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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  November 17, 2015 7:00am-9:01am EST

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♪ no one will interrupt the business of the global community. >> partners in fighting i.s.i.l. developing overnight secretary of state john kerry and france's president talking strategy and more raids and air strikes are being carried out. >> this is to be prudent to make sure a terrorist element is not in the country. >> fleeing war are not welcome in the state. it was a bomb, the kremlin confirming what caused the jet to crash in the skies of egypt. >> severe storms moving across texas right now, tornados threatens the plains as snow piles up in the rockies. ♪
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secretary of state john kerry is in paris today promising to offer more help to france as both nations vow to stop i.s.i.l. and this morning france is demanding more military help from the european union. welcome to your world this morning i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm del walters and kerry sitting down with the president francois hollande in paris and two key suspects and the master mind of attacks still at large. al jazeera's adam has more. >> reporter: with an international manhunt for the suspects underway secretary of state john kerry met today with french president francois hollande here in paris. promising solidarity. and to work with other nations to stop i.s.i.l. >> i'm convinced that over the course of the next week da'esh will feel even greater pressure and are feeling it today and felt it yesterday and felt it in the past weeks, we gained more
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territory, da'esh has less territory. dozens of raids across france and searching for 26-year-old salah abdeslam and his brother was detained by police and released. >> translator: we are affected by what happened and learned about it like you guys watching t.v., at no moment did we think one of my brothers was involved in the attacks. >> reporter: authorities want to find abdelhamid abaaoud and suspect he may be now in syria and being called the master mind of the paris attacks and he is also suspected of organizing the attack in august on a high speed train that was interrupted by a group including three americans. and he is accused of another plot against a church in paris's suburbs and french president francois hollande asked for powers to stop future attacks and three month state of emergency and changes to the constitution. >> translator: we will eradicate terrorism because the
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french want to live together without fearing those next to them and eradicate terrorism because we are attached to freedom and france's influence in the world. >> reporter: that is al jazeera adam beginning our coverage from paris, france and thank you very much. also this morning french authorities say there are 115,000 security officers on the streets in the country, not long ago calling on the eu to help and france is invoking a never before used article of an eu treaty and requiring the 28 members to offer aid and assistance to a member country that is considered to be the victim of armed aggression on its territory. >> overnight france launched fresh air strikes on i.s.i.l. targets in syria, the bomb struck raqqa the de facto capitol and hit tanker trucks used to move oil and french president francois hollande said to unite to defeat the group. >> reporter: believe one of the
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attackers may be hiding in belgium but so far cannot find him as al jazeera paul brennan is focusing on a community well-known to law enforcement. >> reporter: the police swooped with overwhelming numbers and over powering amounts of armed strength and they were taking no chances. their focus was number 47 in the brussels neighborhood of molenbeck and the target was the salah abdeslam the so called 8th attacker and wearing masks and heavily armed with dogs in support it was a massive show of force. >> translator: i saw the police rushing in. they put the barriers in place. i was wondering what was going on. then they pushed everyone away. they asked us not to go outside. >> reporter: this is the face of the most wanted man in europe right now and police believe he is hiding in the molenbeck district and officers barked orders through loudspeakers telling the occupants of the
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house of number 47 to open the winders and surrender. specialist units took up positions on rooftops overlooking the address and explosives were also used to clear the premises but it was a false lead. news spread that the suspect had not been found. four hours after launching the raid the police units began to withdraw leaving behind a sense of shock and bewilderment with the locals. >> translator: it was shock and i'm talking to you with a sense that we have one foot in reality and the other in a sense we are lost. >> reporter: in the next 48 hours when we maybe start to understand what is happening here then i think we will say, wow, we are certainly in shock, we all are. >> reporter: another declined to give his name.
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>> translator: it's always like this in molenbake the police and residents has always been difficult, for the past 20 years it's been like that and not new. it is true what is happening now is making things worse and didn't need the attacks in paris to find out we had jaw had here and we already knew that. >> reporter: it is a fertile ground for radicalized youth and hundreds of i.s.i.l. fighters have been recruited in this brussels neighborhood. the dangers have been well publicized but the complaint is that too little has been done to effectively tackle the problem. >> translator: they are able to recruit these young people here because of the fragile economic and social and cultural situation people live in but those who recruit them you cannot buy kalashnikovs in the local shop here. >> reporter: there is a sense here despite occasional raids of
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high profile policy statements from the government the authorities have never got to grips with the radicalizing elements in belgium and paris has changed all that but will the police response drive a further wedge between the residents and authorities or will it bring new cooperation? paul brennan, al jazeera, molenbake brussels. reaction here in the united states the attacks led governors in 26 states to say no to accepting syrian refugees, they say they worry i.s.i.l. members will sneak in the country and more states on the list with 15 governors saying they will accept refugees from the middle east and michigan was one of the first to express its objections. >> we are going to suspend things until we have a chance to talk to the u.s. department of homeland security. >> reporter: reacting to the attacks in paris michigan rick snyder is suspending the state's efforts to take in more syrian refugees, the concern refugees
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could pose a threat to u.s. security. >> most people are not terrorists and we need to be thoughtful about helping people around the world to be prudent to make sure some terrorist element is not entering our country. >> reporter: not long after snyder's announcement sunday several other governors followed suit, the move is an about face for a governor who two months ago welcomed plans to help refugees fleeing the on going conflict in syria. >> we have always been open and welcoming and now he closed the doors and it's not just closing doors but sends a really strong message that puts blame on innocent people. >> reporter: former state representative is with take on hate, a campaign that addresses discrimination against muslim americans as governor of a state with one of the largest middle eastern populations in the u.s. and says snyder missed the mark. >> governor snyder could have
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displayed some leadership here and could have took the lead how we can do it right through partners and syrian americans who are here connecting them with family members can keep us safe. instead we took a complete extreme position that i think is un-american. >> reporter: so far it is estimated that more than 4 million syrians have left the country since the crisis began, 1600 have come into the u.s. the obama administration says the pledge to take in more syrian refugees in the next year still stands. the state department is looking into whether states can block refugees on their own. >> it's incumbent on us moving forward as we strive to reach this target of at least 10,000 for 2016 to work with state and local governments to address their concerns about resettlement program, whether they can legally do that i don't have an answer for you. >> reporter: syrian american
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the doctor who has family in syria says he is concerned for those who may not find a way out. >> we never give up here. we will lobby the governor, the administrator of michigan and the united states to bring more refugees. >> reporter: with the syrian refugee effort on hold, governor snyder has asked the u.s. department of homeland security for a full review of its procedures and clearances and in the meantime he says about 20 syrian refugees now headed for michigan will not be turned away. i'm with al jazeera, detroit. there are little more than 4 million registered syrian refugees, the majority of them in turkey, lebanon and jordan few have come to north america and united states has only taken in 1500 refugees since the syrian war began in 2011, a little more than a thousand have arrived in canada, both countries have pledged to increase that number. president obama has promised to take in 10,000 syrian refugees
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in the next year and canada promises to reach that number over the next three years. stephanie we are also following breaking news out of russia this morning, russian president putin vowing revenge and russian security forces confirming it was a bomb that took down that plane over the skies of egypt last month and moscow offering a 50 million reward to catch whoever is responsible. al jazeera's rory challenge has the details from moscow. >> reporter: the information that vladimir putin was given by the head of security services fsb was that the metro jet plane was blown out of the sky by a homemade explosive device. it comprised of maybe one kilogram or 1.5 kilograms of some tnt explosive and have not named names of who is behind this attack but the language that is being used by the russian leadership right now is
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one of punishment, of retribution, of destroying those held responsible. what we are likely to see in terms of the response to this, the reaction ranges really from the geo political down to the domestic from the geo political level we are hearing francois hollande, the french president calling for a grand coalition to tackle i.s.i.l. and that is something that the russians have been asking for for quite sometime so this possibly is working out very well for the russian foreign policy objectives right now. the groups that have been operating in syria on different sides of the fence are now showing a greater degree of synergy than we have seen for sometime if ever. then in terms of the actual russian actions in syria, vladimir putin was saying a bombing campaign would only be increased and not decreased and the domestic and we are likely to see a tightening up of
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security at soft targets around the russian nation, train stations, shopping centers, that sort of thing. so it really is a range response to look for over the coming days and weeks. >> and that is our rory challenge reporting from moscow and i.s.i.l. saying that attack was in retaliation for russia's air campaign against syria. this morning president obama is in the philippines for the start of back to back summits and arrived in the capitol manila where he will attend the meeting on wednesday and thursday and go to the east asia summit and focus on trade and economics at a time of stepped up tensions with china over disputed territories in the south china sea. >> the united states has been commits to the security of this region for more than 70 years. we have a treaty obligation. an iron clad commitment to the defense of our ally the philippines. you can count on the united states. >> reporter: obama's trip to
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south asia is on the heels of the g 20 summit in turkey and while there president obama rejected calls for sending in a large number of combat troops to syria and had strong words for its critics. >> reporter: at the close of two days of meetings dominate bid the war in syria and fight against i.s.i.l. president obama rejecting calls for a dramatic military escalation. >> we have the right strategy and we will see it through. >> reporter: means continued air strikes and now in the 15th month, targeting i.s.i.l. leaders and supply lines and helping groups already taking the fight to i.s.i.l. on the ground. but mr. obama warned against thinking of i.s.i.l. as a viable state that could be conquered by a military invasion and once again ruled out american combat boots on the ground. >> if you do not have local populations that are committed to inclusive governance and who are pushing back against
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ideological extremes, that may resurface unless we are prepared to have a permanent occupation of these countries. >> reporter: french president francois hollande has called the paris attacks an act of war and president obama agrees. still, he hit back at what he called belacost statements from critics who says are talking tough but have no realistic plan. >> if they think somehow their advisors are better than the chairman of my joint chiefs of staff and the folk whose are actually on the ground, i want to meet them. >> reporter: but mr. obama's harsh words were for i.s.i.l. itself. >> these are killers with fantasies of glory. >> reporter: with one of the assailants entering with a flood of refugees from the syrian war and president spoke directly to politicians back home. >> when i hear folks say that well maybe we should just admit
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the christians but not the muslims, when i hear political leaders suggesting that there would be a religious test we don't have religious tests to our compassion. >> reporter: governors from texas, michigan and elsewhere have vowed to bar refugees from entering their states citing security risk, mr. obama warned against a backlash that would stereotype all muslims not only is a betrayal of american values he said but also play into i.s.i.l.'s hands. >> they will lead i think to greater recruitment in the terrorist organizations over time if this becomes somehow defined as a muslim problem as opposed to a terrorist problem. >> reporter: that was mike reporting from turkey during the president's asia summits and meet the leaders of the 12-member trans pacific partnership group.
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at home the dangerous storms that produced the tornados are now moving east. >> that was the scene in lubick, texas where 7 suspected tornados touched down and the pictures are from kansas and now that storm system is spawning even more severe weather this morning and let's bring in metrologist nicole mitchell for more. >> 40 reports and over 40 reports of tornados and a widespread system from flooding to severe the snow side of it and get through it through the course of the morning but let's start with the stormy side and see the line coming through produced tornados from kansas to texas last night. we even had a couple of those warnings this morning but this morning it's more what we call the severe weather, higher risk for wind damage but because of all the different types of damage watch for power lines, trees down, so it's kind of a rough commute in a lot of places so here are some of our hazards this morning still a tornado
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watch that means potential but none of those warnings right now. but we do have thunderstorm warnings which means we are seeing some of that severe weather and as i said wind is the primary threat right now. here were the storm reports as they went through and as i said 40 different tornado reports, those are the reds and all the different oranges were wind damage so about 50 of those. and stopping this line where it spawned up yesterday and this is when we were getting most of the tornados and then you can see that line becomes more of a cohesive land spawning more wind damage after that. all that rain is also contributing to some flooding but moves from arkansas into louisiana, that primary risk and wouldn't be surprised if we see a few more tornados today and then i mentioned there is heavy rain associated with this so really along the mississippi river and the mississippi river valley as it moves through is another one of our concern and more on the snow side of this coming up. >> bears watching nicole
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mitchell we will check back in later and thank you protesting police. [chanting] hundreds of demonstrators blocking a highway in minneapolis and are so angry about the shooting death of a black man by police officers there. and a surgical breakthrough a firefighter severely burned more than a decade ago receives a new face. ♪
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secretary of state john kerry is in paris today promising to offer more help to france as both nations vow to stop i.s.i.l. this morning france says it needs more military help from the eu, al jazeera's adam is live right now for us in paris and adam what more can you tell
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us about the meeting between secretary of state john kerry and french president francois holland hollande? >> reporter: well, del, what they talked a lot about is sharing information, beefing up resources for all these countries to cooperate in this ongoing offensive against i.s.i.l. targets and also trying to stamp outer terror attacks in europe and avoid such attacks taking place in the u.s. and trying to show this united front to work together, kerry's image was displayed all across national television here and people are keen to see this cooperation right now. now also what we saw here this morning was interior minister saying that 115,000 security personnel have been deployed across the country. this comes at the same time that france's prime minister admitted that they really still don't know if there were other people involved in planning the attack,
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other people that perhaps are still here in france. so although we are seeing people return a bit to work here, this workweek is only in the second day this week we are also hearing that they have not caught the prime suspect who is suspected to be in belgium and neighboring country and don't know if there are other suspects on the loose in their own country. >> adam as you walk the streets of paris and talk to the people there are tensions still high or are people trying to move on? >> reporter: you see a bit of both and hear everyone saying we have to go to work and must live and dance and drink and say the words, this is france of course but then there will be a moment where a siren goes off or a police car goes by and you see people tense up a bid and don't want to read too much into that but people still do seem on edge and who could blame them. we are also hearing reports everyday about this massive manhunt and bombing of syria and people do not necessarily agree that an increased bombing effort
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is what they need and hear many people saying they need more inclusion of communities that perhaps feel detached or left out of modern france right now, people who live in the surrounding suburbs who they say as easy pickings for groups looking for people to get involved so people are not totally relaxed and at ease and you see that just looking at faces and seeing people walk around this city right now. >> al jazeera's adam is in paris this morning, adam thank you very much. also stephanie this morning the cia director john brennan saying the world should brace itself for attacks like we saw in paris. >> a week of calm for the intelligence community and says i.s.i.l. tech logical abilities have made it difficult to track. >> this is not something that was done in a matter of days and was something that was deliberately and carefully planned over the course i think of several months in terms of making sure they had the operatives, the weapons and the explosives with the suicide belts and so i would anticipate
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that this is not the only operation that i.s.i.l. has in the pipeline. >> reporter: brennan said attacks like this are not inevitable if intelligence agencies work together and i want to get more into this with glen carl who is a former cia agent and deputy national intelligence officer and joins us via skype from massachusetts, glen, good morning and thank you for your time. there are all sorts of arguments you will hear these days from the cia director down to politicians who will say more high tech surveillance is the answer here but these attackers were known to authorities and have been brought in and have been flagged and still slipped through the net and my question is what about knocking on their doors and seeing if they are making suicide vests and stuffi stuffing kalashnikovs. >> reporter: the dht which is the french version of the fbi do a lot of that and the files that organizations have are unfortunately never 100% accurate but are quite good, the
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challenge always is we know someone might be harboring unfortunate or possibly dangerous ideas but until somebody acts it's illegal to detain one in most cases. president francois hollande is trying to address that in france now but that raises the issue that america and all free societies have to wrestle with which is the balance between civil liberties and the need for security. there is no single line to answer this where that falls. >> to that point, glen, we have an article up on al jazeera.com right now that says none of these european countries have the, quote, sweeping powers of surveillance according to the patriot act that was enacted after 9-11 attacks and if you are an agent after the attacks what are you telling yourself about what you can do differently next time? >> reporter: well, i worked with my french counterparts during my
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career and they have been and expressed the frustrations that i think all law enforcement and national security officials expressed from time to time about being hand strung. that said, almost all of them realize that the tension, the almost unsolvable dilemma of how one provides security while protecting one's liberties so i think the problem is not so much knowing who the bad people are but finding this balance and especially, especially the impossible question to answer that all services have found at least is to know when someone of concern is going to say go operational. >> it's an old problem and yet it seems to be a new threat we are seeing from i.s.i.l. especially now that it has confirmed the metro jet over the sinai was brought down by a bomb and i.s.i.l. as you know claimed responsibility for that. these attacks on paris, this attack over the sinai what does
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that tell the intelligence community about the evolution of i.s.i.l.'s trade craft? >> reporter: well unfortunately i wouldn't say it's a new threat. prior to 9-11 the cia was frantic is not a good word to use but is concerned as an institution of individuals can be and has been the case before 9-11, since 9-11 before attacks in paris with french authorities and since, all professionals have been aware of the danger, the change that you refer to is significant, however, i.s.i.s. or i.s.i.l. or da'esh as it's called until now more or less has focused on establishing territory in syria and has not tried to reach out globally very much. that now seems to that clearly has changed with the attack and the train over the summer in france and belgium that was broken up, with attacks of a couple days ago with the bombing from egypt of the airplane and
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now we have what we always fear is it only takes a decision and then a group that has been a regional can become a global threat. >> glen carl. >> what we do are the same things we were trying before. >> glen carl thank you for your insights this morning, battling the backlash. people in the french muslim community are worried about the attitudes towards them that are changing. >> let's go to work. >> reporter: getting back to business people in paris try to resume their routines as they push past the deadly attacks. ♪
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>> welcome back to your world this morning, taking a look at today's top stories.
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russia says a bomb did bring down that plane over egypt last month, killing 224 people onboard. moscow is offering a $50 million reward as president vladimir putin vows to hunt down those responsible. shortly after the crash, isil said it was responsible. >> secretary of state john kerry in paris at this hour meeting with french president francois hollande. kerry saying allied nations need to work together to stop isil. >> governs from two dozen states will not accept syrian refugees. president obama has pledged to help place 10,000 syrians across the u.s. over the next year. >> france launching new airstrikes in syria overnight aimed at raqqa. as al jazeera reports, the
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french pet francois hollande wants the world to join in this fight. >> speaking to the french parliament, president francois hollande pledged to continue the strikes and said he would triple france's air strike capability. we will give no respite or let up, he vowed. after the united states, transhas conducted the most coalition strikes since the bombing of iraq in syria began over a year ago, but that's not saying much. as of last week, just over 2800 strikes were conducted in syria, 2600 u.s. and just quinn 46 by other countries, of which only a handful were french. in washington, c.i.a. director said that the paris attacks were in his words not a one off event. >> i would anticipate that this is not the only operation that isil has in the pipeline, and
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security services are working to uncover it. >> as if to underscore the threat, a new isil video features a spokesman saying as we struck france, we swear that we will strike america at its center in washington. al jazeera, the pentagon. >> authorities are still trying to piece together how the paris attacks were planned, but investigators say they have trades the origins of the plot to syria and isil. we have a closer look at how isil has seized parts of much of the region and how the west has responded. >> trough bring us up to date in syria, we're going back to april, 2013 when after nearly two years of civil war, the leader of al-qaeda in syria abu bakr al-baghdadi declared the islamic state of iraq and the levant. isil began capturing territory
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in syria. by june, they had swept into non-iraq and captured mosul, iraq's second largest city, declaring a caliphate controlling a territory the size of jordan. now on september 10, 2014, that is when the u.s. launched its first airstrikes against isil after the group pushed deeper into iraqi kurdistan. those strikes actually continued after the group beheaded two american journalists, james foley and steven sotloff. isil began suffering a series of defeat by the kurds in the north. the city of co bani on the bored her of syria and turkey fell total kurds in february, 2015 after being controlled by isil for months. that was isil's first major defeat in syria. but july of this year, the number of refugees fleeing syria had topped 4 million, another 6 million had fled their homes, but stayed in the country and
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some 250,000 had been killed in all this fighting. at the end of september, things got more complicated when russia began launching its airstrikes in syria. they were not targeting isil, instead mostly supporting the syrian government striking rebel forces mainly in the west. european officials say those airstrikes are forcing more refugees to flee the country, heading for europe. as we've seen in the wake of the terrorist attacks, one of those terrorists possibly foesing as a refugee. this is another problem in an already desperate and complicated crisis. >> david cameron is speaking right now. let's listen in to the british response to isil. >> that means going after a violent and non-violent extremists. those that sew the poison but stop short of actually promoting violence, they are part of the problem. >> we would improve integration
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by shutting down educational institutions teaching in tolerance and encourage moderate voices to speak up and challenge the extremists as so many do. mr. speaker, it cannot be said enough that the extremists ideology is not true islam, but it doesn't work to deny any connection between the religion of islam and the extremists not least because the extremists themselves self identity as muslims. there's no point denying that. what we need to do is take apart their arguments and demonstrate how wrong they are. we need the continued hem of muslim communities and scholars. they are playing a powerful role and i commend them for their absolutely essential work. >> we cannot stand neutral in this battle of ideas. we have to back those who share our values with practical help, funding, campaigns, protection, and political representation. this i guess a fundamental part of how we can defeat this
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terrorism at home and abroad. >> prior to the g-20 summit there were important discussions on syria and dealing with other long term threats so security, such as climate change and let me briefly address those. >> that is british prime minister david cameron pointing out one of the things he wants to do is shut down the institutions that he says teach violence. back in front, the muslims are pointing out that they are among the survivors and the mourners like everyone. they are afraid and have become victims. they are worried about being seen at dangerous because of their faith. we have the story. >> a mournful gathering meant to show unity. even this small crowd had difficulty truly bridging their differences. >> not all islams are terrorists. only a small group of fundamentalists. they want power.
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they want to flood the planet. i do have a problem with migrants. they are like a trojan horse. some are trained and have contacts to get weapons. >> at the remembrance ceremony for the victims, attendees were somber for more than the obvious reasons. many muslims in the crowd had been worried about worsening attitudes before them even before the horrific attacks in paris. now they say they are as scared as they are sad. >> every time someone looks at me in the street, i feel they think we are at fault, but we have nothing to do with what happened in paris. we are heart broken for those who are living this tragedy. >> 25-year-old malik, tells me islamaphobia really began setting in last year, once it was discover that had several young muslim men from here hadn't just been radicalized, they had gone to wage war in syria.
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>> there are many young people from my generation here who joined up to fight with terrorists. we don't understand why they did that and we don't want to be associated with them. we want people to know we are above all else, french. >> towns folk are at pain to comprehend how a community full of 30,000 people and postcard views like these could have become a breeding ground for radicalization. the growing confusion doesn't diminish the rising anger. >> with the stated aim of expelling radical imams and mosques, houses like this one, the mosque which had been under investigation even before charlie hebdo attacks will almost certainly come under even more scrutiny. >> six men who died fightinging syria in 2014 had attended this mosque. now, another four worshipers tell us they've been instructed by police not to leave and to report to the local police
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station several times a day. it's why so many of the faithful here continue to pray for guidance, even though mosque officials are at a loss on how exactly to proceed. >> i am concerned about how to conduct our religion here. >> many muslims here wonder if that one commonality will ultimately continue to be enough to get them all through this. al jazeera, france. >> a soccer match scheduled for brussels today has been canceled. it was between the belgian and spanish national teams. that is just one of the high profile events canceled this week in wake of the paris attacks. i want to go out to al jazeera live in paris for us, adam, despite the tight security, a lot of people of paris are back
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to their routines today. >> they are indeed. monday marks the beginning of the first work week after these attacks which took place late on friday. we were out amongst people, who were in the city, some going to work, some just doing what they need to do, daily errands. we found that some are still finding it hard to get back into a routine. >> back to work, but not business as usual. there's a heaviness as parisians start their first work week in the wake of the deadly attacks here. you can see people burdened by a weariness, a pain, a nagging fear. many are happy to have something to do, somewhere to go. >> let's keep on moving, let's go to work, let's go to dance, let's go to drink. life doesn't stop. >> despite positive sentiment, danger seems ever close.
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over the p.a. system, a warning about a suspicion package on the metro. a warning people take seriously now. they try to create a new norm hall that is hard. >> people used to be more, i don't know, more alive, i would say. >> there's always work to do in the city and work the street cleaner's can be therapeutic. >> we see our colleagues, we're altogether, we talk about it. it feels good. it's better than staying home locked up doing nothing. it's good. >> at the end of the workday, hundreds of parisians gathered here where people have been holding vigils since the attacks. they came here, it seems, looking for comfort. >> an impromptu concert offered a chance to come together and
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feel alive again. ♪ >> so that was at this very plaza at the end of the workday yesterday, monday, here in paris. we're also seeing despite people coming out, there's also concern for businesses, specific live theater companies and bees astros which are part of the life blood of the economy here. there's a program, everyone to the bistro, that's encouraging people across social media to come out tonight, tuesday evening in paris at their local bistro to fill the gathering spots for the city to come back together. >> what a beautiful image that grand piano by the security cordon there. reporting from paris, adam, thank you. >> here in the u.s., more protests are expected in minneapolis involving the shooting of a black man by a
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police officer. they say they are angry over the shooting of 24-year-old jamar clark by the police. the mayor and police chief calling for a federal investigation. >> a state judge in utah has taken himself off the case of a lesbian couple with a child. they had asked for the judge to be disqualified, saying he imposed his religious beliefs over the law. >> as tornadoes threaten texas this morning, the first major storm of the seasonal could bury parts of the central plain and rockies in snow. blizzard warnings up in colorado can be canals and nebraska. the snow began to fall on monday. today, high winds could produce whiteout conditions. we want to show you this early morning commute in denver. that is snow and ice covering the roads there, and the risk of
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more snow blowing on and it is ugly. it is nasty. >> that storm system is causing serious trouble for millions of people in its path. let's bring in nicole mitchell to find out what the path is. >> you were just mentioning denver for example, i was just looking that up. temperatures in the upper 20's, but with light snow there. some place have the heavy snow, but winds gusting in the 20-mile per hour range is reducing visibility less than a mile. that tells you what the visibility problem is going to be for today. this is all one system, everything from the severe weather and heavy rain we were talking about, but on the backside of this, where the cold air comes in from the north, cold enough, temperatures are dropping usually 10 or 20 degrees as this comes through support all of that snow. because there's so much moisture with this system, it is heavy snow in some case. we have as we mentioned, the blizzard warnings that are up. you need technically three hours of these conditions to be a blizzard. it will at least be blizzard like at times.
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some place could get a foot of snow. we're looking at visibility less than a quarter mile and went gusts 60 miles an hour. it's not just this area, wind gusts actually across that northern tier have the country. even if you don't deal with the snow, you're going to be dealing with that extremely high wind and temperatures falling as all of this goes through. >> it's a big system, nicole mitchell, thank you. >> a former volunteer firefighter has a new face today and he's sharing it with the world after undergoing a breakthrough face transplant. alexei o'brien has the story. >> when he set out for the hospital, he put on his prosthetic ears and took a courageous dip into the unknown. >> i've been working hard every day, trying to get this transplant done. >> he was seriously burned while working at a volunteer firefighter, leaving him if i say figured across his face and upper employed. 14 years and 70 operations
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later, it was time for the big one, proclaimed as the most comprehensive face transplant in history. >> his medical team in new york had been practicing poor more than a year. >> you feel me touching you here, right? >> 150 medical staff worked for 26 hours on this complex, delicate surgery. they flicked the skin to the back of the donor's head, peeling each side forward and cutting bone, then draped is precisely over his face. iit was a medical first, difficult operation, one they couldn't be sure he would survive. >> the most complex portions included the transplant of the eyelids, the ability we transplant them in their entirety so he can blink
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normally, the inclusion of the entire scalp changed the trajectory of his life here. >> it's a change. one that can be a mixed blessing, the first person to undergo a face transplant said she struggled looking into a mirror and seeing someone else's face looking back. he will have to take medicine every day. there will be more operations. after three months in hospital, doctors say he is making remarkable progress and plan ago reunion with his family. >> we'll see how... >> he said the doctors haven't just given him a new face. he now has a new life. al jazeera. >> sometimes there's so much bad news in the world you have to see something that gives that you sense of optimism. >> it's remarkable how natural he looks.
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you wonder how his seek key has to adjust seeing a new face in the error. >> a judge's ruling leaves the operations of two fantasy sports sites up in the air.
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>> there's been another major setback for daily fantasy sports websites, a judge setting aside their request to keep operating after the attorney general ruled draft kings and fan duel are gambling sites. the judge will make a final decision next week. >> today's soccer match between belgium and spain is called off due to security concerns. >> a game between france and england is scheduled for a few hours from now. security is going to be tight and hearts heavy. >> inside wembley stadium where they were welcomed with french colors and trench sentiments, the 23 members of france's national soccer team went
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through normal preparations for a game that will be anything but normal. >> there will be a lot of emotion from us, from players. >> the french national team was on the pitch friday night when the attacks began in paris. this time, there will be beefed up security inside and outside the stadium, with armed officers on alert. fans are being asked to arrive early to go through the security checks. similar steps have been imposed at sporting events around the world from the fight in australia to all the nfl games in the united states. as fart match at wembley, france's coach said he gave each player a chance to skip the game. none has. despite the fact that friday's tragedy touched two players personally. antoine's sister escaped the attack at the concert hall where dozens were killed. another's cousin was one of the 129 people who died in paris
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friday night. >> the last three days were a bit dramatic and i think we were in mourning altogether. >> the british fans will downin that mourning, singing along to the french national anthem displayed on giant video screens so all can sing along. >> it will be important for us to show character through that game and we will share this moment with all the english people. >> it's a safe bet that french soccer officials will be studying security measures in the coming months in tenty. france is hosting next summer's european championship tournament, considered the second biggest international soccer tournament behind the world cup. >> i understand there is going to be a pretty special guest. >> some call him the duke of cambridge, most call him prince
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william. he is going to the game as a mark of solidarity and tribute to paris. >> two of the biggest icons in baseball history will soon receive the nation's highest civilian honor. hall of famer's yogi berra and willie mays will receive the medal pyemas made the catch that helped the san francisco giants win the world series. berra was a 10 time world series champion and three time american league m.v.p. he died in september at age 90. >> mays making that basket catch. >> for the first time ever, the oxford word of the year isn't a word. it is an amobi. the tears of joy captures 2015.
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the latest from paris as france steps up raised is now calling on the european allies to stupp up in the fight. >> russia is offering a multi-million dollar regard for catching the people responsible for the downing of the russian plane over egypt. we'll be back with more. stay with us. >> billions spent training afghan forces. >> there was a bang... i said, "get down". >> after 15 civilian deaths. >> according to the sources that we spoke to... the civilians that weren't killed in crossfire... >> "faultlines". >> what do we want? >> al jazeera america's
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hard-hitting... >> today the will be arrested. >> ground-breaking... >> they're firing canisters of gas at us. >> emmy award-winning, investigative series.
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>> securing europe, france hunting for the people behind the paris attacks also calling on members of the european union to help keep the continent safe. >> this is just to be prudent to make sure that some terrorist element is not interesting our country. >> closing the door, more than half of u.s. states now say syrian refugees no longer welcome there. >> russia confirming it was a bomb that brought down that passenger jet in the skies over egypt. the kremlin now offering a $50 million reward for
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information. >> severe storms threatening millions, blizzard warnings in the rockies and the risk of dangerous weather all the way to the mississippi. >> good morning, welcome to your world this morning. i'm del walters. >> i'm stephanie sy. france is on the hunt for two key suspects in fridays attacks, including the mastermind. >> the french carrying out raised in france and belgium. there are concerns that at least one suspect is in syria. earlier this morning, secretary of state john kerry talking strategy with french president francois hollande in paris and france making the demand for support of members of the european union. britain's prime minister also talking about the fight against isil just a short while ago. >> it is in syria in raqqa that isil has its headquarters, and
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it is from raqqa that some of the main threats against this country are planned and orchestrated. raqqa, if you like, is the head of the snake. over syria, we're supporting our allies, the u.s., france, jordan and the gulf countries with intelligence, surveillance, and with refueling. but i believe, as i've said many times before, we should be doing more. we face the correct and growing threat to our country and we need to deal with it not just in iraq, but syria, too. >> i want to go back out to paris and the vantage point there. al jazeera's adam rainy has been reporting. what can you tell us about the meeting that took place between secretary kerry and president hollande and what came out of it? >> well, what we've seen here that is meeting was mainly about kerry giving full support to france, saying that they need to share more information, america with european countries, with
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france and to accept up efforts to take down-ice as i will. he made a point mentioning france is the oldest ally of the united states, just as obama has mentioned in recent days. they need to deepen ties, share more information and this is what else he had to say. >> we have to step up our efforts to hit them at the core, where they're planning these things, and also obviously to do more on borders and in terms of the movement of people, but the level of cooperation could not be higher. >> well, kerry speaking here in france, at a meeting that many people were watching or many french people on t.v.'s across thety that we've seen today, so this is part of this whole massive international cooperative effort. david cameron speaking in the u.k., you ever kerry here, you have france saying they carried out more than 100 more raised overnight on this massive
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manhunt, a manhunt, of course, they're trying to find the main fugitive they're looking for, also trying to get a bead on a man they believe might be in syria who's considered the mastermind of these attacks, or has a history they think of planning attacks here in europe, some of them not successful, so authorities are by no way definitely having apprehended all the people think think are at large. they admitted that they don't know if there are more suspects they don't know about that could still be here in france. these efforts are being carried out. this isn't necessarily reassuring french people who have started back a work week here in paris. >> adam rainy reporting for paris for us, adam, thank you. >> you heard the british prime minister a short while ago. this morning, all 28e.u. countries saying they have now accepted france's formal call for assistance after the paris attacks. >> today the european union
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through the voices of all the defense ministers, of all the e.u. member states unanimously expressed its strongest full support and readiness to provide all the aid and assistance required and needed. >> france is the first e.u. countries to invoke what is called the mutual assistance clause in the e.u. treaty. there is no procedure for how member states will help each other or what form that assistance will take. >> former deputy national intelligence officer glenn karl said the issue in dealing with attacks like the ones in paris is not just identifying suspects, but balances privacy and security. >> the challenge always is we know someone might be harboring unfortunate or possibly dangerous ideas, but until somebody acts, it's illegal to detain one in most cases. president hollande is trying to address that in france now, but that raises the issue that
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america and all free societies have to wrestle with, the balance between civil liberties and the need for security. >> karl said he and other intelligence officials should be most worried about isil shifts from establishing and holding territory to launching global attacks. >> there's another side to the story, the attacks leading governors in 26 states to no to syrian refugees. they are worried that isil members will sneak into the country pretending to be migrants. more states adding their names to the list, only 15 governors saying they will accept refugees from the middle east. as bisi onile-ere reports, michigan was one of the first to express its objections. >> we are going to suspend things until we have a chance to talk to the department of homeland security. >> reacting to the paris attacks, measure governor rick snyder is suspending the state's efforts to take in more syrian refugees.
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the concern is they present a threat to u.s. security. >> this is to she prudent to make sure that some terrorist element is not entering our country. >> not long after snyder's announcement sunday, several other republican governors followed suit. the move is an about face for the governor who two months ago welcomed plans to help refugees fleeing the on going conflict in syria. we have always been a diverse state and very open and welcoming and now he's closed the doors. it's not just closing doors. it sends a really strong message that puts blame on innocent people. >> former state representative is with take on hate, a campaign that addresses discrimination against muslim americans, as governor of a state with one of the largest middle east pop lakes in the u.s., she says snyder missed the mark. >> governor snyder could have displayed leership here and took the lead of how we can do it
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right, through partners, through syrian americans that are currently here, connecting them with their family members. that can keep us safe. instead, we took a complete extreme position that i think is unamerican. >> so far, it's estimated that more than 4 million syrians have left the country since the crisis began. 1600 have come into the u.s. the obama administration says the pledge to take in more syrian refugees in the next year still stands. the state department is looking into whether states dan block refugees on their own. >> it's incumbent on us moving forward as we strive to reach this target of at least 10,000 for fiscal year 2016 to work with state and local governments to address their concerns about a resettlement program, whether they can legally do that. i don't have an answer for you. >> syrian american, this doctor who has family in syria is concerned for those who may not
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find a way out. >> we never give up. yeah. we all the time lobby the governor, the administrative of michigan and the united states to bring in more refugees. >> with the syria refugee effort on hold, governor snyder asked the department of homeland security for a full review of its procedures and clearances. in the meantime, he says that about 20 syrian refugees now headed for michigan will not be turned away. >> bisi onile-ere, al jazeera, detroit. >> also coming up later in this hour, we'll talk to an immigration activist from michigan. >> russian president vladimir putin is vowing to go after those responsible for bombing an airliner in egypt. the russian security chief has confirmed last month's crash with the result of a homemade bomb onboard. all 224 people, most of them russian onboard died. putin is vowing to find and punish the guilty. >> the combat work of our aviation teams in syria must not only be continued, it must be
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intensified so the criminals understand that vengeance is inevitable. >> isil has said it is responsible for the crash. al jazeera has more from moscow. >> the information that vladimir putin was given by the head of his security services, the f.s.b. was that the metro jet plane was blown out of the sky by a homemade explosive device. >> they haven't named any names of who is behind this attack, but the language that's being used by that the russian leadership right now is one of punishment, of retribution, of destroying those held responsible. what we're likely to see in terms of the response to this, the reaction ranges from the geopolitical down to the domestic from the geopolitical
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level, we're hearing francois hollande, the french president calling for a grand coalition to tackle isil. that's something that the russians have been asking for for quite some time, so this possibly is working out very well for the russian foreign policy abives right now. the groups that have been operating in syria on different sides of the fence are now showing a greater degree of synergy than we've seen for sometime, if ever. then in terms of the actual russian actions in syria, vladimir putin was saying that a bombing campaign would only be increased. they wouldn't be decreased and the domestic, we're likely to see a tightening up of security, at soft targets around the russian nation, shopping centers, that type of thing. it is a range of responses to look for over the next coming days and weeks. >> isil has said the attack was in retaliation for russia's air
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campaign against it in syria. >> this morning, president obama is in the philippines, there for the apec meeting, arriving in manila for discussions involving trade and economics. he then heads to kuala lampur for the asian and east asia summit. at the time of stepped up tensions with china over the disputed territories in the south china sea. >> the united states has been committed to the security of this region for more than 70 years. we have a treaty obligation, an ironclad commitment to the defense of our ally, the philippines. you can count on the united states. >> the president's trip coming on the heels of the g-20 summit in turkey. there the president rejected any calls for sending a large number of u.s. combat troops to syria. as mike viqueira tells us, the president had very strong words for his critics. >> at the close of two days of meetings dominated by the war in syria and the fight against isil, president obama rejected calls for a dramatic military
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escalation. >> we have the right strategy and we're going to see it through. >> that means continued airstrikes, now in their 15t 15th month, targeting isil leaders and supply lines and already taking the fight to isil on the ground. >> once again ruled out american combat groups on the ground. >> if you do not have local populations that are committed to inclusive governance, and who are pushing back against ideological extremes, that they resurface, unless we're prepared to have a a permanent occupation of these countries. >> french president francois hollande has called the paris attacks an act of war and president obama agrees. still, he hit back at what he called statements from critics he said are talking tough but
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have no realistic plan. >> if they think that somehow their advisors are better than the chairman of my joint chief of staff and the folks on the ground, i want to meet him. >> mr. obama's harshest words were for isil itself. >> these are killers with fantasies of glory. >> with one of the paris assailants reportedly entering europe with a flood of refugees from the syrian war, the president spoke directly to politicians back home. >> when i hear folks say that well, maybe we should just admit the christians but not the muslims, when i hear political leaders suggesting that there would be a religious test, we don't have religious tests to our compassion. >> governors from texas, michigan and elsewhere vowed to bar refugees from entering their state, citing security risks. mr. obama warned against a
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backlash that would stereotype all muslims. not only is a betrayal of american values, he said, but it would also play into isil's hands. >> they will lead, i think, to greater recruitment if this becomes somehow defined as a muslim problem as opposed to a terrorist problem. >> that is mick vick reporting from turkey. >> with my hudson is in custody in texas. bodies were found in a rural count southeast of dallas and two were children. >> dangerous storms are moving east.
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>> a scene in texas with at least seven suspected tornadoes touched down. now that system is spawning more this morning. let's bring in nicole mitchell. >> almost 40 different tornado reports, even more high winds outside of tornadic, so a lot of damage this morning, trees down, power lines down, it's going to be a slow morning. you could easily pick up this line now moving from parts of consist into texas, still carrying severe weather with it. we've had more of those winter reports this morning and wean right now in oklahoma, dealing with a tornado warning. it's indicated on radar. haven't seen anything on the ground yet, but definitely want to take precautions there. a widespread watch means conditions are possible and other severe weather watches and warnings, that would be more likely for the wind damage. through the day, we'll see more of this. these are all those different reports yesterday, wind, hail and tornadoes as they moved through. that line was potent.
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i'm stopping at where it started to form up, but it's been a key he'sive line moving through. that risk through the course of the day today, once we get through this morning, more likely places like arkansas, louisiana and once we get into the heat of the day. things have a potential to fire up more. along with that, you saw the rain moving through, areas of heavy rain. especially the mississippi valley, four, five, six inches between today and slowly into tomorrow as all of this moves out. the flooding risk is going to be very high with this, as well. i want to mention, i'll have more on this coming up. but on the backside, it is heavy snow to talk about. >> a mixed bag. nicole, thank you very much. >> rejecting refugees in america. >> more states saying no to syrian refugees fleeing the war, but is it for safety or politics. >> for million was those refugees, they now worry the paris attacks could mean the end of their desperate journey.
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>> that the attacks in paris have a growing number of governors saying no to syrian refugees. they say it's for safety. >> they are concerned the potential attackers could be hiding must not the refugees, president obama pledging to place 10,000 refugees across the united states over the next year. meanwhile, two presidential candidates say they are going to submit legislation to stop syrian muslims from migrating to the united states. the coordinator at welcoming michigan, welcoming the new immigrants to this country joins
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us from detroit this morning. thanks for being with us. i want to look at a map. the governors of more than 20 states won't welcome any syrian refugees. what's been the reaction among the syrian american community in detroit where you are? >> well, thanks for having me on this morning. it's been pretty disappointing. a lot of our community members are really taken aback and surprised. we've been collaborating with the governor's office and local governments in a planning process to prepare for more arrivals of syrian refugees and this is completely unexpected, so folks are reeling, they're really disappointed and they're frightened. they're a little bit concerned about backlash in their communities. >> among the governors unreally the welcome mat, your own governor, we reached out to governor snyder. he declined our request. this is what he had to say.
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he softened his stance a little bit, but in your opinion, is that too late, too late. >> in our opinion, we were incredibly disappointed and we saw his announcement as a lack of leadership in a critical moment. his statement and then the corrections that he issued following has only served to stoke a lot of confusion among folks. a lot of people are unfamiliar with the resettlement pros and his statements just muddied the waters even further. also, the role of the governors of the state in general, they don't even really have jurisdiction over the refugee resettlement process. it's a federal process. >> this nation prides itself as being a nation of immigrants. the inscription on the statue of liberty actually says a mighty woman with a torch whose flame
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is the imprisoned lightning and her name mother of exiles. mother of exiles. do you believe that the ideals that this nation was founded on are now being betrayed? >> i do. that's what the country was founded on, that's what most of our american and michigan respondents believe issue and that's what we want to uphold. we thought it was a lack of moral leadership to lead people astray and sort of stoke fears and heighten concerns in a moment we really should be bringing people together in steady of driving them apart. >> there's somebody yelling at the screen right now saying don't both these guns have a right to this or are they being political, since all but one are republicans. >> we were concerned that there was some sort of message that was trying to be sent. i'm not sure what that is, but
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the fact of the matter is that we already have really robust security clearance processes, and folks in the refugee resettlement world know this, so it's kind of surprising that this process would be attacked. the american resettlement process is different than the european pros. we don't have syrian refugees showing up at our land borders. they're specifically brought here by the united states through heavy security clearance checks, through the department of homeland security, through the state department, with the f.b.i., and it takes over two years or even more for folks to actually arrive here. >> so it's not easy. >> multiple security clearances. it's not easy. actually, the resettlement process would be the most unlikely entry point for a
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terrorist to enter the united states because it is so difficult. >> thank you very much. >> the paris attacks of having a bigger impact in europe. the possibility that one of the paris attackers traveled with refugees through greece is fueling calls to close the borders. al jazeera's jonah hill reports. >> of the may be dreadful consequences of friday's attacks in paris, one key detail may have the widest significance, a syrian passport discovered near the body of one attacker, its holder having entered europe by a greek island as a refugee. >> what i fear is that there will be irrational demands for completely closing down the migration flows, especially from syria. >> the passport connection has not yet been proven, but already, those calls have begun. this changes everything, the words of a german politician,
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challenging german chancellor angela merkel's open door policy on refugees. poland has reversed to take part in the quota system and in france, incendiary language from the far right leader, calling for islamic fundamentalism to be destroyed and illegal foreigners to be deported. >> it is going to be be harder to be an immigrant in europe. >> the extreme right in front and europe will seize the opportunity and it's not a new argument. they had started talking about this, that the confusion, they kind of emphasized is very dangerous between terrorists and then you slide into muslim and from muslim to arab and from arab to migrant and they put everything in one lot. >> those who defend europe's migration policies, the french government among them argued it's wrong to connect what happened here in paris with the
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refugee crisis, but the hundreds of thousands of people making their way to europe are fleeing the very people who carried out friday's attacks, but those voices in danger of being drowned out by the rising clamor of the populace right. >> there is another dimension to consider in the so-called islamic state's motives for these attacks. >> the message from isis is come and join us because the expected retaliation from france and europeans in general will be so harsh that muslims will feel that this is somehow an unwelcome home and they've got to come back. >> if friday's attacks succeed in turning europe against the refugees, and even secular europeans against muslims in general, that may be the very result that isil was aiming for. jonah hall, al jazeera, paris. >> balancing private and security concerns after the
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paris attacks. >> why encrypted software like what's app has intelligence services worried. >> i'm in pennsylvania. join me to find out what this indian squash and these melon seeds can be traced back to the fourth century have in common.
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>> cutting a country in half. >> here's where the canal is gonna to start. >> who's paying the price for progress? >> we are putting all of our future at risk. >> how are they gonna get these sediments out? >> what is difficult, is seeing all the country being destroyed. >> techknow's team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> can affect and surprise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow - where technology meets humanity.
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>> welcome back to your world this morning. it is 8:30 eastern, taking a local today's top stories. dangerous weather is hitting the central part of the country in the northern plains and rockies there are blizzard warnings in effect. this is a live look at denver, which is in the eye of the storm. a bit further south, the tornadoes left trails of damage in texas and kansas and are moving east. >> russia this morning confirming it was a homemade bomb that took down an airliner over egypt last month. all onboard were killed. russian's president vladimir putin vowing to hunt down those responsible, moscow offering a $50 million reward for the effort. shortly after the crash, isil said it was responsible. >> as authorities search for suspects in the paris attacks, secretary of state john kerry is in paris where he met with president francois hollande this
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morning. kerry said allied nations need to work together to stop isil. he told c.n.n. that the u.s. is working with turkey to finish securing the northern syrian border. >> one key question investigators are asking after the paris attacks, how the attackers were able to be coordinated without being deat the time. they may have used so-called strong enegyptian technology and al jazeera's jacob ward explained just what it is. >> if someone wanted a secure application to coordinate an attack, they'd have no end of options. what's app, the world's leading messaging app would be a logical first choice. security sources close to the investigation tell al jazeera that the app may have been used by the paris attackers. in the aftermath of the bangkok bombings in august, the culprits used what's app to communicate. that's not because it is the preferred means of communication for bad guys. it's because it's the preferred means of communication for
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nearly one seventh of the world's population. the company did not respond to our request for comments. what's app reports it has 800 million monthly users. the world uses it to send 30 billion messages. it's a free alternative to text messages and voice calls. >> in its early days, what's app had a somewhat weak security reputation. after the company was acquired by facebook in november, 2014, it initiated an endescription even the company cannot decode. my phone does the in crepting on the phone on the other end the decrypting. they arrange a sort of handshake that doesn't involve any central server. what's app does not have access to my message. it cannot decrypt it even if it wanted to. there is no back door or master key it condition offer to the intelligence community. it's that kind of inception, also used by a lot of other
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competing platforms that has members of the intelligence community complaining it makes their jobs more difficult if not impossible. >> speaking monday, c.i.a. director described encryption this way. >> intentional gaps that have been created and the ability of intelligence and security services to protect the people that they are asked to serve. >> david cameron in the aftermath of the paris shootings in january of this year even called for banning encrypted messaging apps in britain, a move struck down in july by the high court in england. >> it's important to remember that while we discovered again and again that people use these apps to plot violence, it's always in retrospect we find that out. there is no publicly available evidence that any intelligence agency that stopped an attack by monitoring communications. those efforts are you are difficult. >> it's difficult to take a signal that small out of a huge hey stock like that.
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even if they could, there is nothing to prevent terrorists from starting to use their observe code word. they could decide that the weather is good today means oh, we're going to go forward with an attack. >> a russian effort to warn the united states about tamerlan tsarnaev that should have stopped him was missed because his name was misspelled in a database. multiply that complication by 30 billion daily what's app messages and the problem doesn't seem to be a matter of gathering information, it's a matter of what to do with it. joke cob ward, al jazeera, san francisco. >> a senior researcher from george walker to know university joins us this morning. thanks for your time. has technology really given an edge to would-be terrorists? >> it's difficult to say. what we're talking about is a process that may make it harder for law enforcement and the intelligence community to execute broad tracing and surveillance of large numbers of
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are suspects. what it doesn't mean is that it prevents law enforcement from being able to access communications on particular devices. the encryption creating the secure tunnel are still available if you can break and get access to either the computers or the cell phones used in that conversation. >> first you would have to identify the cell phone, get your hands on the cell phone, not -- that has never happened as far as i know in these terrorists operations. it's always in retrospect as reported in the last piece. other than what's app, what are they using and is the so-called dark web a part of this? does isil have hackers? >> so isil definitely has some sort of hacking capability. they've demonstrate they are able to take control of websites and manipulate data in a public way trying to make a name for themselves. other applications, tell gram, there's an arrest back in april of this year, british intelligence found a young boy
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who was communicating with an individual in algeria, using tell gram to exchange messages about joining the group and further its propaganda messages. it's not clear how they got access to those messages, but they were part of the court filings. >> there's a distinction to be made between the propaganda and recruiting efforts of i.s. and their operational communications. a lot of the twitter and facebook social media platform that is we see they are active on are easier to gain access to. there's a better scope of getting access. >> when it comes to the first part of what you said, the social media, the propaganda capability, apparently one of the suspects in the paris attacks was in a magazine, a jihadist magazine and he still wasn't flagged.
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are these guys just getting ahead of law enforcement and intelligence when it comes to the information war, setting aside the use of highly encrypted communications on an operation alex? >> it's incredibly difficult. the task that these intelligence agencies and law enforcement bodies are forced to deal with, but now this group of returnees, individuals from belgium and france coming back and needing to be monitored. french authorities were following two brothers in the charlie hebdo attacks, monitoring one for everywhere he went for more than two years and found no indications of an attack. it's a resource challenge. choices have to be made. one of the individuals was known
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to french intelligence was on a watch list at the -- >> in any way the importance of these high tech apps, because what's app was not around during other highly coordinated attention, including 9/11. is a danger the events the ones in paris are used to justify an orwellian level of court? >> it's a we need to be able to talk in detail about the nature of technology and impact on law endorsement. it's difficult for them in the
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intelligence community to detail any efforts they've had. it's a debate being held largely out of the public eye. >> thank you. >> senior turkish officials telling al jazeera they did share information with france about a possible attack. they say that one of the attackers entered turkey in 2013 and was being watched. turkey is a strategic regional power in the middle east and a major point of entry for fighters trying to join the battle in syria. we have the story from turkey. >> we are here in istanbul, turkey. this is where east meets west. i'm on the european side of istanbul. just over there is asia. this is metaphorically and practically the crossroads of the world. for many years since the in that 20's, turkey has faced this way toward europe and toward the west. it has been a country that has separated mosque and state for a very long time. 13 years ago, president erdogan
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was elected and things started to change in this country. turkey tried to join the european union. it's qualified to join. it's been an applicant since 2005, but the european union has not embraced turkey. nato has embraced turkey because who wouldn't want a country like this, heavily armed in the middle east, straddling europe and asia and on the same side, but when it comes to joining the e.u., the europeans have basically told turkey that there isn't going to be a muslim majority country to be part of europe. as a result. turkey has moved from facing the west, the christian european west to facing the muslim asian east and that has happened as there has been more and more turmoil in the middle east. turkey used to be an ally of the government of syria. that has changed ever since the syrian government turned on its own people. while turkey is a member of nato, it's part of the u.s. led coalition against the syrian government, it's also got a
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problem with kurdish nationalism in its own country, so while its busy bombing syrian government insulations in syria, it's also bombing kurds, who are allies of the west in syria. at the same time, 2 million refugees have streamed into turkey, and they haven't gone on to europe. they're living there, including here in istanbul, some thee hundred thousand syrian refugees right here. turkey is crucial to the fight against isil and against terrorism and extremism. >> that is ali velshi on the ground in istanbul. you can more on the show on target airing tonight. >> more protests are expect in minneapolis today over the police shooting of a black man. more than 50 demonstrators were arrested monday night after they shut down a section of interstate 94 for more than two hours. they are angry over the shooting of jamar clark by officers. both the mayor and police chief are calling for a federal investigation. >> the first major storm of the
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season could bury parts of the central plains and rackies in snow today. blizzard warnings up in colorado, damage and nebraska. that snow began to fall in colorado and new mexico on monday. looks pretty, but it's pretty dangerous out there. high winds could produce white out conditions. >> let's bring in nicole mitchell on that. nicole. >> we've only had light snow reports for the most part this morning, but winds gusting in the 20-30-mile per hour range have brought visibility less than a mile. that is one of our concerns today. this is a big, broad system, the snow is on the backside of that, but the same moisture that's causing flood concerns on the backside is plentiful moisture for those areas of snow. you can see this from new mexico up into the northern plains, parts of the dakotas dealing with that and the high winds are going to be a big problem. not only heavy snow in some cases especially higher elevations getting up to a foot, but the high winds go through the northern plains.
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even not getting the snow, you're going to feel that if you're driving or possibly seeing things come down. that's going to reduce the visibility in this area where we do have the show. temperatures really dropping significantly, so these 70 that is helped us set up for severe weather and fuel that ahead of all of this on the backside, look at this, denver for today, only about 41 degrees, and it's on the move slowly for tomorrow, the southeast gets the rain, and the next couple days, that snow spreads to the northern parts of the midwest. >> you also smile when you say snow. >> i like it a little bit. >> nicole, thank you very much. >> a travel merger in that industry would create the biggest hotel chain in the world, taking over rifle star wood for $12.2 million. it would bring hotels together in over 100 countries. >> this morning, the second largest for profit college
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saying it will change recruitment practices. the company accused of violating the law that schools. we from it from federal financial aid programs. it says they can't cash in as an incentive for recruiters. >> education secretary arnie duncan saying the sign is a clear warning to other colleges. it has schools in 32 states and canada, as well. >> the war in syria is helping spark new calls to protect an endangered species, seeds. many farms have been wiped out by the fighting and with them go many unique plants. john terrett traveled to a farm outside philadelphia where several people of leading the effort to save these seeds. >> you'll never believe this, but here in pennsylvania, there is a food history that, a writer, a gardner, a farmer who specializes in growing rare seeds from all over the world
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and rescuing those plants, as well. here in the allotment, german radishes, garlic from syria. cab only, the for runner to the brussel sprout. the climate is conducive for growing these seeds from all over the world. >> the micro climate here is very much like burgundy in france and the micro climate in this garden is very mediterranean in the summer. >> william weaver said this indian swash and melon seeds that can be traced back to the fourth century would not be here today if not for this work here in this garden in pennsylvania. >> you can see john's full report tonight right here on al jazeera at 8:00 eastern. >> a show of solidarity on the soccer field. >> the french national team plays england, it's first match
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since the attacks in paris.
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>> a hash tag from front going viral this morning, the phrase literally means i am not a terrorist. people are posting images as they rush to the cafes and restaurants. they are meant as messages of love and support for paris
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following the friday attacks. >> today's soccer match between belgium and spain called off because of security concerns follow the attacks. >> another friendly game between england and france is scheduled a few hours from now. security will be tight and hearts will be heavy. >> inside wembley stadium where they were welcomed with french colors and trench sentiments, the 23 members of france's national soccer team went through normal preparations for a game that will be anything but normal. >> there will be a lot of emotion from us, from players. >> the french national team was on the pitch friday night when the attacks began in paris. this time, there will be beefed up security inside and outside the stadium, with armed officers on alert. fans are being asked to arrive early to go through the security checks. similar steps have been imposed at sporting events around the world from the fight in
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australia to all the nfl games in the united states. as for the match at wembley, france's coach said he gave each player a chance to skip the game. none has. despite the fact that friday's tragedy touched two players personally. antoine's sister escaped the attack at the concert hall where dozens were killed. another's cousin was one of the 129 people who died in paris friday night. >> the last three days were a bit dramatic and i think we were in mourning altogether. >> the british fans will join in that mourning, singing along to the french national anthem displayed on giant video screens so all can sing along. >> it will be important for us to show character through that game and we will share this
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moment with all the english people. >> for anyone who doesn't want to read the national anthem off giant screens, local newspapers have put it in their pages for fans to cut out and bring with them. prince william will be at wembley. >> particular symbolic, because they have had a historic soccer rivalry for song. they have to plan security beyond tonight's game. >> the second biggest international soccer tournament behind the world cup, the final will be at the scene of friday night's explosion. >> sports always brings us back together. thank you very much. >> a major setback for daily fantasy sports websites. a new york state judge turning aside the request to keep them operating. that's after the attorney general ruled both draft kings and fan duel are gambling.
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the final decision will be next week. >> when we come back, gone but not forgotten. >> my parents are in distress. we were eight brothers and sisters and now we became six in one evening. >> remembering loved ones after the paris attacks.
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>> a donor was 26 years old, killed in a cycling accident. the father of five can't wait to see his family again. >> he speaks through that voice box because of the operation. he's now able to sleep with his eyes closes for the first time sips the fire left him disfigured. that will be key to saving his eyesight. >> hall-of-famers yogi berra and willie mays will receive presidential medals of freedom. mays is one of the best all around players ever. he made the catch that helped
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the giants win the world series. berra was a 10 time world series champion and three time american league m.v.p. he died in september at age 90. >> a look back at some of the lives cut short in paris. we're learning more about the victims of the attacks. they come from 19 different nations, most of them young. we have their stories. >> it's the little things that made them all so different. to those who loved each of the victims of the paris attacks, irrelacable. >> terrorism. >> 129 people from 19 nations with details now emerging about the paths they forged in life. most were killed at the concert hall, there to see the american band eagles of death metal. a britain, 36 years old was selling merchandise for the
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band. his girlfriend posted frantic messages on line looking for him, then a final goodbye. >> sleep tight, my sweet prince. >> also at the club, a guitarist enjoying the show. he lived in paris with his french wife. his band posted a final tribute on its facebook page. >> pierre was a restaurant manager who loved to sky dive and had infectious energy. >> more fell as they enjoyed the paris night life at restaurants and cafes. a 24-year-old marketing manager,. >> milla who came to paris for her love of fashion. these brothers were at the cafe. the women did not survive. >> my parents are in absolute distress. we were eight brothers and
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sisters and now became six in one evening. >> not worried just about their own loss, but also about the public response. >> we are all inhabitants of this planet and we need to help each other. mr. were black people, arabic people. >>ish people there, all of us were hit. we are all in the same boat. >> that's it for us here in new york. >> we'll have more on the announcement from russia that they are confirming it was a bomb that took down the jet over the skies in egypt. >> we are back tomorrow beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern. for the latest news at any time, go to aljazeera.com. have a great day.
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>> the u.s. secretary of state urgion the world to hit isil as its core after attacks in paris. you're watching al jazeera live from doha. also coming up, russia says a plane that crashed over the sinai in egypt was brought down by a bomb. president vladimir putin vow that is those responsible will be punished. yemen's president leaves his several imposed exile in saudi arabia and returns to the port city of aden. >> strict visa rules for children traveling

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