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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  November 23, 2015 7:00am-9:01am EST

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i firmly support the action that president francois hollande has taken the strike i.s.i.l. in syria. >> united in the fight against i.s.i.l. david cameron is in france saying he supports strikes in syria. new orleans park were gathered there and more than a dozen hurt. big pharma getting bigger and two giants ready to announce the world's largest merger ever. look at the wintry weather and bitter cold following heavy snows and could mean a white thanksgiving for some parts of the country. ♪
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welcome to your world this morning, i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm del walters and renewed support to defeat i.s.i.l. after ten days of attacks in paris and to approve air strikes and cameron meeting with francois hollande and later francois hollande heading to washington and will sit down with president obama and two leaders will talk strategy. >> brussels remains on edge still locked down as authorities search for people connected with attacks and belgium police detained 16 people over raids over the weekend with credible evidence of repeats of paris were being planned in belgium capitol and need help identifying this man and believe he was one of the suicide bombers who attacked in france. and the capitol is on lock down
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and al jazeera's paul brennan is there. >> reporter: on the face of it major success for belgium authorities on sunday night 22 coordinated raids all within minutes of each other and 16 suspects arrested. a judge will decide whether or not those arrests should turn into longer detention and may well be that some of the 16 end up getting released but nonetheless the police and authorities after many days of extreme pressure to make some progress do appear at last to have made a breakthrough. one thing to say though is that salah abdeslam the prime target of the authorities has still slipped through the net and still on the run at the moment and means the terror threat in brussels and alert level is level four and not quite lock down and there are trans and buses running over ground but schools in brussels are shut down and the metro and under ground will remain shut. in way to lift the threat and
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level of alert until they get the prime suspect, the police are at least starting to make some progress in that direction. paul brennan reporting from brussels. also coming up, we will have a live shot out of paris with adam and want to talk about new york and in three days hosting the huge macy's day parade and officials say they are ready. >> clear. >> reporter: over the weekend hundreds of local and federal agrees taking part in the security drill inside the city subway system, officers responding to a mock active shooter incident and nypd says thousands of offers including counter terrorism police will be on the streets thanksgiving day. >> lessons learned here will be spread quickly throughout the nypd and the fire department of new york city but also then through homeland security across the country. these exercises are vitally necessary particularly in light of all that is going on in the world at this particular point in time.
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in new york city we are at this time very well prepared and continually improving the preparedness. >> reporter: the first under ground in new york city subway system and practice was planned before attacks in paris. now we go back to paris, that is where al jazeera's adam is standing by live and adam they just got out of that meeting this morning between david cameron and francois hollande, what else did the two leaders decide? >> well david cameron wants to give full support to france and ally in this on going campaign against i.s.i.l. and wants parliament to approve air strikes by the british government is yet to be seen if that will be approved keep in mind two years ago he failed to get enough votes to start bombing syria and also francois hollande spoke after they met and this is what he had to say. >> translator: we are convinced
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we must continue to hit the islamic state group in syria and intensify the strikes and choose terror strikes with maximum damage on the army and aircraft carrier will hit da'esh and hit it hard. >> reporter: so francois hollande and cameron meeting earlier in paris. they went to one of the vigils less than a half mile walk from where i'm standing and clearly prime minister david cameron very touched and looking to see if he gets the political backing to do more than support france and right now they are offering support at an air base in cyprus to the french and refueling operations to the french planes that will be conducting this ongoing bombing opposition against against syria on the campaign against i.s.i.l. that is the fight against i.s.i.l. in syria, what is the latest of security operations inside of france?
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>> well, basically they continue to have a state of emergency, del, and what that looks like on the ground more than 100,000 security forces in paris and around the rest of the country, one city we reported from yesterday had a three-night curfuy in one muslim neighborhood and authorities taking it upon themselves to make decisions how to keep the community safe and true to root out cells that are allegedly plotting more attacks and people in the community felt unfairly targeted but we see the police and military across the country continuing to conduct hundreds of raids everyday finding stockpiles of weapons, finding documents, finding plans that change in this country in the past ten days is unbelievable when you consider the security operations taking place here and over the border of belgium where they continue to be in lock down
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mode. >> and adam we understand they now released the photograph of a third suspect, what can you tell us about this massive manhunt for suspect number three? >> well from what we are hearing they think that suspect actually died and they are trying to find information that there was another suicide bomber and they are looking for new clues because they don't know the name of the person and circulating this photo in france and on social media and all media to try and understand more about the plot because when they get one clue it may lead them to finding someone else but the main person they are trying to track down is salah abdeslam the most wanted fugitive in france and lots of reports of where he might be and some of his friends have told the media anonymously skyped him in days after the attacks and is stuck between i.s.i.l. and french authorities and doesn't know which way to
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turn and his family encouraging him with media to turn himself in and his brother said we would rather see you in jail than a graveyard. >> live? in paris and thank you very much. we are seeing new images of the attack in mali and video showing guards storming the blu hotel in the city of bomako and rescued 150 but 19 civilians killed and two gunmen and saying an al-qaeda group was responsible and says a radical group liberation front was behind assault. 16 people are recovering this morning after a shooting at a park in new orleans at a playground where people gather erred for a block party and two groups opened fire on each other and we are live in new orleans and jonathan good morning and what do police think sparked the shooting? >> good morning and police say the shooting may have been gang related but as you mentioned at
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the very least know this was as a result of two groups fighting and shooting at one another. you can see this is a playground that happened around 6:00 last night and 300 were gathered and two groups, one group was here for an after party for a second line parade and another group was here for what was a music video shoot, a shoot that police knew nothing about so a big crowd gathered here and police on the way to dispurse the crowd when the shooted happened and some item people were found on the ground requiring medical help and six people showed up themselves to area hospitals. everyone fled the scene and police this morning still trying to search for those gunman and now at least two people fired shots out here, there were so many rounds fired, in fact, that witnesses say they lost count and so police again searching for the shooter this morning and the 16 victims stephanie said to be in stable condition this
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morning. >> new orleans as you know is touting the new statistics that showed that crime over all is down and now we have 16 people shot in one night, how is the community reacting? >> well, people are certainly stunned but i would say a lot of people are not shocked, you are right, just on friday police released a quarterly report showing that over all crime was down about 5% but in the area of gun violence and murders actually it's up slightly about 15%, so there still is a concern here and as i mentioned people are stunned but not necessarily surprised and shocked because even you look back to last year there was a shooting on burbon street and the year before that 20 people shot at a mother's day gathering after a second line so shootings like this have happened repeatedly in few new orleans year to year and police and mayor says please come forward with information something we heard the mayor say
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as he was here on the scene last night they just need people's help. >> it's really hard to police against a bunch of guys who decide to pull out guns and settle disputes with 300 people between them and not what you can tolerate in the city and at the end of the day it will require the people in this park to basically say they had enough and not put in harm's way and give information so the police can do their job. >> so again some 16 at least 16 people we know were shot, police have not released specific information about those victims but we do know there were children here in the park last night and we know at least one of the victims was as young as 14 years old. >> jonathan live in new orleans thank you. new orleans identifying a man they say shot a good samaritan and looking for 21-year-old cane and tried to kidnap a woman a tulane university medical student and stopped to help and he was shot in the stomach, police say he
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tried to shoot the student again but his gun failed. >> we know who you are and need to though we are going to find you and we need the public's help to do it and no question now we know who he is and will be brought to justice. >> reporter: police are confident they will capture and the student 25-year-old peter gold still in the hospital in critical condition and one year since the police shooting of tamir rice in cleveland and marking that anniversary in cleveland and other cities and it was last november when police shot rice as he was waving that pellet gun in a park and grand jury hearing testimony in the case to find out if charges should be filed against officers involved. cold in chicago and temperatures drop below freezing over the weekend and a storm dumped almost a foot of snow and the biggest storm to hit the region in 120 years and set to rise on wednesday and heavy rain
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could melt snow by thanksgiving and in michigan temperatures and wind and hit by the storm leaving more than a foot of snow there and michigan saw road closers, accidents as well as flight cancellations. out west get ready for a major storm that is moving there and let's turn to nicole mitchell, ugly. >> we will see that the next couple of days moving in right now and talking about the system in the midwest and we are kind of in the calm after the storm but i want to mention even with slightly warmer temperatures above freezing melting and refreezing and the roads get extra slick in the morning hours and have eyes focused on this and see a little more cloud cover coming in and a little rain so far and we will get faith tastes of this today and more pushes in tomorrow and this is potent and some of the things we have in advance of this system especially these northern parts of the rocky, we see the snowstorms before but this one
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is really going to be one of the first arctic blasts of the season on top of it and not only areas of heavy snow and why we have advisories up already but bitterly cold, the wind chill and could be blizzard conditions at times as we get into tomorrow and then more of this already starting to approach today as we get closer to the coastline and a lot of winter advisories in effect and this is tomorrow's forecast and you can see how widespread this starts to become and will move its way across the country and as we get in the day today and more so into tomorrow we watch for some of that snow to develop but by the time we get to wednesday this starts pulling out and into the midwest and that means chicago for example that we just saw could be seeing some of that wet weather and rain for thursday so anything that doesn't melt in the meantime into the midwest will be definitely the rain chewing it away. here are some temperatures cool all the way down through the south this morning into the 50s and as temperatures this morning
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are even more frigid and a couple layers today. >> nicole thank you. a vote for change. argentina getting its first conservative president in more than a decade. the iraq museum in central baghdad where thousands of things were looted at the start of the 2003 u.s. led invasion. mark zuckerberg's decision to take a temporary leave from the company.
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coming back with a live look at croatia, beautiful castle there, nice view of your world on this morning. >> it is indeed argentina electing the first conservative president in more than a decade and receiving about half of the votes of the weekend runoff. >> as we report from buenos aires has already made a lot of promises. the impossible was possible
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on sunday night when he became the elected president of argentina. one month ago his chances were slim against the ruling party candidate. but the center right mayor of buenos aires was able to build enough support to defeat kristina kirchner's hand picked successor. >> translator: i'm here because you brought me here and so i ask you therefore don't abandon me. let us continue together that on december 10th the wonderful stage of argentina begins, its year is now! let's go argentina! let's go argentina, it's here, it's now! and his supporters believe him. all of them say they are ready to work for argentina. >> translator: we have the support of the people, we need
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to start acting and not complain so we can really change this country. >> reporter: celebrations continued until late at night. election results show majority in argentina voted for change and people that you can see behind me are not totally celebrating the victory but also the end of an era after 12 years of kirchnerism and the movement that kristina created in 2003. left wing movement brought about deep government involvement in the economy and many credited with pulling millions of argentina people out of poverty and kristina kirchner's supporters there was sadness and defiance. >> translator: people have no memory, once things are doing okay they decide to throw everything out of the window. local media is brain washing people and she won by only three points raising questions about governability but analysts say
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the biggest challenge is the econo economy. >> depletion of the central banks and macro economic policy especially throughout the last two years has been deficient and the economy has been stagnant for four years so there is a change in the macro economic regime coming and it will be pretty difficult to manage this situation without it having an impact on inflation. >> reporter: historical day in argentina. the first second round in this country's history and the first time in 12 years that the people have demanded change. al jazeera, buenos aires. and the opposition in hong kong celebrating its wins in sunday's local elections there, at least eight prodemocracy candidates all now elected all participating in demeanonstrati calling for independent from beijing and opposition hopes to
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elect more prodemocracy candidates in the next year. more violence in jerusalem today, a teen shot and killed another injured after police say a pair stabbed a 70-year-old palestinian man, happened outside a market in the central part of jerusalem and attackers mistook him from an israeli and 90 palestinians and 6 israelis died since last month. david cameron joining the campaign and met in paris with french president francois hollande and pushing for a stronger coalition against i.s.i.l. in the wake of the paris attacks. joining us now elliot ackerman a writer who tracked developments in the syrian civil war from istanbul and also a marine vet who received the bronze star for valor and purple heart and elliot thank you for your time, over the weekend bret the president's special envoy to
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combat i.s.i.l. said forces supported the u.s. seized back 435 square miles front killed 300 i.s.i.l. fighter is mr. obama's strategy starting to wor work? >> and i think he is continuing the strategy he used in the past and i think it will be seen how effective it is and i think as well you know measuring the territory in terms of square miles may not be an accurate metric because you get in a lot of denser urban strongholds in it's difficult in places like mozul or capitol iraqqa and it says strategic blunder in iraq is personal and do not want to see the syrian war up close with savage and continuation draws similar reaction and dips in the
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memories looking for clarity like some lost set of keys and because of the eloquence of that passage elliot i cannot help but think a lot of i.s.i.l.'s leadership are the same guys you fought in iraq, aren't they? >> and they most certainly are and if we look at the conflict in iraq and syria right now as americans we determine if the conflict was over in iraq in 2011 but obviously that is not the case and i think that is what on a personal level makes it difficult to watch because as difficult as we decided there is closer there clearly is not closure and the war continues to eek on and on and on and perhaps we are at a point to assert the war never ended and try to find a conclusion to it. >> do you see potential foreclosure now given complexities on the battlefield in syria? >> one of the things that
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islamic state has done in some respects made this fight much more clear than the fight was for instance seven or eight years ago and by declaring itself a state and holding territory puts it in a situation where it's a murky adversary and the west and coalition of western and arabic countries knows how to fight a conventional war and take background and hold ground and obama administration strategy and the forces its using they are waging a very conventional campaign and seeing metrics of hundreds of kilometers seized and held. >> what is the view from istanbul and get turkey and powers such as egypt to get more involved on the ground? >> well, you know, i think that is a huge going to be a huge challenge for this administration. it seems that it is one they are now going to in earnest and everyone has different equities whether it's the turks, saudis,
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iranians or can russians but i think what probably will be important is realizing that through strong leadership we can work together even if our objectives and our interests are not completely aligned. i mean if people often forget in the second world war the united states worked hand in hand with the soviet union for an unlimited period of time so it might be necessary to enter into a coalition where everyone's interests are not completely aligned. >> we appreciate your insights, thanks for joining us. a former soldier, this was a guy on the front lines and the eloquence you are right is incredible. >> coming up, in the next hour we will have an expert on russia's role to talk about what elliot said. sentenced to prison. >> a washington post reporter finds his fate more than a year and the post and his family insists he is innocent. historic multi-billion merger of two of the largest pharmaceuticals companies saying they are going to join forces.
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>>it's crazy money that you can make here. it's a ticking time bomb. >>do you know what chemicals have been in that tank? >> my big brother didn't wake up the next day. al jazeera america's... >> today they will be arrested. >>they're firing canisters of gas at us. >> we have to get out of here. ♪ looking live at the new york city skyline this morning on this beautiful, chilly morning in the new york and getting ready for the macey's
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thanksgiving day parade. >> 7:28 eastern looking at the top stories france and u k looking at cooperation in wake of paris attacks and david cameron met in paris with french president francois hollande and will ask parliament authority to launch air strikes in syria. on high alert saying a terrorist like attack could be imminent in brussels and 21 people arrested on sunday and transportation and schools and businesses will remain close as they search for suspects. mayor of new orleans asking for public's help after a shooting at a park and opened fire after a block party and injuries not life threatening. it was official two of the world's largest company are joining companies. >> pfizer and allergean make the
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medicine in our cabinets and it's not necessarily about putting new drugs on the shelves. >> reporter: the merger is one of the biggest deals in healthcare history and set to be worth $160 billion. >> we need to say what live are we touching. >> and aimed at u.s. based pfizer to save billions in taxes and headquarters in ireland and subject to the lower tax rate and most of the operations are in new jersey. >> a company with 60 years of eye care expertise. >> reporter: the maker of botox would technically be the buyer even though pfizer is the bigger company and transaction would sidestep treasury rules of the deal known as corporate inversions and lower from 25% to about 15. [switching captioners]
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who can invest $2 billion to $3 billion more in research than we can and we're fighting with one hand tied behind our bag. >> physesser has been dealing with competition from generic drugs, cutting profits since 2010. >> the obama administration has been trying to crack down on in versions. these deals could become a topic. >> one u.s. drug maker was dissuaded from buying its irish competitor. >> megamergers, will jobs be lost and will this lower the price of medication. >> it's not clear if there will be layoffs because of i have the. pfizer that laid off people because of past mergessers, but as far as the drugs are
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concerned, analysts don't expect this to affect the cost of drugs. >> thank you. >> women in california and oregon will soon have an easier time getting birth control. both states plan to give pharmacists the authority to give out contraception without a doctor's precision. the pharmacists can screen patients themselves. the medication would still be covered by insurance. >> facebook c.e.o. plans to step away from his company for the birth of his first child, taking eight weeks of paternity leave when he and his wife have their first child. zuckerberg called the decision very personal. employees can take up to four months off to be with their new bosch. >> donald trump leading the race for the republican nomination four months now in a row. according to the poll, trump leads the field with 32%, ben carson second, florida senator marco rubio third at 11% and ted
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cruz and jeb bush tied at just 6%. trump hitting the talk show circuit sunday, doubling down on his response to the paris attacks is now calling for surveillance at mosques. he also said there should be a data base to track syrian refugees. gail alberta teaches politics and joins us via skype from des moines donald trump saw people, muslims cheering when the twin towers came down. >> they were cheering ass world center came down. it might not be politically to talk about, but there were people cheering as those buildings came down and that tells you something. it was well covered at the time. >> the mayor of jersey city new jersey saying that is flat out
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wrong, your reaction. >> trump says what he thinks. he doesn't necessarily apologize for it. so, if that's what he believes, he's going to say it and probably stick to it. >> what does that say about the voters when they were told over and over again that things said are not true and yet he has been leading in the polls for four months in a row? he is the front runner. >> well, i think the american electorate right now wants somebody who is not part of the current establishment. that's clear by their support for those outside candidates like trump and carson. when a candidate consistently has something that comes out that is inaccurate, that could hurt them in the long run. >> ben carson's numbers though, one of those outsiders, numbers are drop, why? >> cruz and rubio are giving him a run for their main. up, they are fighting over their
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same base. donald trump is not necessarily fighting over the evangelical conservative vote, he is going after the blue collar vote. you have them targeting the coalition and gop. you are going to see those numbers shift over time because they are going after the same people especially in iowa. >> and marco rubio an outsider -- i mean insider, excuse me? >> you could say he is. he's a sitting senator, just like cruz, right? you have these candidates that are part of the establishment. they can position themselves to be an outsider. we've seen that time and time again with very successful elect officials being able to sell themselves as the underdog and as a, you know, outside of the establishment. >> the caucuses are 69 days away. i heard karl rove saying that iowa voters don't make up their
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mind in reality until before the caucuses are held. is that true? >> i would say that most voters in general, there's a lot of information out there, and in order for iowans to make a good decision, they have to wait until they get close. we are quite a ways away. >> is this the so-called silly season then and should we be paying attention to the polls? >> i think the polls are due to change. we will see more candidates drop out before the caucuses. it's still quite a ways away and right now, everybody's views for media attention. >> what about on the democratic side? we've got calls for immigrants to be registered, for there to be a database of syrian refugees and muslims. what can the democratic candidates do to counter thundershowers arguments? >> i think there's a balance between being able to have national security and keep our nation securable yet not go away from the values that we hold near and dear to our hearts here in the u.s., such as helping
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refugees. for the democrats, it's going to be a really tricky balance in that sense, because we do have a strong coalition asking for toughness and to strengthen the borders and to, you know,back down on immigration per se, but at the same time as democrats, they have to balance those two. >> the washington post reported this has happened historically over and over again. gail, thank you very much. >> voters in louisiana have picked a democratic to be their next governor. john bell edwards won this weekend's runoff election to beat david vitter. vitter will not run for the senate next year. edwards takes over phon bobby jindal in january. on sunday, iran's judiciary said ryan has been sentenced to prison. he's been in prison for a year.
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it may be a result of a political battle within iran. >> news about the fate of jason rezaian came sunday on the website of iranian state t.v. the spokesman for iran's judiciary only said that he has been sentenced to prison and the sentence is not yet final. sunday, his brother ali slammed the confusion and lack of transparency surrounding the case saying "my brother is an innocent man and well respected journalist, my family remains hopeful that jason will soon be reunited with us." reskyen is tehran bureau chief for the washington post. the post's foreign editor said part of the secrecy is because rezaian has done nothing wrong. >> if iran had evidence against jason, it would have produced this by now. it wouldn't have been dragging out this case, verdict, this sentence for many many months without ever disclosing what it is jason did.
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>> rezaian and his wife were both arrested in their home in iran in the middle of the night in 2014. she was later released on bail. when rezaian was convicted, she and his mother went to court a try to learn details but were turned away. he has been in prison far longer than the prisoners held in the iran hostage crisis in 1979. as a deal over the nuclear program was talked about, those held in prisons were repeatedly discussed on the sidelines, but with no resolutions. >> we certainly would have hold that at that juncture, at any juncture, that iran would have done the right thing, shown it's humanitarian concern, released jason, given that there's no evidence against him. >> many believe rezaians case is caught up in internal politics.
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>> jason was reporting on iran, really writing more about the people, the lifestyle, nothing that would have aroused the sensitivities of the iranian authorities in any way. >> he's been a victim of the collision between more moderate forces and conservative once. >> the sentence remains shrouded in secrecy. >> there i also a new pilot program in if he got on some indian reservations given tribal police access to federal databases to see if someone arrested has a criminal background. that is a big change from the past. >> when most police departments pull someone over, they've got a computer in their squad car to tell us that person is wanted at a state or federal level. in indian country, that's not the case, but here on the cherokee nation, that's about to change. >> it's called the tribal access program and the cherokee nation police department is one of 10 in the country giving it a trial
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run. soon, they'll have access to the same federal database that any other police department has, saving them minutes or even hours during dangerous situations. >> just two weeks ago, the department's swat team raided the home of a white supremacist group, using tactics like this. inside they found three more people than they expected, but without access to federal data had no way of knowing whether those people were dangerous. >> are they players, part of this conspiracy, not part of this conspiracy. in this program, the tap program instead of waiting through all of our state counterparts, they could have looked us up through the system and immediately had them returned to us and we could get realtime data to that commander saying no, these individuals were not involved and that's critically important. >> the program is expected to be rouped out in 90 days and
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cherokees will train others in the system. >> more than 100 bodies have been pulled from a land slide near a jade mine. it was triggered when a huge pile of debris gave way. accidents in and around that mine are common and many of the dead are believed to be scavengers searching the defree for jade to sell. >> the south is waking up to some of the coldest air so far this season. >> that same system that brought the snow to the midwest has been a big temperature equalizer in a way you probably don't like this morning. very similar all the way through the south that cold air went. atlanta at 31, so you're seeing kind of knows morn temperatures and big changes. these are the changes from yesterday, charlotte, 18 degrees colder, yesterday morning we were in the 40's, this morning we are in the 20's.
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those 20's spread way even into portions of the deep south. that's why we have a lot of different profit and freeze advisories, because you have plants outside or anything growing, hopefully you covered it last night, because it is very cold. in the week ahead, those temperatures will slowly rise, but the holiday forecast, wednesday is a big day for longer travel. if you're taking that plane ride or the longer car trip, we see that system pull out of the rockies and more showers start to develop in the midsection of the country. thursday, the holiday is actually when people take the shorter trip, and there are a lot of those. watch for place like chicago. again on this time, it's going to be rain, but iting all that snow. >> that's a big chunk of the country that could be affected by all that rain. >> there is a toxic mud flow in
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brazil. people there are worried about the long term effect on the environment. >> turn nan dough gomez has been fishing here for more than 18 years, but not anymore. millions of cubic pirates of mud carrying heavy metals and minerals contaminated the doce river. the toxic waste is deadly for the fish. >> it's sad to see the fish dying and we are not able to save them. >> a dam containing the mining residues exploded in the town two weeks ago. 11 died, 12 disappeared and waste polluted most of the 800-kilometer wrong river. environmentalist said it's the worst environment disaster in brazil's history. cleaning it up will be a
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challenge. >> it is a catastrophe that's been underestimated. waste has cop dominate the river banks. those eposts will emerge from the soil during the rainy season, contaminating the river again and again. >> the mining company a joint venture with brazilian valley, will pay the government morn $250 million for damages to begin with. the river was the source of water and fish for thousands of people. the army has been deployed to the city and other communities to distribute fresh water. the fines will also help finance the project arc of noah, implemented as an emergency measure. fisherman helped collect the diversity of fish to create a genetic bank and save them from disappearing. >> we will bring specialist to work on the fish reproduction until we can release them back into the river, but we can't say
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how long that will take to happen. >> for now, fernando, another fisherman will only collect money from the mining company for helping to save the river species. >> all the fish are dead. how can we live like this? we are fisherman, we can only do fishing. they need to give us some assistance. >> environmentalists say it could take 50 years to reverse the damage. they worry the effect in the ecosystem now that the contamination has reached the ocean. al jazeera, brazil. >> iraq's lost heritage. >> the efforts underway to recover and reserve relics lost or threatened during war. >> we'll talk about preserving the rare northern white rhino. one of the last few on earth has now died.
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>> a lot of iraq's ancient heritage is locked away because
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of the threat from isil. thousands of artifacts have been looted or destroyed. >> al jazeera has more on what's being done to protect the heritage. >> iraq's ancient history and relics from the world's oldest civilizations on display at the iraq museum in central baghdad. the walls and corridors are adorned with carve i guess dating back to the syrians and babylonians, predating jesus christ by thousands of years. she has worked at the museum. she said in the weeks before the u.s. led invasion, she and her colleagues warned that the museum was vulnerable, but no one seemed to listen. >> more than 50,000 pieces were stolen just from this museum.
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they damaged furniture and everything. >> almost immediately, officials began efforts to get back the relics, along with u.s. support, a recovery department was set up. objects were unearthed from private homes, recovered in raids and some simply reappeared on the who you seem shelves. other treasures were seized from antiquity's markets in syria, lebanon, kuwait, saudi arabia and as far as away as new yorking, including this piece. the 150-kilogram bronze relic dates back to the mes mesopotama period. >> some are before i could up in storage rooms far from public view. so off limits are the assaults and the contents such a safely guarded secret, we weren't
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allowed anywhere near them. >> that's because of concerns over iraq's readiness to preserve and protect its own treasures. the rapid rise of isil and sectarian division have all raised questions about the plow seem's safety. >> it's not allowed now. >> it's not just art faction stored at the museum at risk. iraq has 12,000 known archeological sites where ancient sites once stood. may not have been looted for years. while some artifacts remain on display or hidden away, much of its ancient heritage continues to be threatened. al jazeera at the iraq museum in baghdad. >> one of the world's last remaining northern white rhinos died. it was a 41-year-old female living in the san diego zoo.
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she had to be put down due to age related health conditions. with her death, there are only three believed to be left in the world. >> in afghanistan, a determined group of young women are going against convention. they formed a cycling team and are training to be in a race. >> three times a week, they take to the roads, hoping to build a world class cycling team. first, they have to learn the basics. on this day, it's learning to ride as a team in a line close enough to each other so the rider behind can take advantage of the slip stream. she used to cycle in iran, six years after moving to afghanistan, she saw another girl on a bike and started riding again. >> even here, in the most progressive part of the country, there were objections.
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>> they said it's shame for women to ride bikes. it's shame. this is bad for us. >> what do you do about that. >> we talk with mullah, and we say that if you know, there is no problem between men and women. if men can ride bikes, then woman also. it's no shame. >> she is now the team's trainer and mechanic. the club has six be byic al s to share. new members have to bring their own. like sisters, they are from one of the poorest enables. >> i went to the market to do some shopping. i saw a little girl riding a bicycle and after that, i begged my father to get me one. >> their father bought one bike, then borrowed money to buy a second so both daughters could
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ride. the bikes cost $100, a month's salary here, but the family thinks it's worth it. the team shares the road with traffic and more traditional forms of transport. >> when you are turning, look both ways. when there are no cars, then you can turn. >> the team won't be able to train outside for much longer. pretty soon it will be too sold and icy to ride on the roads. they are looking for an indoor space so they can keep cycling all winter. >> they hope they can use the local gym for the winter to get ready for the next competition in march. the race allows anyone with a bicycle, boy, man, girl or woman to compete. the team wants to do well to continue to prove that women's sports have a place here. jennifer glasse, afghanistan. >> the biggest names in music thinking about paris last night during a performance at the american music awards. ♪ celine dion performing an
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iconic french song, images was paris displayed in the background. the tribute had many in tears. the night did long top jennifer lopez, kicking off this show with a dance medley to the year's biggest songs and here are some of the night's big winners. best artist of the year, taylor swift taking home awards for favorite album and song of the year, as well, going to taylor swift. >> ahead in our next hour, brussels in lockdown, the manhunt for a suspected terrorist attacker shuts down belgian's capitol for a third day. >> a split between moscow and rash could be bad news or president bashar al assad and his grip on power. stephanie and i are back in two minutes with more of your world this morning. we'll see you then.
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"america tonight" - top investigative reporting, uncovering new perspectives. >> everything that's happening here is illegal. >> then at 10:00 - it's "reports from around the world". >> let's take a closer look. >> antonio mora gives you a global view. >> this is a human rights crisis. >> and at 11:00 - "news wrap-up". clear... concise... complete.
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>> we're here to fully get into the nuances of everything that's going on, not just in this country, but around the world. getting the news from the people who are affected. >> people need to demand reform... >> ali velshi on target. al jazeera america gives you the total news experience anytime, anywhere. more on every screen. digital, mobile, social. visit aljazeera.com. follow @ajam on twitter.
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and like aljazeera america on facebook for more stories, more access, more conversations. so you don't just stay on top of the news, go deeper and get more perspectives on every issue. al jazeera america. >> a capitol on lockdown, brussels closing schools and subways for a third straight day. the fear is that there could be a paris style attack. >> 10 days after the attacks, paris pushes for more cooperation against isil. now the british prime minister wants his country to launch airstrikes in syria. >> a manhunt in new orleans, more than a dozen people are hurt in a shooting that took place in a park. >> a blockbuster deal, two of the world's biggest drug companies agree to merge there
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are billions of dollars at stake in the accident. >> good morning. high alert in belgium where authorities are trying to find more linked to the paris attacks. brussels is locked down with schools and the subway system closed. police detained 21 in at least 20 raised over the weekend. >> france asking for the public's help identifying this man, saying he was one of the suicide bombers who attacked the stayed defrantz.
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>> hoping to get parliament to approve a bombing campaign against isil targets, david cameron is offering logistics support to the french military and also offering the option of refueling operations for french planes who carry on these bombing raised against isil targets and syria and iraq. meanwhile, security operations still on going here in france. we're still in a state of emergency. we're seeing thousands of security personnel across this country. one city ended a three night curfew on monday. we reported from there on sunday, where many people feel that they are being unfairly targeted and casting suspicion. that shows you that local authorities continue to make decisions during the state of emergency to conduct warrantless searching, put people under house arrest and even impose a curfew. we're also hearing reports of a customs official who was killed
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here in france. it's not clear if this has anything told with the attacks that took place in paris or other plots. all we know that is they're investigating this death, because it could also be related to criminal activity. >> adam rainy with the latest from paris. much of the security focus is to the north in belgium where officials have put brussels on lockdown for a third day. paul brennan is there. >> on the face of it, major success for the belgian authorities sunday night, a total of 22 coordinated raids, all within minutes of each other and 16 suspects arrested. a judge will decide whether or not those arrests should turn into longer detention. it may well be that some of those 16 get released. nonetheless, the police and authorities after many days of extreme pressure to make some progress do appear at last to have made a breakthrough. one things to, though, is that
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the frame target of the authorities has still slipped through the net. he is still on the run at the moment. that means that the terror threat here in brussels, the alert level remakes at level four. it's not quite lockdown, you can see trams, buses running overground, but schools in the brussels area are shut today and metro will remain shut. there's no way they can lift the threat, the level of alert until they get their prime suspect. the police are at least starting to make progress that in direction. >> paul brennan from brussels. nato has adjusted operations at plus sells headquarters, staff asked to work from home and scheduled visits to the headquarters have been canceled. >> there is new footage from friday said attack on a hotel in mali. the video shows the hotel stormed. the guards rescued more than 150 people, but 19 civilians were killed, along with two gunman.
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>> in just three days, new york city sets to host the big thanksgiving day parade. the mayor said they're ready. hundred was local and federal agents taking part in the security drill that took place underground in the city's subway system, officers responding to a mack active absoluter situation. the nypd saying thousand was officers, fluiding 1300 counter terrorism police are going to be on the streets thanksgiving day. >> lessons learned here will spread throughout the nypd and fire department of new york city, also then to homeland security across the country. officers, floouiding 1300 counter terrorism police are
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>> more violence today in jerusalem. a palestinian teen was shot dead and another injured after police say the pair stabbed a 70-year-old palestinian man. police say the attackers apparently mistook the man for an israeli. the incident took place outside a market in the central part of jerusalem. more than 90 palestinians and 16 israelis have been killed in the violence since it began last month. >> there is a manhunt in new orleans for the gunmen who shot 16 people at a park last night, shots fired at a play ground where people gathered for a block party. two groups of people opened fire and started shooting. al jazeera's jonathan martin is live in new orleans this morning. what's the latest now with the investigation? >> police say the shooting appears to have been gang
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related but at this point do not know who fired the shots. this all happened in this park in new orleans upper ninth ward about 6:00 last night. 600 people were gathered here for two separate events. some were here for an after party for a second line parade and another group of people were here for a music video shoot. police say the shoot was not permitted, so officers were actually on their way to break up the crowd, they say when the shooting happened, when it was all said and done, 10 people were found lying on the ground after the shooting and another six showed up to area hospitals. police say there were parliament tell shooters. we understand that those 16 shooting victims are at area hospitals all in stable condition. >> then there are those crime stats that show the crime in new orleans is down, now 16 shot in just one incident. what's the city saying? >> yeah, police released a
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quarterly report just on friday saying that crime was down overall in the city, but gun violence still remains a key issue and gun violence and murdered are actually up in the city. people are frustrated when they hear about shootings like this, but not everyone is surprised. last year, there was a mass shooting, 10 people shot on bourbon street, a year before that, 20 people were shot during a mother's day gathering. there have been other mass shootings over the years. people frustrate. one big thing that bothers officials here is when they have this type of shootings, they have trouble getting people to come forward. something the mayor reiterated last night. >> it's hard to police against a bunch of guys who decide to settle disputes with guns and 300 people in between them. that's not something you can tolerate. it's going to require the people in this park to basically say they've had enough and give us information so the police can do their job.
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>> again this morning, 16 victims in the hospital, all in stable condition. police haven't released specific information about those victims other than we know that the youngest, at least one was 14 years old, dell. >> jonathan martin live for us in new orleans, thank you very much. >> also in new orleans. police identified a man they say shot a good samaritan. looking for urich cane who tried to kidnap a person. police say he tried to shoot a student who intervened. he tried to shoot the student a second time but his gun failed. >> we are going to find you. we need the public said help, but there is no question now that we know who he is that he will be brought to justice. >> police are confident they will capture the suspect. the student is still hospitalized and in critical condition. >> it has been one year since the police shooting of
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12-year-old tamir rice in cleveland, demonstrators marking the anniversary of his death in cleveland and other cities. last november, police shot him as he waived that pellet gun in the park, a grand jury hearing evidence to determine if criminal files should be filed against the officers involved. >> it is a cold and snowy morning in and around chicago. a storm dumped almost a foot of snow over the weekend. it's the biggest november storm to hit the region in 120 years. temperatures are set to rice wednesday and heavy rain could melt much of the snow by thanksgiving morning. in michigan, the problem is freezing temperatures and high winds. that state was hit by the storm, leaving a foot of snow there, as well. michigan so you road closures, accidents and flight cancellation. >> that is just ugly. >> how much snow can the rest of the country expect next week? >> we're going to have big gains and losses heading towards the holiday, because in. some places, it will be melting
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and new places like portions of the northern rockies could get a foot with the next storm. right now what we're seeing in terms of across the country, especially that corridor between interstate said 80 and 90, that's where that last storm hit. want country in general is about 22% covered versus 28% last year. last year at this time, we actually had a little bit more snow. the midsection of the country, we're going to lose snow for two reasons. one, because temperatures will get a little above average or freezing so that will melt it. look at all this sun shine now. even if temperatures stay below freezing, sunshine itself evaporates snow. it's called sublimation. this next system, we're start to go get rain in. more moves in tomorrow. ahead of this, we have the different winter weather advisories. this is a watch. the higher elevations could see some blizzard conditions outside
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of this and also watching for some of that right along the coastline, as well. here's that snow as it starts to progress. portions of the rockies will be gaining snow, but as the system moves along, the rain, what's left in the midwest will chew a lot of that snow away as this hits that area mid woke. >> nicole says we should stay inside on thanksgiving, eat lots of turkey and watch football all die. >> wasn't that the plan regardless? >> thank you. argentina had the conservative macri making a change in leadership. >> the impossible was possible when he became the elected president of argentina. one month ago, his chances were slim against the ruling party candidate. in one month, the mayor of buenos aires was able to build
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enough support to defeat christina kirchner's hand picked successor. >> i'm here because you brought he here, and so i ask you, therefore, don't abandon me. let us continue together that on december 10 that wonderful stage of ash jen tina began. it's here, it's now. let's go, argentina. it's here, it's now. ♪ >> his supporters believe him. all of them say their ready to work for argentina. >> we had the support of the people. we need to start acting and not explain, so we can really change this country. >> celebrations continued until late at night. >> the election results show that a majority in argentina voted for change. people you can see behind me are not totally celebrating victory,
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but also the end of an era after 12 years of simple nerrism, the movement that was created in 2003. >> the leftwing movement brought about deep government involvement in the economy, and many credited with pulling millions of argentinians out of poverty. among supporters for kirchner there was sadness and oh defiance. >> people have no memory. once things are doing ok, they decide to throw everything out of the window. local media is brainwashing people. >> macri won by only three points, raising questions about governability. analysts say mockery's biggest challenge is the economy. economic policy throughout the last two years has been deficient. the economy has been stagnant for four years, so there's a
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change in the micro economic regime coming and it will be pretty difficult to manage this situation without it having an influence on inflation. >> sunday was historical in argentina, the first round in this country's history and the first time in 12 years that the people have demanded change. al jazeera, buenos aires. >> in hong kong, the opposition celebrating victories in sunday's local elections there. at least eight pro democracy candidates have been legend, all of them taking part in demonstrations last year, calling on the independence from beijing, the opposition hoping to elect even more pro democracy candidates in elections next year. >> a meeting of the minds in iran. >> putin visiting tehran and syria. >> bringing back a controversial tactic many call torture.
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june russian president vladimir putin is in tehran this morning for an oil and gas summit. he met with the supreme leader and is expect to meet with president rouhani in the comes hour. the war in syria high on the agenda. what do we know about these meetings taking place? >> we know that president putin has primarily come to tehran not just to talk about syria and things like that but to attend
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this gas exporters' summit. i think most of what he's doing in the country is going to be concerned with that. he's talking at the plenary session. he has had a meeting with the supreme leader and with the president later. syria is very, very high on the agenda in those talks. basically, russia and iran are on the same side when it comes to syria. the iranian military has personnel fighting and dying currently in syria. it also is aiding the regime forces of president assad with the hezbollah militia that it supports coming from lebanon. russia is giving both of these forces its air power to support them. what the west is going to be looking for out of this meeting, but also into the future, because maybe we'll see signs of
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it from this particular trip that perhaps there is friction between moscow and tehran may be signs that they are start to go diverge on how committed they are to president assad. that's what the west is going to be looking for. >> russia to boost energy tie witness tehran. what does this mean now as iran is kickstarting it's nuclear program. >> one of the first things we heard today almost before the wheels of the presidential plane touched down is that russia was formally relaxing its restrictions on the export of various pieces of nuclear expertise and technology to tehran. now, that is part of the agreement that was reached as part of the p5 plus one agreements to persuade iran to give up its nuclear ambitions for a while in return for the lifting of sanctions.
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that's one of the first things that's going to happen. also, we know russia is exporting a nuclear reactors to iran and they are two countries that are currently trying to work out how they are going to work together on the international state in terms of selling their open energy abroad, oil, namely. >> russia part of those six party talks. live for us in mass co today, thank you r. thank you very much. >> amy night is focusing on russia and writing on russia's role. in the paris attacks there is pressure for coming together. how important are iran and russia to a solution to ending the civil war in syria? >> they are very important, because they are part of the solution as to what to do with president, syrian president assad. up until now, russia has been
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pretty animate that they are not going to cop creed to western demands that assad step down when they start to formulate this new government shortly. iran is even -- is also against having assad step down. i think russia in fact is becoming at more flexible, and putin perhaps will try to persuade iranian leaders today that they need to moderate their views about assad, but i think he's going to have a hard time. >> how much has russia been cooperating with iran's revolutionary guard or heads blah, which are also support ago sad in syria? do they communicate? >> well, i don't know the extent of which they communicate, but certainly, iran has military advisors along with the
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revolutionary guard on the ground in syria. i know they're cooperating with rush in terms of intelligence. >> a year ago, you and i were talking about the west trying to isolate putin with sanctions because of away nextization with crimea. has putin made himself in dispensable because of his military interceptions in syria? >> i think that certainly things have changed a bit and ukraine is no longer the key issue between russia and the west. now everyone is concentrating on syria and isis and of course with the russian air liner being brought down last month by who we know now were isis rebels, it makes putin look more like someone who has common cause with the west. they are all going to get together and fight terrorism. >> is this like world war ii? many bring that up, that this is
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an instance where the u.s. should ally against russia or with russia against a common enemy, isil. >> i think so. the big sticking point is assad. president obama has actually said a few days ago that russia can't continue to be on the fence about this. in other words, if putin and the kremlin want to be cooperative partners with western governments over syria, they really have to go along with getting assad out of power and persuade, somehow persuade the iranian to say comply. >> do you think the russian jet airliner that you mentioned brought down over the sinai changed putin's domestic support or his calculation vis a vis assad? >> that's a good question. initially, the take of many experts was this was going to causes the average russian to question russia says involvement in syria, military involvement.
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it seems to kind of have the opposite effect, because it's an enemy that is shared by so may be countries. i think many countries are backing russia's involvement in syria. >> thank you for your expertise on the topic. >> syrian president bashar al assad speaking out defending russia's involvement inside his country and the sovereignty during an interview with a hong kong based t.v. station. >> the most important thing fours and for me that because situation and the whole system and the country should be secular. secular doesn't mean against religion. it means the freedom of religion. it's the system that can include every religion, followers, every sect and every ethnicity under
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one umbrella. >> assad insisting that a political solution can only be achieved with what he called the defeat of terrorism. he said it will take two years to come up with a new constitution and hold a referendum on that. >> the u.s. said dozens of forces will arrive inside syria soon to help otherwise local fighters fighting isil in the north. the white house insisting those troops will only work at advisers. >> renewed calls against isil after the paris attacks. >> ahuge merger of two pharmaceutical giants may be less about health care and more about taxes.
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>> hundreds of thousands of people became disenfranchised and took to insurgency. >> from their beginnings in the iraq war... >> when the americans landed in iraq they overturned a centuries old system of power. >> to the front lines of syria. >> those atrocities primed them for when isil came knocking and said "we're your savior". >> the untold story of isil and the fight against terror. >> this is going to be a real time bomb. >> welcome back to your world this morning. 8:29 eastern time. the mayor of new orleans asking for the public's health after a park shooting left 16 people hurt following a block party. injuries are said not to be life threatening. >> brussels on high alert this morning, a paris type attack could be imminent in brussels.
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21 were arrested in raised on sunday. public transportation, schools and businesses will stay closed as security forces search for suspects. >> france and the u.k. agreeing to more cooperation 10 days after those paris attacks. british prime minister david cameron meeting with french president francois hollande saying he will ask parliament for the authority to launch airstrikes against isil inside syria. we are live in paris. what details do you have about that meeting between hole and cameron this morning? >> just behind me, you can walk there in five minutes. they visited a music venue, the scene of the most violent of that attack and clearly touched by that, saying that britain must do everything it can to support its ally.
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more than that, from what he said, it seems that cameron is even more resolved to get the u.k. involved. >> it happens to be right to take decisive action to stop terrorists when they are threatening the lives of innocent citizens. the unit kingdom will dew all in our power to support our friend and ally france to defeat this evil death cult. >> so that's cameron speaking clearly strong, loaded language. now, he tried in 2013 to get approval for airstrikes against syria and assad government. cam rap now has an outright majority that he did not have in 2013, so he's going to push hard to get authorization to join france in these airstrikes. the language he's using doesn't so you didn't like someone giving access to an air base and refueling operationses. it seems he himself is putting
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the u.k. on track to start bombings as well. >> the british parting wan with the president on that that much. ized event. >> their seem aircraft carrier moved into position in the east everyone mediterranean. we don't know targets they are striking at, but know they are keeping up the assault on the offensive and people here we've been speaking to in france say they support this mission, because they say isil as, you know, a target that is a valid target, because these people attack them here. they said it's very different, they say than when the u.s. went to war with iraq. they seem to always mention that when they speak to them. it's interesting to do so how the iraq war is so strong in imagination for many french
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people because it was largely a war not that popular here in france but they seem to be supporting the government actions with the airstrikes in syria and iraq. >> what about the security situation inside france? >> in france, i would not say it's business as usual, because there's more than 100,000 security forces on the streets of paris and other cities across this country, a local mayor in a city south of paris had a three night curfew that's just ended monday morning. there have been around away thousand police raised since the attacks. other than that, you do see life going on in paris, but everyone clearly is thinking about this, people we've spoken to anecdotally say they are afraid to take the metro. they drive when they can. one woman i spoke to said she is trying to find an apartment that is not on a metro line and she
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can start to work instead. we can't say all french peopler voiding the metro, but you have a sense of unease in people returning to work trying to avoid situation ins which they feel at risk. >> thank you very much. >> the paris attacks have led to more questions over letting refugees into europe. at least one attacker may have slipped through among syrian refugees and that has some in germany rethinking their open door policy. we have this report from dresden. >> they are clearing ground for a new 350 bed refugee camp. [ buzzing ] >> this is northern drill park in dresden. the city was where he could by allied bombing in world war ii and became part of communist east germany. 25 years later, the region remains much poorer than western germany. it's a week after the paris attacks and fresh graffiti
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suggest some residents don't want more refugees here. hence frank, getting paid to build the camp, doesn't want them either. >> my dad was a russian prisoner of war, but he came back to rebuild dresden. the syrian could be honest people and rebuild their own country, but there's a lot of syrian criminals. the only things we can learn from them is how to build ourselves in pieces instead of dying slowly on welfare payments, he says. the attacks may be fueling anti refugee sentiment, but the city was already home to an anti lambic sentiment. >> we should go back and rebuild the wall again, then we can live in peace. >> 700 refugees from syria,
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afghanistan and north africa are sheltered in this huge building supply store. security is tight, because the facility has already been targeted by what these describe as neonazis. the regulation on the door are clear, no wane, no weapons, no we'd. we joined refugees as they head to play soccer. >> here there's a bit of racism but in other cities, it's better. but here, there's racism be he says. >> in the nearby area, a hotel has been converted into a migrant hostel. bikers at a local motorcycle club have been vocal opponents. >> i think we've reached the limit and we need to send half
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of them home. make no mistake, these refugees will not simply want to go home. among them, there will be some like in france or the ones hiding in belgium and one day, they will act, he says. in an area racked by high unemployment, others reward new arrivals at economic migrants and blame them for draining the welfare and health system. >> they should get out germany. they're scroungers. if one of us does something against the state or economy or cheat on taxes, we get taken to court, but the refugees get a free pass. they are allowed to steal groceries and even get a free bus ticket, he says. >> those disgruntled voices are at odds with the government's open door policy. terror attacks combined with the refugee crisis could fuel a potentially explosive political
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mix. al jazeera, dresden, germany. >> that refugee debate playing out on the campaign trial here in the u.s. donald trump is now calling for a database to track syrian refugees. he said there should be surveillance at mosques, his polls keeping on top of the presidential field. politics professor at drake university said trump rhetoric won't ching as long as he's on top. >> trump says what he thinks and he doesn't necessarily apologize for it. if that's what he believed, he is probably going to stay and stick to it. >> what about the voters told over and over again things that are said are not true, yet has he been leading if the polls for four months in a row. he is the front runner. >> i think the american electorate right now wants something who is not part of the current establish pent.
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that's clear for respond indicates like trump and carson. that being said, when there is something inaccurate, that can hurt them in the long run. >> ben core son's numbers are dropping. why? >> you have cruz and rubio giving him a good run for his money. they are fighting over the same base, while donald trump is not fighting for the evangelical vote, he's going after the blue collar vote. you are going to see numbers shift over time because they are going after the same people. >> i don't mean to contradict you, but isn't marco rubio an insider? walk. >> say he is. he's a sitting senator, much, or just like cruz, right?
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you have these candidates that are part of the establishment. they can position themselves to be an outsider. we've seen that time and time again with very successful elected officials being able to sell themselves as the underdog and as a, you know, outside the establishment. >> that a.b.c. washington post poll has trump on top four months and new fox pole leading dr. ben car sob by 10 percentage points. >> john bell edwards won the runoff election beating david as a resulter. he's looking to expand medicaid, something the current moyer bobby jindal opposed. >> it is a half hour old, two of the world's largest drug companies joining forces. >> as we report, the deal is not necessarily about putting new drugs on the shelves.
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>> the merger between pharmaceutical giant pfizer andal began is one of the biggest deals in health care history, said to be worth $160 billion. >>al leer began is headquartered in ireland, subject to that nation's lower tax rate, even though most operations are i have not new jersey. >> allergan would be the buyer and side step treasury rules against corporate in versions. the deal would allow pfizer to lower tax rate from 25% to 15%. speaking to the wall street journal recently, pfizer c.e.o. said there's no competitive advantage to officially being
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headquartered in the u.s. >> i have foreign companies who have tax rates of 15% who can invest $2 billion to $3 billion more in research than we can. we're fight, one hand tied behind our back. >> facer the maker of lip pour that had competition with generic construction cutting sales $2 billion since 2010. >> the company will share the name pfizer, offices based in ireland and global operational headquarters in new york. as for the drugs they provide, analysts don't expect the prices to change. >> what has the government been doing to try to stop companies from doing these in versions? >> they've been establishing new rules to prevent these deals. there was a u.s. manufacturer that wanted top merge with an irish company but backed away from that. the obama administration is clear they don't like these deals and these could be a topic
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during the presidential election, because it costs billions of dollars in revenue. >> women in california and oregon will soon have away easier time getting birth control. bolt states plan to give fortunately since the the authority to give out contraception without a doctor's prescription. they would screen patients themselves. the reduce are expected to take effect in the new year and the medication still covered by insurance. >> tehran called upon to immediately release washington post bureau chief jason rezaian. the case could be the result of aplitela political in fighting.
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>> news about the fate of jason rezaian came sunday on the website of iranian state t.v. the spokesman for iran's judiciary only said that he has been sentenced to prison and the sentence is not yet final. sunday, his brother ali slammed the confusion and lack of transparency surrounding the case saying "my brother is an innocent man and well respected journalist, my family remains hopeful that jason will soon be reunited with us." rezaian is tehran bureau chief for the washington post. the post's foreign editor said part of the secrecy is because rezaian has done nothing wrong. >> if iran had evidence against jason, it would have produced this by now. it wouldn't have been dragging out this case, verdict, this sentence for many many months without ever disclosing what it is jason did. >> rezaian and his wife were both arrested in their home in
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tehran in the middle of the night in 2014. she was later released on bail. when rezaian was convicted, she and his mother went to court a try to learn details but were turned away. he has been in prison far longer than the prisoners held in the iran hostage crisis in 1979. as a deal over the nuclear program was talked about, those held in prisons were repeatedly discussed on the sidelines, but with no resolutions. >> we certainly would have hoped that at that juncture, at any juncture, that iran would have done the right thing, shown it's humanitarian concern, released jason, given that there's no evidence against him. >> many believe rezaian's case is caught up in internal politics. >> jason was reporting on iran, really writing more about the people, the lifestyle, nothing that would have aroused the sensitivities of the iranian authorities in any way. >> he's been a victim of the collision in iran between more moderate forces and conservative once.
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>> evan as the sentence is handed down, it remains shrouded in secrecy. >> can the region handle anymore housing? >> i'm at the iraq museum where thousands of antiquities were looted at the start of the 2003 u.s. led invasion.
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>> brussels on a third day of high alert over a paris style attack there. >> residents are responding to a police request for radio silence. they are posting images of cats. these images are going viral. it started when authorities urged you people not to talk about the raised on social media. instead, they got creative with cats. >> here, many are waking up to really cold temperatures, let's bring in anymore mitch for more. >> mondays are rough enough, when you stick the foot outside the covers, go back in. some have dropped 20 degrees from yesterday morning all the way through the south. some place in the north are warmer that that the south this morning depending exactly where you are. huge temperature changes especially into the southeast, orlando 18 degrees cooler than yesterday at this time. you have to put that in
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perspective, yesterday morning was close to 70, this morning is 50, so it's hard to feel too sorry for orlando. other temperatures in the south are in the 20's, birmingham in the 20's right now. temperature for the day remain cool, 40's up the east coast. we'll have slow warmth over the next days. the other thing we watch is the poll days coming up. the system brings rain to the midwest, heavier snow over the next days into pores especially of the nowhere rockies, by thanksgiving, this is when people do the shorter trips, driving to grandmother's house, for example, heavy rain through the midsection of the country is possible, so that will make you want to snuggle in more and eat turkey. >> nothing wrong with that. >> the u.s. is calling for urgent international action saying it needs to be done to prevent climate related deaths, the u.s. saying more than 600,000 people have died from
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weather disasters, another 4 billion were injured or in need of emergency assistance. agency now calling on global leaders to reach a climate deem at next week's talks in paris. >> a battle over water in southern california, developers looking to build a new town, but critics saying the area simply doesn't have the water. we have the story. >> sand, shrubs, dry and desolate. some say this stretch of desert as beautiful as it is inhospitable. others see an opportunity to build big on the southwestern edge of joshua tree national park. 8500 new homes, schools, restaurants and retails. >> right now, we're standing on the northern boundary of the proposed paradise valley development, which is in essence a new city. >> it's one of six proposed or approved new developments in one of the fastest growing regions
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in california. >> 15 miles from the side of paradise valley, you'll find the future development. another massive ambitious planned community. it's really like a city within a city. developers promise 7800 homes, condos, apartments, retail space, parks, schools, churches, even its own fire department. >> it's hard to envision now, but picture a place like this. palm springs, only a few miles up the interstate, once a barren brown desert, too. cities throughout the valley are a manufactures oasis in one of the dryest place in north america. >> if you look around, there isn't any water. >> how do you strike the balance between needing the growth and needing the new development and this diminishing resource called water? >> tonight on al jazeera, we'll take you on a trip to the
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desert, where the frontier spirit continues to drive development, even as california struggles through the worst drought on record. jennifer london, al jazeera, california. >> a rare piecies one step closer to extinction. >> the struggle to preserve the northern white rhino.
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>> a lot of iraq's ancient heritage is locked away from the
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threat of isil. thousands of artifacts have been looted or destroyed by fighters. >> many relics were stolen following the u.s. invasion in 2003. we have more object what's being done to protect the country's history. >> iraq's ancient history and relics from the world's oldest civilizations on display at the iraq museum in central baghdad. the walls and corridors are adorned with carvings dating back to the syrians and babylonians, predating jesus christ by thousands of years. she has worked at the museum since 1999. she said in the weeks before the u.s. led invasion, she and her colleagues warned that the museum was vulnerable, but no one seemed to listen. >> more than 50,000 pieces were stolen just from this museum.
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they damaged everything, furniture and everything. >> almost immediately, officials began efforts to get back the relics, along with u.s. support, a recovery department was set up. objects were unearthed from private homes, recovered in raids and some simply reappeared on the museum shelves. other treasures were seized from antiquity's markets in syria, lebanon, kuwait, saudi arabia and as far as away as new york, including this piece. the 150-kilogram bronze relic dates back to the mesopotamia period. >> some antiquities are bricked up out of view. off limits are the vaults and contents such a safely guarded secret, we weren't allowed near them. >> that's because of concerns
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over iraq's readiness to preserve and protect its open treasures. the rapid rise of isil and sectarian divisions have all raised questions about the museum's safety. >> it's my history. i have to be proud to put these pieces in this gallery, but it's not allowed now. >> it's not just artifacts stored at the museum at risk. iraq has 12,000 known archeological sites where ancient sites once stood. many are not protected and have been looted for years. while some of iraq's artifacts remain on display or hidden away, much which its ancient heritage continues to be threatened. al jazeera at the iraq museum in baghdad. >> one of the world's last remaining northern white rhinos has died. nola was a 41-year-old fee maim living in the san diego zoo. sunday, she was put down due to
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a bacterial infection and age related infections. there are only three northern white rhinos believed to be left in the world. they are all in kenya. >> maybe performing in front of a television audience was too much for one little singer. ♪ ♪ week. >> hiccups. he had to hiccup through the australian national anthem before a baseball game, but he didn't let that slow him down. he sanction through the entire anthem and finished to loud applause from the audience and high fives from the players. >> that happens to me sometimes when i get nervous. >> i do it all the time during the newscast. >> coming up next, the latest from brussels on high alert as security teams try to find suspects in the paris attacks. >> we are back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time.
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no hug cups, we promise. >> have a great morning. >> believe a coalition, british's prime minister tells francois hollande that he backs strikes against isil in syria. >> cameron and holland will have to convince vladimir putin to join their cause. russia's president is currently in iran to discuss the war in syria. >> argentina's new president dances the night away after winning a historic presidential runoff. plus. >> i'm at the iraq museum in central baghdad, where thousands of

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