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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  November 30, 2015 7:00am-9:01am EST

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here, if we act now and replace our own short term interest behind the air that our young people will breathe and food they will eat and drink and hopes and dreams that sustain their lives then we won't be too late for them and my fellow leaders accepting this challenge will not award us with moments of victory that are clear and quick, our progress will be measured differently in the suffering that is averted and a planet that is preserved and that is what has made it so hard and our generation may not see the full generation of what is here but the next generation that is better off for what we do here if you cannot find more of a reward than that, passing that on to our children and our
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grandchildren so when they look back and they see what we did here in paris they can take pride in our achievements, let that be the common purpose here in paris, a world that is worthy for our children, a world that is not marked by conflict but cooperation and not by human suffering but by human progress, a world that is safer and more prosperous and more free than the one we inherited, let's get to work. thank you very much. ♪ that was president obama speaking at the climate change summit in paris. >> your world this morning begins right now >> this is the moment we finally determined we would save our planet. >> that is today's top story,
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tackling climate change and president obama joining dozens of world leaders in paris and time is running out to limit global warming. day in court the alleged gunman accused of killing three people at a colorado planned parenthood will face a judge today. >> on trial jury selection beginning with one of the officers charged in the death of freddie gray in baltimore. >> millions head home and wicked weather leaving the country water logged and others coated in ice. ♪ world leaders are gathering in paris for the high powered conference on climate change and pressure on for negotiators and charged with coming up, with a deal to cut carbon emissions and welcome to the world, i'm del walters. >> and leaders talking inside the conference there are protests outside.
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activists demanding meaningful action from world leaders and not all of these protesters here are environmental activists though and police on paris on edge after the resent attacks and pushing back hard. >> and al jazeera is watching the talks from washington d.c. and president obama meeting with chinese leaders and concerns and pressure on the world leaders to get something done, what are the chances of getting that done? >> you are right and high hopes and comes after two spectacular and failures of conferences that have taken place in the place and one in the 1990s and copenhagen at beginning of president obama's first term in 2009 failed to reach agreement and now the bar is set very high and as president obama just told the assembled gathering there of 150 world leaders, leaders from around the world gathering on the outskirts of paris and
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stephanie is in the aftermath of attacks security is said to be extremely high as you can imagine and president obama addressing the gathering there and says the world faces the prospect of disappearing coastal lands and refugees and crumbling economies and the goal is to set emissions targets over the course of the next several years and united states and china have done so although still very ambiguous and not as concrete as many people who warn of the dangers of global warming wanted to see earlier today before the president addressed the conference and did meet with xi jinping and the two countries who are the world east largest polluters and a little of what the president had to say. >> two largest economies in the world and the two largest carbon e mitters and we both determined it is our responsibility to take action and since our historic joint announcement of the post
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2020 climate targets in beijing last year more than 180 countries and all of them announcing their own plans and so our leadership on this issue has been absolutely vital. >> reporter: del, one of the controversies surrounding this conference is a goal set by scientists that limits the warming of the planet to two degrees and 3.7 degrees fahrenheit and many scientists say that is simply unattainable and the sciences you cannot do it because of the science and never mind the politics and president obama faces a great deal of opposition from republicans back home to any deal that is struck on emissions at this conference. >> what are the obs obstacles and what are the leaders facing? >> barack obama facing
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skepticism and many believe it's a hoax at this point and internationally there are countries and developing countries and country whose are still working to develop their economies who say there is just no parody here and united states and western china have been on the backs of global emission due to the industrial revolution beginning in the 19th century and all the sudden they want to pull the rug out and tell us as we are developing we cannot pollute as we have done at a pace over the last 150 to 175 years and a course of parody and how they tackle it is a stumbling block they will be facing over the next few weeks in paris. >> mike thank you very much. before turning attention to climate talks president obama paid victims to par 't paris attacks and visited the bataclan
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hall laying flowerers outside and 130 victims of attacks died there. u.s. embassy in afghanistan is warning of a possible imminent attack there and diplomates say they received credible information in the plot of the capitol kabul and say it can happen in the next 48 hours and did not give details and u.s. citizens currently in afghanistan should consider leaving immediately. the suspect in the deadly shooting at a planned parenthood in colorado springs due in court this afternoon and finding more about who died in the shooting and stuart was a father of to and spent time in airaq. >> and he was a six-year vet at colorado springs force and leaves behind two children as al jazeera reports the search is now on for a motive. [sirens] to people who met him the suspect of the shooting of a
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planned parenthood clinic was strange, antisocial and strongly critical of president obama. >> we got some anti-obama pamphlets which kind of weird with three minutes of meeting somebody and wanting to give you that stuff. >> authorities are not confirming that robert lewis dear junior said no more baby parts after surrendering to police, nevertheless questions about the role antiabortion rhetoric may have played in the shootings dominated the sunday talk shows on abc this week the head of parenthood rocky mountains chapter said it fueled an act of domestic terrorism. >> i can't believe this is not contributing to some folks mentally unwell or not thinking that it's okay to target planned parenthood or target abortion providers. >> reporter: republican mike huckabee agreed calling the shooting domestic terrorism and stopped short blaming the
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antiabortion movement. >> i think that is a little bit disengi disengine -- disingenuous and selling of body parts to say we would like to retaliate by sending some madman into a clinic to kill people. >> reporter: republican candidate donald trump refused to blame antiabortion and called him an maniac but dislike of planned parent hold is bolstered showing them discussing fetal tissue research. >> don't low ball it. >> i will tell you there is a tremendous group of people that think it's terrible that all of the videos that they have seen with some of these people from planned parenthood talking about it like you are selling parts to a car. >> reporter: investigators say it will be days before they finish processing the evidence from friday's shooting.
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meanwhile a portrait is emerging of robert lewis dear junior, an recluse and a drift and legal gun owner and someone who seemed to give little indication he was not only armed but potentially very dangerous. paul with al jazeera in new york. >> reporter: classes cancel t at chicago main campus and f.b.i. investigating an on line threat made against the school and someone posted a message with attack on the campus quad this morning and f.b.i. and school trying to figure out who posted the threat. in a few hours jury selection begins with a bament more baltimore officer charged with killing gray and his defense team said he may not get a fair trial in a city recov recoveringrecover ing from the protests that
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happened in april and we are live outside there and what is the atmosphere like as this trial begins? >> well, good morning stephanie and del, it's almost seven months to the very day since state attorney filed charges against six baltimore police officers and today the first of six trials that of william g porter gets under way and a police officer on trial in baltimore is a pretty big deal and issues surrounding the case very complex. >> no justice. >> reporter: baltimore city center and protests and trial venue for those charged in the death of freddie gray. >> his death was a homicide. >> reporter: porter plead not guilty to manslaughter and second degree assault and endangerment and this is one of the toughest hurdles facing him
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and the feel. >> climate right now for a police officer charged with manslaughter or any sort of criminal act against an unarmed civilian. >> reporter: protests against police officers have taken place not just in baltimore but all over the country and the trial is getting underway on the heels of a murder indictment against a chicago police officer, baltimore is still recovering from riots following the death of freddie gray and suffered a spinal injury after arrested on april the 12th after transportation in a police van and says officer porter caused his death when he failed to secure gray with a seat belt contrary to a recently adopted policy. >> his back was broke. >> reporter: this video reports to show porter looking on as gray is shackled and placed in the van. >> he doesn't step up to seat belt him, is that a crime, does that rise to the level of such unreasonable conduct on the part of an officer, not every wrong
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is a crime. >> it was a deliberate failure to do their duty. >> billy murphy sees it differently and reached a $6.4 million settlement with the city. >> every one of the officers who was in a position to know and had a duty to know his medical condition and just ignored him and that is called malfeasance in office and part of the prosecution's case. >> the driver of the police van stopped around 9:00 a.m. and asked porter to check on gray and according to a report in the baltimore son newspaper gray asked for medical help and stopped to pick up another suspect and paramedics not called to 9:24 when the van reached the police statement and gray's statements and those of all officers accused will likely raise complex legal questions in
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court but in freddie gray's neighborhood where his memory looms large the answer is simple. >> somebody needs to pay for what they did for the boy, somebody needs to pay for that because six police and then he goes in the hospital and dies, spine injury, no. >> reporter: trials for the other five officers charged are scheduled from january through march next year. the case of porter is not the totality of the case against the six and they have to watch as it plays out between today and the middle of next year stephanie. >> are they expecting protests rounds the trial at all today? >> yes, they are and you might be able to see over my shoulders some barriers surrounding the courthouse and protesters will be here between 8:30 and 5:00 this afternoon and say they will protest peacefully but in
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pretrials there were some that run amuck through the town and have a system of dealing with that and the squad systems and squads on stand by and if protesters do break away from this area where they will be buried in then they will be soith after by the police squads who will go and shoot them down from trying to disturb the peace of the city, stephanie. >> john in baltimore, thank you. >> making news and 14 are dead after snow and ice come to the plains and hoping to get a clear picture of the damage caused by the weather and al jazeera has more. >> reporter: more rain over flooded roadways and rivers in north texas and arkansas where deadly storms hit parts of the plains over the week and eight are dead in texas and six in kansas and some were struck in the cars including 29-year-old
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benjamin floyd and his vehicle is seen her and he was swept off the road driving to work. >> he told 911 that water was coming in the vehicle and then they lost contact with him. >> reporter: at this texas they had to come in and rescue. >> in oklahoma and kansas ice and freezing rain are to blame for problems over the thanksgiving holiday and thousands lost power allowed the governor to declare an emergency and wichita, kansas was all but impossible and cars and trucks had to be towed after veering off the road. as that storm passes another has formed for those hard hit areas and let's bring in nicole mitchell. >> and behind what we are talking about we are watching one in the next couple of days moving in the west coast and
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this is the player and rain through the central and eastern portion of the country to the snow and yes some more ice in the midsection of the country including the midwest and more on the snowy and cold side and can see some of the pinks and des moines getting some of that around the falls and the rest is snow and more will move in today and right along the minnesota-south dakota border probably the most of this but the whole region is looking at decent amounts and a lot of places getting 6" or more and as i mentioned in the core of that especially with winter storm warnings up we will see some of those places up over a foot so that is a big snowstorm for us and need cold temperatures for us and rapid city and behind the single digits is air moving in and a lot of other air in the 20s and 30s and cold enough for the snow and the cold air moved across the country and first from the last system being reenforced by the other one and
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much cooler from the southeast with 70s. >> the northeast in the northeast is all gone. >> a memory. thank you very much. dozens of students this developing overnight have been critically hurt after a bus overturned in virginia and carrying students from the university of virginia, virginia tech and radford and returning back to campus after thanksgiving break and the driver took a ramp too quickly and charged with reckless driving. surveillance program now coming to the end nsa authority to collect the bulk metadata ending on sunday part of a compromise deal reached by congress and white house last summer and government still has access but the records are with service providers until the court gives its okay. the latest batch of e-mails from presidential hillary clinton private server will be released today and messages she sent while she was secretary of
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state. >> and welch and popularity with unions can help with labor groups and chris christie and struggling and picking up an important endorsement over the weekend and publisher saying in an editorial he can take on the washington establishment and paper saying he has experience and knows what he is doing as opposed they say to the current frontrunner donald trump. >> two months away from the 2016 season and iowa caucus and cruz spend the weekend campaigning there and is now polling second in iowa behind donald trump thanks for support from evangelicals and tea party. >> he went to syrian refugee camps there and called the camps quite nice and said middle eastern countries should take in refugees and opposed to president obama's plan to bring in thousands of syrian refugees into the country. guilty verdict in jerusalem. >> a court convicting two
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israelis of killing a palestinian teen and also. i'm in kissimmee central florida and a suburb of puerto rico and with a thousand families moving here each month we will you how their voices are changing a political landscape.
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♪ israeli court found two israelis guilty of murdering a palestinian teen last year, prosecutors say the pair admitted to abducting and burning 16-year-old mohamed kadir but verdict for the murders and ring leaders was postponed and his lawyers submitted a last-minute insanity plea and the death sparked problems in israel and days later the war in gaza began. in ramadi broadcasting on
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iraqi t.v. and unclear if that means to retake it from i.s.i.l. is imminent and also this morning russia being blamed for an air strike that killed 44 people and happening at a busy marketplace in northern syria, if russia is behind the attack it's one of the deadliest since they launched the campaign two months ago and doug is the contributor at al jazeera and also the serving as director for iraq at the national security council under the bush and obama administration and joins us from washington d.c. and doug thanks for being with us, is it all outing an assault to take ramadi about to begin. >> relatively imminent and that can mean a week or two or three but it appears that we really do have ramadi encircled and we have seen the number of bombings going up conducted mostly by coalition and u.s. war planes and therefore we should start to
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see people moving into the city center, iraqi forces moving into the iraqi city center in the coming weeks. >> an art in usa today over the weekend saying coalition forces killed as many as 23,000 i.s.i.l. fighters and elite forces are manning checkpoints because it's that high is the coalition starting to see gains on the ground in iraq and syria? >> we saw prime minister abadi of iraq this week come out and say they have retaken 40% of the territory that the islamic state had at its peak, they pushed them back of 40% of the to territory and syria as well and are being bombed regularly and are taking a lot of casualties and so a number like 23,000 is certainly plausible, of course we have to wonder how many new recruits have come across the turkish border into syria and
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the syria-iraq border in the same period and still may well be fighters on the ground. >> they are fighters who do not wear a uniform or represent a country and all they have to do is change clothes and it's up to the coalition to figure out if they have defected or are just laying low? >> this is a very serious problem, always in this type of battle and you can never know when the aftermath did we kill 25-year-old civilians or did we kill 25-year-old fighters whose friends then went along and picked up weapons as they left and it's always hard identifying when they do not wear uniforms. >> article in the "new york times" this morning and i.s.i.l. bringing in a billion a year on taxes on oil revenue and taxes on the people themselves all of this despite the coalition air strikes that destroyed 116 oil tankers in a single mission and how can you destroy i.s.i.l. without destroying the
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infrastructure of iraq and syria that will have to be rebuilt? >> it's going to be very difficult to get to the islamic state's revenue stream without retaking the cities in iraq and syria, that piece by my friend matt rosenburg talks about confiscatory if that is a word and confiscating the property in iraq and syria and the tax rates as they call them are simply so high because people are willing to give up anything to save their lives or not be beaten. it's not sustainable in the long-term and cannot tax people at 50, 60% year after year and after a while they run out of things to give you but in the short term this is great for islamic state and raking in a lot of money and what they get from the oil sales and and
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antiquities and it comes from the people they are get it. >> blamed the air strike that killed 44 people, is russia doing anything in your opinion to limit civilian casualties? >> look all our partners in the coalition and russians and the french have very different approaches to how many civilian casualties are permissible and their equipment drives that, we have precision guided weapons to put them where we want them to avoid this and they don't and have dropped dumb bombs. >> thank you very much. last week it was clear u.s. air strikes killed more than 100 civilians. >> exactly. message of reconciliation. >> pope francis asking for unity as he wraps up. smog alert as they talk climate change and one of the world's polluted cities issues the highest warning of the year.
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>> concealed iguanas in his prosthetic leg. >> revealing the shocking lengths traffickers go. >> i've had monkeys jump out of suitcases. >> now scientists joining the fight to save endagered species. >> the more we buy, the more these animals are going to become extinct. >> tecknows' team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >>...can affect and surprise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow, where technology meets humanity. >> welcome back. time to take a look at today's top stories. the accused gunman in the colorado planned parenthood shooting is due in court. police say robert dear shot and
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killed nine people, injuring himself on friday. he is being held without bond. >> one of the baltimore police officers charged in the death of freddie gray goes on trial this morning. the officer william porter has pleaded not guilty to manslaughter and other charges. freddie gray died in april while in police custody. his death sparks huge protests across baltimore. >> leaders gathering in paris for an international summit on climate change hope to cut a deal to limit greenhouse gases and slow the warming of the planet. president obama calling on the planet to come to a long term agreement before it is too late. >> the situation in china is only getting worse. heavy smog has blanketed china's northern regions, including the capital for three days in a row. >> beijing smog alert at its second highest level ever. >> for much of the day, the air quality index has been above .500 60. anything above 100 is considered
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dangerous. at the weekend, the government was forced to issue an orange alert. only red is higher. so a very, very bad day to be in this city. now the government said one of the problems for the pollution today is that it's the start of winter and so people have been burning coal to heat their homes. also, power stations are still very dependentent on coal. this is a country still hooked on fossil fuel. a few days ago, i went to a city with a notorious reputation. it is officially china's most polluted city. >> the city in northeast china is grim in winter. more so now, because the air quality in this industrial city has just been ranked the worst in china, which makes it among the worst in the world. in the first five months of this year, it had just 16 days when the air quality was considered good by the country's environmental watchdog.
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>> the air was very good before. when i was a kid, the sky was very blue, but now, the smog is very serious. >> in the old days, the winter was very cold, but you could still see the sun. now you can barely see it. >> the sun was struggling to shine on the day we visited. government leaders have this year declared a war on pollution, and have already made some painful decisions here. >> the central government shut this factory to shush pollution because we produced a lot of waste water and emisses. now we need to find a new location for the factory. >> more than 3,000 men and women lost their jobs when the government ordered this plant to close back in may. it had been one of the region's biggest producers of polyester, but it was also one of the biggest polluters. >> pollution in this city is a
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sensitive issue, but there are signs that the city is trying to clean up its act and reinvent itself. it's been designated a low carbon city, a hub for green technology, home to the world's largest maker of solar panels. they're now a feature on the streets. >> we have made a great contribution to the local economy. we have more than 20,000 employees that have created many work opportunities for local people. >> the technology's not totally clean because solar manufacturing still needs large amounts of coal fired power from the grid to run the machines. >> we still need electricity to make our product. electricity is still generated from a traditional energy like coal, but we are a responsible enterprise. we properly handle the waste water and emissions. >> a start has been made here for china's transition to a
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green economy is likely to be a long one. >> you lived in china, you said very depressing. >> it's not just depressing, but actually affecting human health there, one of the issues and why china is at the fore front of the summit. >> positive change in africa, pope francis wrapping up his trip to that continent. he held his mass and went to a mosque in a very dangerous neighborhood in the central african republic. he called for calm and peace between christians and muslims. >> a highly symbolic visit under intense security, pope francis ventures into a volatile area to convey his message of peace, the
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mostly muslim neighborhood is surrounded by armed christian groups. the pontiff appealed for the violence to end, saying christians and muslims are brothers and repeated his calls from sunday. my wish for you and all central africans is peace, a great peace among you, live in peace. >> there have been divisions with muslims and christian militias fighting each other. human rights watch said more than 100 people have been killed in just the last few months. >> to all those who make unjust use of weapons of the world, lay down these instruments of death. arm yourselves instead with righteousness. >> this is the pope's final stop in the three country tour. despite security warnings from the french with troops stationed there, soldiers have been deployed as well as more than
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3,000 u.n. peace keepers for his visit. >> we need his message to facilitate the work of -- to bring people together, to build social cohesion to build a kind of hope and also to call the attention of the world. >> this i guess the first time head of the roman catholic church that visited an active conflict zone in what some call a chance of hope during troubled times. gerald tan, al jazeera. >> the european union is promising turkey $3 billion to help the country cope with millions of syrian refugees, but there's a condition. the e.u. wants turkey to block them from going the oh europe. we have this report. >> a historic day, that's how turkey's prime minister described the summit meant to seal a trade-off. ankara gets more than $3 billion from the european union to help refugees within its borders and to stop the people traffickers who made it possible for hundreds of thousands to leave
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its shores for greece this year alone. in return, the success process that could seen turkey join the e.u. is taken out of the deep freeze. there are strings attached. >> let me stress that we are not rewriting the e.u. enlargement policy. the negotiating framework and conclusions continue to apply, including its merit based nature and respect for european values, also on human rights. >> the complete failure of the e.u. states allowing those in already on their borders has let to desperate scenes like this on saturday president greece macedonia border as many continue to germany as their preferred destination. or angela merkel, criticized at home for taking in almost a million migrants, it's time to reverse the flow. >> turkey will take back and we will see in the fall if the
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preconditions for a more liberal regime are fulfilled. >> despite the talk of progress, this dome is full of condition that is turkey has to meet before any real progress on its accession to the european union will begin. thousands of people are already in limbo on the edge of the european union desperately trying to get in. turkey's prime minister sounded a warning. the only hope for a long-term solution is an end to the war in syria. we have to act together, how to deal with refugee crisis. again, we agree that in order to solve this crisis, this there is a need of a solution to syrian crisis. otherwise, even if we have action plan, if it continues like this, turkey and europe will be facing much bigger problems in the future. >> we have now small steps to solve a huge humanitarian and political crisis. al jazeera, brussels. >> here in this country, there
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is a storm system that is dumping heavy rains on the midwest. nicole mitchell, we were talking just a second ago. we saw that rancher with the horses saving them. horses can swim but you pointed out the currents are very, very fast. >> we see people drown in these events. it only takes six inches of that rushing water to knock people off their feet and just a foot or two to move a car. it's not always just that stagnant water. today this is a different system that caused those other flooding concerns. the other was more texas, oklahoma, arkansas. some of the heaviest rain will be place like tends between today and tomorrow, getting easily three or four inches. a good soaking rain but not as wide a flood concern. you can see all that moisture. eventually, this will make it a little more into the northeast. as we mentioned earlier, there's that snow and ice on the backside where more cold air
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that moved in. the forecast today, heavy snow, some places especially on the south dakota-minnesota border getting six inches, isolated spots over a foot. the core of the heavy rain continues to be on the move. here's how all of this looks as we pu put it in motion. this morning, moving just a little bit tomorrow hits the east coast a little bit more with that rain. that will linger for a couple of days. still wrap around snow on the backside of that, so chicago's rain today, in a couple days might be the snow. finally as we clear this for wednesday night, lock at how quiet the rest of the country looks. we have another system coming to the west, that one will mostly stay through the west coast. we will get a little recovery time for a lot of the country after we get through this next storm. >> turning back to our top story, the climate summit in paris. world leaders are trying to make a deal to slow global warming.
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joining me now is an representative from an international climate control group. china is responsible for more than a quarter of the world's greenhouse gas emissions. there is a reason for optimism that it will uphold any agreement out of paris? >> i think there is. today, this morning, here in paris, we saw the president of china and president obama sit down together to discuss how our two countries could work together to see action on climate change. people have a bit of nervous energy here, the first day, but overall, i think the tone is optimistic and looking to send a positive signal that the world is moving away from fossil
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fuels. >> what about the u.s., who behind china is responsible for about 16% of the world's emissions? if a republican wins the presidential election next year and maintains the gop control of congress, could all the efforts and the commitments that president obama has made on climate change be undone? >> the simple answer is no. the president has locked in a huge amount of ambitious action from the federal level in the united states and that only supplements all the work that's happening at the city and state level around the country. that builds on the work of this growing climate movement has done to make climate change a top political issue. a recent poll showed over 70% of americans support a strong deal in paris. that includes a majority of republicans. i think no matter who gets elected, we will see continued progress on climate change. we are looking to continue to make this an issue. president obama should feel
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secure that the climate movement is going to back him up and help deliver the promises that are made here. >> paris, for them, national security is at the fore front now. the big marches that we usually see with these annual climate conferences are not allowed because of the security situation there. what are plans to have your voices heard? >> well, i was in the streets of paris yesterday with over 10,000 people who lined the boulevard that runs just near where the terrible attacks on november 13th took place. it was an amazing outpouring of solidarity to join hands and say we stand for climate justice, peace and security in this world, as well. we need to continue to see that sort of creative demonstrations in the streets of paris, here and asking that the french government continues to
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prioritize supreme court but doesn't use the situation to crack down on activists. we've had concerned about house arrests of climate activists that should not be happening. this should not be used to vital civil liberties. no matter what happens, climate activists will find creative ways to have our voices heard. >> some protests yesterday resulted in clashes. i don't know that those are necessarily climate change activists, but that has caused some criticism, and whether it's smart to have climate change activism outside an area where so many people were killed in a terrorist attack two weeks ago. june the majority of the protests yesterday were completely peaceful. the police did a great job of
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keeping everybody secure. later on, people were looking to antagonize the police not only climate issues, but other protests. we stand with people who want to peacefully demonstrate in the streets of paris, but ask that people do that non-violently. everybody in the coalition of climate group here signed a pledge to do so. it's a shame that that happened. hopefully we'll see that action and rifle energy channeled in a different way and we're asking the media to do its part in covering the beautiful demonstrations that are happening around the world and not fixate and small groups of protestors looking to disrupt the peaceful protests. >> there is a new regulation going into effect in new york city in restaurants. it will let customers know how much salt they use. it requires a salt shaker label to be placed on menus at chain restaurants. that will identify dishes that top the daily limit of
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2300 milligrams of sodium. the average american consumes about 34 milligrams of sodium every day. >> the blood of babies in california is screened for genetic disorders. that can be sold and that has critics concerned about privacy. we have this report from jacob ward. >> as any parent can tell you, the birth of a child in a blur of hurried parking, terrible pain, anxiety and a lot of medical forms. when my kids were born here in california, we were asked to sign a form that would allow the state to do genetic screening doing a blood sample. when we looked at it. it made a lot of sense. >> little poke, sweetie. >> the form allows the state of california to take blood, blot it on to a piece of paper and screen for more than 30 potential applications. it's also become possible in the last decade to use that blood to sequence a baby's d.n.w. be a revealing all the information
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for a doctor or scientists to see. those samples are stored at a facility main taped by the department of health. this is a treasure trove of information. your average scientific database offers up maybe a few thousand people but this place has the information of pretty much everyone born in california since 1983. that is millions of peoples genetic information. >> those samples are available to more than parents and headlight workers. california's program makes samples available to law enforcement and to private companies, which can pay to use the samples for gene sequencing and medical research. according to literature, the samples are die identified and passed along to companies at anonymous data, but d.n.a. is so unique. it's possible to use on line information to cross reference
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and identify individuals. the resale practice is so alarming to some california residents that an assembly man introduced a bill requiring written consent from parents for in definite storage and research. it failed to pass and the database continues to grow. >> it's an incredible resource. >> this doctor has used the california database to investigate childhood disease. >> all of us have diseases that run in our family and by sequencing people's d.n.a., we hope to be able to predict that. you actually need data from a lot of people to try and understand that. >> he said my kids stand to benefit from being part of the database. >> for people who have these diseases when they're serious, the parents don't care about privacy. they really want, they care at some level, but number one priority is to solve their child, find out what's wrong with them and possibly lead to a treatment. >> the program allows me to have my kids data droid, but
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researchers are hoping i won't do that, because the code of our bodies can help bring more healthy children into the world. jacob ward, al jazeera, san francisco. >> puerto rices changing the political landscape. >> why people fleeing the island and its financial problems are finding growing influence in the florida city known as little puerto rico. >> point, click, shop, watch your money say goodbye, the internet dominating this year's holiday sales.
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>> in-store shopping this past holiday weekend was not at robust as retailers hoped. many shopped on line instead. on line shopping surged over the weekend especially on cell phones. consumers spent nearly $4.5 billion on line thursday and friday. the retail group said more than half of black friday transactions were done on mobile devices. >> oh, the times, they are a changing, your next order on amazon could be delivered by drone. they are showcasing their prime air service. it shows what the delivery service would look like with the go ahead from the f.a.a. a time line is not in place yet. >> puerto rico is facing its
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latest deadline on the island's financial crisis. a $350 million payment is due tomorrow and puerto rico may not be able to make ends meet and pay it. many puerto rices are now heading for central florida. we have this report. >> for years, this has been referred to as little puerto rico. the bakery has long been its most popular taste of home. there's nothing small about this puerto rican community. central florida is home to around 400,000 migrants from the island and growing at a pace not seen in decades. carrol and her family arrived just weeks ago, driven from puerto rico by a deepening financial crisis. >> the situation over there is hard, and here you have more opportunities. i came here july 3 and the fourth had an interview, started working the seventh.
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now it's better. >> one of the first things carrol did when she moved was register to vote. puerto rices are u.s. citizens by birth. with an estimated thousand families arriving each month, that's significant. >> it's the highest concentration of puerto rices in the i-four corridor. >> both political parties are keenly aware of the growing voice this community has, and voters are asking some searching questions. >> a lot of them are paying very close attention to where the candidates stand on helping puerto rico in order to support that candidate. >> this part of central florida has always been considered pivotal, but this latest wave of migration could make it more important. when peter regions do so, it could be in high numbers. most have no political affiliation, making their votes more vital. >> that is something parties are
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acutely aware of. with independent voters up far gobs, there is a unique opportunity. >> that can be a blueprint for future actions. if the election is close in florida on the line, what we do here in osceola county could decide who we have as the next president. >> florida is now poised to become the state with the largest number of puerto rices in the u.s. it is thought the exodus will continue for sometime to come. with a growing number of new arrivals comes growing political influence, something that may help those left behind. al jazeera, kissimmee, florida. >> this morning, a memorable selfie is getting a lot of attention on line. two canadian brothers snapped this picture just moments before releasing that bald eagle. they found the bird stuck in a trap, it's talon clamped in.
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they used a branch to open the trap, release the bird. the eagle appeared to be unharmed. >> you should see the selfie the eagle took. >> ahead, world leaders meet in hopes of reaching a climate change deal, but can they agree after two decades of failed promises. we are back in two minutes. we'll see you then. >> lead paint... plaster that is falling... rodent infestation. >> if it was your own children, you'd have the money to take care of it. >> who does the buck stop with?
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>> these people have decided that today they will be arrested. >> i know that i'm being surveilled. >> people are not getting the care that they need. >> this is a crime against humanity. >> hands up... >> don't shoot. >> hands up... >> don't shoot. >> what do we want? >> justice. >> when do we want it? >> now. >> explosions going on... we're not quite sure - >> is that an i.e.d.? >> we're here to fully get into the nuances of everything that's going on, not just in this country, but around the world. >> what, as if there were no cameras here, would be the best solution? >> this goes to the heart of the argument. >> to tell you the stories that others won't cover. how big do you see this getting? getting the news from
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the people who are affected. >> people need to demand reform... >> we're here to provide the analysis... the context... and the reporting that allows you to make sense of your world. >> ali velshi on target. al jazeera america gives you the total news experience anytime, anywhere. more on every screen. digital, mobile, social. visit aljazeera.com. follow @ajam on twitter. and like aljazeera america on facebook for more stories, more access, more conversations. so you don't just stay on top of the news, go deeper and get more perspectives on every issue. al jazeera america. >> this is one of the most important sites in the century. >> this linked the mafia and the church. >> why do you think you didn't get the medal of honor? >> i can't allow you not to go into that because that is your job.
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>> we gonna bring this city back one note at a time. >> proudest moment in my life. >> it may be too late to stop the damage from pollution. >> rush's president meets his counterparts from germany and israel as nato tries to lower tension witness turkey. >> jury selection beginning for a police officer charged in the death of freddie gray. >> ice storms in oklahoma knock
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out power for tens of thousands and more storms could make it a rough day for millions more. >> teres are high in paris where world leaders are gathered for climate talks. they held a moment of silence in honor of the victim ofs paris attacks. welcome to your world this morning. >> inside, outside, protestors have gathered. police pushing back this group of demonstrators over the weekend, not taking chances with huge crowds taking so soon after the paris attacks. president obama saying the time to deal with climate change is now. he also commended the city for still inviting the world leaders to come despite what happened just a few weeks ago. >> we salute the people of paris
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for insisting this crucial conference go on, an act of defiance that proves nothing will deter us from building the future we want for our children. >> mike viqueira is monitoring the talks from washington. mike, good morning. i imagine the paris attacks are on the minds of world leaders and french security as these talks get underway. >> good morning to you, receive knee. as a matter of fact in the wake which those paris attacks, there was talk that this conference long planned 150 world leaders now in paris for this long planned conference on climate change. there was talk in the aftermath of the attack that it would not happen. president obama for his part is there, obviously. his first act upon getting off of air force one, touching down in paris was to go to the site of the theater where he laid a single flower, a rose, we are told, by his side, french president francois hollande, the
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president, observing a very long moment of silence. the latest in a long line of businesspressions of solidarity and unity with the french government and french people, president obama, this high profile gesture upon arriving in paris, stephanie. >> mike, to the main point here about climate thank, this very high powered summit, president obama spoke more than an hour ago. he told the world that the u.s. would lead. >> we are seeing very high stakes here, 150 nations, their heads of state represented, as we said. what they are doing is their gathering pledges or commitments from each of these states for carbon emission reduction in each individual country. there is no source of controversy, but many feel that the moment is now these countries are galvanized, the perceived every day perception that the climate is in fact
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warming, high profile spokes people like pope francis have taken up this issue. this has been going on for two decades or more, but gaining steam now. president obama has been busy since arriving in paris. not only did he visit the theater, he met with the chains president xi, these presidents representing the largest polluters, china the largest in the word, the united states the largest on a per capita base. president obama went to the conclave where he addressed these world leaders. here's a little bit of what he had to say. >> i've come here personally, as the leader of the world's largest economy and the second largest emitter to say that the united states of america not only recognizes our role in creating this problem, we embrace our responsibility to do something about it. >> the united states commitment as they come into this conference, reduce carbon emissions by 26% to 28% by the
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year 2025 in 10 years. >> what do leaders real the accidently hope to achieve in these two weeks in paris. >> they hope to have commitments from each of these countries, the scientific community think that is global warming needs to be held to two degrees celsius in total, 2.7 degrees fahrenheit. many believe that that is unattainable at this point. even if many commitments that these countries are talking about are met, the global temperatures expected to rise by 3.7%, also, there are many poor or less developed countries, we should say that feel that this is unfair, that the developed countries have emitted all this carbon and now want to put restrictions on their economies just as they're starting to grow. >> mike, thank you. >> also, russian president vladimir putin will be talking about syria and isil on the sidelines that have summit. he plans to meet with german chancellor angela merkel and israeli prime minister benjamin
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netanyahu. this week is iraq's prime minister saying his fores have now retaken 40% of isil controlled territory. al jazeera's national security contributor said that means there is real progress being made in the fight against isil. >> on the iraqi side of the border, that is happening and in syria, as well. they are being bombed regularly, taking casualties. a number like 23,000 is certainly plows i'll. of course we have to wonder how many new recruits have come across the turkish border into syria and syria-iraq theater during that time period. >> isn't the problem that these are fighter that is don't wear a uniform or represent a country and all they have to do is change clothes and it's up to the coalition to try to figure out whether they have indeed defected or are just laying low. >> this is a very serious problem always in this type of battle. you can never know in the aftermath did we kill
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25-year-old civilians or 25-year-old fighters, whose friends then went along and picked up the weapons before they left. it's always hard identifying when these people don't wear uniforms. >> there is a new push to tackle isil in the wake of the paris attacks, president francois hollande putting together what he calls his grand coalition to go inside syria. >> u.s. sit ins are urged to leave immediately, diplomatics saying they have received what they say is cell information of an imminent attack in kabul. they say it could happen in the next 48 hours but did not offer details. >> jury selection getting underway in baltimore. officer william porter pleading not guilty to charges in the death of freddie gray. there are concerns there could be more violence as the proceedings move forward. john terrett live this morning outside the courthouse in baltimore. john, you were on the streets last summer when those protests
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turned violent. what is the like in baltimore this morning? >> yes, i was indeed. good morning, del and stephanie, as well. i think it's a bit on edge, if i'm honest with you. i think the city wants to try and avoid what happened last april when freddie gray died. the city is making the point that the first of the six trials against the six officers is not the totality of the city's case against the police department here or against these officers. you must look at each trial individually and see what happens in each one. with that going forward, we start today with jury selection in the trial of one of those six officers, william g. porter. as you can imagine, having a police officer under these circumstances in baltimore is an extremely big event, and the issues surrounding his case are very, very complex. today, what will happen is 75-80 people will appear before the judge and he will ask if they
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think they can give officer porter a fair trial. the trial could last several weeks. >> can you explain the case against officer porter? >> well, the case against officer porter as i said just now is relatively complex. he face as range of charges, but the most serious one is manslaughter. now remember, he was one of six officers who were expected to officer adult of care towards freddie gray, the suspect in the back of that police wagon, but the key question the jury will have to address is, is it a crime not to have seatbelted freddie gray in the back of the police wagon. now, the defense is going to argue that this is a bit of a gray area, because in fact, there is a new regulation which exists only in the city of baltimore where suspects must be seatbelted in the back of police wagons. they're going to argue this it's new, not uniformly applied throughout the city and some of
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those police wagons don't have seatbelts. they're going to argue that freddie gray contributed to his own death by being violent and aggressive in the back of that police wagon. >> john terrett, you could see the barricades behind him. it is tense there. coming up in 10 minutes, we'll take a closer look at the case with a former baltimore city prosecutor. >> this afternoon, the suspect in a deadly shooting at a planned parenthood in colorado springs will be in court. robert dear, jr. is facing murder charges. we are learning more about the three who died that in shooting. one was a mother of two. she reportedly was at the clinic friday to support a friend. another was an iraq war veteran and father of two. a police officer, garrett swayze leaves two children behind. he was a six year veteran of the university of colorado at colorado springs police force, now authorities are trying to figure out the motive for the killings. >> to people who met him, the
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suspect in friday's shooting at a planned parenthood clinic was strange, anti social and strongly critical of president obama. >> we got some anti obama pamphlets. it was kind of weird, like three minutes of meeting somebody, they are already wanting to give you that stuff. >> authorities are not confirming that robert dear, jr. said no more baby parts after underring to police. questions about the role anti abortion rhetoric may have played in friday's shootings dominated the sunday talk shows. on this week, the head of planned parenthood's rocky mountain chapter said hate speech fueled an act of domestic terrorism. >> i can't believe that this isn't contributing to some folks mentally unwell or not, thinking that it's ok to target plant parenthood or abortion providers. >> republican presidential
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candidate mike huckabee agreed with calling the shootings dom terrorism but stopped short of blaming the anti abortion movement. >> i think of that's a little bit disingenuous on the part of plant parenthood to blame people who have a strong philosophical disagreement with the dismembering of human babies and selling of body parts to say that we would like to retaliate by sending some madman into a clinic to kill people. >> republican candidate damaged trump refused to blame anti abortion sentiment, calling the shooter a maniac. trump admitted that dislike for planned parenthood has been bolstered by video showing plant parenthood officials be discussing fetal tissue research. >> don't low ball it. >> ok. >> tell me -- >> i will tell you there is a tremendous group of people that think it's terrible through all of the videos they have seen with some of these people from plant parenthood talking about it like you're selling parts to
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a consider. >> investigators say it will be days before they finish processing the evidence from friday's shootings. meanwhile, a portrait is emerging of robert lewis dear junior, a man alienated ant adrift, a legal gun owner, but someone who seemed to give little indication that he was not only armed but potentially very dangerous. paul beban, al jazeera, new york. >> no classes today at the university of chicago's main campus. that school canceling classes and activities after someone went on line and posted a threatening message, saying there might be an attack on the campus quad. the f.b.i. and the school now trying to figure out just who post that had threat. >> at least 14 people are dead after a major storm brought snow and ice to the southern plains. >> some people trapped inside their cars with the floodwaters rising all around them. we have more. >> more rain over flooded roadways and rivers in north texas and arkansas where deadly
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storms hit parts of the southern plains over the holiday weekend. at least eight people of dead in the accident, another six in cans. some drivers were stuck inside their cars, including 29-year-old benjamin floyd. his vehicle is seen here. he died after swept off the road while driving to work. >> he told the 911 that water was coming in the vehicle and then they lost contact with him. >> at this texas farm, rescuers stepped in to save these farm animals. >> the horses were up next deep in water. >> in oklahoma and cans, ice and freezing rain are blamed for much of the problems over the thanksgiving holiday. thousands of homes and businesses lost power, leading the governor in oklahoma to declare a state of emergency. frozen highways across kansas made driving all but impossible. cars and trucks had to be toed after veering off the road. >> storms this morning are bringing snow and rain to several states.
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let's bring in nicole mitchell for more on that. >> this is a separate system bringing problems to places we saw with the same concerns just over the course of the weekend. rain is moving more toward the mitt atlantic right now, tennessee valley area, all the way up through on the backside of this, snow, some of the heaviest of that will be minnesota, south dakota. we do see it as far as cans. the pinks there. there had been precipitation mixing with all of this but not as widespread as we saw friday into saturday this past weekend. here is where we're seeing everything. some of the heaviest snow is going to come today and into the day tomorrow as it moves, especially today. as i said, minnesota into south dakota, kind of of that border area is going to see some places could be over a foot of snow, widespread, where we have the winter storm warnings, six-inches or more. that's significant snow, places like interstate 90 are not going
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to be pleasant trying to get through this. that system is bringing in much cooler air, as well. we already had the colder air come in, this is just reinforcing, these temperatures in the teens like rapid city, warmer than last hour, but definitely is going to keep those temperatures cool. we were already cool all the way to the east coast, those 60s that we had for example on friday, long gone. more 40's have replaced it. the only part the eastern half of the country hanging on to some of that warm, atlanta till on the south side of that with 71 degrees, but a lot of cold air through the rest of the country now that we're getting more into that wenter pattern. >> you couldn't teal sorry for those little pets, slipping and sliding on the ice, though. >> it's hard on everyone. >> nicole, thank you very much. >> at least one person is said to be in critical condition after a bus overturned in virginia carrying students from the university of virginia, virginia tech and bradford
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university all returning to their campuses after thanksgiving break. dozens were hurt. police say the driver took a ramp too quickly. he has been charged with reckless driving. this morning, the n.s.a. no longer legally allowed to collect bulk information on phone calls. the n.s.a.'s authority to collect bulk megadata ended sunday, part of a compromise deal reached last summer. the government still has access to the information, but records remain with the service providers until the court gives its ok. >> new worries in baltimore as a police officer goes on trial for freddie gray. >> the fears and whether that could spark more violence.
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jury selection about to get underway for the first police officer charged in the death of freddie gray, pleading inning to charges. gray died from a spinal cord injury days after six police officers, including porter placed him under arrest. a former city prosecutor joins us this morning. good to see you again. >> thank you, del. >> it seems the prosecution in this case lost several key rulings, the biggest being that the cases are now severed. how much will that hurt their case? >> i don't think it really will hurt their case that is much. it makes it a longer process for
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the cases to be severed and tried bun by one by one. i don't think it was unexpected ruling that the cases would be severed. >> you heard it described earlier, baltimore is a city on edge. are there concerns that what happened during the summer could happen again if there is a not guilty verdict and as a former prosecutor, were you aware of high profile cases like this? >> absolutely. but this case is the highest profile case that the city of baltimore has seen that i've been aware of. the city is concerned there could be another unrest, but i think this time around, they are much more prepared if there should be unrest on how to handle it. how to deal with it. there is a new police commission are and they've learned from their mistakes of the past. i think they're ready and hopefully there will not be any unrest, whether there is a guilty verdict or whether there is a not guilty verdict.
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>> do you think the jury feels all that have pressure and if they do, does that work to benefit the prosecutor or the defense? >> well, you never know how it works to benefit either one side or the other until the jury is seated in the box, because we don't know what the jurors will look like. we do know that the jurors are going to know that this is an important case. it's an important case to the citizens of baltimore and to see that justice is done, but there's a tremendous amount of pressure on the jurors that will be seated in this case. they know that going into that. >> with all of the pressure being placed on both sides, will these officers get a fair trial? because already, one of the defense attorneys is saying they will not. >> loot, they will be able to get a fair trial. what a fair trial really means, del, is not that you have not heard about the evidence in the case. it's not that you haven't heard about what's been put out in the media and news, but a fair trial
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only means and judge williams will instruct all prospective jurors that if you can, knowing what you know about the case, just set that aside and base your verdict solely on what you hear inside the courtroom. that's all that a fair and impartial jury really needs. i think absolutely, yes, they can get a fair jury trial in the city of baltimore. >> debbie hines joining us, as always, thank you very much. >> freddie gray's death put the spotlight on a city with some of the highest murder and poverty rates in the country. half a year later, things aren't much better. baltimore broke its record for the most homicides in a single year. we have this report. >> in baltimore's poorest, most drug riddled neighborhood, they're rebuilding one of is only pharmacies, destroyed last april in the rage that followed the death in police custody of freddie gray. it's a hopeful sign in a city where thousands of homes have been left derelict, but small comfort in the light of
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baltimore's worsening cycle in daily violence. more than 300 homicides, making this year the deadliest per capita in the city's history. victims like kendall february wick, father of three, who tried to stop the drug dealing around his home. >> we need to be outraged when someone like him is killed in this manner. >> i don't think the death of freddie gray caused it to get worse, it's the same. >> these appeals against violence are a small effort to stop the pleading. the group buys abandoned houses and turns them into after school learning and physical fitness centers. >> we're showing what is a viable alternative to some of these boarded up properties, tearing them down and turning them into a community asset. >> leadership. >> his group's street marches
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have focused on trial prevention and providing local youth with leadership skills rather than protesting abuses by police. >> bad individuals put on a badge, but we captain isolate ourselves from the entire function of police officers, because we need people to fight the bad guys, because we have too many bad guys in our communities. >> some defenders of the police questioned whether they've responded to the protest by relaxing their enforcement of the law and there be aggravating the conditions for violence. >> we reach out. >> but america's top law enforcement official discounts any such police backlash. >> there's no data to support it. what i have seen in my travels across this country is the dedication, the commitment and the resolve of our brave men and women in law enforcement to improve policing. >> without more resources to divert another generation of black youth from drugs and despair, repairing relations
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with the police may be a recurring struggle. >> tom ackermann, al jazeera, baltimore. >> that officer you see at the end of that package has been walking that beat for decades. >> you used to work down there in baltimore. >> he's a good guy. >> world leaders trying to reach the deal on climate change, scientists warning it may already be too late. >> fighting isil and trying to help the refugees, as well. turkey's role in the migrant crisis and in nato
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>> they believed in what they were doing but they were not scientists. it wasn't science at all. >> there's a lot of lives at stake, a lot of innocent people. >> how many are still locked up? >> the integrity of the criminal justice system is at stake, plain and simple.
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>> "faultlines". >> what do we want? >> al jazeera america's hard-hitting... >> today they will be arrested. >> ground-breaking... >> they're firing canisters of gas at us. >> emmy award-winning, investigative series. >> we have to get out of here. >> one of the baltimore police officers charged in the death of freddie gray is going on trial this morning. officer william porter is pleading inning to manslaughter and other charges. his lawyers say he may not get a fair trial after the massive protests across the city last year. he freddie gray died in police custody. >> the suspect in the deadly planned parenthood shooting will go before a judge today. robert dear is facing murder charges. >> world leaders gathering in paris at this hour for an international summit on climate
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change. tensions are high in light of the attacks in paris early they are month. security as a result tight in and around the conference. president obama praising the city for going ahead with the summit despite attacks. >> the president also says the world should be hopeful that meaningful change could happen during these talks. >> this is a turning point. this is the moment we finally determined we would save our planet. it is the fact that our nations share a sense of urgency and growing residation that it is within our power to do something about it. >> president obama has met on the sidelines with chinese president xi. china is the world's largest producer of greenhouse passes. today, beijing is under a smog alert, heavy smog has been in the capital for three days in a row. >> climate change means a
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dangerous condition for coastal communities. the capital of the philippines is on that list. >> over the last 20 years, the philippines has seen the most number of extreme weather events of anywhere in the world. now the country is already in the direct path of typhoon that is develop in the pacific, but scientists are saying thyme change is making them stronger and more predictual. more than 20 already on average strike the country, but for example in 2013, the strongest typhoon on record up until that time cut a swath across the value islands and left millions homeless. it also left more than 6,000 people dead. the country is still recovering from the effects of that typhoon. the president of the philippines speaking in paris will not only be asking for the more developed nations to cut down on emissions, but contribute to funding that poorer nations like the philippines, which are more
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vulnerable to climate change will need to help make communities here that are most affected more resilient to damages brought about by weather conditions. >> an israeli court found two israelis guilty of murdering a palestinian teenager last year. prosecutors say the pair and a 30-year-old man admitted to abducting and burning muhammed. it was days after palestinians killed three israeli settlers in the occupied west bank. >> as al jazeera's stephanie decker reports, the verdict for the older suspect is still pending. >> it's taken almost a year and a half for this partial verdict to be reached. the two minors found guilty of committing the murder, but the main ringleader, a man's lawyers have submitted an insanity plea. the courts saying a final verdict on his case will come on
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the 20 are december. a lot of disappointment here. we spoke to the lawyer of the family who sees this as manipulation. he tells us at the time of the arrest, ben davis meticulously went through what he planned and went through the entire murder. there was no indication that he was in sane. there was a very clear, planned, meticulous action there. also at issue is how palestinians perceive this on the street. they're very skeptical that any injustice will be done to israelis accused of crimes against palestinians. we're going to wait how this worked out and how the two minors will be sensed. recently a law affecting palestinian minors accused of what is called terrorism a maximum sentence. if ben david, the main ringleader gets convicted, his sentencing, too, will happen on that date. >> stephanie decker reporting from jerusalem. the murder sparked protests in
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israel in the occupied territories. just days later, the 2014 gaza war began. >> nato standing by turkey over the downing of the russian fighter jet. nato secretary general meeting with turkey's prime minister saying he supported turkeys decision to fire on that jest last week, killing one of the pilots onboard. >> all allies, turkey is right to defend its territorial integrity and its air space. i welcome turkey's efforts to establish contacts with moscow, and to its contacts with russia to deescalate the situation. >> russia's president vladimir putin said he has yet to receive an apology over what happened. the turkish prime minister today saying his nation will not apologize for protecting its borders. >> the european union be is promising turkey a little over $3 billion to help the country cope with million was syrian refugees. there is a condition.
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the e.u. wants turkey to block those refugees from going to europe. al jazeera has this report. >> a historic day. that's how turkey's prime minister described the summit meant to seal a trade-off. ankara gets more than $3 billion from the european union to help refugees within its borders and to stop the people traffickers who made it possible for hundreds of thousands to leave its shores for greece this year alone. in return, the success process that could seen turkey join the e.u. is taken out of the deep freeze. there are strings attached. >> let me stress that we are not rewriting the e.u. enlargement policy. the negotiating framework and conclusions continue to apply, including its merit based nature and respect for european values, also on human rights. >> the complete failure of e.u. states allowing those in already on their borders has let to
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desperate scenes like this on saturday at the greece macedonia border as many continue to germany as their preferred destination. or angela merkel, criticized at home for taking in almost a million migrants, it's time to reverse the flow. >> turkey will take back third country nationals and we will see in the fall if the preconditions for a more liberal regime are fulfilled. >> despite the talk of progress, this deal is full of conditions that turkey has to meet before any real progress on its accession to the european union will begin. thousands of people are already in limbo on the edge of the european union desperately trying to get in. turkey's prime minister sounded a warning. the only hope of a long-term solution is an end to the war in syria. >> we have to act together, how to deal with refugee crisis. again, we agree that in order to
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solve this crisis, there is a need of a solution to syrian crisis. otherwise, even if we have of joint action plan, if it continues like this, turkey and europe will be facing much bigger problems in the future. >> we have now are small steps to solve a huge humanitarian and political crisis. al jazeera, brussels. >> pope francis now wrapping up his trip to africa holding a mass this morning. he went to a mosque in a very dangerous neighborhood. there he called for calm and peace between christians and muslims. al jazeera's gerald tan reports. >> a highly symbolic visit under intense security, pope francis enters a volatile area with a message of peace. the mostly muslim neighborhood is surrounded by armed christian groups. the pontiff appealed for the violence to end, saying christians and muslims brothers
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and repeated his calls from sunday. >> my wish for you and all central africans is peace, a great peace among you, live in peace. >> there have been years of political divisions with muslims and christian militias fighting each other. human rights watch said more than 100 people have been killed in just the last few months. >> to all those who make unjust use of weapons of the world, lay down these instruments of death. arm yourselves instead with righteousness. >> this is the pope's final stop in the three country tour. despite security warnings from the french with 900 troops stationed there, soldiers have been deployed as well as more than 3,000 u.n. peace keepers for his visit. >> we need his message to facilitate the work of -- to bring people together, to build
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social cohesion, to rebuild a kind of hope and also to call the attention of the world. >> this is the first time head of the roman catholic church has visited an active conflict zone in what some call a chance of hope during troubled times. gerald tan, al jazeera. >> congress is getting back to work after thanksgiving recess and focusing on the budget. congress has until december 11 to pass a new funding bill and avoid a government shutdown. the main issues holding up a new bill include federal funding for planned parenthood and whether to accept syrian refugees. >> you might want to pack your bum about her shoot if you're heading to work. john terrett, a bum about her shoot. >> it's an english word.
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we're seeing the heavier rain side of this, and of course there's snow. we are going to get heavy areas of rain especially around tennessee into parts of kentucky, north carolina. charlotte this morning, that might be causing delays. you can kind of see the core of that with the yellows. that would be today and tomorrow, some places getting four or five inches of rain. there could be spotty flooding, not quite the extent with what we saw in place like the accident or oklahoma. the snow side, that's the cold side, and that will eventually come to somewhere like chicago, in the next two days, but in the meantime, a lot of this is rain. it continues where we saw this range by the rest of the day. by tomorrow, we get more of this up and down the east coast. that lingers into wednesday, as well. still getting cold enough air where we get areas of snow. wednesday into thursday, this
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clears out. look at how much dry territory we have across the country, starting tomorrow, we will be watching another system pull into the west coast, but really, we've had such an active pattern lately, we definitely want to get a little break to dig out all that snow we'll be getting and also just to have quieter weather. this really did drop temperature, we're not looking for any figure warmups, but that break a couple of days from now will at least be appreciated. >> nicole mitchell, thank you. >> an earthquake made for an early wake-up call for people in the middle of the country, the 4.5 magnitude quake was centered miles from the oklahoma-cans border. people reported feeling the ground shake in both states. an aftershock happened later, but there were no reports of injuries. >> transgender inmates are currently being housed, all housed in georgia in all male
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facilities. diamond was recently paroled after she filed a federal lawsuit against the state. we have her story. >> this is the letters from jail. >> 37-year-old ashley diamond has been out of prison for two months now. >> you've got to feel lucky that you made it out. now you the question is what do you do now? >> what do i do now is the question that i ponder every night before i go to bed, and i wake up every morning posing that question, what do i do. >> diamond was freed unexpectedly, sent home after serving about a third of an 11 year sentence for a probation violation. >> i reported the first rape, and i was told that it was my fault. >> diamond identifies as a transgender woman, but was locked up in an all male prison. inside, she says that she was raped more than seven times, beat up and verbally abused. >> that i would be put in a cell
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with like a rapist, a convicted murderer, or most of all, my roommates had, you know, long sentences over 200 years in most cases. >> when her story landed in the new york times, there was a flood of calls to free her. diamond quickly became another headline for transgender rights. while in prison, diamond recorded this. just six months after the southern poverty law center filed suit claiming the georgia department of corrections system clip refused appropriate care for transgender inmates, georgias parole board freed her. in her case, the prison denied her the hormones she had been taking for half of her life. while in prison, without the medical treatment she says she needed, diamond took extreme
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action, include be attempted suicide and self kass station. >> nearly four areas in prison, verbally biased, beaten, threatened your life, raped. did anyone do anything to try and help you while you were there? >> no. no one ever made any attempt to help me. >> how did you deal with the fact that at any moment, you could be sexually assaulted or perhaps even killed? >> i prayed. >> diamond now lives in this trailer park outside rome, georgia, though if she doesn't get a job soon will end up living with relatives. ♪ >> she plays music to soothe the demons that she says haunt her all day long. with no job yet, diamond is volunteering at a dog shelter until she lands on her feet. >> i woke up 3:00 a.m. this morning completely covered in sweat from head to toe because
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when i do go to sleep, i'm on so much medication, anti psych particulars, antidepressants, sleep aid that is even, you know, i'm becoming immune to that. >> for ashley, the boot brail wounds are open and bleeding. >> i question sometimes if i'm even safe under my own hand, because, you know, there was a a lot of suicide attempts, and, you know, that's still a lingering thought, that, you know, stays with you, so. >> don't do that. >> robert ray, al jazeera, rome, georgia. >> the 2016 iowa caucus is now months away. >> i'm in kissimmee, a city considered as a suburb of puerto rico. with a thousand families moving here each month, we'll tell you how their voices are changing the political landscape.
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>> despite lines at the malls this past weekend, in store shopping not as strong as retailers had been hoping, customers shopping on line for their holiday bargains. >> the national retail federation said on line shopping surged over the weekend, especially on cell phones. consumers spent $4.5 billion on line friday and retailers spent more than half of black friday transactions were made on mobile devices. >> the latest batch of emails from hillary clinton's private servers will be released today.
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those were messages she sent as secretary of state. she received the endorsement of boston's mayor. his popularity with unions could help her with pro labor groups. >> chris christie's struggling an important enforcement,king up christie can take on the washington establishment, the paper says in in a editorial. he said he knows what he's doing compared to donald trump, their words. >> today is an important date in presidential politics. the iowa caucuses. senator ted cruz has climbed to second in presidential polls there thanks to evangelicals. he spent the weekend campaigning in iowa. ben carson spent the weekend in jordan visiting requireian refugee camps. he called those camps quite nice and said middle eastern countries should take in those refugees.
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he rejected president obama's plans to bring thousands of refugees to this country. >> puerto rico's bank facing a $350 million payment to really. the latest amount due as part of the islands financial crisis. the difficulties are forcing many to leave. some are heading for central florida. >> for years, kissimmee has been referred to as little puerto rico and the bakery long its most popular taste of home. there's nothing small about this region's puerto rico community. central florida is home to around 400,000 migrants from the island and growing at a pace not seen in decades. carrol poe and her family arrived weeks ago, driven from puerto rico by a deepening financial crisis. >> the situation over there is hard, and here you have more opportunities. i can hear that, you know, july 3 and had an interview.
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working the seventh. now it's better. >> one of the first things carrol did when she moved was register to vote. puerto rices are u.s. citizens by birth. with an estimated thousand families arriving each month, that's significant. >> it's the highest concentration of puerto ricans in the i-4 corridor. >> both political parties are keenly aware of the growing voice this community has, and voters are asking some searching questions. >> a lot of them are paying very close attention to where the candidates stand on helping puerto rico in order to support that candidate. >> this part of central florida has always been considered pivotal in any general election, but this latest wave of migration could make it more important. when peter regions do so, it could be in high numbers. most have no political affiliation, making their votes more vital.
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>> that is something local republican party representatives are acutely aware of. with independent voters up far grabs, there is a unique opportunity. >> that can be a blueprint for future actions. if the election is close in florida on the line, what we do here in osceola county could decide who we have as the next president. >> florida is now poised to become the state with the largest number of puerto ricans in the u.s. it is thought the exodus will continue for sometime to come. with a growing number of new arrivals comes growing political influence, something that may help those left behind. al jazeera, kissimmee, florida. june privacy worries over d.n.a. >> why practice in california, collecting blood from babies is raising concerns over just what it's used for.
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>> half a million fields will lie fallow. >> if we had another year of this severe drought, i'd say all bets are off. >> increasing scrutiny for a controversial practice in california. for years the blood of babies there has been collected and screened for genetic disorders and sold to private companies for research. that has critics concerned about privacy. >> as any parent can tell you, the birth of a child in a blur of hurried parking, terrible
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pain, anxiety and a lot of medical forms. when my kids were born here in california, we were asked to sign a form that would allow the state to do genetic screening using a blood sample. when we looked at it. it made a lot of sense. >> little poke, sweetie. >> the form allows the state of california to take a pin prick of blood, blot it on to a piece of paper and screen for more than 30 potential applications. it's also become possible in the last decade to use that blood to sequence a baby's d.n.a revealing all the information for a doctor or scientists to see. those samples are stored at a facility maintained by the department of health. this is a treasure trove of information. your average scientific database offers up a genetic database of maybe a few thousand people but this place has the information of pretty much everyone born in california since 1983. that is millions of peoples genetic information. >> those samples are available to more than parents and
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healthworkers. california's program makes samples available to law enforcement and to private companies, which can pay to use the samples for gene sequencing and medical research. according to literature, the samples are de-identified and passed along to companies at anonymous data, but d.n.a. is so unique. it's possible to use on line information to cross reference and identify individuals. the resale practice is so alarming to some california residents that an assemblyman introduced a bill requiring written consent from parents for in definite storage and research. it failed to pass and the database continues to grow. >> it's an incredible resource. >> this doctor has used the california database to investigate childhood disease. >> all of us have diseases that run in our family and by sequencing people's d.n.a., we
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hope to be able to predict that. you actually need data from a lot of people to try and understand that. >> he said my kids stand to benefit from being part of the database. >> for people who have these diseases when they're serious, the parents don't care about privacy. they really want -- i mean, they care at some level, but number one priority is to solve their child, find out what's wrong with them and possibly lead to a treatment. >> the program allows me to have my kids data destroyed, but researchers are hoping i won't do that, because the code of our bodies can help bring more healthy children into the world. jacob ward, al jazeera, san francisco. >> that restaurant goers in new york city will soon get information that will tell them how much salt they're about to consume. the law goes into effect tomorrow and requires a salt shaker label to be placed on menus at chain restaurants. it will identify dishes that top the daily limit of 2300 mill
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gaps of sodium. the average american consumes 3400 milligrams every day. >> an incredible sight from one of the most active volcanos in mexico. a camera caught these eruptions on saturday. local officials say it went off four times in a few hours. one of the plumes topped 500 feet. local officials warned people in the area to stay away from falling ash. >> one of basketball's greatest players will soon step off the court. kobe bryant said he will retire at the end of the season. he's been with the los angeles lakers for every season of his career. he penned a poem on line, saying a recent string of injuries is forcing him to leave the game. he said my body knows it's time to say goodbye. that's it for us here in new york. coming up next, the latest from the climate summit. world leaders are trying to find a solution to stop the planet from warming. your word this morning is back tomorrow at 7:00 a.m. eastern.
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have a great day. june the next generation is watching. world leaders are urged to agree a meaningful deal at the u.n. climate conference in paris. hello, welcome, you're watching al jazeera live from doha. also coming up: turkey's prime minister remains defiant about shooting down a russian plane. a message of reconciliation in a conflict

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