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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  November 10, 2015 7:00am-9:01am EST

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immigration setback, appeals court blocks president obama's plan to protect millions from deportation. [chanting] campus protesting and getting results forcing leaders to resign but will it be enough to ease racial tensions. a president debate and who needs a breakout performance. >> loss of humidity, a lot of color. >> i think it's beautiful. >> a clean slate after two decades of good scrubbing for one of seattle's popular by strange attractions. ♪
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this morning the justice department is trying to figure out what is next after a federal appeals court ruled the president's executive action on immigration will remain on hold. welcome to your world this morning i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm dell walters and have undocumented immigrants stay in the u.s. but as we report it means millions of people in legal limbo. >> reporter: the court decision is not unexpected but a setback on president obama's immigration reform and has under taken circumventing congress and making them angry and the dream act where the president talked about deportation proceedings against young people brought to the country not of their own choice as children and deportation proceedings deferred against them and the parents of
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those who are already u.s. citizens and the president announced after the mid term elections in 2014 when it became clear the republican leg congress is not going to move on immigration reform. now earlier in february a texas judge in a lower court had bought the president's plan going forward and issued essentially a stay and the white house and department of justice appealed to the fifth circuit in new orleans and known as a conservative court to allow the president's plan to go forward and denied the request and on monday evening came out with their ruling saying the texas judge the earlier lower court ruling from february still stands and not unexpected, this is a court with two republican appointees and one democrat appointee and the vote of the court was 2-1 and may look at this as a positive development however because now it does clear the path to the supreme court to make a final decision, sometime in this term, in other
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words in president obama's term before he leaves office the supreme court's term just beginning a few weeks ago. now there is hope the supreme court will bring this up and issue a ruling sometime next year, no one needs to be reminded that is an election year, a volatile issue on the campaign trail and donald trump and others on the republican side making a great deal of hay to immigration reform and trump saying he wants to deport all of the 11 million individuals who are in this country illegally. but for now the five million individuals this would have affected the president's initiative on hold now as all eyes turn to the supreme court who could issue a final ruling on this sometime in the middle of next year again, a presidential election year. >> reporting from washington and republicans criticized the president's executive action as illegal over reach and 26 states challenged the plan in court. stephanie also this morning the university of missouri is looking for a new president
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after weeks of racial tension on campus and both top leaders resigned and members of the football team who once threatened to stay off the field this weekend are expected back at practice later today and andy is live in columbia, missouri and andy what is happening there this morning? >> reporter: well, right now, del, the tense of the protesters are still up here in the middle of campus but they are empty and up i'm symbolically and yesterday we talked to the race relations committee and he said it was after last year's protest in ferguson, missouri that the students on this overwhelmingly white campus started to pay attention to racial incidents and to take a bigger interest and called it a shift in the titanic plates and what happened yesterday an earthquake. a somber resignation of the school president tim wolf. >> i'm resigning as president of the missouri system.
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>> reporter: emotional reaction in the center of campus. for months black students on this overwhelmingly white campus said racial tensions were poisonening the atmosphere and a sw swastica in feces was on the side of the building and someone used the n word when he walked on campus. >> i had incidents with students racial and it's just time that people start listening. >> reporter: activist group called concern student 1950 named for the first student was admitted to missouri confronted the president tim wolf at home coming last month and he iing knowed him and he later apologized but last week butler began a hunger strike vowing not to eat until wolf was gone. monday a hungry butler said he started eating again and was grateful. >> i do appreciate the prayers
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that i received, positive thoughts and messages, thank you for the community. >> reporter: over the weekend some republican and democrat lawmakers in the state legislature began calling on wolf to resign but the end of the line may have been a threat by at least 30 black members of missouri's football team and announced on social media they wouldn't practice or play as long as wolf stayed, a prospect that could have cost the school millions of dollars and wolf took responsibility for lack of dialog on campus and threats and the hunger strike were the wrong way to make changes. >> we have to respect each other enough to stop yelling at each other and start listening and quit intimidating each other. >> reporter: missouri football players said it gave new meaning to studen student athletes and coach supports them. >> will support the community on the campus. >> didn't look at consequences and that wasn't about it at the
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time, it was about helping my players and supporting my players when they needed me. >> reporter: the students may have brought down the president of the university of missouri system but still have issues to face, how bad is the racial tension here and how do you solve it. >> i think you can introduce new programs, you can really just foster an environment of acceptance and include everyone and really hear all the voices that need to be heard. >> reporter: the tents went up about the time butler started his hunger strike and they are empty now but made it a tight-knit group area and formed a gigantic circle in the area and very antimedia and for some reason they were very distrustful of the media and in the end they got what they wanted which was the resignation of tim wolf. >> the students behind you, the ones in the tent and we saw black and white and asian faces and have they said they are satisfied with monday's results
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or could we see further shake ups in the university leadership? >> that depends what the leadership will give them but right now they are saying the right things and hired an interim chancellor and announced the formation of a diversity committee on all the campuses in the university of missouri system and have also hired a diversity officer which is a step in the right direction and they say that they are going to go ahead with plans to do some other things that the protesters have always called for including more diversity among the faculty here, it's only about 5% nonwhite is the makeup of the faculty and calling for diversity training for all incoming students and faculty as well although that chairman of the race relations committee says that will not be cheap and says it could cost millions of dollars ultimately so we will find out more today, del. >> in columbia, missouri and andy thank you very much and this morning the police chief in tuscaloosa, alabama saying more
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officers could be arrested when the investigation of a tasing incident continues and three have been suspended with pay and tasing a university of alabama student and hitting others with a baton and all of this as you can see caught on tape and responding to a noise complaint and three students facing charges with abstruck shun and resisting arrest. his six-year-old son who was shot and he was shot in confrontation with officers and his son was laid to rest but few has not been told his son was killed and as al jazeera jonathan martin says they are trying to piece together what happened. >> they are being held on $1 million bond, monday a judge ordered the two louisiana police officers upon release to home incarceration with electronic monitoring, they must also surrender their badges and weapons. investigators still don't know why the two police officers
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pursued christopher few's suv last tuesday and opened fire in the dead end street in louisiana, at least 18 rounds were fired, several of them hitting and killing his son six-year-old strapped in the front seat and monday afternoon the boy was laid to rest. >> he is with god. >> reporter: police poured over 911 calls and interviewed witnesses but so far body camera footage from a third officer who responded for backup has given investigators the clearest picture of what happened, the video has not been released but according to few's attorney a state police investigator described it to the judge during monday's bail hearing and the lawyer says it shows his clients with his hands up posing no threat to police before they opened fire. >> i think it showed some things that disturbed me as police and father. >> reporter: lieutenant with the police department and greenhouse a reserve officer and
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both working part time as city marshals and their job is to serve warrants but chris few had no outstanding warrants and was unarmed. >> shaken the community a lot. this is a small community and everybody knows everybody and it's a tragic situation and everybody is paying the price. jonathan martin, al jazeera new orleans search for a diplomatic solution to the civil war in syria and secretary of state john kerry will go there with a meeting from eu, and 17 countries and trying to map a political transition to end the war and syrian government and opposition won't be there but russia and iran bashar al-assad's biggest backers will take past. lost investigation of the two americans at a military training center in jordan and an officer opening fire leaving at least five people dead and roslyn jordan has more.
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>> reporter: this is not a war zone by any stretch of the imaginization and shooting at a police place is so shocking and the jordan government are trying to figure out why a veteran criminal investigator opened his weapon at other colleagues at the training facility on monday, six people have been killed at least, the gunman apparently was killed during a shoot out with local authorities. what they don't understand is how something like this could happen in a facility that has been open since 2003 for the purpose of training iraqi and other police forces around the middle east. while the u.s. has been accustom to the notion of green on blue attacks during the wars in iraq and afghanistan it never had to deal with something like this in a country it corpss a very close ally, certainly there are going to be many questions that have to be answered and hoping they can do so quickly. and that is roslyn jordan
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for us at washington d.c., attack taking place on the tenth anniversary of one of the deadliest attack in history and bombing three luxury how items in aman and 57 people killed. tonight the presidential hopefuls will take the main stage in milwaukee and the fourth debate comes as the new frontrunner ben carson faces scrutiny in his past and he will be in the spotlight and so will the moderator answer we have a preview. >> reporter: despite revelations he may have padded his resume ben carson leads in my polls as republicans arrive in mill milwaukee. >> it's a marathon and polls go up and down and not spending a lot of time worrying about it. >> reporter: the debate in colorado less than two weeks ago carson grabbed if lead from donald trump. >> i don't like being second because second is terrible to me. >> reporter: and it's not just that drove the conversation, it was the debate and cruz said it
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directly. >> the questions asked so far in the debate is why american people don't trust the media. >> reporter: complaints followed and the republican national committee with a letter suspended their relationship with nbc, the parent of c nbc putting into doubt a nbc debate scheduled for february. that complaint and a hurried meeting of many of the gop campaigns led to a list of demands for future debates and none of the campaigns ultimately signed on complaints were heard and even mocked by at least one person. >> they can't handle a bunch of c nbc moderators. [laughter] if you can't handle those guys, you know then i don't think the chinese and the russians are going to be too worried about you. >> reporter: but for all of the bluster about the debates themselves the candidates will need to make their points to a
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presumably friendlier host on fox network and some candidates more than others. >> we need a president who fixes our budgetary mess, i can fix it. >> reporter: jeb bush has tried to fix his campaign since the last debate which featured heated exchanges between him and senator rubio now ahead of milwaukee bush has continued to go after the man he once mentored. >> the challenge we face as a nation are too great to roll the dice on another presidential experiment. >> reporter: cry as he might to criticize rubio, rubio is ahead and scored big last time by criticizing the press. >> the democrats have the super pac it is the media. >> a chance to refocus the debate on the economy. >> i will immediately put us on a path to a balanced budget. >> i led hewlett packer through
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a hard time. >> they want to leave the stage as the best, al jazeera, milwaukee. new jersey governor chris christie and mike huckabee will not be on the main stage tonight and dropped from the top tier because of low poll numbers and coming up, later this hour how television ratings may effect presidential debates. louisiana has gotten a court's okay to retry an inmate held in solitary confinement for decades, the federal appeals court said the state can continue to hold albert wood fox as it seechs a third trial and he is the last of the angola three and in jail for more than 40 years and convicted twice for killing a prison guard in 1972 and the convictions were overturned. no comments from "rolling stone" after a lawsuit filed against it by the university of virginia a fraternity there and they want $25 million in damages that frat was implicated in this
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2014 article describing a rape on campus, two investigations revealing that rape never occurred, the article was retracted. when we come back closing guantanamo bay. >> plans as congress tries to stop it, where those prisoners may end up. [whistle] the fight for 15 fast-food workers hitting the streets in their biggest strike yet. and it is the end of an era as seaworld big changes in the park's controversial killer whale show. ♪ the only way to get better is to challenge yourself,
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and that's what we're doing at xfinity. we are challenging ourselves to improve every aspect of your experience. and this includes our commitment to being on time. every time. that's why if we're ever late for an appointment,
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we'll credit your account $20. it's our promise to you. we're doing everything we can to give you the best experience possible. because we should fit into your life. not the other way around. ♪ today the senate plans to vote on a bill banning the transfer of guantanamo by prisoners to
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the u.s. >> working to close the prison and as jamie mcintyre the full plans could be out by the end of the week. >> pentagon looked at a number of sites looking for options to send guantanamo detainees who cannot be released or sent back to other countries and looked at the u.s. navel brig in charleston, south carolina and looked at the u.s. military prison at fort leven worth, kansas and settled on the best option as colorado super max prison known as adx in florence and one of the most secure in the prison and nicknamed sometimes alcatraz in the rockies and has high profile prisoners there including the 9-11 conspirator and yousiff master mind between the 1993 world trade center bombing and
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faruk who is the so called underwear bomber all held in this facility and the official talked to me on condition of animity and they will send it to congress possibly as early as thursday. >> congress repeating the attempts to close gitmo and wants to move them to u.s. soil and we have the human rights division of amnesty international and joins us from washington dc and ndaa restricting gitmo prisoners from being sent to the mainland and how does the white house get around of what congress clearly does not want to happen? >> thanks for having me and thank you for covering this issue. i think first of all we need to be really clear because there is fear and ignorance when we talk about guantanamo and closing
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guantanamo is the right goal and this plan at least what has been reported is not the way to get there and the plan will not win support from congress which has asked for the plan in the first place with no intent to support it no matter what it said and also doesn't close guantanamo the central problem of guantanamo is this idea there are certain individuals that are too dangerous to release even if they are not charged or prosecuted, that is the human rights violation central to the guantanamo problem and has to end and moving it to colorado or anywhere else just changes the zip code and doesn't close it. >> would give inmates rights if they are transferred to american soil, is that not the case? >> well, it is certainly the case that the bush administration originally orchestrated and designed guantanamo to be a business outside of the reach of the rule of law and something the obama administration promised to do away with and i believe the plan they are trying to get there. what we are understandirging ths
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put together a plan that abandons the failed trials that have been set up in guantanamo and does away with indefinite detention without charge or trial and accountability and redress for human rights violation including torture the detain detainees are. >> and closing this is this more about concerns for the home land or blocking the legislative agenda of president obama before he leaves office? >> you know, i truly this that is part of it but i also think as i said earlier guantanamo has come to this sort of mythological and people held there are super humor a species we never had a system to handle and the truth is the criminal justice system in the united states and mentioned earlier in the report is perfectly capable of handling the prosecution and punishment and detention and everything else of convicted
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criminals including those of terrorist activity. now, let's remember only a handful of people at guantanamo are facing charges, the rest have been cleared for transfer or waiting for the clearance process to go through and waiting in limbo and talk about people as if -- sure, i will wrap it up and say sure. >> i wanted to ask you one question before you go is it your opinion the most dangerous inmates are already out of guantanamo? >> well, it's the opinion of amnesty international and many others people do not get detained based on potential dangerousness of something they may do in the future but criminal activity they have done and we would like to see rule of law and human rights protection and charge and try people if there is something they have done and if not they have to go. >> ms. beavers thank you very much for being with us. del israel's prime minister has a round of meetings in washington and netanyahu talking with jewish groups and expected
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to meet with senate leaders on capitol hill and monday he and president obama met for the first time in more than a year and al jazeera's patty reports. >> they burned the people in the house. >> reporter: outside the white house heated debate of the israeli palestinian conflict. >> they started, don't ask me because you are brain washed. >> welcome once again. >> reporter: but inside a much more calm tone as the two leaders tried to send a message of unity on the issue. >> i want to be very clear we condemn in the strongest terms palestinian violence against innocent israeli citizens and i want to repeat once again it's my strong belief that israel has not just the right but the obligation to protect itself. >> i want to make it clear that we have not given up our hope for peace. we will never give up our hope for peace and i remain committed to a vision of peace, of two states for two people, a
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de-military state that recognizes the jewish state. >> reporter: obama administration says it's not as hopeful. >> a two-state solution was not going to happen while president obama was still in office and even the possibility of talks about a two-state solution between israelis and palestinians was unlikely over the course of the next 14-15 months. however, if there is an opportunity for us to try to move the process in that direction, sort of talks, that is something that the united states remains committed to. >> whatever netanyahu may say. >> reporter: matt thinks they could be hinting at taking action at the u.n. security council. >> a question of what might be done multi laterally and this is with the u.n. and if a resolution on settlements or perimeters backed by the u.s. laying out what the reservoir
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resolution to the conflict might look like and solutions to put it in a better footing than it is now. >> could be dangerous for u.s. president because most do not agree with what raman wants to see happen. >> we ask the government to stop supporting them with arms and billions of dollars with u.s. taxpayer's money to support the israeli government and put more pressure on illegal settlements. >> reporter: the conversation was about giving israel more money and increasing it above $3 billion the u.s. already promised every year. >> thank you very much. >> reporter: the new higher amount would be guaranteed for a decade. patty with al jazeera, washington. russia calls it unfounded. >> kremlin acting to the widespread doping allegations in sports and could see the russian teams kicked off the olympic playing field. blood pressure and lowering your numbers below recommended standards just might extend your life.
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>> shot dead and the government does nothing. >> they teach you how to eliminate people? >> ya. >> we've done it and that is why we are there. >> my life is in danger. >> anyone who talks about the islamic religion is killed. >> don't miss the exclusive al jazeera investigation. >> i can't allow you not to go into that because that is your job. >> only on al jazeera america. >> you're looking live at the u.s. virgin islands. >> nice view.
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>> welcome back. taking a local today's top stories, the justice department is considering an appeal to the supreme court after a federal appeals court blocked the president's executive action on immigration. the plan would have granted permission for 5 million undocumented immigrants to stay in the u.s. and apply for work permits. >> after weeks of tensions in the university of missouri, both of the school leaders have resigned or will resign after a hunger strike and the football team that threatened. >> quit. >> eight republican presidential candidates faceoff oh night in a presidential debate. >> governor chris christie and mike huckabee will faceoff in the earlier debate. >> the newest republican presidential poll finds the outsiders still leading the way. a poll has ben carson leading the pack, donald trump following. the only other republican in
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double detects is senator marco rubio with 12%. alan schroeder is a professor, good morning. thank you for being with us. let's talk about the debate tonight. after fierce discussion about the mad raters after the debate, what do fox business news anchors need to do to be prepared. >> they signaled they are going to stick to the economy, financial issues, that's the stated theme of this debate. i think what they'll probably do is that's what they're comfortable with, concentrate there and leave some of the personal stuff aside. >> i've never had the pleasure of being a debate moderator but what do you think the job is, to stick to the script and ask
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questions or be an aggressive political journalist when facts warrant? >> i think the latter. there isn't a script. it's a live television show, organic exercise and you just don't know what's going to happen. moderators have to be alert to everything that happens, be listeners, as well as presenters of questions. i hope they don't stick so closely to the script that it sucks the air out of everything. >> more than 20 million viewers have been drown to the debates. do you think ratings pressure influences how the moderators frame question to the candidates? >> i'm not sure it influences how the questions are framed, but think that it influences the way that the debates are produced. they have been very glitzy, almost a combination of a game show and reality show. it's something we're seeing here, this phenomenon of
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networks showcasing their talent. there were six people asking questions all because cnbc wanted to show off its talent roster. that's where you see the influence of ratings. >> you have john harwood, one of the talent asking a question to trump, is this a comic book version of a presidential campaign. that kind of questions, when a reporter asks that, it is bound to be provocative. do you think that there is pressure to show some blood on the mat, given that these are being framed like big sporting events? >> perhaps so, but the best way for that to happen is when the candidates themselves provide the blood on the mat. the last three debates, donald trump has gone over various candidates. he singles someone out and goes after them at the beginning of
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the debate. you can get that same energy from the candidates. if the moderators get too provocative, they open themselves up to the charges of being biased. the reality is it road be about the candidates. >> we keep hearing this is going to be about issues and policy, jobs and the economy. what are the risks to these mod raters of asking questions that are either too wonky or too many soft balls that may undermine their journalistic credibility? >> these reporter know this stuff inside and out, so i think that it is a general audience debate, but on the other hand if they stick to the economy and really stick to questions that their fluent in, i think it will
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show whether the candidates themselves are equally as fluent in these important matters and that's something useful for voters to know. >> thank you for your insights this morning. >> one of the topics that is sure to fire up the republican base is the topic of immigration. some republicans are speaking out against anchor babies, people born in the u.s. to undocumented parents. we have has story. >> this is the face of what some u.s. presidential candidates call america's lately evident threat. >> because i'm born in the united states, means i'm 100% american, but i mean, like, i feel myself as mexican, too. >> jeanette and fatima were born here, making them american citizens. their parents and older sister were not. republican presidential candidates have a word for that. >> the anchor babies.
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>> people are bringing pregnant women in to have babies to get birth right citizenship. >> we now take care of that baby, social security, medicare, education. give me a break. >> there are cases of foreigners bearing children in the u.s. for citizenship, but in reality, children cannot help their family become legal citizens. they can't apply for family members to join them until they are 21 and it takes years more if they are undocumented. the girl's sister cannot go to work or attend colleges. >> she can't be allowed to go to colleges. i realize that she's been struggling a lot, working hard. >> advocates or immigrants say the talk in the republican president and see laying victimizes an already repressed minority. >> its leads to scapegoating, you are unfortunately demonizing
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a large segment of the population which are not just latinos, but immigrants from all over the world. >> the 14th amend says all persons born or naturalized in the united states and subject to the jurisdiction thereof are citizens. in 1868 it was added just after of the civil war. at the time the u.s. did not limit immigration. the main reason was that slaves were not consider road citizens. this guaranteed their children would be. >> jeanette and fatima's parents risk daily deportation. >> it affects us because we go to work and we don't know if we're coming back. every day we pray that we can go to work and come home. >> each year, u.s. immigration officials deimportant as many as 70,000 parents with u.s. born children like jeanette and fatima. al jazeera, chicago. >> whole have complete coverage of tonight's republican debate beginning at 8:00 p.m. eastern
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time. >> this morning, fast food workers are demanding a higher minimum wage. >> protestors were out before down in new york city asking for $15 an hour. it is repeated across the country. we have more on the fight for 15 from miami. >> after 40 years of working for the same nursing company in miami, lily is raising her voice for better pay. she earns $10.85 part time serving food to the elderly. her social security check covers her $800 a month rent. >> how much are you left with after you pay your bills? >> zero. >> solomon is part of a group of health care workers joining forces with fast food employees around the nation, demanding minimum wage go up to $15 an
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hour. in florida, it's currently $8.05. >> what do you say to the people who say employers can't afford to pay everyone an increased minimum wage? >> i don't buy that. i think they're being a little selfish. >> even though cities like seattle and san francisco approved gradual minimum raise wages to $15 an hour, the move in florida has been slow. the workers say many colleagues don't want to speak out for fear of ring reprimanded. >> some people don't wants to anything, but i speak up for the rest of the staff. >> this is my daughter. >> with no savings and two children at home, solomon said there is no way she can stop fighting now. >> hear me out. i mean, hear my cry. i need more money. >> this morning, the supreme court is taking up a case involving one of the country's biggest meat producers.
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workers at tyson foods claim they are hurt by unfair job rules. as pot sob reports, the ruling could determine the future of class action lawsuits. >> it's the latest case before the supreme court that could carve away at class action lawsuits. a case brought by employees at a tyson meat processing plant who claim they weren't properly compensated for the time it took them to put on and take off protective gear. jurors found in favor of the workers who received affinal award of $5.8 million. tyson cried foul, arcing the jury formula for determining the award was flawed and more crucially, that the group of more than 3,000 workers doesn't pass legal muster as a so-called class, because some of them suffered no injuries. >> this case could either cut back on class actions a little or a lot.
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>> john is a professor at columbia law school. >> if all they talk about is the need for a more typical, more representative plaintiff to represent the class, that's a small injure. if they were to require either that you have to prove every member of the class had standing before the class could be certified, that would be a major barrier that might prevent many consumer injure or tort cases from ever bin certified. >> how how that bar is raised matters a lot to the workers at the low end of the wage scale. >> they lack the resources to take on a big corporate employer or large award to attract a good lawyer. banned together as a class and low wage workers for more likely to get their day in court. tyson lawyers said if we win thes class action device will be put back where it was intended to be. lawyers for the workers are
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concerned about the message a win for tyson would send to big corporations. >> the message is likely to be that companies can get away with an awful lot, as long as their workers are just a little bit different, they won't have to worry about class actions of plaintiffs banning together to vindicate their rights. >> the supreme court is considering two other cases this term that could limit class actions. >> if class actions get more and more difficult, there is no question that the small clientant -- >> that was patricia sobga reporting. >> chipotle is expected to reopen today, closed after dozens of people were sickened with e-coli. public health officials are still working to find the cause of the outbreak. most of those sickened kind in seattle and portland. officials say test this woke
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found no e-coli in foot samples. >> there's a new study out showing pushing blood pressure below 120 can save lives. that's lower than the current guidelines. the death rate was 26% lower for patients who followed new guidelines. there was a 38% fewer cases of heart failure. the rate dropped 24% by using drugs most doctors already prescribe. >> the medications we're using were just the standard meddations that any practitioner would use. we were careful to use preferred drugs, full doses, very careful about our blood pressure measurements. actually to get the difference we saw, which was a big difference in blood pressure, it was only one medication in difference. it's certainly very, very achievable in clinical practice. >> findings could help more than 10 million americans right away.
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there's a new warning over the size of your waist. people who carry their fat in their waist line may be at a higher risk of death even if their weight is considered to be normal. the risk is higher than in overweight or obese people with fat in their hips and thighs. for men, if your waist size is larger than 40, women 35. >> russian president vladimir putin is pushing back on accusation of state sponsored doping by russian athletes. a scathing report by the world anti doping agency alleges widespread cheating at all levels. russia could be banned from the summer olympics next year. >> it takes a little bit of analytical work to unpick what has been said here in russia, but i've been doing that over the last hours and i can detect three things in their message. the firsting compliance, the
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sports ministry saying whatever the i.a.a.f. decides in a week or so, russia will comply with that. it is going adhere to the decisions made by the international sporting body. the second is evasiveness, saying we haven't been given enough time to respond to this report and the accusations contained in it yet, we need to go through it, look at the individual accusations and work out whether they are true or not. the last strand is of course defensiveness. russia and the sports ministry is not denying that it has had a bit of an issue with doping, but it is a bad apple theory, saying these issues were due to individual athletes and their coaches and not a systemic issue. that's why the sport's minister is saying that the report is fictitious and baseless. he's basically refusing the
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allegation that this was something that the russian state itself was complicit in. as to how this whole thing is being in they were related by the russian media, you only have to look at headline in a tabloid which said that the events in geneva on monday were like a bomb going off. >> rory challands reporting from moscow. a short time ago, the world anti doping agency suspended the accreditation of moscow's national drug testing laboratory. sea world chining one of its attractions, the company doing away with the killer whale show. they will still perform. we have more from san francisco. >> for decades, the sham u killer what i will show sold
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out. pressure from animal rights activists and declining attendance forced the company to make a change. >> we are listening to our guests. we're evolving as a company. we're always changing. >> the decision comes after california representative adam said he would in to dues legislation. in 2014, california lawmakers introduced similar legislation. >> the practice of keeping orca captive for human amusement must end. >> sea word defend's its killer whale program. >> they receive the highest level of care available. >> the loss of continuing access to this diverse and thriving group of animals would have a devastating effect. >> the bill was tabled but the issue far from resolved. sea world planned a major expansion of its killer whale tanks. despite protests, california
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ledge later endorsed the plan with restrictions, including sea world agreeing to stop breeding orcas. the company says it will appeal that ruling. >> it just is a bad precedent not only for us, but for all that use aquariums. no change to the tanks will be sufficient for the sensitive and intelligent animals. >> they will focus on the natural setting and behaviors and have a conservation message that remains to be seen whether it will help bring more people back to sea world in san diego. al jazeera, san francisco. >> volkswagen is out with its plan to compensate the owners of diesel cars recalled in the emissions cheating scandal. the vehicles have software which turns offer pollution controls under normal driving conditions.
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>> in the sticky landmark is finally getting a face lift after more than two decades. >> one pricey painting, this art has become one for the record books.
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>> scientists working in brazil made a surprising discovery, fossils of amphibians that had teeth and were controversy dating back 278 million years. all the continent were connected. findings will give clues how animals from the area evolved and migrated across the globe. >> on pluto, a recent fly by showed the planet has icy sol contain knows. we have the first close up showing huge mountains with large holes in the summit that usually means a volcano.
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these spew ice. >> on facebook, you'll find a new user this morning, president obama. the white house created a poet at us page, his first post, a video tour of the white house back yard with a wedge on climate change. you can like the president's page but cannot send a friend request. >> starting today, a sticky attraction is getting a cleanup in seattle. it's a wall of gum 20 years in the making. we got an up close look. >> seattle's must-see tourist spots, space needle, fremont troll, bruce lee's grave, the pike place market and the gum wall. >> really, really disgusting. >> i think it's beautiful. >> it's seattle. >> yes, the gum wall. 2,000 square feet or so of living, growing putty flavor art of the grotesque. really two walls now. >> smells like wrigley
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spearment. >> d.n.a. from all over the word. >> yeah. >> it started as a place for theater patrons to park their gum but morphed into so much more. >> it's crazy, look how much gum is on the wall. >> it's easy to participate. >> just threw it, stick it, and you're part of something really special forever. >> lots of humidity, a lot of color. >> only it's not forever. after 20 years of spontaneous gum d.l. bustion. >> its time. >> it's time for a very thorough cleaning right down to the bricks. >> steaming. it's going to take three days. it's gotten to the part we hired professionals. >> all this public art, the jaw work of generation from locals and visitors from around the
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world will melt away. >> does this gum speak to you you? >> a little bit. now that i know it's going away, i had to get down here. >> going away, but probably not for long. >> let's do a stretch start and gum wall will reemerge. we expect it to be book within 24 hours. >> i'm for it. >> these are walls clearly not meant to be blank. >> it's going to take three days to clean up. >> my desk in first agreed was a work are art. >> an early 20th century painting fetching a larger than life price tag, a masterpiece of a nude woman sold for $170 million. no telling how much that gum wall would fetch. that is the second highest price paid for art at auction and only the 10th work to sell for nine
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figures. >> high art, low art. >> ahead, students are celebrating changes at the university of missouri, but will new leadership shift the tone on campus. >> an appeals court keeping president obama's landmark immigration policy on hold. we'll tell you what's next for the 5 million people who now face deportation. >> we are back in two minutes with more. >> at 9:30 - "america tonight" - top investigative reporting, uncovering new perspectives. >> everything that's happening here is illegal. >> then at 10:00 - it's "reports from around the world". >> let's take a closer look. >> antonio mora gives you
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a global view. >> this is a human rights crisis. >> and at 11:00 - "news wrap-up". clear... concise... complete.
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>> new leadership, old problems, changes at the university of missouri tackling racism on campus with some students saying they still don't address the underlying issues. >> immigration policy defeat, another court rules against president obama's order that would prevent millions of done documented immigrants being deported. >> shutting down gitmo, the white house plans to close that prison and could have detainees headed to a super max jail in
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the rockies. >> the kremlin demands proof of doping allegation that could keep russia out of the olympics. >> good morning, welcome to your world this morning. >> this morning, student activists at the university of missouri are calling for more change to address the issues of race and discrimination on campus. >> they won a major victory on monday with two resignations, president tim wolfe was charged with not doing enough to deal with racism on campus. we are live in missouri. what is the mood on campus now that the resignations have taken place? >> happy, but still there's a
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feeling of what happens next, and will demands be met. a little tent city that popped up in the middle of campus is still here, but empty right now. basically it's someblic at this point. the protestors say there wasn't one big incident, but a series, smaller once like use of the n word on campus. after the rioting in ferguson, missouri, they started to sit up and take notice. >> a somber resignation by president tim wolfe. >> i'm resigning as president of the university of missouri system. >> led to an emotional reaction in the center of campus. for months, black students on this overwhelmingly white campus said racial tensions were affecting the atmosphere.
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>> i have gone here since freshman year and had racial incidents with other students. it's just time that people started listening. >> an activist group named for the year the first black substitute was admit to missouri confronted university president tim wolfe at the school's homecoming last month and he ignored them. wolfe later apologized but last week graduate student jonathan butler began a hunger strike, vowing not to eat until wolfe was gone. monday, he said he had started eating again and was grateful. >> i do appreciate the prayers that received positive thoughts and messages, thank you for the community input. >> over the weekend, some republican and democratic lay makers in the state legislature called on wolfe to resign. the end of the line may have been a threat by 30 black members of missouris football team, announcing that they
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wouldn't practice or play as long as wolfe stayed, a prospect that could have cost the school millions of dollars. wolfe took responsibility for the lack of dialogue on campus but said the threats and learning strike were the wrong way to make changes. >> we have to respect each other enough to stop yelling at each other and start listening and quit intimidating each other. >> afterwards, football players said this gave new meaning to the term student athletes and their coach supported them. >> we will continue to build with the community and support positive change on the campus. >> i didn't look at consequences, that wasn't about it at the time. it was about helping my players and supporting my players when they needed me. >> the students may have helped bring down the president of the university of missouri system, but they still have issues to face. how bad is the racial tension here and how do you solve it? >> i think that you can introduce new programs, you can really just foster an environment of acceptance and
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include everyone and really hear all the voices that need to be heard. >> one interesting side note is normally in a big protest on campus, the protestors love it when the media comes running and brings the story out on a national scale. here, it almost got violent. these protestors were anti media, excusing the media of twisting the story and didn't want near them, an interesting aspect that we'll look into later today. >> that brings us back to the basic question, what happens now? >> now they do have an interim chancellor on campus here. they'll look for a full time president for all the campuses here. they have announced already some changes in policy. they're going to hire a diversity officer for each of the four campuses in the university of missouri system. they're also going to administer training for incoming faculty and students and look at the policy rewarding the amount of
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diversity in the faculty. it's only 5% of non-whites that are part of the faculty here so they will look at that to see if that will change. these demands that the protestors are asking for that have been initiated at this point. >> andy, thank you very much. >> the justice department says it is reviewing a federal appeals court ruling, keeping the president's immigration actions on hold. it is a major setback for president obama's plan to protect 5 million undocumented i am grants from being deported. mike viqueira reports from washington. >> well, the court decision is not unexpected, but is a setback for president obama's executive actions on immigration reform. you recall that the president has undertaken two initiatives by executive action, circumventing congress. the dream act where the president deferred deportation proceedings against young people brought to this country not of their own choice at children.
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deportation proceeding deferred against them, also the parents of those children already u.s. citizens, the president announce that had after the midterm election ins 2014 when it became clear to the republican led congress was not going to move on immigration reform. in february, a texas judge in a lower court blocked the president's plan going forward, issuing a stay. the white house, department of justice appealed to the fifth circuit in new orleans. known as a cop court to block the state to allow the president's planning to forward, they denied that request and on monday evening ruled saying that the the accident judge the earlier lower court ruling from february still stabs. again, not unexpected. this is a court with two republican appointees, one democratic appointee and the vote was 2-1. advocates of reform may look at this as a positive development, because now it does clear the path to the supreme court to make a final decision sometime
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in this term, in other words in president obama's term before he leaves office, the supreme court's term just beginning just a few weeks ago. now there is hope that the supreme court will bring this up, an issue a ruling sometime next year. that is an election year, a volatile issue on the campaign trail. donald trump and others on the republican side making a great deal of hey over their opposition to immigration reform, of course trump saying that he wants to deport all of the estimated 11 million individuals who are in this country illegally. for now, the 5 million individuals that this would have affected, the president's initiative on hold enough as all eyes turn toward the supreme court who could issue a final ruling sometime in the middle of next year, again a presidential election year. >> mike viqueira reporting from washington. republicans had criticized the plan as a political overreach.
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>> in washington, the senate will vote on a major defense bill to block the transfer of guantanamo bay prisoners to the u.s. the vote is happening as the pentagon is working on its own plan to close the prison. >> the pentagon looked at sites looking for options to send guantanamo detainees who cannot be released or sent back to other countries. they looked at u.s. naval before i go in south korea, at the u.s. military prison in fort leavenworth, settling on colorado's super max prison in florence. it is a very secure prison, considered one of the most secure in the country, nicknamed sometimes alcatraz in the rockies. it already has some very high profile prisoners there, include be the 9/11 conspirator, the
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mastermind behind the 1993 word trade center bombing and a third who is the so-called underwear bomber, all held in this facility. >> it is expected to the white house will send it up to congress sometime this week, possibly as early as thursday. congress repeatedly blocking the president's effort to close gitmo and move the remaining detainees on to u.s. soil. amnesty administration saying the new plan won't close began to know mow. >> closing guantanamo is the right goal. this plan is not the way to get there. it is neither going to win support from congress, which that disingenuously asked for this plan with no in tent to support it no matter what hit said, but it doesn't close
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guantanamo. there are certain individuals that are too dangerous to be released even if they are not going to be charged or prosecuted. that is a home rights problem central to began to know mow. moving that just changes the zip code, doesn't actually close it. >> the obama administration needs a plan for trials and end indefinite detention. >> israeli's prime minister has meetings in washington today. benjamin netanyahu will talk with jewish groups and meet with senate leaders on capitol hill. that's after a friendly meeting with president obama at the white house. >> we condemn in the strong evident terms palestinian violence against innocent israeli citizens, and i wouldn't to repeat once again it is my strong belief that israel has not just the right, but the obligation to protect itself. >> we'll never give up our hope
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for peace. i remain committed to a vision of peace, of two states for two peoples, a demilitarized palestinian state that recognizes the jewish state. >> this was president obama's first meeting with the israeli prime minister in more than a year, both emphasized commitment to peace in israel and the palestinian territories. >> politicians from both sides of the aisle lining up to meet with netanyahu during his visit to washington. the u.s. relationship with israel is a key issue, especially for the democrats running for president. >> hillary clinton is now the latest 2016 presidential candidate to promise a warmer relationship with benjamin netanyahu than the israeli prime minister has had with president obama. in a recent op ed titled how i would reaffirm the unbreakable bond with israel, i will do everything i can to he be hans a strategic partnership and strengthen american security relationship with israel. i would have it the israeli
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prime minister to the white house in my first month in office. the pledge to stand closer with netanyahu has been politically widespread. >> the united states congress above all has your back in a very bipartisan way. >> ironically, the american jewish community is divided over netanyahu and his hard line expansion policy. >> there's a very strong sentiment amongst many american jews that israel is shooting itself in the foot or perhaps even in the heart by pushing for and allowing so many settlers to have settled in the west bank and de facto making a palestinian state almost impossible. >> many members of the american jewish community were outraged when netanyahu just before his last election said he wanted his people to come to the polls, otherwise israeli arabs would have too much influence. why isn't the divide over
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netanyahu reflected in u.s. politics? >> that section of the jewish world that is willing to be pro netanyahu have been willing to put a lot more money behind their views than the liberals have, and so that ends up making a big difference to candidates who are looking for financial support. >> it's true across the political spectrum. take hillary clinton, for example, one of her biggest donors how is an israeli america businessman and democratic party megadonor who strongly supports netanyahu. jewish american leaders say frustrations with netanyahu also gets submerged politically because the united states and israel share democratic ideals and western values. so disagreements over israeli policies can seem small compared to the contrast between america and other parts of the middle east. >> i think that it's not
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possible to do well in american politics by distancing yourself repudiating the vision of a united arab israeli front in this world and that's growing increasingly clear as radicalism becomes a force in the middle east and throughout the world. >> it all means less criticism of the prime minister of israel and more public support, even as divides in the american jewish community keep growing. david shuster, al jazeera. >> fewer candidates but more at stake. >> primaries are fast approaching, gearing up for debate for a much smaller state. >> students at yale demand change on the same tape the university of missouri's top leader steps down. the only way to get better is to challenge yourself,
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and that's what we're doing at xfinity. we are challenging ourselves to improve every aspect of your experience. and this includes our commitment to being on time. every time. that's why if we're ever late for an appointment, we'll credit your account $20. it's our promise to you. we're doing everything we can to give you the best experience possible. because we should fit into your life. not the other way around.
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>> late last month there were confront is as over request that students and faculty not wear racially insensitive halloween costumes. a student wrote that she was turned away from a fraternity party after someone said it was for white girls only. the fraternity denied that happened. some say these are symptoms of a much deeper problem. >> what's important is that there is a consensus that that's not a safe space for us and the university needs to take that seriously. >> yale's president met with students about their concerns. >> i committed to them that we will work to make this the best yale it can be. >> yale's dean has pledged to enforce standards that safeguard members of the campus community.
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john henry smith, al jazeera. >> similar tensions on the university of missouri's campus even though school leaders are stepping down, the school president tim wolfe stepping down after you'd of not doing enough to fight racism on campus. the chancellor saying he will step down at the end of the year. the university president resigning, the chancellor saying he will do so, too, what's next? >> the students are leading this movement in columbia and they have a list of issues that they have with the administration. the students will be leading this effort. they will be telling us what steps they want to take next and we will be 100% supportive of
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them as they move forward with these issues. now, i would likes to that we are so very, very proud of our students here in colombia, proud of our athletes who stepped forward and supported the students. this is a first. the students have said that this is not just a one time thing. you are very, very proud of the leadership our students ever taken. i'm sure we will working with them to move forward. >> was this about the racial climate on the campus or fears that the school could lose at much as $2 million if the football team didn't take to the field? we have a graphic for our audience. african-american students at the university of missouri make up 63% of the football and basketball players, but less than 3% of the total undergraduate population, so was it about the football players
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and the basketball players and the athletes and the lack of money or about the insensitivity of the president? >> i think ultimately, the movement was started by the students, who were very unhappy with the racial slurs, with the atmosphere on campus. the fact that the football team came along is just a plus, a bonus. we have to ask ourselves had the football team not stepped forward, whether or not things would have moved along as fast, as quickly as they did, but i have no doubt with the tenacity of the students, the determination of the students that they would have prevailed anyway. i think that the rapid response happened because of the financial resources that were
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threatened by the lack of players suiting up. >> was there really anything the president could have done to stave off this firing? is this a slippery slope? there was no middle ground in the demands of the students, the president step down or the protests continued. >> i think that's, you know, everybody's looking at this as something that just happened recently. this is not something that just happened recently. we've had a number of incidents on campus. we had a few years ago, we had the cotton incident, where cotton was put on the black cotton house as a symbol of savory. there have been a number of
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things. i think that was just the fact that the president did not uses good judgment when confronted with these issues and that's one of the things that i talk about all the time. it is imperative that we sit at the table. when incident's happen, we cannot be afraid to sit at the table, because of race. people are afraid to talk about the race problems that we really have in america, and until we are willing to sit at the table and really openly talk about and until institutions, cities, governments all understand that that's a real racial problem in this country, it will not be resolved, so it has to happen, sitting across the table and honestly discussing race and how to eradicate it in this country. >> thank you very much. >> related to that story, a confrontation at the university of missouri campus is going viral between students and a freelance reporter.
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>> you need to go, students can you tell him how much -- you don't have a right to take our photos. no! no! go! go! go! >> he actually does have the right to take that photo. a student working for espn was photographing the students when several protestors, including at least one instructor there blocked him. they said they didn't want reporters nearby. the university of missouri is one of the nation's most prominent journalism schools. >> doctors saying a man in louisiana whose 6-year-old son was fatally shot by police is improving from his injuries, shot in a confrontation with law enforcement officers. his son was laid to rest. he has not been told his son was killed. investigators are still trying to piece together what happened. >> both norris greenhouse and
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darrin stafford are held on $1 million bond. a judge ordered the two louisiana police officers to home incarceration with electronic monitoring upon release. they must surrender badges and weapons. investigators don't know why they pursued the s.u.v. last tuesday and opened fire on this dead end street in marksville, louisiana. at least 18 rounds were fired. several of them hitting and killing pugh's son, who was strapped in the front seat. monday afternoon, the boy was laid to rest. police have poured over 911 calls and interviewed witnesses, but body camera footage from a third officer who responded for backup has given investigators the clearest picture of what happened. the video has not been released, but according to pugh's attorney, a state investigators described it to the judge,
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saying it shows his client with his hands up, posing no threat to police before they opened fire. >> it showed things that disturbed me as the head of the state police, disturbed me as a father. >> stafford is a lt. approximate the marksville police department, greenhouse a reserve officer. both were working part time at city marshalls, whose job is to serve warrants. investigators say chris pugh had no outstanding warrants and was unarmed. >> it has shaken the community. this is a small community, every knows everybody and it's a tragic situation and everybody is paying the price. >> jonathan martin, al jazeera, new orleans. >> the police chief said more officers could be arrested as the investigation into a tasing incident continues. so far, three officers have been suspended with pay. the officers tased a university of alabama student and hit others with batons. the entire incident was recorded. police say they were responding to a notice complaint. three students face charges,
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including obstruction and resisting arrest. >> cameras these days are everywhere. >> pushing politics for higher wages. >> we're going to talk about the fight for 15, rallies held across the country today asking the candidates to back their campaign. >> worries over rail safety, oil trains could be even more dangerous than we thought.
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>> it's the biggest question out there. >> go inside the groundbreaking research. >> are you ready to have your brain scanned? >> ready to go! >> challenging your deepest beliefs. >> feeling the spirit is very subjective. >> i don't buy that. >> techknow's team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> can affect and surprise us.
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>> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow - where technology meets humanity. >> welcome back, the justice department is looking at appealing their case all the way to the supreme court after a federal appeals court blocked the penalty's executive action on immigration. the plan would have granted permission for 5 million undocumented immigrants to stay in the z and apply for work permits. >> a prominent egyptian journalists has been release from prison. he was detained sunday morning and charged with publishing false news. he wrote an investigative story last month about a possible coup. he could face charges after release. there are allegations that myanmar is intentionally
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delaying election results. aung san suu kyi's party said that's because the opposition is heading for an overwhelming victory. eight republican presidential candidates will gather in milwaukee for their fourth debate. the latest poll show the outsiders lead the way, ben carson leading with 24%. donald trump 23%. that is in the margin of error. the only other republicans in double digits are marco rubio with 12%. michael shure has a preview of tonight's faceoff. >> despite new revelations that he may have padded his resume, ben carson leads in many polls as the republicans arrive in milwaukee. >> i think it's a marathon and polls are going to go up and down. i'm not going to spend a lot of time worrying about it. >> since the last debate, carson grabbed the lead from donald trump. >> i don't like being second.
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second is material, to me. >> it wasn't only the polls that drove the poach bolder conversation, it was the debate itself. ted cruz said it directly. >> the questions asked so far in this debate illustrate why the american people don't trust the media. >> other complaints followed and the republican national committee with a letter from chairman suspended their relationship with nbc, the parent of cnbc putting doubt a debate scheduled for february. that complaint and a hurried meeting of gop campaigns led to a list of demands for future debates, though none of the campaigns ultimately signed on, the complaints were heard and even mocked by at least one person. >> they can't handle a bunch of cnbc moderators at a debate. if you can't handle those guys, then i don't think the chinese and the russians are going to be
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too worried about you. >> for all of the bluster about the debates themselves, the candidates will need to make points to a friendlier host in box business. >> we need a president who fixes our budgetary mess. >> i can fix it. >> jeb bush has tried to fix his campaign since the debate featuring exchanging between him and senator marco rubio. now ahead, bush has continued to go after the man he once monitored. >> the challenges we face as a nation are too breath to roll the dice on another presidential experiment. >> try as he might to criticize rubio, rubio came out ahead and scored big last time by criticizing the press. >> the democrats have the ultimate super pac calmed the mainstream media. >> while the backlash put the spotlight on the mad raters, milwaukee will be a chance to refocus the debate on the
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economy. >> i will immediately put us on the path to a balanced budget. >> i led hewlett packard through a very difficult time. >> it is a simple flat tax. >> each wants to stand apart and lead the stage as milwaukee's best. >> it is likely that tonight's debate will go differently when it comes to the moderators. >>. the economy, financial issues, that's the stated theme of this debate. i think what they'll probably do is that's what they're comfortable with, what they know. i think they'll concentrate there and leave personal stuff aside. >> what do you think the moderators job is, stick to the script or be an aggressive
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political journalist pushing back when facts warrant? >> i think the latter. the problem with sticking to the script, it's a live television show, organic sort of exercise and you just don't know what's going to happen. mad raters have to be very alert to everything that happens, they have to be listeners as well as presenters of questions. i hope they don't stick so closely to the script that it as you cans all the air and you have the thing. >> do you think ratings pressure influences how the networks and moderators frame their questions to the can't dates? >> i'm not sure it influences how the questions are framed, but i think it influence the way debates are produced. they have become glitzy almost combination of a game show and reality show. it's this phenomenon of the networks wanting to showcase their talent. >> we will bring you complete coverage beginning at 8:00 p.m. eastern. >> fast food workers demanding a
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higher minimum wage. >> protestors were out before down in new york city asking for an increase in pay to $15. it's being repeated across the country. we have more on the fight for 15 from miami. >> after 40 years of working for the same nursing company in miami, lily is raising her voice for better pay. at 68 years old, she earns $10.85 part time serving food to the elderly. her social security check covers her $800 a month rent. >> how much are you left with after you pay your bills? >> zero. >> solomon is part of a group of health care workers joining forces with fast food employees around the nation today, demanding minimum wage go up to $15 an hour. in florida, it's currently $8.05.
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>> what do you say to the people who say employers can't afford to pay everyone an increased minimum wage? >> i don't buy that. i think they're being a little selfish. >> even though cities like seattle and san francisco approved gradual minimum raise wages to $15 an hour, the move in florida has been slow. the workers say many colleagues don't want to speak out for fear of being reprimanded. >> some people don't wants to anything, but i speak up for the rest of the staff. >> this is my daughter. >> with no savings and two children at home, solomon said there is no way she can stop fighting now. >> hear me out. i mean, hear my cry. i need more money. >> al jazeera, miami. >> louisiana has gotten a court's ok to retry an inmate held in solitary confinement for decades. the federal appeals court said the state can continue holding
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albert woodfox as it seeks a third retile. he is the last of the angola three, in jail for more than 40 years. he has been convicted twice for killing a prison guard in 1972. those convictions were both overturned. >> no comment from rolling stone magazine following a lawsuit filed against it by a university of virginia fraternity. it wants $25 million in damages after implicated in this article describing a rape on campus. two investigators revealed the rape never happened. the article was redacted. >> there is a new warning this morning that says a vast number of bridges in america are falling apart, including bridges that carry oil trains. the report is now on our website, aljazeera.com. the survey by an environmental group found half of the bridges deteriorating. it cites missing or crumbling
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concrete, rotted pilings and core roded steel beams. because responsibility for maintaining the bridges is on the railroad, not the government, this is happening. the companies rarely make their inspection records public. marcus stern joins us from atlanta. good morning. thank you for being with us. i want to show video associated with one of these keepers in tuscaloosa. the video shows an oil train crossing this old bridge. it's unnerving i assume for people to see how old these bridges look, but what are the real dangers and are those keepers structural engineers equipped to judge? >> good morning. these keepers are not certified bridge inspectors, but it's awfully tough to get certified bridge inspectors to do an
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inspection of these bridges, because they would need access to records of the bridge, deluding inspection reports, designs and other things, including access to the rails themselves. the railroad doesn't allow that access, so you can't have certified bridge inspectors do this work for us. i tried, and was not able to get people to agree to do it. >> you talked to the association of american railroads and they told that you these bridges are among the save r. safest segments of the nation's infrastructure. have you found reason for the public not to take them and their inspectors at their word? >> well, let me first of all to be paper to the railroad very proud and discreet, spending tens of millions of dollars to make the tracks safer and the number of derailment down by a half over the decade. there are still more than a thousand a year. there are about one hub thousand
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bridges, there's no inventory of the railroad bridges, but there's believed to be 100,000 of them. some date back to the 1830's. if there is an accident with this kind of crude oil, it could be catastrophic if it occurs in an urban area. >> reporting goes back to the rail accident in quebec, 47 people died in that disaster, basically leveled an entire downtown area in quebec. you're seeing picture of that. you've covered this for a long time. this all goes back to the fracking industry, right and volume of oil that is transiting this country. has congress heeded the warning from these disasters? >> it does stem to a disaster in quebec, canada in 2013, where 47 people were killed when a train
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derailed, an oil train. these oil trains are very new. what happened was they just developed fracking technology that enabled the energy industry to begin pulling out a million barrels a day so suddenly you have last year there were 500,000 rail cars of this stuff moving across the tracks. only in 2008, there was hardly any, so there is a 50 fold increase in the amount of oil moving across the freight railroad network, and so that's increased the risks tremendously. >> you can the report at aljazeera.com this weekend. thanks for coming on. >> this morning, the u.s. supreme court taking up a case involving one of the country's largest meat producers, worker
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at tyson food say hurt by unfair job rules. the case could have an impact on the legal system, as well. >> it's the latest case before the supreme court that could carve away at class action lawsuits. a case brought by employees at a tyson meat processing plant who claim they weren't properly compensated for the time it took them to put on and take off protective gear. jurors found in favor of the workers, who received a final award of $5.8 million. tyson cried foul, arcing the jury formula for determining the award was flawed and more crucially, that the group of
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more than 3,000 workers doesn't pass legal muster as a so-called class, because some of them suffered no injuries. >> this case could either cut back on class actions a little or a lot. >> john is a professor at columbia law school. >> if all they talk about is the need for a more typical, more representative plaintiff to represent the class, that's a small injury. if they were to require either that you have to prove every member of the class had standing before the class could be certified, that would be a major barrier that might prevent many consumer injury or tort cases from ever being certified. >> how how that bar is raised matters a lot to the workers at the low end of the wage scale. >> they lack the resources to take on a big corporate employer or large award to attract a good lawyer. banned together as a class and low wage workers are far more likely to get their day in court. tyson lawyers said if we win then the class action device will be put back where it was intended to be. lawyers for the workers are concerned about the message a
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win for tyson would send to big corporations. >> the message is likely to be that companies can get away with an awful lot, as long as their workers are just a little bit different, they won't have to worry about class actions of plaintiffs banning together to vindicate their rights. >> the supreme court is considering two other cases this term that could limit class actions. >> if class actions keep getting more and more difficult, there is no question that the small claimant will find it more difficult to get into court. >> that was patricia sobga reporting. >> chipotle is expected to
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reopen today, closed after dozens of people were sickened with e-coli. public health officials are still working to find the cause of the outbreak. steps of restaurants in the region were closed. this week, no e-coli was found in samples. >> russian athletes facing an olympics ban. >> the kremlin is calling doping allegations unfounded. the scandal could change international sports. >> sea world making a change, how public pressure convinced the theme park to drop its most controversial attraction.
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>> all of us have been there, stuck in the airport with time to kill. these are he women from the university of louisville swimming and diving team. they refuse to get bored. >> you can see those walk ways used for all sorts of things, rowing, cycling, backstroke. >> one team member posted the video. it has been seen more than a >> russian pat value put is pushing back on accusations of state sponsored doping. widespread cheating is being accused at all levels.
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>> it takes a little bit of analytical work to unpick what has been said here in russia, but i've been doing that over the last hours and i can detect three strands in their message. the first is compliance, the sports ministry saying whatever the i.a.a.f. decides in a week or so, russia will comply with that. it is going adhere to the decisions made by the international sporting body. the second is evasiveness, saying we haven't been given enough time to respond to this report and the accusations contained in it yet, we need to go through it properly, look at the individual accusations and work out whether they are true or not. the last strand is of course defensiveness. russia and the sports ministry is not denying that it has had a bit of an issue with doping, but it is a bad apple theory, saying these issues were due to individual athletes and their coaches and not a systemic issue.
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that's why the sports minister is saying that the report is fictitious and baseless. he's basically refusing the allegation that this was something that the russian state itself was complicit in. as to how this whole thing is being interpreted by the russian media, you only have to look at headline in a tabloid which said that the events in geneva on monday were like a bomb going off. >> rory challands reporting from moscow. a short time ago, the world anti doping agency suspended the accreditation of moscow's national drug testing laboratory. sea world is doing away with one of its attractions, the company doing away with the killer whale show. >> volkswagen is out with its
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plan to compensate owners of diesel cars that would recalled. drivers would get $1,000 in gift cards and vouchers and three years of roadside service on top of v.w. paying to fix the cars. the software turns off pollution controls under normal driving conditions. >> it's a seattle landmark getting a long overdue cleaning. >> wait until you see it, two decades of sticky souvenirs coming off the wall.
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ski scientists working in before his still. amphibians hat teeth, dating back 270 million years when continents were connected. >> legendary new orleans musician has died in spain. the 77-year-old suffered a heart attack following a concert last night in madrid. he was a songwriter, producer, composer, performer, his work include the hit song southern nights. he was called one of the most influential figures from the new orleans blues scene. >> 40 years ago, the edmund fitzgerald sank on lake erie. ♪ >> everybody from a certain
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generation remembers the song. it sank suddenly. all 20 men onboard died. there were no distress calls. it was once the largest ore carrier on the great lakes. only the bell on the ship was recovered. >> a sticky attraction is getting a cleanup. it's a wall of gum 20 years in the making. we got an up close look. >> seattle's must-see tourist spots, space needle, fremont troll, bruce lee's grave, the pike place market and the gum wall. >> really, really disgusting. >> i think it's beautiful. >> it's seattle. >> yes, the gum wall. 2,000 square feet or so of living, growing multi flavor art of the grotesque. really two walls now. >> smells like wrigley spearmint. >> d.n.a. from all over the
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word. >> yeah. >> it started as a place for theater patrons to park their gum but morphed into so much more. >> it's crazy, look how much gum is on the wall. >> it's easy to participate. >> just chew it, stick it, and you're part of something really special forever. >> lots of humanity, a lot of color. >> only it's not forever. after 20 years of spontaneous gumbustion. >> its time. >> it's time for a very thorough cleaning right down to the bricks. >> steaming. it's going to take three days. it's gotten to the part we hired professionals. >> all this public art, the jaw work of generations from locals and visitors from around the world will melt away. >> does this gum speak to you you? >> a little bit. now that i know it's going away,
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i had to get down here. >> going away, but probably not for long. >> let's do a fresh start and gum wall will reemerge. we expect it to be back within 24 hours. >> i'm for it. >> these are walls clearly not meant to be left blank. >> what do the kids say? i got nothing. i think there's going to be a run on gum sales, because everybody's going to want to pile on again. >> if you're on facebook, you're going to find a new easier, president obama and the white house creating the poet at us page and posting a video tour of the white house and video about climate change. you can catch the president's page, but you can't send a friend request. that's it for us here in new york. >> coming up next, more on the doping allegations against russian athletes.
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we are back tomorrow at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> russia's anti doping agency said the lab for testing has been shut down. you're watching al jazeera live from doha. also ahead on the program, the u.n. said levels of greenhouse gases have hit a new record, as world leaders try to reach a deal to cut emissions. >> u.k. prime minister calls for reforms. e.u. or else britain may have to exit the word body. >> how lead to printin

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