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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  November 5, 2015 7:00am-9:01am EST

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> was a bomb to blame? u.s. and british intelligence suggest explosives may have brought down the plane over egypt day of destruction, why anonymous is promising a day of global action in hundreds of cities. >> protect the consumers. we don't want anyone to get sick. >> tainted with toxins, a warning to consumers not to eat a popular dine of shellfish and do you have the right stuff? n.a.s.a. on a mission to hire new astronauts.
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this morning russia is pushing back on the latest theories over what brought down the airliner over the skies in europe. there's preliminary evidence that suggests a bomb. good morning, welcome to "your world this morning", dim del walters. >> i'm stephanie sy. the explosive on the plane is a significant possibility. british flights into the sinai are suspended, stranding thousands of tourists. lisa stark has the latest. >> reporter: the big question is was a bomb planted on the plane at sharm el sheikh airport. the associated press reports communications have been intercepted that seem to indicate a rebel group affiliated with i.s.i.l., located in the sinai, did plant a bomb on the plane. we should stress there's no definitive conclusions reached by investigators or the
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intelligence community. egyptian investigators have not determined whether an explosion or mechanical problem brought down the blame. the british government says it now points to a bomb. we have concluded that there is a significant possibility that there was an explosive device in the aircraft. >> the british are advising that all but extensive travel, 20,000 britains, are vacationing there. >> there'll be no u.k. passenger flights out to sharm el sheikh from now. passengers who are on the ground in sharm el sheikh will be returned to the u.k. the state department says it is not jumping to any conclusions, but has restricted u.s. embassy employees from travelling to the area. >> it's the responsible thing to do for the united states government to tell its workers "don't go to the sinai right
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now." >> in the signa rebels are fighting in the area. u.s. airlines have been warned to avoid flying below 26,000 feet warning: sh there are no u.s. carriers, that regularly operate out of the sinai peninsula. in fact, the airport in question at sharm el sheikh is, in fact, not the last point of departure into the united states for any airliner united airlines does fly over the sinai, the only u.s. carrier to do so. with flights to dubai and kuwait. the airline told al jazeera it is diverting until further notice. crash investigators have the plane's black boxes, and say there's good data on the flight
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recorder, but the voice recorder was damaged and will take work to decipher. a u.s. military satellite detected a heat flash around the russian jet as it broke up at 30,000 feet. the question - does it indicate a bomb. the wreckage will reveal the answers. >> if it was something strong enough to bring the aircraft down, it will dodo -- do a lot of damage to the air frame. >> one thing that is certain is the plane was not brought down by a missile. rebel groups doesn't have the technology, and the u.s. military satellite detected no evidence of a missile launch the first victim of the crack was buried. family and friends said good buys to a 6-year-old.
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rescue teams retrieved 140 bodies, russian officials say they should finish their search for remains by the evening. in about 15 minutes we speak with a former accident investigator about the latest developments. >> flights to and from san diego's airport are back on a regular schedule. a gunman surrounded to police. he shot several rounds from an ex-girlfriend's apartment, throughout wednesday. that is in the airport's approach path police in northern louisiana, investigating an accidental shooting by police of a little boy. the officers from chasing a man on tuesday. he tried to back his car into a squad car. police opened fire, accidentally killing his 6-year-old son inside the car. the man is in serious condition, hit as well there are reports that the whiff and son of an illinois
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police officer under investigation after officials believe the police officer committed suicide. he died after radioing that he was chasing three suspects. investigators believe it was an elaborate setup to cover up for his own crime. >> this is the first time as a law enforcement officer in my career that i felt ashamed by the acts of another police officer. >> reporter: harsh words about the shooting death of an officer. officer joe had been shot dead in pursuit of suspects, initially. on 8am he radioed that he stumbled upon three suspicious men. >> the lieutenant informed communications he was in a foot pursuit. his communications lost contact with him. when our first responding backup unit arrived at the scene, they located the lieutenant injured
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with a gunshot wound. >> the manhunt for the suspects shut the area for days and cost the city more than a quarter of a million. after her husband's death, his widow told "crime watch daily", there was no way her husband killed herself. >> there were two shots. somebody that is going to kill themselves is not going to shoot themselves twice. >> reporter: in september, one of the shots hit his bulletproof vest. the commander of the major crime task force says his death was an elaborately planned suicide to hide seven years of activity. >> he was found to have forged signatures on official documents. thousands were used for personal expenses, travel, gym memberships, adult websites. >> reporter: investigators recovered incriminating
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statements, and postings delighted from his work and phone prior to his suicide. one said: the police department had been under review for its conduct, and the chief of police resigned days before the death. investigators admit they were fooled. >> our intention was never to mislead the public, we believe from day one that this was a homicide. through the text messages that we retrieved, that the stress in his line began six months ago. when he indicates and exchanges text messages that he's feeling pressure with the new management within the village. >> reporter: the medical examiner found he died due to a civil devastating gunshot wound. the coroner now says it was self-inflicted. lake county said two others were likely aware of the action, and
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plans to prosecute every individual who conspired with him. the true victim is the community at large this morning investigators in california are trying to find the motive behind a stabbing on a college campus. a police shot and killed a student who stabbed and killed four people at the university near sacramento. police have not released the attackers name, but says he injured two students, a staff member that tried to stop the attack. >> the hacking group anonymous is promising to pull the hood of thousands of members of ku klux klan. they'll release a lift of clans men. they were on the streets of new zealand and australia, taking part in a campaign called the million mask mask. jonathan betz reports this is not the first time anonymous drew international attention for its actions. >> reporter: a force for good or
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evil? exposing criminals or harming incident people? the mysterious activist hacking group anonymous - some consider cyber terrorists, other digital crusaders. >> does that mean in 100%. times their interventions are positive, no. the motivations that drive them are driven by noble intentions anthropologist studied the group for years. formed nearly a decade ago. anonymous is known for pushing for social justice. launching cyber attacks. hacking to reveal secrets and demand attention. whether it's about police brutality or online bullying. >> we didn't have this kind of support whenever everything happened. now that we do have a lot of support and people listening, it's like a miracle. >> in ohio, a 16-year-old girl
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was allegedly raped in 2012. there were concerns of a cover up to protect high school football stars. anonymous helped to identify suspects, uncovered deleted tweets, and even an alleged video of the crime. two players were convicted. and the school superintendent resigned. >> in community is fixing things. this community is holding people accountable. >> anonymous is a loose collective. impossible to hold accountable and at times they were wrong, like when they misidentified a killer. or even with the k.k.k. early leaks of alleged members appear to be false, causing the group within anonymous to work on the clan hack to distance itself from leaks of those names. it will reveal the information. >> claims can be hard to track
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and confirm. vigilanteism is at times misguided. raising questions about how a group shrouding itself in anonymity can expose others. >> they don't always agree on the correct tactics. there's bickering along the lines of legal versus illegal methods al jazeera's correspondent is joining us live to washington. wajahat ali, j is anonymous threatening to release the came of the ku klux klan members. >> it goes back to last year when protesters protested against the killing of michael brown in ferguson, missouri. november 5th, they'll do operation k.k.k. hashtag op
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k.k.k. where they say they'll release 1,000 names of those affiliated with the k.k.k. - not just names, phone numbers, physical addresses, payment history. later today they say expect a massive data dump. >> guy falling wanting to -- faulk wanting to overcome parliament in britain. what is the goal. >> 671 cities for a march, an issue by anonymous, protesting against mass civilians, government corruption, what they say is the 1% of the collective 99%. 18,000 people, will show up in london. 25,000 in washington d.c. they'll wear the guy faulks mask, popularized by the v for victory. and commemorating the 1605 plot
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with guy faulks and activists trying to blow up parliament, and anonymous, the army saying they are standing up for the people against tyrannical corrupt government some. members of the clan have been unmasked because of laws saying they can't wear hoods during protests and parades. among the clan members, what is the response from the ku klux klan. >> there's a lot of back and forth beef on social media, but the ku klux klan said it will plan an oint anonymous rally. nothing materialized. let's wait, something may materialize, nothing concrete. >> wajahat ali joining us from washington d.c. the invisible empire may not be so invisible. >> especially if there's a million of them. >> international aid group doctors without boarders has details of investigations into
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the hospital. 30 died when a u.s. air strike hit the facility. the report is that there were no weapons or fighters in the hospital at the time. some afghan officials say the taliban was using it as a base. the u.s. was conducting its own investigation. we are learning more this morning about what is in a major trade deal when the u.s. and 11 other countries, the time text of the t.p.p. was released today, a month after it was signed. among the element disclosed is a u.s. agreement with vietnam, allowing their workers to unionize and go on strike in exchange for more trade with the u.s. the deal ends trade barriers among the 12 pacific rim counties, accounting for half of the global economy. >> as i look at the weather maps, looks like a lot of you will get wet. let's check in with nicole mitchell, how wet is wet going to bep. >> it's not going to be
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prolific, unless you get under a thunder storm, the system we have been following through the rockies is entering the united states, anything from temperature drop, snow, rain and small storms, it's a wet go in parts of the dakotas, the back side of it is snow. more on that in the next half hour. moving south, places making it to texas, and a line that we are monitoring that could have severe weather. because we are saturated, an inch or two, which is the forecast, unless you get under a thunder storms, it's enough to have the flood catches up, because we are waterlogged from the last two systems, and the places we have flood warnings, especially the rivers that have not crested from the last flooding experience, and the severe weather risk, the best
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chance for a little bit of that activity, as we get into texas and oklahoma, and chances for thunder storms along the lines. part of that is the temperature changes. we have had dramatics changes. temperatures cold, in some cases falling 20 degrees. in texas, behind the front, 50s and '60s, and ahead into the 80s today, and that warm weather will file the risk for the storms. >> there's parts of texas where there was that severe drought. >> a lot of that was wiped out in may with the first round of flooding and the last few weeksate the rest away. >> when we come back, paid patriotism. pentagon funded military dislas. and saving the reefs, one biologist and his team fighting to save the world's coral. coral.
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>> we cannot be certain that the russian airliner was brought down by a terrorist bomb, but it looks increasingly likely that that was the case, so i act on the intelligence, i act on the advice of experts, and it's the right thing to do to suspend these flights until we can safely bring people home british prime minister david cameron spoking moments ago about the latest intelligence in the downing of a russian plan in egypt. flights into sinai have been suspended. he as a meeting with abdul fatah al-sisi. early assessed suggested that a bomb was responsible.
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defense secretary ash carter speaking a moment ago talking about that being a possibility. a former accident investigator and pilot who teaches at ohio state university was part of the team that investigated comair flight for the airline pilots association. thank you for joining us via skype. as you heard some security, government officials saying it's too soon to draw a concrete conclusion as to whether or not a bomb was exposed. the u.s. is saying that that is a possibility, do you believe they have information that is not public to the citizenry or the egyptian government? >> i am not sure they have information that supports that. but rather i think that they are wisely acting under an abundance of caution. it will be the physical evidence at the scene that will make that final determination, that will take a little bit of time.
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it's prudent as far as how they are approaching this. >> if there was a bomb. how did that bomb get there. there seems to be a growing body of concern that it was smuggled on board the plane. if that was the case, what does it say about airport security. >> obviously that in that location, at a minimum at the airport, there has been a significant security breach. you have to, you know, the approach is going to be - is that if it was a bomb, did it come through baggage handling, you know through ramp workers or was it a passenger that brought it on board in the cabin with them. through screenages. if that's the case, they have a significant breach in the security system that needs to be evaluated. >> many of us that do what we do and do what you do travel to a lot of places. it's safe to say airline
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security differs from country to country. are there gaps that need to be addressed. >> there certainly are. the u.s. state department puts out a list of airports that feels that security does not meet the standard that the united states requires, and that's why they published that list. i think for the most part security throughout the world is, in fact, adequate. there are - there'll always be gaps, but they are known john signing us via skype from colombus ohio an egyptian court postponed the final trial of mubarak. he was sentenced to life in prison for conspiring to kill hundreds of demonstrators, an appeals court threw the sentence out. the final retrial taking police
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na january a search is under way for survivors of a building collapse, 18 died, 75 hurt when the building came down in lahore. 150 died at the time. they are not sure what happened. >> a fourth storey was being conducted. it was not calculated, whether the existing building could bear the load several survivors have been pulled from the rub. pakistan hit with a powerful earthquake, and it's not clear if that played a role in the col as. >> it's common to see military at sporting events, turned out some of those are nothing more than paid advertisements. the pentagon paid out there 10 million for events. elise holman has the details. >> reporter: it's called paid patriotism, displays like these
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have been commonplace. armed services honoured by unfurling flags, performing the national anthem, and loved by fans. turns out it came at a price. >> unfortunately, thanks to an indepth investigation, a lot of patriotism is paid for. as much as 6.8 million that saw the department of defense spend or marketing contracts in 2012. they obviously should not be doing this. >> reporter: a senate report released on wednesday revealed the demonstrations were taxpayer fund of course, a programme intended to promote the armed services and boost recruitment. >> there's a lot of good things that professional sports do to honour the men and women that serve in the military.
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these millions of dollars are not acceptable at the expense of taxpayers dollars. investigations showed as many as 72 contracts were in place, with up to 50 pro-sport teams. the payments totalling $9.1 million involved the biggest competitions - n.f.l., n.b.a., national hockey league and major league baseball. >> we went to the pentagon for information, it was like pulling teeth. we are not convinced we have all the information. >> the practice is banned. teams that profited are urged to donate the money to charity. charities that help veterans. future displays of patriotism have to be free. police in california arresting a man suspected of stabbing spencer stone, the air force officer that helped stop an ape tack on a paris-bound train. he was stabbed trying to break up a fight in sacramento, it was
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not related to anything ha hopped on the plane. >> the danger in crabbs. why health officials are warning people not to eat the popular shellfish along the post paving the way for the legalizing of marijuana. a high court ruling that could turn drug laws upside down. upside down.
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june supporters of anonymous she taking part in a campaign called the million mask marsh. protests are laid in 150 cities around the world. later today, they will release the numbers of thousands of ku klux klan members.
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>> it is looking likely that it is a bomb that took down that airliner over egypt. preliminary evidence suggests a bomb was responsible but russia is dismissing that as speculation. british prime minister david cameron indicating based on the advice of experts, it was right to suspend flights in and out of sinai. >> the strongest statement so far, they seem to back up the claim from the sinai branch of isil that they were responsible. it's very significant, because it could mean they are adopting new tactics. there is an emergency meeting held last night and they'll hold another one in the next few hours in the this just behind me here, discussing the new intelligence they have, how to beef up security at airport and how to bring those 20,000
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british holiday makers home safely. u.k. aviation experts are on the ground putting in short term measures, making sure everything going on to those passenger planes is properly screened. there's concern about the lack of security there. we know the minster of defense confirmed that a small military team is also on the ground now advising on security and logistics. of course, we don't know exact -- ourse, we don't know exact --
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>> this crab pot hasn't been in the water since last season and there's no telling if it will get in anytime soon. it depends on when the water temperature drops and when the level of neurotoxins in the crab subside. >> scientists say unusually warm water has led to blooms of algae that produce the poison. restaurant manager don mcfarland said customers have started calling and asking where the crabs he's serving comes from. this is from north of the bay area.
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>> we're going to have to explain it's coming from washington and it's safe, then they're going to wonder why they're paying so much. >> he said the cost will go up if the crab isn't local. >> it is what it is. we have to protect the consumers. we don't want anyone to get sick. >> you want four of these, how many you got there? >> the consumer may pay a little more and the fisherman earn a little less in the name of keeping food safe. al jazeera, san francisco. >> last week it was my steak and my sauce only, this week it's my crab. >> at least it's in the west coast. >> some are waking up to snow this morning. let's bring in anymore mitch for that. >> might be less concerned about crab and making the chile and
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for comfortable things coming up. higher elevations in the mountains, starting off at rain. the backside, temperatures start dropping and it converts over to snow. i have seen snow reports in northern north dakota and into nebraska, starting to see a little of that to answer i guess at the lower elevations. then we have the problems in the higher elevations. heading to the south and rockies, colorado, the ski resorts love this, a lot of them try to get open especially by tanks giving. the new amounts of snow in higher elevations, could get more than six-inches of snow. frost and freeze advisories because temperatures have gotten cold behind the front. as this moves along the next couple of days, we mentioned earlier, today, we have along especially the southern edge of
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the front chances for isolated severe weather. so watch for that. northern edge, rain along the rockies into tomorrow and later friday and possibly saturday, that moves through the rest of the east coast, bringing chances for rain and finally the cooler temperatures, so just dependency what day you get the cooler temperatures. the trailing end could have more moisture as we go into the weekend, because that part of the front isn't moving quite as quickly. in the meantime, we have areas of fog in the south. today it's also in the northeast. heading into new york city, where that is already a rough commute, a little hazy getting out there. >> i saw that this morning. nicole mitchell, thank you. >> this morning, european union leaders predict the surge of migrants into the continent will continue. the e.u.'s latest economic forecast says 3 million more migrants could arrive by the end of next year. the commission says the in flux has increased government spending and nations should expect a positive bump in their economies within a few years.
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more than 700,000 people have come to europe seeking asylum on economic opportunities so far this year. most of the refugees heading for europe are fleeing the syrian civil war. joining us this morning is one of those refugees. he moved from istanbul before making a journey to austria. thanks for being with us. start why did you leave damascus. >> well, needless to say, the situation was really intense. it was really scary for us as a family to stay there, and, well, my dad was personally wanted, let's say, from both sides actually from the regime side and from the free army side, so we just decided to leave before we got killed.
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>> your dad, you said was targeted by both the assad regime and free syrian army which has the backing of the united states. you started off in istanbul. you at some point went to malaysia for a while but decided to head for europe. what was the hardest part of that journey to austria? >> the hardest part was not knowing where we are. me and my mom and my sister, well, we got into let's say a vehicle, it was a truck from istanbul directly to austria, vienna in particular, and the hardest part was that we only got off of it once a day in the middle of the night and in the middle of nowhere, so we didn't know where we were at the time. that went on for six days.
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it was really scary for us. >> some refugees have died that way, because they've been packed into those drugs. you didn't know if you were going through slovenia or hungary or whatever. were you worried about your life at any time? >> of course, all the time we were worried about our lives. that was of the only solution that we had, our only option, staying in istanbul in turkey wasn't he said, because financial issues, and studying there for us isn't that good. there is no future for us there. >> turkey does not offer refugees, i understand, the same opportunities that are offered in europe, and so that's why you made your way to austria. >> yes, exactly. >> what are you doing now? >> now we got the refugee stats, thank god. we've been here for about a year now. i'm going to school, me and my sister are going to school. first it was a little hard, we have to learn the language and to get in touch with the
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community and all, but and then everything worked out, so basically, we are living in a little amount, meanwhile, me, my sister and my mom, we go to school and we're trying to build our lives. >> that is really heartening to hear. i don't know how much you follow the news, but we have been reporting for months now about the hundreds of thousands of migrants and refugees making that same journey that you are. do you think that europe should accept all of them? >> well, of course. i mean, europe could have its own restrictions and all, but it can't deny any of them, because all of them are fleeing from war and that's basically death. you can't just tell them go back and die. >> what is your advice to them as they make this dangerous journey? >> be careful, don't trust
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anyone, and stay safe. that's all i can say. i mean, it is a really tough journey and for us, it went that tough. i talked to people that actually walked from istanbul to austria. i met some people at the first camp that we got into, and i mean, i heard horrifying stories, compared to ours, ours isn't at horrifying at theirs. >> do you plan to go back to syria if the civil war and peace ever comes back? >> well, yeah, account. i mean, me and my family only went out of syria because we were basically going to die if we stayed. we just ran away from death. if death isn't there anymore, then we'll go back. >> thank you so much for your time. >> if every word leader heard exactly what you just said. >> it is really inspiring actually to see how quickly he learned the language. >> he didn't speak the language,
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but he learned, yeah. help wanted in space. >> nasa looking for men and women for the next generation of space travel. motorists confessing that they drive drowsy.
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>> the world coral reefs are threatened and scientists say their disappearance is hurting the whole underwater ecosystem. >> researchers in the florida keys found a new technology that could reverse that trend. rachel is live in miami. good morning, you went to that laboratory there. tell us what scientists are doing to save the coral reefs. >> well, it's really a breakthrough and has to do with barrier reef coral. this is a big coral at the bottom of the ocean and barrier here in the florida keys and anywhere it's found throughout the world, australia, the caribbean. the technique has been so
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successful that scientists are now teaching it to their partners in mexico and even cuba. >> i thought coral scientists needed self help groups, because they saw what was happening underwater years ahead of people on land. >> scientists are worrying about scenes like these, dead corals appearing all over the world. more than a quarter of the earth's corals have disappeared as a result of rising temperatures, pollution and ocean acidification. >> marine biologist david and his team at the laboratory in the florida keys are racing to try to reverse the alarming loss. ten years ago, he discovered if you cut coral into tiny fragments, it stimulates it to grow up to 50 times its normal rate. >> these were just cut today and
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as you can see, these are very tiny pieces and just a couple of poll lops in there are arrive. in just a few weeks instead of a few years, these will start growing and these are just a month or two old and have almost grown to fill out that base. >> this is a game changer. >> this is a real game changer for the reef growing corals, which everybody else forget. >> the fragments are arranged on small rocks in stay water nurseries. using the method, his team can produce thousands of micro fragments in days. these fragments are cut from corals which have survived warmer more acidic conditions, giving them a better chance of survival. in nature, this coral would take about 15 years to reproduce, and there's about a one in a million chance that it would even be able to do so, but this new technology means that dr. vaughn and his team are able to grow
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these corals to this size in less than a year. >> once the coral's reach a certain size, they are then transplanted on to dying reefs. it's now one of the largest coral restoration projects of its kind. thanks to government grants and private donations, next year, they plan to expand the program and double the amount of reef restoration. over the next decade, dr. vaughn hopes to restore more than a thousand acres of florida's reef. throughout his career, dr. vaughn has seen some coral species nearly vanish but now is optimistic. >> we can't wait 100 years that corals may come back on their own. we want to head start them by planting thousands if not millions of little tiny ones so we'll have corals here for a long time. >> dr. vaughn will retire in the next few years and he says his goal is to have planted over a million coral, at least here in
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florida. >> what is his success rate? how successful has he been? >> they've had a an incredible success rate. 95% of the coral they have planted has survived, so they're confident this method can slow down, in some areas reverse the deterioration of coral reefs. >> rachel, thank you very much. we could find out more today about mars and the future of travel there, as nasa is set to unveil key scientific findings on the planet's atmosphere. the result could further boost the hope was sending a manned mission to mars in the next 15-20 years. in september, a nasa spacecraft circling mars found evidence of water on the planet's surface. nasa's out with a help wand. soon it will accept flicksion for its next wave of astronauts. >> they are getting a head start on future missions, including
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mars. we have this report. >> nasa is looking for a few good people to make a very long trip. >> i want you to apply for nasa's astronaut problem. >> it's part of the plan for future exploration, once again sending as straw put thats to the international space station, missions to the moon and eventually the red planet. >> the 2030's, the ultimate goal is to go a mars and conduct stays on the surface, so by soliciting new astronaut applications now, they are trying to show they are serious about these plans and that they intend to use these people for decades to come. >> three years ago, nasa put out a similar public request that got 6,000 responses. nasa has grown in the social media era. from the orion test to the first fly by of pluto, since grounding
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its space shuttle program in 2011 and plan to say out source space travel to the private sector, there's been an exodus of astronauts. nasa had almost 150 astronauts, today 47. >> there was a lot of turnover in the post space shuttle area. a lot of people moved on from the agency because they knew there would be respite opportunities. this is an effort to start getting in a new crop, kind of fresh blood and start ramping up in preparation for mixes that may not come for 10-20 years. >> applications will be accepted starting mid september. the lucky hires announced in 2017. >> candidates have to have at least a bachelor's degree, professional experience and 1,000 hours of flying a jet aircraft. starting salary is at $66,000. >> you also need to know how to do pushups.
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how much time will it be before astronaut go on a mission? >> some wait five to 10 years. they'll probably use their current fleet of astronauts and phase in the rookies for the more ambitious missions. they are sending orion to the moon by 2021. >> that's the new spaceship. >> they'll have plenty of time to fit into that. >> if you fit into this category, you need not apply. a no stayed estimates 43% of drivers nodded off while driving at least once in their lifetime. federal officials estimate drowsy driving causes between 5,000 and 7,000 deaths a year. triple-a said young drivers reporting the most incidents. >> big names in nashville got big honors in the c.m.a. said. ♪
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>> justin timberlake of all people was just one of the artists that took part. the new group little big town walked away with three awards. chris staples got new artist and album of the year and entertainer of the year went to luke ryan. i didn't know justin timberlake was in country music. >> a little bit country, a little bit rock and roll. >> moscow is urging caution in the findings from the plane crash. >> anonymous promise to say unmask 1,000 members of the k.k.k. we are back in two minutes with more. >> tough that the country gave up on me. >> look at the trauma...
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every day is torture. >> this is our home. >> nobody should have to live like this. >> we made a promise to these heroes... this is one promise americans need to keep.
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>> planes grounded and thousands of tourists stranded after officials suggest a bomb brought down a russian passenger jet over the skies of egypt. >> i personally think you need to live your life and not let the terrorists win. >> this morning, moscow and cairo say there is no firm evidence of an explosive onboard. >> the million mask march, protesting in cities around the world, anonymous promises to unmask the k.k.k.
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>> scientists are trying to determine whether shelled animals can survive in the oceans of the future. >> welcome to your word this morning. i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm del walters. there are several new developments into the investigation in the crash of that russian jet over the skies of egypt. u.s. officials are being quoted this morning as saying preliminary evidence suggests there was a bomb onboard. >> the british government says because of that in tell, flights in and out are still not flying this morning, stranding thousands of tourists. >> that's why we suspended the flights and that's why it's going to take sometime before we can fly people out back to
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britain. >> british tourists stranded in europe are getting impatient. >> i think that nowadays, this can happen anywhere in the world, and i feel really sorry for the egyptians now that they've had a real block in tear tourism now. i personally feel you need to live your life and not let the terrorists win. >> just this morning, the british transport secretary saying flights back to the u.k. continue on friday. the investigation into the cause continues. >> the big question, was a bomb onboard the plane. the associated press is reporting that some communications have been intercepted that seem to indicate that a rebel group affiliated with isil did plant a
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bomb aboard the plane. there have been no definitive conclusions reached by investigators or the intelligence community. >> egyptian investigators have not officially determined whether an explosion or mechanical problem brought down the plane, but the british government says information now points to a bomb. >> we have concluded that there is a significant possibility that that crash was caused by an explosive device onboard the aircraft. >> the british are now advising against all but essential travel. 20,000 britons are vacations there. >> passengers who are on the ground will be returned to the u.k. >> the state department says it's not jumping to any conclusions, but has now restrict u.s. embassy employees from traveling to the area.
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>> it's also the responsible thing to do for the united states government to tell its workers don't go to the sinai right now. >> in the sinai, egypt is fighting rebels affiliated with isil, so even before the metro jet accident, the f.a.a. had issued an alert to any u.s. airlines to avoid flying below 26,000 feet there, warning exercise extreme caution during flight operations due to ongoing violence and unrest. >> there are no u.s. carriers that regularly operate out of the sinai peninsula. in fact, the airport in question is in fact not the last point of departure into the united states for any airline.
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>> crash investigators have both the plane's black boxes, saying there is good data on the flight recorder but the voice box was damaged. >> a heat flash was detected around the russian jet as it broke up at nearly 30,000 feet. the question, does that indicate a bomb. former ntsb board member bob france said the wreckage will reveal the answers. >> if it was something that was strong enough to bring the aircraft down, it's going to do a lot of wreckage to the frame, to the air frame. >> one thing that is fairly certain at this point is that this jet was not brought down by a missile. rebel groups in the sinai simply do not have the technology to attack a plane at cruise altitude and the u.s. military satellite detected no evidence of a missile launch. >> lisa stark with that report.
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this morning, the russian government rejects the claims of a bomb onboard the plane. al jazeera's peter sharp has more from moscow. >> first funeral taking place on the day that the search area in the sinai deserts will end. it will finish at 10:00 local time. tonight, so far, 140 bodies have been recovered and many body parts but only 55 bodies so far have been identified, so it is going to be a very, very long and grizzly task to put names to those bodies to allow the funerals to keep going. meanwhile, in moscow, the kremlin's broken its silence and it says as we thought they would, they're sticking to this line that any idea of why the plane crashed, the british saying that it possibly was an explosion onboard is just absolutely pure speculation. putin spokesman said and they
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will continue to fly russian aircraft into and out of the area. >> today, the metro jet grounded its fleet of airbus planes, that was the type of jet is that crashed in egypt. >> former accident investigators saying it is impossible at this early stage to determine exactly what brought down that jet.
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>> coming up, we'll talk to the former chairman of the ntsb. today, members of the hacking group anonymous are on the streets of australia and new zealand, taking part in the million mask march. similar masks of expected around the world and u.s. they promise to publicly release the names of 1,000 members of the k.k.k. >> why is anonymous releasing the names of the k.k.k. members? >> this beef goes back to last year when the k.k.k. threatened with violence those protestors protesting the death of michael
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brown. today, anonymous said that they will do a data dump of 1,000 members of the k.k.k., not just names, phone numbers, physical addresses, payment history, even occupations, and this is a way for them to get back against what they say is a white supremacist bullying organization that has been in america since 1865. >> where are these marches going to take place and how many people might we expect to see? >> this is the fourth year in a row now for the million mask march. in washington, d.c., 25,000 people will show up. london, they are saying 20,000 people and the the anonymous army, they call themselves the anonymous army, they are wearing the guy fox masks because in 1605, around november 5, guy fox and catholic activists tried to blow up the parliament and kill king james i.
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>> there has been a history of violence associated with these protest manches against the plan and greensboro first comes to mind. is anyone expecting violence? >> yes, scotland yard is warning against violence. last year, there were skirmishes with the riot police and vandalism. about 10 people were arrested, scotland yard said they are going to take massive pro cautions this time, there are going to be restrictions for the protest. they are going to limit it to west end and they are warning the protestors as long as you protest peacefully, there is no problem, when you as soon as you step out of line, they are going to crack down. they are protesting against riot police and warn shopkeeper to say be safe and stay home if possible. >> thank you very much. stay with us, coming up in 15 minutes, we'll talk to the southern poverty law center and explore whether anonymous
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exposing people helps or hurts their cause. >> this morning, the international medical aid group doctors without borders has details of its own investigation into the bombing of its hospital in kunduz, afghanistan. >> there were no armed combatants observed within the hospital compound. an ironclad policy of prohibiting, not allowing any weapons on the hospital premise. >> at least 30 people died when a u.s. air strike hit the facility. the report insists the clearly marked hospital was intentionally targeted. the u.s. is conducting its observe investigation. rescue crews are searching for survivors after a deadly building collapse. 150 workers were inside the believe when it went down in lahore. 18 people were killed and more than 75 people sent to the hospital. dozens are believed to still be trapped in the rubble.
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>> a fourth story was bin constructed and had not been calculated whether the existing building could bear the load or not. at the moment, we have our emphasis on rescuing more people. >> the pakistani military is sending in teams of engineers to assist with the ongoing rescue efforts. the cause of the collapse is now under investigation. al jazeera has more. >> a major rescue effort is underway. the government is sending earth moving equipment, trains. they've sent in hundreds of rescue teams to try and save lives here at this collapsed factory building. the four story building did not stand a chance and despite warnings, construction was still continuing while the factory workers were busy producing shopping bags. now as you can see, the big challenge is to try and cut gaping holes through the
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concrete slabs to try to reach the lower floors where most of the people are said to be trapped. their relatives are waiting outside the factory for news of their loved ones, but this is going to be a cumbersome operation, because it is a tedious operation, a very critical operation in which they will try and save lives. however, the fear is that as time passes, hope will be fading for many of those wounded badly in the collapse. the big challenge, of course, will be how to remove all this rubble and find those people buried under it. the important thing is that despite the fact that people are now working at a faster pace because it is daylight, it appears that this operation will last for several days, and it will not be clear as to how many people were killed in this
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building. >> reporting from the scene there. the building collapse happened after a magnitude 7.5 earthquake hit. >> we are learning about what is in the final text of the transpacific partnership. it was released today, almost a month after it was signed. among the elements disclosed is a u.s. agreement with vietnam. it will allow vietnamese workers to unionize and go on strike in exchange for more trade with the u.s. that deal will end most tariffs and trade barriers among the 12 pacific rim countries. they account for nearly half have the global economy. >> today some severe weather could bear down on texas. the storm has been dumping snow on the west coast is moving east. it has the potential to bring hail, strong wind and heavy rains to most of the midwest and south. texas is struggling to recover from weeks of wet weather at
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this point. let's bring in nicole mitchell. >> this almost wouldn't be noteworthy, just one or two inches of rain in. for the south that's usually not a big deal but we are inundated with two big systems in the last couple weeks. here's that system as it pulse out of the rockies, leaving a lot of snow in its wake. i've been getting different snow reports from all these ski resorts that we're very excited about as they ramp up for all of their seasons. you can see now the northern edge of the mainly is into portions of the midwest. we had a little line of stronger storms especially in the heat of the day yesterday. that diminished now. a frontal boundary could redevelop today in the heat of the day. here's how it looks heading into texas. you can see the moisture moving in, very sparse now. unfortunately where that line is setting up is where we had some of the heaviest rain with those recent systems. we already have saturated grounds, and the brighter greens that you're seeing, those are a lot of places, especially rivers
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that were still cresting from the last round of flooding, so that's why we have so many watches up, even though the rain hasn't been heavy and is probably not going to be heavy especially in isolated spots. it will add to everything that's going on. i mentioned the severe risk that heat of today could add to that. it's a slight risk, but not out of the question that we could see a couple of spots of severe weather. i mention that had heat, it's a real diverse line. behind it, 40's, 50's, ahead of it, 70's and 80's. as the front goes through, those temperatures are plummeting. >> nicole mitchell, thank you. >> there are reports this morning that the wife and son of an illinois police officer are now under investigation. officials revealed wednesday they believe lt. joe glenowitcz committed suicide. he died of a gunshot wound in september after radioing he was chasing suspects. it is believed his family helped him stage the shootout to avoid
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prosecution for steal money from the police department. supporters of anonymous taking to the streets, but will it hurt more than help. as president obama hosts native american leaders in washington, we look at one tribe that needs more federal help.
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supporters of anonymous are on the streets in australia and new zealand, taking part in the
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million mask march. protests are planned in 250 cities today as they threaten to release the names of names of those in the k.k.k. why now, why anonymous? >> anonymous has been in a kind of war with people on the radical right for some years now. a few years ago, they ran operation blitzkrieg aimed at outing neonazi groups. in that latest round operation k.k.k. really began back in late 2014, when a particular clan group threatened to bring lethal force to ferguson missouri. this is apparently now the
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biggest effort yet. >> are they doing something that law enforcement can't do partly cloudy because of privacy cob veterans. >> they are doing something illegal, breaking into computers and outing people. there's a real problem in that a lot of mistakes have been made, either by anonymous or by others using that name with that just within the last couple of days, the names of four u.s. senators and five mayors of large cities were released, supposedly by anonymous, although some people on the internet are saying no, that wasn't anonymous. but in any case, it seems to me at least it's extremely unlikely that these named u.s. senators and mayors were actually members of the clan. in that case, their names are out there. >> p.t. barnum once saying there is no such thing as bad
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publicity. they drive object getting the message out that they're big, bad and hidden, so doesn't this play into their hands? >> i suppose one could make that argument. let me say that as a matter of fact, the plan today is small, weak, and poorly led. it is very small especially when one looks at it in the historical arc. 1925 there were 4 million klan members in this country, the next peak 1965 in the middle of the civil rights movement when there were perhaps 40,000 and today we are looking at 4,000 divided up into 23 different groups that spend a great deal of their time bickering with one another, each one claiming that we're the one true klan and the others of fakeers -- >> is anybody going to be surprised by finding out who is
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the head of the k.k.k.? >> i very much doubt that we're going to find well known people in these lists, at least if they are accurate. you know, the reality today especially for a politician is if it is found out that you are a member of the klan, you know, it's i instantaneous political death. >> the klan has been claiming to be enormous and powerful and you know in the halls of power.
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to those of us who stayed the klan today, it's obviously not true. if these lists prove to be accurate, i think the picture they will paint of the klan is not a very flattering one. >> mark, as always, thank you very much. >> del, flights in and out of san diego international airport are back to normal after a five hour standoff between police and a man firing a high powered rifle. the 33-year-old was arrested after giving himself up at an apartment complex near the airport. numerous shots were fired, but there were no injuries. louisiana police had a police pursuit that ended in the fatal shooting of a 6-year-old tuesday in the northern part of the state. officials say police did not know the child was in the car when they fired on it. they were trying to stop his father from hitting a patrol car. his father was shot and in
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critical condition. >> native leaders gathering in washington to meet with the president for the white house tribal nations conference. the he leaders there say there are major problems that have to be fixed on their reservations. we went to one of them. >> the ground i'm standing on used to be a sidewalk. the area behind me was a place to park buses and repair them. for the last 30 years, students here have had to use this as a school. with a waiting list of 100 schools that need replacement, school officials say the bandaid fixes can only hold up for so long. >> we are here at the school where funding for education is a big priority for tribal nations. it's also one of the issues president obama will discuss today as he meets with native american leaders from across the country at the tribal nations conference in d.c. this is the seventh year he has held such a meeting and representatives from 500 tribes will be there. president obama made native
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american issues a key part of his time in office. we spoke to two tribal nations in minnesota to find out whether those initiatives have made a difference on the ground, specifically when it comes to education. here on the fond du lac reservation, tribal leader said he has seen plenty of signs of progress over the last seven years. >> he did his part to help us succeed. he helped us with education. he helped us with infrastructure development. we've got programs here that are a direct result of the obama administration. >> since the president took office, funding for many programs in indian country have increased, but for some communities like the leech lake reservation two hours north, the money hasn't trickled down. >> if you are in d.c. with the
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other tribal leaders right now, what would you ask president obama? >> i would just ask him to give us the funding so we could build a school and i would invite him here so he can see what our building looks like. that's what i would do. >> school officials hope the funding comes through soon, before pop leaves office. if not, they worry they might have to start the whole process over again with the next administration. al jazeera, on the reservation. >> every administration promises they are going to do something, and each time -- >> the community is still trying to get a piece of the land of opportunity. >> the land they were here first on. >> an international dispute over the cause of a russian plane crash in egypt. >> the u.s. and u.k. saying it looks like a bomb was responsible, moscow and cairo saying no. we'll talk to a former chairman of the ntsb about the political fight in the investigation. russia is sending anti
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aircraft missiles to bashar al assad's government in syria. how stepped up support could affect the u.s. mission.
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>> you're the first one on the scene. suicides, homicides, the roof is crushing into somebody's chest. >> what is the number one cause of death for police officers? >> suicide. >> welcome back, time to take a look at our top stories. the so-called million mask march is underway for the supporters of the group 19 must.
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protests are planned in 650 cities around the world. nobody must will release the names of thousands of members of the k.k.k. >> rescue workers are digging through a building collapse in lahore, pakistan. 18 were killed and 75 injured when the building came down. local officials are still trying to determine the cause. they say some 150 people were inside at the time. british officials saying it is looking increasingly likely that a bomb took down the airliner over egypt. u.s. officials say early evidence suggest a bomb was responsible. russia saying that is speculation, but the british transport secretary saying egypt needs to put in tighter long term security measures before british flights resume to the sinai peninsula. we have more on our stair from london. >> the strongest statements by any officials so far in the downing of that plane may back up the plane from the sinai branch of isil that
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they were responsible. the government has called an emergency security meeting known as the cobra meeting. they held one last night, will hold another in the building just behind me here discussing the new intelligence they have, how to beef up security at sharm el-sheikh airport and bring british holiday makers home safely. the u.k. aviation experts are on the ground now putting in short term measures to make sure that everything going on to those passenger planes is properly screened. there's been lots of concern about the lax security there. a small military team is on the ground now advising on security and logistics. of course, we don't know exactly what is behind that air crash and until the data from those
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black box recorders is revealed, we're going to be in the dark. >> the egyptian president al sisi has been meeting with david cameron in london today. britain also expressing concerns about the security at the airport as it is trying now to get its tourists out of the country, egypt insist be the airport at sharm el-sheikh is safe. >> joining us is former ntsb chairman jim hall. again, thank you for your time. what do you make of statements out of britain that this may well have been caused by an explosive device? >> well, i think the british government is taking responsible steps to protect their own with concerns about the safety of their own citizens, so the information in the intelligence community would certainly is -- needs to be heeded until the egyptian government is more
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transparent in their investigation. >> knit's president dismissing this saying we do not want to russia to conclusions. who should we trust more with reliable information, the facts, and you know this, you were ntsb chairman, what was your experience with the forthrightness of egyptian authorities. >> well, i had some concerns at that time. of course, it was president mubarak at that time who is no longer in charge of the egyptian government. i hope things have changed. they have outstanding aviation investigators but the government makes decision ins reward to what is reported, unlike the united states where we have an independent national transportation safety board and the investigations are independent and the board
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chairman and the board speaks when we believe or the ntsb believes safety of flight has been compromised. >> we assume that the u.s. and the britons have intelligence, because they don't have access to the physical evidence, or data and voice recorders. as a public, how to you weigh that, the intel or physical evidence. >> i worked closely with the russian aviation authorities and british. russian us have world class laboratories, world class investigators. they clearly know more information than has been disclosed at this point and president putin in light of mh17
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i think has a responsibility to be sure that the egyptian government provides information so the traveling public can be aware if there are dangers and there is no -- >> it sounds like you are saying that the potential for the investigation is being politicized potentially by russia and egypt. let me ask you this. at this point, this happened over the weekend, that crash. if we're talking about an explosive device, some sort of bomb, would you at this point expected we would have heard about some sort of residue on the parts of the plane? the individuals on that aircraft and very importantly, they have
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the recorders. the russians are very sophisticated in explosive sounds that may be a signature on the cockpit flight recorder that might determine what explosives were on the aircraft. >> the voice recorder may be damaged and maybe that explains the delay. i want to be clear, when we talk about an explosion on the flight, we are not necessarily talk about a bomb explosion, correct? in other words, could there have been some mechanical catastrophic failure that would have led to an explosion? >> well, certainly. we saw that of course with t.w.a., we've had incidents with cargo doors not being properly closed, where the door and there was a rapid decompression of the aircraft. in this case, there's been conversation about the bulkhead being compromised by the bad repair of the tail section of
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the aircraft, so there are both criminal and civil possibilities here. >> former ntsb chairman jim hall, thank you for your expertise this morning. >> reports came out that russian officials have now sent anti aircraft missiles to syria, designed to safeguard its jets involved in airstrikes, it's fighter jets. the commander of the russian air force saying the mission would protect against an attack or high jock on a mission. russian planes have been carrying out airstrikes against isil in syria since the end of september. the u.n. refugee agency expects 5,000 refugees a day to arrive in greece and turkey over the next four months. may be are fleeing syria. a refugee now in austria told us about his journey and why his family fled. >> the situation was really intense, really scary for us as a family to stay there.
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my dad was personally wanted, let's say, from both sides, actually from the regime side and from the free army side, so we just decided to leave before we got killed. the hardest part was not knowing where we are. me and my mom and my sister, well, we got into let's say a vehicle, it was a truck from istanbul directly to austria, vienna in particular, and the hardest part was that we only got off of it once a day in the middle of the night and in the middle of nowhere, so we didn't know where we were at the time. that went on for six days. it was really scary for us.
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>> now we got the refugee stats, thank god. we've been here for about a year now. i'm going to school, me and my sister are going to school. first it was a little hard, we have to learn the language and to get in touch with the community and all, but and then everything worked out, so basically, we are living in a little apartment, meanwhile, me, my sister and my mom, we go to school and we're trying to build our lives. i mean, me and my family only went out of syria because we were basically going to die if we stayed. we just ran away from death. if death isn't there anymore, then we'll go back. >> every met a lot of syrians along the way who's experiences were far scarier than his. an egyptian court postponing the final trial of president mubarak. he was he is 87 years old now.
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>> victims of a south sudan cargo plane crash, dozens of people died wednesday after a russian built aircraft went down shortly after aircraft from the main airport in the capital of juba. three people slide e. survived, one a baby. >> stone was stabbed while trying to break up a fight in sacramento last month. authorities say the stabbing not related to anything that happened onboard that train. >> groups are calling on nbc to fire candidate donald trump before he hosts "saturday night live." there were protests wednesday. activists delivered petitions
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with more than half a million names calling on numbers to dump trump as the host of this weekend's show. >> hard working, we are law abiding individuals. we are fighting in our nation's armed forces. we served this country as well as any other community in this country and we do not deserve to be attacked by someone like donald trump every single time he opens his mouth. i don't know what they were thinking. they extended this invitation to him. >> on the weather front, snow in the rockies, rain in texas, you have been busy. >> as this made its way along, different things we have seen, as this has gone through the rockies, we now have a couple of ski resorts open now, loveland reporting six inches of snowfall in the past 24 hours and more trying to get open for tanks giving, so that's a good sign, getting north, we've got snow
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all the way from parts of north carolina take to northern portions of new mexico. pores of the accident will stay rain, but you had a temperature whiplash. ahead of the front, temperatures are even milder this morning. maybe 10 degrees warmer than yesterday morning and some like dallas. behind this in albuquerque, they propped over 10 degrees from what you felt yesterday morning at this time. that's how the rest of the day is going to trend, ahead, 70's and 80's, where the front has gone through 50's and 60's, and even colder at night, that's why we've seen support of that snow. now as this continues on and gets to the great lakes, again, most of this will be rain, but this is what we're looking at by the time we get into tomorrow, and then for the coastline, a little bit more later friday and into saturday, dropping the
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temperatures then. temperatures drop, depending on where you are. this will also help clean out some of this fog, still dealing with a little bit of it this morning in new york and connecticut. >> when we came to work this morning, you could barely see the manhattan skyline. images out of washington, d.c., just to show you how bad the fog is. that is capitol hill somewhere. >> pea soup. >> the congressmen will manage to make their way to work. they just merged this morning, the food giant kraft hines, and is closing several plants. it is going to result in 2600 layoffs, 14% of their northern american factory workforce. the country says it will save $1.5 billion. >> it is not uncommon to see salutes to the military in the
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sporting events. $10 million were paid out to events. teams in every sports league took the money. the senate is moving to ban the practice. many sports teams hold military events without being paid. >> when we come back, we'll talk about saving the out of theres. >> ahead why scientists say a warming ocean could mean an end to the shell fish. >> under the ocean, reviving coral reefs, saving treasures under the sea.
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job the company needs to put out
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5 million out of theres a year. as he watches them struggle to grow, he's calling in help. >> we've learned that it's complex. as the ocean sucks up carbon, scientists like tessa hill are studying whether out of theres, a crucial part of the food chain can survive an ocean that's more acidic and has less oxygen. >> the changes humans are imposing on the system are unprecedented relative to any other change in history. it's a question whether organisms can adapt fast enough. >> this isn't about special pressures. it's not a question of whether or not you and i get to east out of theres in the future. they are trying to figure out whether clams, out of theres have a future in the oceans at all. >> this environment that are experienced in this part of the range we figure is a proxy for future environment.
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>> andrew's lab is collecting be a loney to sort out whether they can survive. >> these are abalone, the oldest in the world. they are an important species, represent a proxy for animals, basically anything with a shell around here. >> an animal has to reproduce enough for a genetic trait to emerge. >> are abalone prolific enough to produce enough genetic diversity? >> a single female can generate hundred was thousands. if they are able to run that gamut of development they are likely to be the seeds of future
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generations. >> he hopes that this could maintain the future of the company. >> this has been pretty good he says. he worries about the next year and something like that and whether out of theres can change as fast as the ocean will. jacob ward, california. >> they are trying to save the chesapeake bay. it's been so many out of theres that they used the shells to pave driveways. >> with one ocean. the word's coral reefs are dying at an alarming rate affecting the entire underwater ecosystem. >> a laboratory in the florida key has discovered technology that mayeverse that trend.
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>> i thought coral scientists needed self help groups, because they saw what was happening underwater years ahead of people on land. >> scientists are worrying about scenes like these, dead corals appearing all over the world. more than a quarter of the earth's corals have disappeared as a result of rising temperatures, pollution and ocean acidification. >> marine biologist david and his team at the laboratory in the florida keys are racing to try to reverse the alarming loss. ten years ago, he accidentally discovered if you cut coral into tiny fragments, it stimulates it to grow up to 50 times its normal rate. >> these were just cut today and as you can see, these are very tiny pieces and just a couple of
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polyps in there are arrive. in just a few weeks instead of a few years, these will start growing and these are just a month or two old and have almost grown to fill out that base. >> this is a game changer. >> this is a real game changer for the reef growing corals, which everybody else forget. >> the coral fragments are arranged on small rocks in seawater nurseries. using the method, his team can produce thousands of micro fragments in days. these fragments are cut from corals which have survived warmer more acidic conditions, giving them a better chance of survival. in nature, this coral would take about 15 years to reproduce, and there's about a one in a million chance that it would even be able to do so, but this new technology means that dr. vaughn and his team are able to grow these corals to this size in less than a year. >> once the corals reach a certain size, they are then
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transplanted on to dying reefs. it's now one of the largest coral restoration projects of its kind. thanks to government grants and private donations, next year, they plan to expand the program and double the amount of reef restoration. over the next decade, dr. vaughn hopes to restore more than a thousand acres of florida's reefs. throughout his career, dr. vaughn has seen some coral species nearly vanish but now is optimistic. >> we can't wait 100 years that corals may come back on their own. we want to head start them by planting thousands if not millions of little tiny ones so we'll have corals here for a long time. nasa is looking for the next generation. >> who nasa wants at the controls of its latest mission. n.
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>> tough that the country gave up on me. >> look at the trauma... every day is torture. >> this is our home. >> nobody should have to live like this. >> we made a promise to these heroes... this is one promise americans need to keep.
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>> we could find out more today about mars and the future travel of space. nasa set to unveil key scientific findings on the atmosphere of mars in the hopes of sending a manned mission to the planet over the next 15-20 years. >> nasa will soon begin accepting applications for its next wave of astronauts. >> it's getting a head start on future missions. we have more.
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>> nasa is looking for a few good people to make a very long trip. >> i want you to apply for nasa's astronaut problem. >> it's part of the plan for future exploration, once again sending astronauts to the international space station, missions to the moon and eventually the red planet. >> in the 2030's, the ultimate goal is to go to mars and conduct stays on the surface, so by soliciting new astronaut applications now, they are trying to show they are serious about these plans and that they intend to use these people for decades to come. >> three years ago, nasa put out a similar public request that got 6,000 responses. nasa has grown in the social media age. from the orion space flight test to the first fly by of pluto, since grounding its space
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shuttle program in 2011 and plans to out source space travel to the private sector, there's been an exodus of astronauts. nasa had almost 150 astronauts, today 47. >> there was a lot of turnover in the post space shuttle era. a lot of people moved on from the agency because they knew there would be less flight opportunities. this is an effort to start getting in a new crop, kind of fresh blood and start ramping up in preparation for these missions. the lucky hires will be announced in 2017. >> candidates need a bachelor's degree in engineering, math and science and 1,000 hours of pilot time. pay starts at $66,000 and can go up to $140,000. >> that's it for us here in new york. i'm stephanie sy. >> coming up next from doha, more on the vehicles into the crash of the russian jet in
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egypt. british officials saying it was likely caused by a bomb. >> egypt's president along with the british prime minister talking about the cause of the crash dominating the agenda at talks. >> also ahead, the british prime minister says a bomb is most likely to blame for that air crash in egypt. >> we can't be certain that the russian airliner was brought down by a terrorist bomb, but it looks increasingly likely that that was the case. >> revenues the requireian government said it's retain a stragi

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