lot of people wanted to see jeb bush coming out of the pow wow with his family talking to them about what to do with his campaign. he went after marco rubio. when he did, on his attendance record, on his voting record in the senate, here's what ensued. >> jeb, i don't remember -- well, let me tell you, i don't remember you ever complaining about john kerry's vote record. you're doing it now because we're running for the same position and someone convinced you to attacking me is going to help you. here's the bottom line, my campaign is going to be about the future of america, not about attacking anyone else on the stage. i will continue to have tremendous admiration and respect for governor bush. i'm not running against govern bush or anyone on the stage. i'm running for president. >> i talked to michael steele, the former head of the republican party, himself a bush supporter. i said what happened, why did that happen? michael steele said to me i think that jeb just picked the
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wrong fight. a lot of the fights that happened last night were with the media. a lot of people looked at the debate and it was mentioned that jonathan's package, as well, when you hear the way that the republicans were talking about it, they said cnbc dropped the ball. the head of the r.n.c. tweeted this out, saying in spite of the moderators, i'm proud of our team for standing up against the improper and unprofessional display put object by cnbc. that distracted from a lot of it. you talk about who had a lot to proof, cnbc had a lot to prove, but jeb bush didn't get done what he needed to get done. >> jeb bush was the man to beat, now the polls have him far behind carson and donald trump, dr. ben carson. how did they do last night? >> donald trump and ben carson had different debates, ben carson coming as a doctor to a debate that was billed as your
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money, your vote. people thought this is where he would be vulnerable. he wasn't tested. that frustrated the bush people and trump people. for the most part, he defended himself on bankruptcy and he was not the centerpiece of this debate. i spoke to both of them after the debate. >> when they got to the question, i said does that mean that you're not paying attention, just crazy stuff like that. i'm finding that across the nation, because you'll notice that everyday there are 10 new articles saying carson said this or carson said that, but the people aren't paying attention to it, and that's good. >> mr. trump, what do you think about the way the debate went from having to catch ben carson in the race? >> i think we won. well, we're number one, by the way. i think we won the debate, according to everybody, it seems we won the debate. >> that's exactly what donald trump says after every debate, so it's no surprise that i think
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trump just by the way jeb bush and marco rubio the day after and last night, it was not the win for donald trump that others might have been. >> by the way, you look great. michael, thanks. >> all right. it will be at least another month before the fed raises interest rates, at least another month. the central bank wednesday decided to keep rates near zero, but in the statement said rates could go up in december during it's last meeting of the year. the decision sparked a rally on wall street, but this morning futures are mixed. >> the commerce democratic will release a big economic measure, third quarter g.d.p. patricia sobga will be here to tell us what those numbers mean. >> there's an new effort underway to end the war in syria. talks are being held about ending that four year conflict. iran will be taking part, but tehran is at odds with the u.s.
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over removing bashar al assad from power. al jazeera has the details. >> elite iranian forces have been training, fighting and dying alongside syrian troops since at least 2012. that's proof, according to the obama administration that tehran is trying to keep president bashar al assad in power. now, world leaders are about to meet in vienna in a search to an end to the civil war. ran's foreign minister will be among them. the u.s. has finally agreed iran should be at the table. >> the challenge that we face in syria today is nothing less than to chart a course out of hell. >> u.s. secretary of state john kerry has long accused iran of destabilizing syria, but in light of the waves of syrian families trying to escape the civil war, and isil takeover of key northern territory, kerry says now's the time for all concerned to meet. >> at the end of the day,
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nothing would do more to bolster a fight against daish that a political transition that sidelines assad so that we can unite more of the country against extremism. >> officials say the u.s.'s decision to engage with tehran should be a surprise. >> the secretary is a pragmatist on this. he's looking at this with a very clear eye. it's our expectation that people will come to this meeting with serious intention about solving syria's problems. >> some believe it could be forcing it finally to talks. >> i think sitting at the negotiating table to find a dialogue and a way out of the syrian crise by dialogue and politics, i think that is because it doesn't want to lose anymore commanders. >> the russian foreign minister
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sergey lavrov will be in vienna because of his countries financial and military supported for assad. u.s. officials are looking for serious intentions from lavrov, as well. >> they're probably going to find in the very near future since they're not going to be able to resolve this militarily that they want to think about a political resolution. >> there won't be any leaders of the syrian opposition attending the vienna meeting, mainly because u.s. officials don't think they're unidentified, a sign the obama administration is willing to go only so far right now. >> police in indianapolis are still looking this morning for the gunman who opened fire in a target store. police say he and another man started shouting and then he pulled out a gun. two women were hit with stray bullets. all are expected to survive. police say the two men apparently knew each other. >> please in tennessee closer to arresting a man wanted in connection with shooting an officer if that two people who
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know him were taken into custody wednesday. they were found driving a car that was belied to belong to cook. cook has been on the run since saturday, shutting down schools and businesses in that area. >> stormy weather in the northeast. let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchell for the forecast. >> there was time with the rain coming down and the wind, it almost felt like you were in a tropical storm. you weren't, but hopefully everything on the patio was battened down. you can see a spiral with the low pressure in the atmosphere. because it was such a strong area of low pressure, that ratchets up the wind. the heaviest rain has moved out, but there are still remnant bands. you get on the backside of this, the coldest side where the air is coming in directly from canada. i've seen a couple of snowflake reports in minnesota.
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temperatures in the midwest will only go up a degree. on the front side of this, still showers in that forecast, but the wind, although it's slowly dying down through the day is still going to be a gusty day with high wind warn ins up or at least the advisories up for parts of the region, so watch oh for that. temperatures, the front hasn't quite made it to the like that yet, behind that, look at the 50s, so everyone will see colder temperatures by the time we get into the day tomorrow and in terms of temperatures for the rest of the beyond, southward, you get even a few 80's and we're expecting more rain in seattle, 60 degrees. >> thank you. >> general motors and the united auto workers are closer to a labor agreement this morning. it will now go to the rank and file for a vote. the deal calls for wage increases, signing bonuses and improved health care. there are 52,000u.a.w. members
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at g.m. >> the republicans who want to be president laying out their economic plans last night and the debate got feisty. >> how much which what they said was true? we'll fact check the candidates. tes. >> in stat enisland, new york, three years after super storm sandy and some residents still can't get back into their homes. the only way to get better is to challenge yourself,
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and that's what we're doing at xfinity. we are challenging ourselves to improve every aspect of your experience. and this includes our commitment to being on time. every time. that's why if we're ever late for an appointment, we'll credit your account $20. it's our promise to you.
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we're doing everything we can to give you the best experience possible. because we should fit into your life. not the other way around. >> questions that have been asked so far in this debate illustrate why the american people don't trust the media.
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>> the democrats have the ultimate super pac. it's called the mainstream media. >> no, john, you want me to answer or do you want to answer? how are we going to do this? because i got to tell you the truth, even in new jersey, what you're doing is called rude. >> that is total propaganda and this is what happens in our society. >> is this a comic book verse of a presidential campaign. >> no, and it's not a very nicely asked question the way you say that. >> candidates made it clear there were a lot of questions that they did not like. several questions prompting interesting and at times inaccurate statements. john greenburg is a staff writer for pundit fact and joins us from washington. great to see you. let's start with this question posed to donald trump. >> we talked about marco rubio. i think you called him his
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personal senator. >> i never said that. another gentleman in florida happens to be a very nice guy. >> my apologize, i'm sorry. >> somebody is doing really bad fact checking. >> this is a question about whether trump has called rubio facebook accept tore. who's tell the truth? >> well, quick, the moderator was telling the truth, and the truth actually lies in donald trump's website. if you go to his website, unless they've taken it down this morning, last night it was there, in his section on immigration, he definitively calls marco rubio zuckerberg's personal senator, and so that's donald trump's website. he can deny it, but in fact, it was interesting despite his equip for somebody not doing good fact checking, he is not reading his own website.
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>> ben core san and his tie to say a controversial nutritional supplement company, carson said linking him to the company man attack is propaganda, but check out this commercial. >> i began to recognize that yes, traditional medicine is good, but also, you know, looking at some addition of natural products. >> so this is a commercial. how can he say he didn't have a relationship with this company? >> well, i suppose mr. carson has to answer that question for himself. our job as fact checker is simply to go back to the record, so that's what we did. he said he didn't have a relationship. in fact, he had an ongoing relationship, and spoke highly of the company and its products and so forth. i think that if one listens to more of it, you hear him couching his enforcement, if you
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will, in somewhat qualified terms, but, you know, he comes across as a very sincere man and he clearly liked the product, and he clearly was associating his name with the product. i would call that involvement. i think most people would. >> i guess it depends how you define relationship. >> i want to ask about the media. let's listen to one exchange. >> ok. it's a question about why you're having difficulty and i want to ask you in this context. ben bernanke who was appointed fed chairman by your brother no longer considers himself a republican because the republican party has given in to no nothingism. is that why you're having a difficult time? >> the great majority of republicans and americans believe in a hopeful future. they don't believe in building walls and a pessimistic view of the future. they're concerned that washington is to dysfunctional
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it's holding them back. >> i was really interested in that question, because the republicans came out ant r.n.c. saying these moderators were biased. i know you like to deal in the realm of fact, do you feel like these moderators were biased in their questioning? >> well, i can't speak directly to whether or not they have any bias. i do think that the moderators clearly had a hard time controlling the people on stage, and there's something to be said for establishing a tone and keeping regular order in place, but, you know, i do find it troublesome and i think we all should, when rather than answering questions, and it was not an unreasonable question,
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the response is to attack the person asking the question, and very often in those exchanges when that happens, you never got an answer to the substantive question whatsoever. i think we have to be very careful when we see people attacking the media. in general, journalists are trying to do a fair and square job and the question of attacking the media plays very well with the republican base. >> some of the loudest applause of the night, yeah. we'll have to leave it there. thank you for your insights this morning. >> we're not perfect, that's for sure. pushing diplomacy in syria. >> the u.s. and its allies sitting down with russia and iran trying to end the war there. could the equation be complicated? complicated?
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>> tough that the country gave up on me. >> look at the trauma... every day is torture. >> this is our home. >> nobody should have to live like this. >> we made a promise to these heroes... this is one promise americans need to keep. >> welcome back to your world this morning. now 8:30 eastern time, taking a look at your top stories this hour. paul ryan is expected to become the next speaker of the house.
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the house voting today. ryan is already the chair of the ways and means committee, a position he has to give up to become speaker. >> the republicans who want to be president are regrouping this morning after their latest faceoff. last night's debate focused on the economy and taxes. this morning, most political observers say former senator marco rubio emerged as the big winner. >> china is ending its one-child policy, saying the ruling communist party will now allow families to have two children each. that move is part of the government efforts to manage china's slowing economy. the one-child policy has been in place for more than 30 years. >> secretary of state john kerry is in vienna this morning, he and other world leaders are trying to find a way to end syria's civil war. for the first time iran is taking part in the talks. we are live in vienna. put into context for us the significance of iran's involvement during these talks.
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>> stephanie, it's a very big deal that iran is here, primarily because iran is one of the primary backers, sponsors of syrian president bashar al assad's regime, the other backer being of course russia. over the past four years, there have been meetings such as the one taking place today and tomorrow here in vienna and they haven't yielded any kind of result on the ground in syria that would result in an ending to the humanitarian crise or an ending or slowing down of the fighting in syria, as well. now you have iran, which is more involved in diplomacy in this region, especially after the iranian nuclear deal from just a few months back opinion the fact that the u.s. was willing to allow iran to be invited this time, even though in the past, they had ensured that iran was disinvited show the kind of power that iran is yielding now.
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whether it will make any difference here at the table tomorrow, that is yet to be seen, but it is a very big deal that they are here. >> at the heart of the summit is the future of president bashar al assad. can this be resolved during these talks? >> that's the other big question. what we've seen in the past few days, stephanie is that there has been a shift in tone when it comes to the continued leadership or the question of the continued leadership of bashar al assad. now russia has stated in the past week that there should be elections, both parliamentary and presidential in syria as soon as possible. just a day after that, you had a russian delegation visiting damascus. bashar al assad told that delegation that he would be willing to institute elections in syria if that was something that the syrian people wanted or demanded. beyond that, we've also heard a
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softening in tone from the u.s. side of things, u.s. officials over the course of the past weekend indicated that perhaps they have softened their stance when it comes to maybe bashar al assad having more of a role in a transition process. that's a big difference than before, when the u.s. and other countries stated that bashar al assad must step down before there is any political transition. >> thank you. >> the conflict in syria spurred the largest refugee crisis since world war ii. many are risking their lives trying to get to western europe. overnight, the greek coast guard rescued nearly 250 people near lesbos island after a boat carrying hundreds of refugees capsized. at least seven people including two little boys drowned. dozens of still missing. sofia jones from the word post traveled with some of those refugees through europe. >> before several months ago,
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they were walking the entire journey. it was thousands of miles long, they had to walk the entire route. when i did it in late august, most of it was actually by train or by bus. we would walk a dozen miles at a time, several miles here and there, but even then, it was incredibly difficult. it was difficult for me and people with young children and the elderly and it was indeed perilous. they don't have anything behind them. they have to keep going. they carry these babies and hope that they will have a better future ahead of them, even if that means risking death. i met so many people with young children, the children often really didn't understand, but they were so brave. i met many women who were pregnant, eight and nine months pregnant who made this journey in hopes they could give birth in a german or swedish hospital.
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there are people with many different believes making this trip and many people were pro revolution or anti assad, but some people expressed doubt whether or not the revolution was worth it. june the u.n. estimates most displaced people are still within the country. >> the u.s. and chinese naives are holding talks about the disputed south china sea, the u.s. sending a destroyer into that sea this week, challenging china's claims of territorial rights. china protested the move. talks will be held via video conference. >> a big honor today for an imprisoned saudi arabian blogger, awarded the prize for freedom of thought just a few hours ago. he was arrested in 2012 after starting a website that criticized muslim clerics in the country. he was sentenced to 10 years in prison and 1,000 lashes. in honoring him, the european parliament called on saudi arabia to free him. >> it was three years ago today that super storm sandy swept
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through new york, new jersey and connecticut. it has become one of the costliest storms in u.s. history. a lot of people are still wait to go rebuild three years later. we are live on staten island, hard hit by sandy. what is it like for the people you have talked to there? >> they are telling me it's been a long and difficult process. i'm standing on a street that was eight feet underwater during sandy, the ocean just one block away from here. many homes here were just ruined. some homeowners have sold their property to the government to convert it to wet land, but as you can see, some houses have yet to be demolished. other residents decided to keep their properties. we spoke to one couple sometime waiting for their house to be rebuilt. >> this was our living, dining room, which is now a big storage unit. >> the rebuilding of allison and claire's home hasn't really
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started yet. >> the water line was about five feet. that was just the water line. >> the couple escaped through this bedroom window. when they came back, this is what the inside looked like once the water receded. >> it's a nightmare. >> it's been quite a roller coaster. >> is this something you think about every day? >> yes, every day, because i'm making a phone call or checking an email. >> with the help of volunteers, they cleaned out their home, started repairs on the house, gutting the inside. that stopped the day fema told them they had to elevate they're entire home or built a new one higher up. >> three years later and you're going to demolish this. >> right. >> and build a new one. >> it will be almost like day one, this is what we should have done from the first day. >> rebuild has been a struggle for them and hundreds of other families. new york city estimates nearly 1200 of the roughly 1900 construction projects begun over the last year have been completed, and about 60% of families who applied for
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reimbursements received their money. >> for years to come, we're going to constantly be working on resiliency, but a lot of folks have finally been served and their lives getting better and we will not stop until every family is served. >> claire and allison certainly hope so. they expect to wait another year before their home is rebuilt. >> do you blame anyone? >> anyone? there's so much to go around. there's no one person to blame, theres' no one organization. there's no one piece of government. it's a shared blame all around. >> on the third anniversary of sandy, they're still waiting and hoping to reclaim what they knew before the storm. >> it's a day to commemorate, memorialize to people that we lost and we are grateful to have our lives, but it's still another reminder that we are still not whole yet. we are living with pieces. stuff of ours is here and there and everywhere and we're not together like it should be. not only do the residents have to deal with different agency
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says and paperwork, but regulations for rebuilding. some have to be elevated off the ground and rebuilt with certain materials, so it's a whole new set of codes. >> what do the people of stanton island do now to make sure it doesn't happen again? >> the sea wall is going to be buried underground and they expect this to be a huge protection in this area. >> live on staten island this morning, thank you very much. >> to the weather today, a series of storms are headed towards the west this morning. let's bring in nicole mitchell with more on that. good morning. >> good morning. we already had one that's pulled into the mountains and now are just waiting for the next one. here's a look at that. as you can see, as the system goes through the mountains, that tears them up and get bit, they look less organized, this will get more otherwise as it pulse into the midwest southern plains
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and get that moisture. as we head to the northwest, where some of this had gone through, spotty showers today, but we are getting a break into tomorrow. the next system starts to move in. this is tomorrow's forecast and between tomorrow and saturday, some places in washington state could get easily a foot of rain some places, the localized amounts even more. we'll have to watch that closely. the other system as it pullles out of the rockies is going to get gulf moisture. place like texas not at heavy as we saw this weekend, are already saturated. we'll have to keep an eye on that for potential new spots. this gets us to saturday night. if you're taking your little pumpkins out, gulf coast to the great lakes is what we're looking at for some areas of moisture, where unfortunately they might have to hide the costume under a slicker. >> that's what i was just getting ready to ask. what is she going to be. >> they have been called the water bucket of the nation's
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bread basket. for centuries, the snow fields in wyoming bear tooth mountains have fed the grain fields of america. for the first time, they've never disappeared. we have a report on the impact that could have nationwide. >> normally these mountains would be covered in snow and ice. for the first time in thousands of years, he says they're bare. >> this is a warning, you could call the loss of the permanent snow is the canary in the coal mine. >> it regulated water flow off the mountains. in the winter, fresh snow would fall and the ice below keep it cold through the summer. the slow melt meant it was available all year. now those days are gone. that means fire seasons make that start earlier and last longer, crops like corner and wheat along the great plains won't get enough water and animals will see big changes. >> one of the things i worry about here in the greater yellow stone he can key system is the
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grizzly bear. it counts on the white bark pine for nash to issuement to fatten up in the fall to hibernate. we know that the white bark pine is sensitive to temperature and we're at the southern limit of its range, as it gets warmer, we are going to lose that. >> climate change for the loss of the snow fields, he says they will likely never return. al jazeera, the bear tooth mountains, wyoming. >> he will have more on tonight at 8:00 p.m. eastern. >> a new report paints less than a rosy picture. >> we're going to talk about those third quarter g.d.p. numbers and what they mean for your pocketbook. >> school's out for students in one town and teachers strike in one of the city's poor evident areas has students turning to other options for their education.
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>> the g.d.p. numbers are out showing the economy didn't grow very much last quarter. >> patricia sobga is here with us on the set. what are the numbers? what do they mean? >> these numbers came in at the lower end of expectations, but still within expectations. the economy grew 1.5, at the lower end of expect is as, but to the plus side that a big driver was definitely consumer spending. that grew 3.2%. that's a deceleration from the
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second quarter, but still was a a strong spot in the third quarter economic growth. he can ports grew 1.9%. again a deceleration from the second quarter, but better than many were expecting. a big drag last quarter was business inventories. they were negative. they actually knocked some points off the g.d.p. dell and stephanie, that's key, because this signals that businesses are working through their stockpiles and they're concerned with demand down the road and probably demand from the global economy. >> people thinking about home loans, auto loans. what does this mean for the fed and raising interest rates? >> the fed wrapped up a two day policy meeting yesterday, chose to leave interest rates unchanged. they did leave the door open on a possible rate hike in december and very key to that fed statement yesterday is they dropped the language or toned down the language about concerns about weakness in the global economy washing on to u.s.
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shores. they're back in monitoring mode. the market is prizing in about a 50% chance that the fed could hike rates in december. if not, we're looking further down the road. >> a very bat carder for deutcher bank. most of those job cuts will be in germany. they will close divisions in 10 other countries. the bank reported a net loss of six and a half billion dollars in the third quarter. >> thousands of students in east st. louis, illinois are out of school again this morning. teachers have been on strike for nearly a month demanding higher pay. the standoff has kids and their parents wondering if they will ever get back to class. >> east st. louis teachers want walked out of their classrooms october 1 furious over a tentative contract that would have doubled the time it takes them to reach the top salary scale from 11 years to 21.
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>> >> there's been an atmosphere since this strike began of the administration telling the teachers what to do. we expect you to go back and vote on something you already voted down. >> east st. louis is one of illinois' poorest communities. half its residents live below the poverty line. the state took over the school district four years ago because of poor performance. district spokeswoman kelly hawk said teachers salaries need to be reigned in to avoid potential layoffs and program cuts. >> we're not in a position to raise the taxes for the community, and we already are experiencing challenges keeping up with taxes which are higher than our surrounding areas. we want to make sure that again we're making a decision that is best first for our students, for the teachers of the district and we have to consider the entire community. >> the students probably won't miss that much time in the classroom, because the school year will be extended. the problem is, they may not be as well prepared for
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standardized achievement tests in the spring. >> community organizations like the christian activity center are filling the void, tutoring kids in math, reading and other subjects. still, high school junior said the strike has taken a toll on her and her friends. >> i don't think i'm going to be as motivated, because like -- because the school is like -- like, no offense, people think of it as a filing system, so it's like -- i don't think school is taken seriously. >> some teachers say students could be the big losers in the long run if they give in to the district's demands. >> my fear is that our district will not be able to retain teachers, because it's going to take them too long to -- they'll crawl to the finish line. >> the teachers thought they were close to resolving the dispute tuesday night, but talks broke off. they'll resume again thursday. diane esterbrook, al jazeera,
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east st. louis, illinois. >> we have an update on a story we've been closely watching, that high school football coach in washington state that praise with his students after the game has been suspended. he was told to no longer have any contact with his team. he's been leading the post game prayers for nine years. earlier this month, the school district asked him to stop, threatening to fire him. kennedy said he now intends to file a lawsuit against the school district. >> the south carolina sheriff's deputy has paid the price for throwing his student or a student to the ground. the deputy was fired after what he did was caught on cell phone video pop now he is insisting that he was justified as the student recovers from a broken arm and other injuries. >> sheriff's deputy ben fields was not fired for this, violently pushing a teenage girl off her chair, but for this,
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throwing her across the room. >> that's what caused me my heartburn and what my issues with this, the maneuver that he used was not based on the training or acceptable. >> losing control, a violation of the rules of arrest, says field's boss. >> it continues to upset me what i see that video is the fact that he picked the student up and he threw the student across the room. that is not a proper technique and should not be used in law enforcement. cell phone video shot by a classmate went viral. investigations have been opened. you the sheriff said the deputy was fired despite strong support from the classroom teacher and the principal. the deputy who's been in the job seven years is if not remorseful certainly concerned that in doing his job, he discredited the department. >> he is sorry that this whole thing occurred. it was not his in tent. his in tent was not to do
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anything that brought discredit on the sheriffs department or him or that school. he tried to do his job. >> the unnamed 15-year-old girl who was pulled from her chair and a 16-year-old classmate who was also arrested at the same time aren't off the hook, either. >> he was like you want some of this, too and then he just said you're going to jail too. >> the sheriff said they'll need to face up for disrupting class. >> the students arrested, the charges stand. there is noguchia changed with those charges at all. they still need to be held accountable for their actions. >> john terrett, al jazeera. >> another classic in kansas city. >> the royals roll over the mets and that's the understatement. it happened in their second meeting of the world series. we'll talk about what new york can do just to get back in the game. >> a blimp on the run. army investigators want to know how this blimp got loose.
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>> the royals crushed the mets to take a two games to none lead in the world series. johnny cueto threw a complete game, allowing just with it hits. the mets will try to get back into it when the series moves to new york on friday night. >> the pentagon trying to figure out how that blimp broke free causing serious damage in maryland and traveling
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150 miles. in the pros, it took down power lines along the way. john siegenthaler reports. [ laughter ] >> college students in pennsylvania laughed. >> it's going down! >> but they didn't know that the runaway blimp is a highly sophisticated military aircraft designed to detect missile attacks. it got loose from the aberdeen proving ground in maryland. it drifted 150 miles to central pennsylvania, where according to norad, it finally landed. >> it has been deflating. i understand that it is deflating as we speak, and we continue to work closely, very closely with the local authorities on safely securing it. >> no injuries were reported, but as the blimp floated, it dragged feathers across power lines triggering blackouts.
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the pentagon said there was never any danger, but it did scramble f16 fighters jets to keep track of the blimp. >> we were never looking at shooting it down. our action has been solely focused on monitoring it and tracking it and working closely with the authorities on the ground and with our inner agency partners to make sure that we were able to so i havely recover it. >> the do you understand blimp is one of two that the u.s. army spend $3 billion to develop. >> a revolutionary long-range surveillance capability. >> its mission to identify large metal object like planes or missiles over a 300-mile rank in any direction across the northeastern u.s. both ships can hover at 10,000 feet and are designed to foil a sudden short range enemy strike. the army sees the air ships as superior to ground based missile defenses. >> it's persistent, over the
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horizon, so currently, we don't have to worry about the terrain or buildings. >> it must undergo three years of testing. the army hopes these aircraft are better than the 15 earlier lighter than air ship programs that were scrapped at a cost of nearly $7 billion. john siegenthaler, al jazeera. >> there once were two of those blimps, one went missing yesterday, the other grounded. >> that is it for us here in new york. >> coming up from doha, we're going to have more on these images, that search for survivors onboard a migrant boat that went down in the mediterranean. at least seven are dead. >> we are back tomorrow beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern. have a great day.
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jewel dozenles of people missing after a boast capsizes near the greek island of less boss. >> john kerry arrives in vienna for an international summit on ending syria's civil war. >> i'm in

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