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tv   Weekend News  Al Jazeera  November 29, 2015 6:00pm-7:01pm EST

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announcer: this is al jazeera. hello, welcome to the al jazeera newshour, live from our hours in doha. i'm elizabeth puranam, coming up in the next 60 minutes - the e.u. agrees to give turkey billions in aid to limit the flow of refugees into europe. more than 40 people killed in syria after air strikes in idlib. russia is being blamed. >> pope francis calls for peace and forgiveness as he visits the
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central african republic. a country divided by sectarian violence. >> and a call for action. demonstrations held around the world, urging leaders meeting in paris to reach a climate deal robin ad s with the supported. a 79 year long wait for davis cup action is over. from an absorbing final in belgium. it's coming up later in the programme turkey could be one step closer to joining the e.u., after striking a deal in brussels. the amount of the summit was to secure turkey's help to stem the flow of refugees crossing into the european union. the e.u. will provide $3.2 billion in aid for more than 2 billion refugees in turkey, it's hoped that improved living standards will keep them
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from making the journey to greece. several thousand made the trip from turkey across the agean sea to greece. turkey wants the visa requirements lifted for turks travelling to the e.u., something that could happen next year, and wants frozen e.u. membership negotiations unfrozen. >> reporter: an historic day, that is how turkey's president described the summit. more than $3 billion to help refugees, and stop the people traffickers that made it possible for hundreds of thousands to leave the shores. in return, the succession process that could see turkey join the e.u. has been taken out of the deep freeze. there's strings attached. >> let me stress we are not rewriting the e.u. policy. the framework and conclusions apply, including the nature and
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report for european values. also, on human rights. >> the faylure of european states to agree quotas allowing those on the borders led to desperate scenes at the macedonian border on saturday. many head to germany. for angela merkel, criticized for taking in almost a million migrants, it's time to reduce the flow turkey will take back third party nationals. in the fall of next year, we'll see if the conditions are fulfilled. >> reporter: despite the talk of progress, the deal is full of conditions that turkey has to meet before real progress on the accession to the european union can begin. what it doesn't contain is solutions for thousands in limbo on the edge of the european union, trying to get in.
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turkey's prime minister sounded a warning. the only hope of a long-term solution is an end to the war in syria. >> we have to act together, how to deal with refugee crisis. in order to show the crisis, there's a need of solution. otherwise, if we have joint action plan, in the way of refugees, if it continues, turkey and e.u. will be facing bigger problems in the future. >> what we have for now is small steps to solve a humanitarian crisis a migration expert and researcher at the center for turkish studies at the university in london. he says the deal sounds good for turkey and the e.u., but doesn't do enough to help syrian refugees. >> in my opinion, there are three parties in the deal. one is turkey, the other e.u. both parties may declare victory.
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this is historic, and a good deal. for syrians, i don't think it is a good deal. and i don't thing this deal will work any, because migration from syria, like in many other parts of the world is driven by conflict, and until you sort out the conflict once and for all, you can't stop migration. >> turkey swapping from this kind of a deal. they get visa free travel. and it is important in domestic politics. overall it doesn't mean turkey will become a member. there's so many chapters unopened in the process. and that will be the second one opening next month, and maybe one or two in the next we are. it is still a long way in terms of e.u. membership. e.u. will have an opportunity to say when it doesn't work, they will say it's turkey's responsibility, and they are doing their deal. but, i mean, turkey nose they
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cannot stop it. there's so many examples, countries building walls and fences, it doesn't work russia is being blamed for an air strikes that killed 44 people in a marketplace in syria. if russian wash planes is behind the attack, it will be one of the deadliest sites. the marketplace is in idlib province. hashem ahelbarra reports from the turkish-syrian border. >> reporter: this man is lucky to have survived. in yet another air strike in rebel held idlib, dozens of civilians are dead. in poorly equipped hospitals, they have struggled to cope. this is a way of life since the
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sir strikes strike which killed people in a crowded marketplace in syria hello, i'm barbara sara, you are watching al jazeera from london turkey - cash and closer ties in return for help with the refugee crisis flashes in paris as worldwide demonstrations take place over climate change. [ cheering ] a message of forgiveness and reconciliation, the pope opens bangui's door in the central african republic russia is being blamed for an air strike in syria. the marketplace is in the town in idlib province. hashem ahelbarra reports from the turkish-syrian border. >> reporter: this man is lucky to have survived. in another air strike in rebel held idlib, dozens of syrians are dead. russia is blamed for an air strike which killed at least 44 people in a crowded marketplace in syria syrian officials say it was captured by al nusra front, and despite losing control of most of the country, president bashar al-assad and his allies insist he is vital to the fight against groups like i.s.i.l. the syrian opposition, along
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with western and golf allies don't agree. >> the syrian people have a number of priorities, number one is bashar al-assad must leave. >> while the political solution is limited to discussions on the ground. the bashar al-assad government is finding it hard to resign control of areas in which opposition fighters are in aleppo and latakia. it's no march nor those that want to get rid of bashar al-assad. the latest escalation of violence raises concerns of a conflict. many say as long as countries like russia and turkey are divided on how to solve the syrian crisis, fighting will
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continue and more will die. >> the timing of the raid was early hours of the morning, when the marketplace was busy. hit by two missiles. separated by 50 meters, living drugs. it has been under the opposition control since may, there's no presence of i.s.i.l. in the area as alleged by the russian ministry. russia had intense fire on many fronts. places that are heavily populated areas, thousing those displaced. the people here, civil and medical staff are out raged by
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the strikes. the air strike did not target military positions belonging to d.a.e.s.h. or other opposition groups, most targets were civilians? >> the syrian observatory for human rights has already accused russia of killing many in air strikes. the syrian observatory for human rights estimates there has been 42,000 air strikes by bashar al-assad government in one year turkey recovered the body of a ruban pilot -- russian pilot. he was received at an airport. ankara refused to apologise, saying russia violated air space. moscow placed economic circumstances on turkey.
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thousands attended the furniture of a lawyer shot dead. he was shot on saturday while making a. turkey's prime minister coming up on the nouri al-maliki, voters in burkina faso await the outcome of the most democratic election. >> al jazeera meets people on both sides of the wall of shame, on what many say is a dividing line in peru's capital. and nico rosberg makes it three wins in a row as the curtain comes down on a memorable formula 1 season. that and the rest of the sport
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later. >> the roman catholic pope sent a message of peace. he urged christians and muslims to lay down their winnans o. we have -- weapons, we have this report. >> reporter: for all those that make unjust actions, i make this appeal. arm yourself with love and m.e.r.s.ly. religious differences are not the source of conflict. it lies in regimes supported by
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france. the bluntering of natural resources and ploxy wars. in the last few years religion has been exploited to divide the country furthers. 80% of the country is christian, 50% muslim and 5% amenist. the pope popes to visit a mosque on monday. he believes it's the way forward for peace. pope francis visits a cap that is hope to 4,000. the pontiff spoke in the primary language. russia is blamed for an air strike which killed at least 44 people in a crowded marketplace in syria hello, i'm barbara sara, you are watching al jazeera from london turkey - cash and closer ties in return for help with the refugee crisis flashes in paris as worldwide demonstrations take place over climate change. [ cheering ] a message of forgiveness and reconciliation, the pope opens bangui's door in the central african republic russia is being blamed for an air strike in syria. the marketplace is in the town in idlib province. hashem ahelbarra reports from the turkish-syrian border. >> reporter: this man is lucky
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to have survived. in another air strike in rebel held idlib, dozens of syrians are dead. russia is blamed for an air strike which killed at least 44 people in a crowded marketplace in syria syrian officials say it was captured by al nusra front, and despite losing control of most of the country, president bashar al-assad and his allies insist he is vital to the fight against groups like i.s.i.l. the syrian opposition, along with western and golf allies don't agree. >> the syrian people have a number of priorities, number one is bashar al-assad must leave. >> while the political solution is limited to discussions on the ground. the bashar al-assad government is finding it hard to resign control of areas in which opposition fighters are in aleppo and latakia. it's no march nor those that want to get rid of bashar al-assad. the latest escalation of violence raises concerns of a conflict. many say as long as countries like russia and turkey are divided on how to solve the syrian crisis, fighting will continue and more will die. >> the timing of the raid was early hours of the morning, when the marketplace was busy. hit by two missiles. separated by 50 meters, living drugs. it has been under the opposition control since may, there's no presence of i.s.i.l. in the area as alleged by the russian ministry. russia had intense fire on many fronts. places that are heavily populated areas, thousing those dspced. thousands attended the furniture of a lawyer shot dead. he was shot on saturday while making a. turkey's prime minister coming up on the nouri al-maliki, voters in burkina faso await the outcome of the most democratic election. >> al jazeera meets people on both sides of the wall of shame, on what many say is a dividing line in peru's capital. and nico rosberg makes it three wins in a row as the curtain comes down on a memorable dump dump another first. >> to burkina faso, people have voted in historic elections. it's the first time they were able to participate in a truly open election after 30 years in power. the president was forced to resign after a revolt. voters cast ballots in what is called the biggest election history. crowds of voters lined up at polling centers, waiting to vote. 5.5 million people were in 17,000 polling station. no one will predict who the winner will be. 14 candidates are running for the presidency. this is one of the frontrunners. >> this is an important election for our country. the first time in 50 years our people will have a civilian president. i call on people to come out and vote
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the election marks the end of the transition of period of the blaise compaore rule, from last year. he was one of the longest serving presidents, before stepping down after an uprising. the vote was to have been held last month, delayed by a coup in september. led by members of the elite presidential guard. with the domination of politics, past elections have been marked by low voter turn out. many did not feel the need to vote in elections they considered won. and today many are voting for the first time in their lives. >> 30-year-old is one of them. >> we didn't thing in the past that the vote can change anything. we grown up, we had the same president. voting and voting, talking about people. i think things don't change.
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the regional economic lock monitors the most. so do hundreds of observers. >> voting has its move. if things go it the the way they are, it will be a free and fair process. >> security has been tightened with 25,000 soldiers deployed across the country. a winning candidate needs 50% of the vote to avoid a run off. 15 days after. many hope that they'll have a president from the first round. >> guinea's last known ebola patient left hospital putting them on track to be free of the virus. it is praised as a symbol of progress. they'll be ebola free if no new cases are reported after 42 days. >> israeli forces killed a palestinian teenager during
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protests in jerusalem. another palestinian man was killed by forces after carrying out a stopping attack in east jerusalem. the man accused of targetting an israeli policeman near the damascus gate. 123 palestinians and 21 israelis have been killed in a wave of violence that began last month. >> meanwhile, israel suspended the european union's role in peace protest negotiations. the move comes after the e.u. issues guidelines for the labelling of products made in israeli settlements. agricultural produce must have clear labels showing a place of origin, all settlements in the west bank are considered illegal under international law. >> as the u.n. marks a day of solidarity with the palestinian people. the israeli separation wall continues to be built, through a
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valley west of bethlehem on land owned by palestinian families. stephanie dekker reports. >> work started in the valley under armed protection. the foundation being laid for moristration. palestinians submitted a high court stopping the wall built through bethlehem. it's been a long battle. this is the longest remaining space. it is agricultural and is owned. 58 christian papers. they have 700 dinners for the vine yard where they produce wine. >> they started to build the wall. once it's complete, it will cut across the valley, confiscating
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large parts of the area in bethlehem. there are two israeli settlements on the hill. palestinians are convinced the move is about a land grab. the separation wall is needed for security reasons. there's a monastery. it is ruled that it should not be separated from the nunnery. it's not clear what path the wall will take. prayers have been taking place in protest every week. it seems these may go unanswered. there's a wider religious implication if the wall is completed. >> bethlehem is the twin city of jerusalem. in bethlehem the moment of the nativity is in bethlehem as the church of the holly sepualing
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tour is breached. they have been to the vatican. if this will cut across the land. >> it's the last nail in the cross of bethlehem in a wall in lima, it has been dividing neighbours for decades. it was build to prevent crime, others say it was a way to separate poor areas from the rich. we have this report from lima. >> reporter: it's 10km long, on one side a rich neighbourhood. on the other among the poorest areas of lima. the gap between the rich and poor is among the highest in latin america: they watch the wall built over the last 30 years. the wall was built so the poor
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people couldn't cross to the other side. the need for safety and security justified the wall's existence for some. tens of thousands living in suburbs like this took over public and private properties. like many, this man and his family are living here, but on land that is still belonging to the rich side. >> on the other side they have sewage, electricity and water. they don't have services. >> it is wrong to call it the wall of shame. >> there are walls in the city. it's not discriminatory when we divide next door neighbours. it is considered discriminatory. the national institute of statistics says 30% of lima's 10 million residents have been a
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victim of crime. many have built security barriers around the properties. we are about 1km downhill from the wall of shame. in this poor neighbourhood. people are living in gated communities. millions of peruvians live in pore conditions and crime is high as an as a result of a lack of urban planning. >> lima is one of the most insecure cities because of crime. the elite and the poor enclose themselves with the walls to defend themselves. >> reporter: the government says it's taking action by increasing police presence and better training for the officers. back at the home, they understand how some may see the wallace discriminatory. it's not important for them. for him it's about having safety. they have to stay home to protect what little they own, rather than going to work to
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earn a living. >> to south korea, teachers are warned they'll face court action unless they stop protests over a history textbook, the book contains distorted factors. harry fawcett reports from seoul. >> reporter: teachers taking to the streets on issues dominating seen politics. it plans to bring in a state authored textbook. they are laying themselves open to prosecution. employment requires political neutrality. this is one of 84 teachers summoned for questioning. it's not possible to oppose the textbook without criticizing the government. the current regime is proceeding with a plan for its own benefit to hold on to power forever south korea's main opposition party took to displaying the history books,
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which the government says is left leaning. too soft on the possibility for starting the korean war. too harsh on leaders who oversaw the economic rise. what do they say. the education book talks of low-level skirmishes. but states north korea's army started a surprise invasion across the 38th parallel with the u.n. calling it a surprise aggression. they scribe the back. >> in the long term it weakened response to the outside world. >> what is common is the way they described the seizure of power as a coup. one which led to improvement to people's livelihoods. he happens to be the father of the counter president. the president characterises the drive to reform history teaching as a fight for the soul of the
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nation. >> translation: it would be difficult for students learning from current textbooks to have a sense of pride. instead they ask why haven't they done better. >> reporter: the president's critics say she's following the lead of her father, stifling political opposition. she's called for a ban on masks such as those called for. and they can allow infill trigs by state militants. >> today, in south korea, the government has to resolve issues within legal parameters. it's different from the. the lack of dialogue is worrying. they want to instill a shared sense of pride. it's exposed a deep divisions of the present. >> still to come - we are in
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papua new guinea and a judge will decide if detention centers like this are legal truth and american politics. u.s. hopeful donald trump refused to back down from comments about muslims on 9/11. >> and in sport - we have action from a busy day of football for germany, spain and england. those details coming up in 20 minutes. minutes.
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>> half a million fields will lie fallow.
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>> if we had another year of this severe drought, i'd say all bets are off. good to have you with us on al jazeera newshour. turkey secured a 3.2 billion deal with e.u. leaders to seal the border with greece to stem the flow of refugees. an air strike in syria's idlib province kills 44 people and a russian strike has a busy marketplace. a town is controlled by the
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muslim front rebels that took role of the area in may. >> the head of the catholic church brought a message of peace. >> christians and muslims urged to lay down the weapons. >> heavy fighting in the city forced more than 30 hospitals and medical facilities to close. doctors warn of an acute shortage of supplies. some of the images in the report are disturbing. >> reporter: the fiercest of battles for tiaz. witnesses tell al jazeera that they have not experienced such heavy fighting before. the houthis and elite republican guard loyal to the president surrounded the city since march. pro-government fighters supported by the coalition are trying to break that hold. over the weekend, the coalition
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intensified aerial raids, and destroyed o number of targets and killed houthi rebels trying to infiltrate houthi rebels. lives lost, but not just those engaged in fighting. this child tries to account what happened to him hours earlier. he and his friends gathered around a water dlooefr truck when hit by houthi shells. some decide. many are wounded. >> hospitals in tiaz are overwhelmed more than 30 forced to shut down. one doctor says six remained in operation. >> hospitals are packed with the injured. we are facing a shortage of medical supplies and lack sufficient facilities. as we speak, a massacre is being carried out by militias. >> the humanitarian situation is getting worse by the day. many homes are without power. food and water is scarce.
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supplies can't get in. tiaz has been regarded as yemen's cultural capital. as fighting escalates there's a fear that the children are growing up with a culture of weapons there's no plan b. that's the warning ever protesters gathered at a protest in paris. police used tear gas at a rally, banned under the emergency laws. elsewhere demonstrations were noisy, but peaceful. >> there has been a show of expectation from the streets of europe. >> london saw the biggest gathering. colourful costumes and a unified demand for a deal. we need to change. no time better than now.
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>> it's a lot of oil. a lot of big business. we have to try, haven't we. >> i have never done anything like this before. it comes to a point where you have to do something. >> also there was a fashion designer, vivian westwood, with emma thompson, singer and activist. politicians are becoming aware that a lot of the people of the planet are worried about the issue and file it's a threat. hopefully they'll respond, and i think that's part of the aim of this march and these marches going on over the world. >> what is striking is the number of groups coming together under the banner of the fighting climate change. there are animal conservation charities, lob which groups and families. the message from is clear. do sa deal. do a deal that will last.
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public protests banned since the attacks. 10,000 people placed pairs of somehows in t shoes in the plac la republique. it turned violence and police fired tear gas. around 100 arrests were instead. mer aware there were disrupting elements. and those that wanted the conquest to succeed. that's why there has been arrests. ath thens demonstrated outside parliament. many expressing solidarity. the global matter in paris. they can walk for the climate change. we can do it for them. it is a day they'll send clear
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messages. a crowd estimated 20,000 took to the streets, with a smaller gathering in barcelona. more than 10,000 congregated in berlin. in blues else, demonstrators bypassed a ban on large gatherings by spreading out in a large chain containing 2,000 protesters. calls have been loud and clear. it's up to the global leaders and negotiators to try to make ambitions a reality well up to half a million people took part in rallies around the ordinarily. it was the largest protest history. about 2,000 marched in the chilean capital carrying banners and flags in support of a deal. there was a smaller demonstration in the capital, but the message was the same.
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protesters demanding justice from world leaders. u.s. president obama arrived in paris, he's among the leaders for more than 150 countries, and thousands of delegates. ahead of the talks, a long term plan must be reached to prevent global warming. and chinese president xi jinping is in paris, where he held a working dinner with the french president francis hollande. she arrived on the same day china issued a highest level smog alert. china, the u.s. and india are the three largest carbon emitting countries. >> the process of reaching an agreement on climate change is inevitably challenging. our environmental editor nick clark reports from paris. >> final preparations are made. finishing touches applied. in a bizarre tradition of the world of diplomacy, this corner of france is u.n. territory for the duration oft conference.
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it is indicative of how anticipated this event is, when the u.n. climate chief is pursued by the media for going on a tour of the site. >> what can we expect. >> what is finalised in paris is none other than the second legally binding instrument under the convention that will then go into effect in 2020 once we are through with the kyoto protocol. >> many are asking to what extent can an agreement be legally binding. there's no end of on tackles in the way. >> this time world leaders come at the beginning of the conference rather than the end. lima, warsaw, doha, canadian open in denmark. the climate summit's trip off the tongue as a roll call of inaction and progress. >> all the signs size there's no time to lose, from wildfires to
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cyclones, effects of wherever are evident. the target is to stop the temperatures increasing over preindustrial levels. beyond that the effects are globally catastrophic. jim hanson is an n.a.s.a. scientist. warned of the dangers of climate change. >> if all that paris an amounts to is what it appears to, where it appears to be headed with no real global reductions, then our children and grandchildren will inherit a situation that is out of their control. the ocean will keep getting warmer. ice sheets will begin to melt faster and faster. and our coastal cities will be doomed nearly every country at the negotiations has put forward proposals on how they planned to keep emissions downed. trouble is they are not enough.
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commitments leave us for something about three degrees warming. just to get a sense ever perspective. at 1 degree we are seeing the hottest degree ever, last year was the hottest year ever. next year will be hot. we see record storms, drought, heatwaves and other freak weather that scientists tell us are about climate change. >> the changes are enormous. the debate is hard and furious over the coming dice over the search for -- days over the search for a united front against climate change now, a judge in papua new guinea will deed whether a prison set up for refugees is legal. it has been created for asylum seekers trying to seek asylum in australia. human rights have disputed the way the refugees are being treated. what will the judge be looking
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at? >> about 200-300 of prisoners held on the island, there's nearly 1,000, joined one of two cases before the papua new guinea court system, and a decision on one of them should come any day. the refugees argue that the decision on mann us island and the transfer from australia, are both illegal, and the seconds that are being held in here are akin to torture. all of that is against the constitution, they say. if they were to win the case, it would have profound implications for their own lives, but broadly for the controversial policy, who try to reach its shores by boy. >> they are travelled either here to the mann us island or another island. nauru, with no prospect of ever being resettled in australia.
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the refugees i spoke to say that the physical continues are bad enough. it's extremely hot and humid. there are marl aerial mosquitos. worse than the physical torr. is the mental anguish, not knowing what is happening to them. many of the men are held in detention for more than two years, with no prospect of knowing when they'll come out, knowing that if they do come out as refugees, they'll have to stay in papua new guinea, a place they say is not suitable for refugees. they have no history of resettling refugees. getting access to minnesota wild is rare. we managed to get here. we had a rare glimpse inside the facility. >> journalists and cameras are banned. they can get close to the regional processing center. what is a prison for 1,000 men
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is on the coast. the refugees are locked inside. some bribed the cleaners and guards. >> what do you hope will happen. i have seen people. religious people. it's as if there would be a god. it would have saved us by now. we are human, not animals. >> the prison was established as a deterrent along with another for families in nauru. australia government said people taking boats seeking asylum would be turned around at sea or deported to pacific countries with no prospect of living in australia. the policy works, the boats of refugees almost entirely stopped coming to australia. the legacy is people are locked up in there, 2 years after arriving on australian soil.
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we did manage to drive past security guards and through the facility, those we talked to say conditions inside are terrible. in the past prisoners sowed their lips together in protest. last year outsiders broke in and beat a man to death. 50 men, the first assessed as genuine refugees have been released. they live in a transit center. it's guarded. but they can leave and walk to the local town. so far, one man left minnesota wild altogether. this man was an engineer in iran, and fled after uncovering corruption. an australian friend bought him a plane ticket to port moresby. there he is about to start a low-paying job. >> i could leave there to here. i'm getting out from a terrible situation to a bad situation. at the moment i'm in a bad situation. into papua new guinea is too
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poor, with too much crime. other refugees on mann us hope a legal case goes share way, in a court declares their transfer or yist n constate -- imprisonment unconstitutional. >> we are asking for them to be taken from papua new guinea to australia. and ask the government to compensate them. australia government spent hundreds of million on papua new guinea, for taking its refugees. that has been worth it, it says, the policy has been a success. those locked up don't see it in the same way. >> well you heard one of the prisoners in the report saying that we lost all hope. some others i spoke to, the two court cases are their only hope. they see it as an only viable future, that the court case goes their way, that the whole policy will be thrown occupant, and they can start in another
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bureaucra bureaucracy, no matter where it may leave them. the whole system has been prescribed by organizations like the united nations for a few years. a politician in new zealand called the facilities modern concentration camps. others are not as stream as that. conditions are extremely tough. and being here as they have for the last few days, it's hard not to feel sympathy for those locked up for more than two years. as asylum seekers that committed no crimes. >> thank you for that. andrew thomas joining us live from papua new guinea's mann us island. u.s. republican presidential hopeful donald trump is refusing to back down over his latest controversial comments. he said he was 100% right men he said he saw muslims cheering the 9/11 attacks. fact checkers debunked his claims. during the same speech he made fun of a disabled reporter.
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he denies doing that. despite a series of gaffs, he olds a whiched leave over the competitors. i saw it at the time. i stick by it. hundreds confirmed it. there's a huge population between patterson and different places, an unbelievable large population, if they do it at soccer games and all around the world, it was when the trade center came down, it was done all around the world, and you know that, it has been reported. why wouldn't it have taken place. i had hundreds call and tweet on twitter saying that they saw it, and i was 100% right we'll go to john greenberg, a writer. a project dedicated to checking the accuracy of claims by politicians and people. he's joining us live from
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washington d.c. mr greenberg, can you hear us. good to have you with us on al jazeera. why is donald trump standing by the comments even after fact checkers said it was not true. does he believe what he is saying. >> you'd have to ask donald trump himself if he believes what he is saying. i think that donald trump makes a practice of making very bold statements and to the extent that he ever sort of walks them back. he doesn't walk them back much. in this case he's saying that of all of the mainstream press is wrong, the people have tweeted at him. hundreds of them, they say that they too remember seeing the same images, that they said he saw. he's not backing down. that is his style. >> what is it about the statements which are often
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targetting minorities, that seem to be resonating with many people in america. he is leading the polls in the republican race. >> right. well you have to recognise that all the claims that he makes. if he says that there are 34 million undocumented immigrants in the united states, for example, or if he says unemployment is really 42%. all of them have the common theme that he is spouting big numbers. donald trump style is to use numbers to catch people's attention. he really doesn't care very much whether they are particularly accurate. he views hem as representing, i would say, some sort of larger truth. that is for his style of communication. >> don't people - don't his supporters care if the large
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unanimous are accurate or not? >> i have no idea what his supporters really like. as a fact checker, i never tried to step into anyone's head. if i might, let me read you something from the art of the deem. written by donald trump in 1987. i play to people's permanent cities. that's where a little hyperbole never hurts. people want to believe something is the biggest, greatest and spectacular. i call it truthful hyperbole, it's an innocent form of exaggeration and an effective form of promotion. the man is applying a mode of communication working well for him in business and entertainment and applying it to politics. john greenburg, writer with pundit fact joining us live from washington d.c. thank you for your time. we appreciate it. >> next on the al jazeera
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newshour. fresh off the biggest victory of his career. boxing's world heavyweight champion ready to put it on the line for a rematch. details in sport.
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time for the sport new us. >> thank you. tennis, and andy murray inspired great britain to win the davis cup for the first time. the world number two won his reverse singles in straight sets, giving britain a 3-1 win.
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joel has our report. >> reporter: five years ago great britain faced relegation to the fourth tear of davis cup tennis. now the team has their hands on the tlofy for the first time since 1936, in the days of fred perry and bunny austin. he was the last man to win the men's singles until andy murray came along with his starring role in this davis cup campaign, scoring 11 out of team gb's 12 points. andy murray wrote himself into british tennis history. giving britain a 2-1 lead with a win in the doubles. murray, the world number two was up against david gougher, the world number 16 in the first of the reverse singles. the gap showing as andy murray won 6-3, a straight forward win on the cards.
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the davis cup rarely works that way. goughan took a 4-3 in the second, spurred on by the fans. murray's big-game temperament came into his own, he broke the serve, taking the set 7-5 for a 2-0 lead. this was belgium's first davis cup final appearance. and goughan was determined to match opponents. an early break in the third set had the fans hoping for a comeback. murray broke back. scots at match point. 5-3 in the third. the final point producing the rally of the match. andy murray winning it and the match. and great britain's tenth title. making them the third most successful team in davis cup history. >> everyone's, i think, everyone played an unbelievably high level. there were chances in almost every match we played.
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i can't believe we did it. in terms of davis cup title, the u.s. were the most successful with 3 # wins. australia -- 32 wins. australia with 28. france dropped down to fourth with nine wins. ironically britain beating all three on the way to the 2015 title. andy murray acknowledged that the focus on the davis cup affected his form in the slams this season. with this victory he can concentrate on adding to the two grand slam titles, in in this form you wouldn't bet against him. >> fawn came to a slow with valentino rossi winning the third in a row for the first time in his career. it was rosberg just ahead of team-mate and world champion lewis hamilton. the mercedes made a clear get away. they clashed with pesto. it was crowded in the lane.
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with the mclaren of jensan button clipped. at the front. two mercedes were having a personnel battle as they have all season long. leading the mercedes 1-# raikkonen third. 322 points. >> i'm excited about how the end of the season went. and next year can come any moment. form if it weren't for me, i don't need a holiday. no, it will be - it's great to end the season, go on holiday like this. thank you for your support. thank you to the team. it's stunning. stunning car that you have given me to football - real madrid closed the gap on spanish premier league leaders. barcelona six points. 2-0 on sunday.
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oozing pressure. the two goals scored by the two most expensive players, bale and cristiano ronaldo. they are third with 2 points behind atletico madrid. >> dortmund back to winning ways. prolific striker. he was the star with two goals on this occasion. the international. scored 17 times in the first 14 league games of the season. that's a new club record. tightening the grim on second place, eight behind leaders. bayern munich won on saturday. >> bayer leverkusen six off the two champion's league spot. after a 1-1 draw against shall kerr, having gone behind the half time break. the equalizer before full time. shall kerr drops to eighth with the result. dortmund was winning in germany,
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it was a good day for their former coach jurgen klopp, moving up four places to sixth. beating swansea. liverpool were the only winners on sunday. the other three games ending in draws. >> tyson fury would be happy to fight have ladd mir vitaly klitschko. he was speaking after ending a nine year rain as world heavyweight champion, fury is the w.b.a. i.v. f and w.b.a. champion. winning full 12 rounds in doesle dorfe germany. vitaly klitschko has not been beaten in 11 rounds. the english fighter fury was awarded the title by you nam mouse decision. extending the decision to 25 wins and no losses. that's is your sport. more later thank you u that does it for the al jazeera newshour. back in just a few minutes with another news bulletin. thank you for watching. watching.
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