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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  December 9, 2015 7:00am-9:01am EST

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the fall out from fear. why donald trump's anti-muslim rhetoric may be a threat to national security the money trail, why a loan may help the police in the san bernardino shooting in commence the dusk and a third suspect identified who killed himself at the bahamas concert hall and rains trigger land slides, evacuation and overflowing sewers donald trump insists he has no bigot, but this morning there's growing condemnation
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from around the world over the republican runners calls to ban muslims entering the united states. welcome to "your world this morning." i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm del walters. the front pages of the independent says "ban him from britain", an online petition has tens of thousands of signatures here in the u.s. there has been condemnation from both sides. it was said: trump hints that he has the support to run as an independent, and the obama administration warns the harsh language he sues could put america at risk. >> they can never, ever, ever come back. >> reporter: at the white house donald trump's anti-muslim rhetoric was portrayed as
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tantamount to aiding and abetting the enemy. they said it would be harder to recruit allies to battle i.s.i.l. on the ground. >> anything creating tension, the notion that united states is at odds with the muslim faith and islam would be counterproductive to our efforts right now. and totally contrary to our values. >> in iraq, donald trump called for a ban on muslims entering the united states, as the baghdad shopkeeper shook his head. >> i think such an idea and remarks are wrong, as it increases hatred and ravingor in the west, and cause a risk between muslims and christians there. >> they have no respect for human life. >> before trump's latest remarks drew fire, president obama said the talk of imposing a religious test on refugees entering the
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u.s. was giving i.s.i.l. a tactical victory in the battle of ideas. >> i cannot think of a more potent recruitment tool for i.s.i.l., than some. of the rhetoric coming out of here during the course of the debate. >> prominent muslim groups are outraged. >> he and others are playing into the hands of i.s.i.s. >> this is what i.s.i.s. wants from americans, to turn against each other. and for that, donald trump and other candidates who are targetting american muslims are doing great service to i.s.i.s. the ones that we are all finding as common enemy. >> homeland security secretary is appearing with the local imam at the same time trump was addressing his supporters in south carolina. said the vilification is all the more damaging, because it comes
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not from fringe candidate or a front runner. >> when a leading candidate for office proposing something that is irresponsible, illegal and contrary to law, un-american, and will hurt the efforts at homeland security and national security, we have to speak out stay with us on this. in about 10 minutes a closer look at trump's impact on the republican party and the backlash from businesses in the middle east and a senate committee to talk about restrictions on foreigners. the house passing changes to the visa waving programme on tuesday. 38 countries are part of the programme, allowing citizens to enter the u.s. without a visa. forcing those from iran, iraq and sudan to go through that process. and details emerging about the couple that carried out the mass
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shootings. investigator are looking into an online loan that may have helped them fund their arsenal. they received about 28,000 through prosper, days before the attacks. it's unclear what the loan was used for. >> in france, investigators identified a third suspect in last month's attacks in paris, saying the man who attacked the bataclan concert hall was a french citizens coming from a german border city of strasbourg. we'll go live to jacky rowland in paris. what do you know about the third suspect. important reply he had crossed the police's radar, but was not on a wanted list. the information, the news came via a text message received by his mother, receiving a text message from syria saying your
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son died as a martyr in paris. she contacted the police, gave them a d.n.a. sample and they were able to identify the third attacker who died at the bataclan concert hall almost four weeks ago. >> french officials are looking for living suspects in the attack. are there updates to that investigation? >> that is the problem, they've been able to identify men that died in the attack. they have been able to search and piece taght a wider network of support. logistical, financing and other practical support. the main suspect on the run. a man salam, there has been no
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progress on him, and it looks like he may have scaerpd back to syria -- escaped back to syria. >> what will stop another attack like this. >> france was under emergency. the police have sweeping powers. hundreds of searches have been carried out and taken in for questioning. they were reinforced security measures all over the major cities in paris. train station, the airports, any tour of the attraction. very heavy security presence there. inevitably there are questions about is france trading off its freedoms in exchange for security. most people in maryse at the moment -- paris at the moment see they'll have to see some
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restrictions in freedom of movement a familiar conversation we are having in this country, jacky rowland this paris. for the first time russia launched air strikes from a submarine as part of syria's war. these are images of the rough stuff launching missiles from the mediterranean. the strikes hit i.s.i.l.'s targets in raqqa, including record stores and oil infrastructure it's the second day of talks. the meeting in riyadh including the national coalition and the free syrian army. other groups say they are not there and were not invited. the groups are trying to present a unified front to peace talks. the talks could effect a meeting on ending the syrian war. scheduled for this month, and that is what the secretary of state john kerry and ban ki-moon
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talked about this paris. >> it talked about the process taking place now, and depending on the outcome of both the saudi led conference, and other issues. it's our plan to attend and have a meeting in new york. >> the two leaders say it is important for the ceasefire to take effect as soon as possible. >> iraqi forces say they have taken another key district. troops fighting for months to secure the city. officials say they are taking apart roadside bombs and booby-trapped houses as they make their way to the center of the city. the news is considered a breakthrough in the fight against i.s.i.l. >> the u.s. console ute is
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closed as a security threat, the nature of which is not made public. the warning warn u.s. citizens to take appropriate steps. the state department said limited urgent services will be available, diplomatic services in turkey will operate normally in tving officials investigate thou how a group of taliban firefighters got through several points. the afghan military finally repelled the attack after 24 hours of fighting. 37 mr killed, including hostages. the military said 10 fighters died on the assault on the heavily fortified combat. >> in a few hours rahm emanuel will address the council about police accountability. after this video was elected, showing a man tasered in a gaol
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cell. 38-year-old philip core vein died of an allergic reaction. the police had been reduced by the head of the authority. now a former investigator tells al jazeera he was fired because he spoke up about how investigations took place. >> reporter: when lorenzo joined i p.r. a in 2008, the work was straight forward. >> we'd go to the scene of the shooting and investigate. we'd get what is known as a walk-through by the officer-in-charge. later came the interviews and the officers and witnesses. davis claims i p.r. a was, as the name says, independent. when scott ando took over of administrator. ando and others had backgrounds
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in the drug enforce. agency. >> when they came in. the culture changed into one where there was a distinct towards police officers. it become not independent at all. it was like an arm. chicago police department. >> davis says on half-a-dozen police-involved shootings, he felt the officers used excessive force. i was told to change the name of my cases. >> in july davis was fired from his $92,000 a year job, and was told it was because of a marginal force. davis didn't buy it and is suing the city. >> ipp ra was born in 2007, in the fallout from this video showing an off-duty cop beating
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a female bartender, costing the officer and the police superintendent jobs. and cost the city 900,000 for settlement. a federal judge criticised a code of silence among cops. the city's office of professional standards which was the investigating body was criticized for its handling of the case. it was replaced by ipp ra. ipp ra has been under fire. >> the attorney for the family of ronald johnson said ipp ra never interviewed the officer that did the shooting. sunday night, scott, the chief that fired davis, resigned. monday, rahm emanuel named a replacement. >> i promise you i bring no agenda other than the pursuit of the integrity and transparency in the work that ipp ra does. this is what the chicago
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brethren reserve and the citizens demand. >> as for davis he agrees. he also says he thinks there was a cover up. and disagrees with the decision not to charge the officer. a decision announced on monday. davis says there's no rule saying a police officer can't shoot an armed officer in the back as he's running away. if the officer felt the officer was a threat. >> if it's not necessary to kill a person, why would you. this morning washington and oregon are pounded with rain. port land has so much water sewers are overflowing. in western washington major rivers are close to spilling over. it started over the weekend and continued throughout the week. >> raising the question - will
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they catch a break. >> not in the future. we have round after round coming in. part of it is the pineapple express. of the moisture extends to hawaii. in the earlier frames, you may see the funnel of moisture. you can see the next system behind what we have now. we'll have persistent moisture, a couple of breaks. today you see the area where we have that moisture. a little more from yesterday, washington, oregon, getting into california. for the next couple of days, that is where some of the other amounts, six inches or more. rain is the biggest threat lending to the area we were talking about flooding, and areas with fires, landslides, mudslides still a risk. that is not the only thing we are worried about, as the
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systems come in, some of the wind gifts could, unto itself cause damage, because of snow. we are looking at avalanche warnings, and know through the sierra could get over two feet as the next round moves in. >> nicole mitchell, thank you not the rain, smog in china, blanketing beijing. residents told to say indoors, the schools are closed, there's limits on cars, factories and construction sites. despite those measures, the smog remains, continues slightly wetter today than the day before. you can't see it you wonder if it affects the changes in the clean deal. >> ahead - resettling catholic refugees. >> why some much brought to
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america despite trying to stop them. sure, tv has evolved over the years.
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it's gotten squarer. brighter. bigger. it's gotten thinner. even curvier. but what's next? for all binge watchers. movie geeks. sports freaks. x1 from xfinity will change the way you experience tv. tand that's what we're doings to chat xfinity.rself, we are challenging ourselves to improve every aspect of your experience. and this includes our commitment to being on time. every time. that's why if we're ever late for an appointment, we'll credit your account $20.
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it's our promise to you. we're doing everything we can to give you the best experience possible. because we should fit into your life. not the other way around. the first thing a president does when he or she takes the oath of office is to swear on oath to preserve, protect and defend the constitution of the united states. and the fact is that what donald trump said yesterday disqualifies him from serve as president. >> the white house press secretary is not the only one upset about donald trump's call to ban muslims coming to the u.s. from the speaker of the house to the head of the republican party, the g.o.p. is making an effort to distance themselves from donald trump
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some condemn the call to allow muslims to come to the u.s., others are angry. this is not the first time rhetoric reached the campaign trim. >> in the wake. i.s.i.l. rampage in san bernardino, and amidpublic concerns that more attacks are coming. appeala urged americans not to overreact. >> freedom is more powerful that fear. >> soothing fear about violence can be difficult. 24 hours later donald trump went the other way. >> we could be politically correct or stupid. it will get worse and worse. >> as dramatic ace trump's rhetoric may seem, in this campaign, the exploitation of fear has been going. >> i want surveillance of certain mosques, if that's okay. i want surveillance. we had it before, and would have
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it again. >> i would not advocate that we put a muslim in charge of the nation. >> some analysts point out that in the early republican nomination contest the sentiment could be beneficial. >> in states like iowa and south carolina, where you have a lot of white evangelical christians, a lot are likely to be among the voters suspicious of islam not just as, you know - not just islamic terrorists, but the religion has a hole. >> after 9/11, the bush administration sold america on a war against iraq, by warning of potential attacks on the u.s. homeland involving weapons of mass destruction. >> we don't want to smoking gun to be a mushroom cloud. we cannot wait for the final proof. a smoking gun that could come in the form of a cloud. >> during the swathe presidential campaign on
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60 minutes, democrats hillary clinton seemed to stoke false claims about pam ape's faith. >> -- president obama's faith. >> no, there is nothing to base that on. as far as i know. >> reporter: clinton tried to ratchet up fears particularly about president obama's experience. most likely in this ad. >> it's 3:00 a.m. and you and your family is asleep. the phone is ringing in the white house, your vote will decide who answers the call. >> reporter: fear can go both ways and donald trump faces a rush can establishment arguing americans have reason to fear him. rick is an historian and correspondent for the national spectator, and the author of nixonland, the rise of a president and a fracturing of the americans. he is in chicago.
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it's the age old saying, if it looks like a duck, it is a duck. for many, they are coping, some say he is racist and others that he is sexist. he is the front runner of the republican party. is the true face of the g.o.p. donald trump. >> reporter: well, this has been a long time in coming. the republican party is the party of joseph mccarthy. it dwarfs all in the history of man. we had regan who stoked fears of welfare recipients. >> you don't think you are tough on republicans. >> well, of course, jed bush is supposed to be the grown up in the room. and he was the guy that said we
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should consider only taking christian refugees from syria. you pointed to the rise of barry gold water in the '60s. he was an outlier, and you maintained that the outlier became the focus for the republican party that we know? >> yes, i have written a history of the conservative takeover of the republican party since the 1950s. it's three books, and every case was seen as extreme. worked closer and closer to the center of the water, donald trump as are was the apatiosis of that. when we talk about segregating americans, not allowing people of certain religions into the country, we are seeing the things you used to see in the
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swamps of newsletters. this guy is the guy that has 36%. 26% more. it's the head of the apart. he is the creation of the party. it's interesting to see the rest of the republican party beginning to wonder whether this creation of theirs has to be distanced from. >> let me ask the question this way, if the republican party keeps donald trump as their nominee, are they in essence saying that the white house is more important than the principles upon which the nation is based. freedom of religion, and all men are created equal. >> what do they say if the republican party keeps trumpt as the referee, is -- pump as the referee. is that the question. >> if they don't dis-invite him from debates et cetera. what is the republican party, is it, you know, millions of voters who tell pollsters that they
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want to be president. and who are voting in february, march and april or the officials sitting in officers at the republican headquarters and elected officials. and that is a problem. if the republican officials do things like dis-invite donald trump from debates, there's a question practically and legally if they keep a gi on the ballot in these states, keeping them from waging. we have a crisis in the governing of two major parties. i'm not sure how the establishment could stop donald trump. a lot of people will vote for him because he's being abused by the elite. >> thank you very much when we come back, dr recommended. >> the controversial paediatric guidelines to test children for adult diseases. >> the word was there, but the
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story was not we'll talk to the man that turned a sugar plantation into the first museum dedicated to the issue of slavery.
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>> i felt like i was just nothin'. >> for this young girl, times were hard. >> doris' years in a racist, impoverished setting had a major impact. >> but with looks, charm... >> i just wanted to take care of my mom. >> and no remorse... >> she giggles every time she steps into the revolving door of justice. >> she became legendary. >> the finer the store, the bigger the challenge. >> welcome back to your world
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this morning. time to look at today's top stories. after 24 hours, the taliban siege on an air base in can't hair, afghanistan is now over, 37 died, including the hostages held. the military saying 10 taliban fighters were killed. investigators are now trying to figure out how attackers managed to get through security. >> the couple that carried out last week's mass shooting in san bernardino may have used an on line loan to buy weapons. the pair got a loan for $28,000 in the weeks before the attack. they obtained it through the website prosper. >> global outrage is growing against donald trump and that call to ban muslims from coming into the u.s. an on line petition in the u.k. demand parliament ban him from coming into the country now has more than 100,000 signatures. legislatures there have to take up the matter. >> one of donald trump's business partners in the middle east appears to be breaking ties with him in the wake of his aptly muslim contents.
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lifestyle is based in dubai. the radio tailor is removed trump products from outlets across the mideast, north africa, pakistan and tanzania. the c.e.o. said: joining me now is business reporter from mashable. jason, thank you for being with us, good morning. a lot of donald trump's profits reportedly come from his licensing business, basically him tacking his name on to buildings, on to golf courses. according to the financial times, he gets just in one example between $1 million to $5 million a year for licensing his brand into istanbul, a muslim majority country. are we talking about a lot of licensing products? >> in the grand scheme of his big business empire, not really. he puts his net worth at around
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$10 billion. bloomberg puts it closer to $3 billion. it's a part have it and i don't think anybody's going to turn their back on that kind of money and certainly because trump's brand name is synonymous with his business, anytime people desert that, it kind of hurts the core of what he's trying to do, but as far as dollar amounts, it's probably not a big deal. >> can you picture a muslim golfer going to a golf course named trump. dubai has a golf course. we have a picture of property owner standing with trump, calling him friend. >> people will talk a big name but when it comes to breaking ties or giving up on business
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deals, it can take a lot to stop that. trump seems to be pushing people that way. somebody bonn donning a deal, like his furniture business, a relatively small part is symbolic where this is headle. if he keeps this up, and the trump brand name is damaged, what's the point of being in business with him. >> has it been damaged in some quarters already? >> obviously the dam is done right now, but thee months and three years down the line we'll see if people feel this way or if it's a footnote of his already storied history. >> this is trump and his wife and his business partner at that do you think he put this into his business interests at all when he made comments about muslims? he did lose a lucrative deal with univision making comments about mexicans. >> i think it's more of a sense
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that he's probably all in on the presidency right now. it seems donald trump is not the most famous person in america. he is the most recognizable person in the united states. i think he recognizes there's value to that, no matter what, what happens, the attention he has accrued by saying these things and getting into this race is going to be a net positive, at least he thinks so. >> even in terms of profits. >> i think there's a good chance of that, yeah. >> jason, business reporter from mashable, thanks for your time. >> a fight between security and foreigners arriving playing out. a charity has settled some in two states. >> the governors of texas and indiana were among dozens of state leaders who vowed their states would refuse any new syrian refugees after the september 13 paris attacks. >> i have no higher prior to
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than the safety and security of the people the state of indiana and i'm going to continue to uses the authority that we have to take a stand. >> catholic charities has taken its own stand. tuesday, the group helped settle a syrian family of six in houston, another family of six in the dallas area, and a family of four in indiana. indianapolis archbishop joseph toe bin declined al jazeera's request for an interview but said in a statement: i'm disappointed with the decision by catholic charities. >> indiana governor mike pence asked the archbishop not to resettle any syrian refugees in his state but now will lou the family to take advantage of state services, despite his
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order barring state agencies from helping. >> this is not about families or catholic charities. this is about an administration and a congress that should take decisive action to pause this program and review it to ensure that we can go forward. >> in texas, a lawsuit challenging the resettlement is making its way through the courts, but that state dropped its demand or immediate injunction barring any syrians from being brought there. >> while governors expressed concern about syrian refugees not being properly vetted, it's important to note that family that's moved to indiana has gone through two years of security checks. they moved to indianapolis because they have family already living there. >> in fact, some go through three years. we understand one governor now joining a new effort to stop refugees from coming to the u.s. >> del, under federal law, states have no power to block the refugees, but on tuesday,
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just as two families were settling into his state texas governor joined with ted cruz to announce a bill that would give states the right to turn away any refugee they believe to be security risks. obviously the passage of that bill into law would give states the power they lack right now but of course that faces an uncertain future in congress. >> that would run up against international law. >> absolutely. >> thank you. >> this morning, affirmative action is once again on the docket at the supreme court. the justices for a second time will hear the case of a white student claiming she was denied admission to the university of texas because of her race. we have this report. >> which race have been front and center on campus this fall from the ivy league to the heartland. now, before the u.s. supreme court, a key question in the debate over college diversity.
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>> whether tax tear funded universities can consider race among factors in putting together an incoming class. >> the case was brought by abigail fisher who applied to university of texas in 2008. she claimed the pro diversity admissions policy violated her right to equal treatment. >> i was taught that any kind of discrimination was wrong and for an institution of higher learning to act this way makes no sense to me. >> u.t. admits texas high school grads in the top 10% or so of their class. >> but it's not just any university. >> fisher fell just below that bar. some 25% of admissions set aside for holistic review where talents to family circumstances are considered alongside academics. one of those criteria is race. >> there aren't any quotas or targets, so it's not affirmative action in the sense a lot of
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people think bit. it's a much more holistic approach to admissions to make sure that you get a class that's reflective of the community that you're trying to serve. >> the u.t. student government calls that die serious city a central part of higher learning. >> that's not to say anyone is smarter than another, people come from all back grounds, but as a university, it's important to have people from across the spectrum to build a better view of the world. >> the case went to court in 2013 after the fifth circuit court of appeals ruled against fisher. the high court didn't settle the issue. sending the case back to the circuit for a second look. that court against ruled against fisher, who again has asked the supreme court to step in. >> should you treat people differently because of their race. >> this professor has taught at the university law school for five decades. he said any consideration of race in admissions is
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unconstitutional. >> so you say they have different experiences. so what. do you really think admitting a few blacks with lower scores than the whites that you don't admit with higher scores is educationally beneficial for anyone? i personally don't know how anyone could think that. >> voices on the other side of the argument of no less passionate. >> looking at a historically segregated university. >> the director of the texas civil rights project in favor of affirmative action to level the educational field spoke to us. >> we need to acknowledge that the way we have structured the education system has this baggage, just to focus on that one moment of walking in the door of the college isn't true to the whole history that comes before that. >> round two of arguments on fisher versus u.t. is scheduled for wednesday. al jazeera. >> the supreme court is also considering another politically contentious case, the principal
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of one person, one vote. tuesday justice heard arguments in a voting rights case from texas. that state's current is it draws up voting districts based on population count, but the lawsuit challenges that, saying only eligible voters should be counted. >> texas did not engage in discrimination. what it did was provided fair representation by ensuring that an equal number of residents were in each district. >> opponents argue if the plaintiffs win, power will shift from cities to more rural areas where voters tend to be older, white and republican. members of the congressional hispanic caucus said that could reduce the influence of the growing latino community. steve sarkisian was fired back in october, he was on his way to an alcoholism treatment center. instead of helping him with his disability. he says the school kicked him to
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the curb. he said the school owes him $12.6 million. u.f.c. said we are profoundly disappointed an how mr. sarkisian has -- the fact and we intend to defend these claims vigorously. >> there are unfortunately warm temperatures in much of the nation today. >> it's december. when you have temperatures in the 60ed all the way through parts of montana, yeah, we have definitely a warm weather pattern out here. what we have is these systems coming in the northwest even with that. so far there hasn't been a lot of cold air with those systems. seattle is 52. ahead of that, you get that southerly flow and especially portions of the northern plains very warm today. even in minneapolis, it looks warm, but that is still a couple of degrees above average for this time of year and another warm up up the east coast. it's in between weather systems we are having those warm ups.
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one of the most profound ones through portions of the midwest, denver at 66, over 20 degrees above average and we see more of the same into the day tomorrow. that will hang with us for a couple of days, those mild temperatures, it's falling in between systems that we have a little warm yum, a little bit more average with this light area of rain moving through the midwest and great lakes and then ahead of that, another warmup for portions of the east coast. with all of this going on, we have areas of fog. can't see it on the radar, but places like the coast of the accident this morning, it is going to be a slow go. >> it is balmy in new york. >> not too bad. >> there is still plenty of time for winter. >> we'll get there. >> chipotle says norovirus was to blame for the illness affecting at least 80 boston college students. they had all eaten at a chipotle near campus. the fast food chain is already dealing with an e-coli breakout
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that hit nine states. >> the c.d.c. saying the number of infant deaths falling 2% last year. that is a 13% decline over 10 years. they say there is still room for improvement. infant mortality rates in the u.s. are still about 50% higher than any other developed country, including finland and sweden. the american academy of pediatrics is out with new guidelines for children's checkups. it calls for screenings more often than adults. >> the recommendations appear in the journal pediatrics, all children, even if they are not considered at risk should be tested for high cholesterol, depression, and h.i.v. the findings are based on years of studies which show that many adult's health issues can start early in life. due to the high rate of obesity in young children, the academy of pediatrics, a u.s. leading group of pediatricians recommend
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children be screened for high cholesterol as young as nine, for depression, the academy suggests doctors start screening children at age 11. this is an attempt to deal with suicide, which has become one of the leading causes of death among adolescents. rewards to h.i.v., the group suggests teenagers should first be screened between 16 and 18 years old. the group's finding is based on previous research, showing that one in four new h.i.v. infections are in young people age 12-24. the updated guide lines call for updates in dental health. doctors say preventative testing could save young lives by catching major health problems before it's too lefty. bisi onile-ere, al jazeera, new york. >> a chemical in e-cigarettes is being linked to severe
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respiratory disease. three quarters of e-cigarettes and liquid refills on the market contain a chemical associated with a condition called popcorn lung, a degenerative brown kite advertise that often requires a lung transplant. >> micro beads are closer to being banned from products in the u.s. the house approved a law studies that would stop them from being in soaps and personal care products. they would be phased out beginning in 2007. they can flow into lakes and oceans with fish mistake them for food. >> still ahead, promoting pedal power. >> cycling and groups working to spread the message. plus. christmas carols looking up to the true meaning of the job title. sure, tv has evolved over the years.
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it's gotten squarer. brighter.
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bigger. it's gotten thinner. even curvier. but what's next? for all binge watchers. movie geeks. sports freaks. x1 from xfinity will change the way you experience tv. tand that's what we're doings to chat xfinity.rself, we are challenging ourselves to improve every aspect of your experience. and this includes our commitment to being on time. every time. that's why if we're ever late for an appointment, we'll credit your account $20. it's our promise to you. we're doing everything we can to give you the best experience possible. because we should fit into your life. not the other way around.
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>> later today, president obama and other lawmakers will hold a special ceremony on capitol hill marking 150 years since the abolition of slavery. >> in louisiana there is a museum opening ocean of what was once a plantation to show the reality of slavery. jonathan martin takes us inside. >> it was never in my education, ever. slave, the word was there, but the story was not. >> a self described rich white guy and trial lawyer, john comings said he didn't learn about slavery until he bought a sugar plantation and came across old documents. >> mama sent for us in the fields and toed us to come to the quarters, to the slave quarters because we're going to texas. that's when mama told us that papa couldn't come, because he belonged to another plantation.
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>> comings spent 16 years and $8 million of his own money transforming the 250-acre former plantation into the countries first museum dedicated to slavery. >> people here will say i can't apologize for something i didn't do. i said first of all, nobody's asking you to apologize. we just want you to understand what happens. >> historian serves as the academic director. >> here the emphasis is on slavery. it is our philosophy to focus on the people's whose blood, sweat and tears made all the wealth possible and made these masters very comfortable. >> statues of slave children, in the house, guides talk about house slaves, women separated from their children. you won't find memorials to the family who owned the property. the wall of honor pace homage to
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the slaves they owned. elsewhere on the property, the names and stories of 107,000 slaves brought to louisiana between 1719 and 1820. >> this country was built on the sweat and tears of african slaves and their descendents. we have to know it, own it, not to be ashamed about it. >> comings does own it, along with the criticism that his exhibits are too provocative. >> i have no pride of author ship and don't have the sensitivity of an african-american. >> for comings, the dialogue is the important part, the education, understanding history as a means to move past it and fix the problems the country faces today. jonathan martin, al jazeera, wallace, louisiana. >> coca-cola is apologizing for a christmas ad some called offensive, the video shows sad
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faces of indigenous peoples in mexico. it also shares statistics about how they feel rejected for not speaking spanish. then you see happy, urban youth coming to their town with boxes of coca-cola as gifts. they also work to put up a christmas tree. coca-cola said it did not intend the ad to be innocence active. >> the national highway traffic saves administration said a test is focusing on vehicle survive accidents and keep passengers alive. those changes will go into effect for the 2019 model year. there is a climate change battle brewing in california pitting two wheels against four, pedal power versus putting the pedal to the floor. >> adam smith learned to fix bikes from his father. >> i would find abandoned
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bicycle frames and collect them and take them into my room, a tire here, a spare medal there, and i would just go into my room and i'll spend literally like all day after school just trying to put it together until i finally got one. >> the bike became his outlet web says. >> i would get upset for something would be going wrong at home and i just ride my bike until i couldn't ride anymore. >> now he's teaching his children how to fix bikes at this regular gathering in san francisco called bisi's e poo he be blow, teaching families the skills not just to ride a bike but make it their primary mode of transportation. this isn't just a matter of fun and convenience. this can have a global impact. this organization has a representative at the paris climate summit right now and that's because if everyone traded in their car for public transportation, biking or walking, a new study has found, we would actually hold global
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emissions below 2010 levels all the way to 2050 in major metropolitan areas, saving trillions of dollars in health care and fuel costs. as china gross wealthier, the bike has shrunk between 35%. there are echos of that pattern here in the united states. organizers say it's not just the difficulty of trying to get someone to learn something new or take some exercise. in low income communities, there's stigma attached to riding a bike. >> bicycling is considered something that poor people do. it's something that we strive to get a car, you know, that whole coming of able, of can't wait until i drive, can't wait until i get off the bus. we're trying to make it cool in
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our community, it's for every day use, it's for commuting. it's for weekends. it's for wherever you're at, let's get you on that bike. >> adam smith says the benefits are obvious. >> it has zero emissions. it's self powered, you know, i just think it's a better alternative than polluting the world with gas and fumes. >> this is a very old form of transportation. as we look to reduce emissions and improve global health, maybe bicycles need a closer look. it could be the vehicle of the future. >> a new york trained conductor took his title really seriously when he found yale university's glee club was riding his train. ♪ >> a video of the impromptu christmas carol has gone viral in time for the holiday season. the group didn't rehearse.
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the conductor said this is it for his music career. he's going book to checking tickets. >> with everything going on in the world today. >> it's nice to have a video like that. >> ahead, we're going to talk more about that growing push back against donald trump. why muslims in this country are worried over his call to keep fellow members of the religion out of the country. rebels talk strategy while the u.s. and turkey try to secure the syrian border. we are back in two minutes. >> it's the biggest question out there. >> go inside the groundbreaking research. >> are you ready to have your brain scanned? >> ready to go! >> challenging your deepest beliefs. >> feeling the spirit is very subjective. >> i don't buy that. >> techknow's team of experts show you how the miracles
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of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> can affect and surprise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow - where technology meets humanity.
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>> making america unsafe. the pentagon now saying donald trump's comments over muslims could hurt national security. >> police identify a third bomber in the paris attacks. his ties to the war in syria. even a small number of individuals can do us grave harm. >> tighter restrictions, the house approving new rules for foreigners coming to the u. repairs and emissions, the supreme court considers a case that could affect affirmative
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action programs in american colleges. good morning, welcome to your world this morning. i'm del walters. >> i'm stephanie sy. this morning, the global anger against donald trump is growing. the front cover of today's independence in the u.k. says ban him bottom britain. the british parliament will have to debate the issue after an on line petition calling for the ban collected more than 100,000 signatures. >> trump continues insist he is no big got for calling to stop muslims from coming to the u.s. vice president joe biden said the front runner is on an unsustainable path. he said: >> we have reaction from america's largest muslim community. >> hey, good buddy. >> muhammed said he doesn't have to leave his father's middle eastern bakery in dearborn,
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michigan to feel under scrutiny as a muslim. >> it makes us all look bad. everyone's going to be scared of us now from what two people did or from what trump's saying. >> in the nation's largest muslim community, reaction to donald trump's call to bar muslims entrance to the united states was swift with many alarmed by his tone. >> it's scary, because if he does get elected, it's going to affect us all. >> trumps comments are a stark departure from the ideals that so many here in dearborn believe america stands for. >> america is for everybody, every religion. >> working closely with the community in detroit. >> it dehumanizes us, talking about a database of americans that are muslim, targeted someone solely based on their faith, you are making them less equal to you. >> at a leak and others say
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trump is playing into fierce that muslim will carry out for attacks on americans. scholar said that narrative is unfair and said mass killings by muslims pale in comparison to murders by anonymous limbs. >> white actors, whether sandy hook, colorado springs or any other myriad of situations happening in movie theaters, shopping malls, schools, churches, testifies to the fact that there is a major problem in the united states when it comes to mass killings. the fact that muslims have committed some of those acts is not something that should be avoided or should be dismissed, but one has to take a look at the percentages and see the broader issues facing the opportunity tory. >> communities like these have seen a rise in splits and crimes against muslims since the attacks in san bernardino and paris. >> i'm scared for my family, mother and sisters. >> he doesn't see things getting better any time soon. >> it's all just going to go
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downhill. >> what will you do? >> just keep doing what i'm doing. we can't live scared for the rest of our lives. >> al jazeera, detroit, measure. >> at the pentagon, officials saying donald trump's comments could have a serious affect on national security, saying trump's comments pits the u.s. against muslims. >> we want to in essence take the fight to isil with the help of muslims and others around the world, and anything that somehow challenges that, we think would be counterproductive to our national security. >> in 10 minutes, we'll look closer at the effect of trump's comments on the issue of national security. >> attorney general loretta lynch is criticizing the european union's decision to restrict data sharing with the u.s. and other countries. lynch said a planned e.u. data protection law could undermine efforts to stop attacks.
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the u.s. and europe have discussed data sharing between the two sides in the wake of the paris attacks. >> overnight, investigators in france identifying a third suspect in last month's paris attacks, saying the man who talked the bataclan concert hall was a french national from strasburg. jacky rowland has more from paris. and we're also learning more about the couple that carried out that mass shooting in san bernardino, california. officials are saying that sayed farook and tashfeen malik received about $28,000 in a loan through a website prosper weeks before the attack. it's unclear what the money was for, but investigators believe it may have helped them pay for some of the weapons used to kill 14 people. >> the senate expected to vote over the next few days on new restrictions for foreign travelers trying to come to the
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country, the house overwhelmingly passing that measure on tuesday. as al jazeera's mike viqueira reports, supporters say security concerns were behind their vote. >> in a an often fifed u.s. house, closing a loophole in the law. >> we cannot give people from other countries special access to our country if we don't have all of the information that we absolutely need to ensure that they are not a threat to our national security. >> at issue, the visa waiver program, allowing passport holders from 38 countries entrip to the u.s. for up to 90 days without taking the extra step of getting a visa. it would require people from waiver countries who have been to syria, iran, iraq or sudan in the past five years, since the start of the syrian civil war and the rise of isil, to go through the visa process before coming to the u.s. >> the overwhelming majority of travelers who use the program are not a threat in any way,
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however, even a small number of individuals can do us grave harm. >> backers of the bill point out that 9/11 plotters and shoe bomber richard reed in came to the u.s. with waivers. it was the attacks in paris and concern over the 5,000 fighters who have gone to syria to join isil and hold passports from waiver countries like france and belgium that's galvanized the will of congress. >> there are islamic terrorists looking at our immigration policy aspects to find any way possible to exploit it. we learned that lesson on 9/11 and learned that lesson last week in san bernardino. >> the bill also requires passports to contain a travelers biometric data and for countries to share information about known or suspected terrorists with the u.s. the european union objects to the measure, hinting that tourism to the u.s. could suffer, costs the u.s. economy billions. some civil liberties groups object, calling the new
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requirements discriminatory and too broad. >> i think our focus should be on behavior, not just country of origin. >> those voices were in short supply. >> on this vote, the yeas 407, nays 19. >> the senate could act in the coming days and president obama is expected to sign the measure, making it law in very short order. mike viqueira, al jazeera, washington. iraqi forces have retaken another key district in ramadi. the area has been under the control of isil since may and iraqi forces have been closing in for months. 45 coalition airstrikes last week helped provide cover for the iraqi soldiers. officials say they are dismantling roadside bombs and booby trapped houses making their why to the center of the city. in afghanistan, an investigation is checking how a joint afghan nato air base was
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attacked. the military said it repelled the attack after almost 24 hours of fighting. at least 37 people were killed, including the hostages, the military also says at least 10 fighters died in the assault. two afghan trainee have gone missing from georgia. there is no indication either man is a threat to security. officials have been trying to find them since monday. >> for the first time, russia launched airstrikes from a submarine as part of syria's war. russia's defense ministry said these are images watching missiles from the mediterranean. moscow said the strikes hit isil targets in raqqa, including weapons stores and oil infrastructure. it is the second day of talks for syrian opposition groups, but kurdish groups like the u.s. backed syrian democratic forces say they weren't invited.
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the groups are trying to build a unified front for peace talks with syrian president bashar al assad. those talks could affect another meeting on ending the syrian war ending next week. that is what secretary of state john kerry and u.n. secretary general ban ki-moon talked about today in paris. >> we specifically talked about the process taking operation now and depending on the outcome of both the saudi led conference of the opposition taking place the next day, as well as a few other issues, it's our plan to try to attend have a meeting in new york on the 18th of december. >> the new u.s. envoy to the anti isil coalition says the focus should be on closing the border between turkey and syria to stop the volunteers and supplies to isil. in our to the investigation into the attacks in paris. al jazeera is in paris now with
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jacky rowland. they've identified a third suspect. what do we know about him? >> if you recall, when there was a attack against the bataclan concert hall, there were three attackers when the anti terror police went in, two blew themselves up and the police shot a third bomber. well, it's taken them almost four weeks to identify the body of one of those attackers and the information came in a text message from syria to france. someone sent a message to the man's mother saying your son has died as a "martyr" in paris. now she contacted the police. the police came, took a d.n.a. sample and it was through the mother's d.n.a. that they were able to identify the third attacker who was involved in that attack which killed 90 people. >> jacki, have there been any other updates in the
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investigation? well, one of the main targets of the investigation has been a suspect whose still alive, a man who was accused of participating in the attacks very much involved in the logistics and organization. his face was flashed all over europe to various police forces and overseas, even further afield. he was really the number one wanted man and yet somehow, it appears that he was able to get back to syria, so that has obviously been a setback. the authorities have been carrying out hundreds of searches, questioned hundreds of people in order to try to get the bigger picture of the broader network who were involved in helping the preparation from the attacks and crucially trying to identify other suspects who may be involved in trying to plot future attacks. >> what else have you witnessed as far as the french government trying to prevent another attack like this? >> first of all, within days of
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those attacks, the whole of france was put under a state of emergency and that will be in place now in my the middle of february. also, we see much greater security presence in france and paris in particular. we're talking about targets like locations like transport hubs, train stations, and airports, but also tourist attractions. you see a lot of police and army troops out on the streets. >> jacky rowland in paris, thank you. >> this morning, chicago mayor rahm emanuel will address the city council about the controversy surrounding the police department, talking about police accountability one day after city officials released a new video showing a man being tasered in a cell. 38-year-old phillip coleman later died at the hospital from an allergic reaction. the officers involved had been cleared by the independent police review authority. portland getting so much water over the last few days, the sewers are overflowing.
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in western washington state, officials say major rivers are close to spilling over. that rain starting over the weekend. it is expected to continue throughout the week and nicole mitchell, when does it stop? >> the least through the end of the week, we are looking at this wet pattern. portland, this has been an unusual pattern. not only have we been so wet that we set record rainfall, but yesterday, portland, one of main cities that set record rain and record temperatures, because this has been more of a southerly flow bringing in the pineapple express when moisture extends back to hawaii, but we're also now going to get another system coming in. you can see it on the final games, the next one, crueler air with that. i guess if you have to deal with the rain, i would have it on the warmer side than the cold penetrating rain. we devil have got more of that warm rain today, temperatures on average spreading into northern portions of california. we've gotten so much recently
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that not only do we have the flooding concerns, we have had reports of landslides. more of that could be on the way and some rivers in western washington especially are cresting between today and tomorrow, so a lot of flood concerns. heaviest rain into northern portions of california, but still that whole court line getting it and we get interior and the one system that's pulling in high winds, some of this parts of montana could see winds over 80 miles an hour, that's greater than hurricane force for pores of the sierra as this moves interior, one to two feet of snow not out of the question, so a lot of different things. as i said, this is a current round, we get a brief break not even a day and another one right in behind this so no end in the near future. >> i keep thinking how great the ski's going to be. >> if you can get there through all the rain. >> nicole mitchell, thank you. the u.s. and cuba wrapped up talks overcompensating americans who lost property during the cuban revolution.
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the u.s. said cuba owes up wards of $8 billion for property confiscated after the 1959 revolution but cuba said it is owed $121 billion for damages caused by the 50 year economic embargo. another round of talks is expected next year. >> the former commander of gitmo's top secret camp seven defending her decision to use female guards with muslim prisoners. the former commander said there was a shortage of guards with proper training. she was testifying as part of a pretrial hearing for the five men charged in the september 11 attacks. the military is trying to ban using those guards to handle female prisoners. >> a danger to national security. >> why the pentagon is to worried about proposed bans on muslims saying it could help isil. the supreme court considers whether race should be a factor in deciding who's in and whos out in college admissions.
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>> more now own donald trump's call to ban muslims from coming into the country. it is drawing strong rebukes here and overseas. >> al jazeera's jami macintyre reports. >> they can never, ever, ever come back. it's over. >> at the white house, donald trump's anti muslim rhetoric was portrayed at tap mount to aiding and abetting the enemy. at the pentagon, a spokesman said it would make it harder to recruit muslim allies to battle isil on the ground in syria.
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>> anything that creates tensions and the notion that the united states is at odds with the muslim faith and is slam would be counterproductive to our efforts right now, and total contrary to our values. >> in iraq, trumps call for a total and complete ban on muslims entering the united states has this baghdad shopkeeper shaking his head. >> i think the remarks are wrong, as it increases hatred and rancor versus the west and america and will cause a wrist between muslims and christians there. >> they have no respect for human life. >> while trump's latest remarks drew fire from all sides, president obama said last month, the talk of imposing a religious test on allowing immigrants into the u.s. is giving isil a tactical position.
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>> i cannot think of a more potent recruitment tool for isil than some of the rhetoric coming out during the course of this debate. >> muslim groups are outrage would. >> he and others are playing into the hands of isis. this is exactly what isis wants from americans, to turn against each other. and for that, donald trump and other candidates who are targeting american muslims are doing great service to isis. the ones that we're all find as common enemy. >> jay johnson appearing with a local image about the same time trump was addressing his supporters in south carolina says trumps vilification of muslims is all the more damaging, because it comes not from a fringe candidate but from a front runner. >> when a leading candidate for office proposes something that is irresponsible, probably
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illegal, unconstitutional and contrary to international allow, unamerican and will actually hurt our efforts at homeland security and national security, we have to speak out. >> jami macintyre, al jazeera, new york. >> mike pregent joins us. thanks for being with us this morning. is donald trump someone who is a threat to national security? >> i'm an adjunct, not a senior fellow, you might get me fired. the thing trump needs to know and does know is that the muslims in the intelligence community and military and law enforcement are at the tip of the spear in the fight against terrorism. the people that kept americans loin afghanistan and iraq are muslims. we couldn't have fought al-qaeda and defeated al-qaeda in 2008, 2009 without the me help of sunni muslims and the sons of
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iraq. the thing about trump, this is an opportunity for republican candidates to jump on trump, democratic candidates to jump on trump. i truly believe that the people i've worked with over the last 28 years don't believe that the u.s. reflects what trump is saying. this is an individual who said something he shouldn't have said and it is alienating, but i think muslims across the world know the united states better than that. i don't think this should be any tool for isis whatsoever. >> is that a yes or a no? >> i'm saying donald trump hurts himself, he's not hurting national security. he hurt himself yesterday. the people that know us and have worked with us for the last, you know, 30 years know that trump does not represent our country. you hurt himself. he is not hurting u.s. national security, no. >> we talk about isil but little about what they say and do. how do they convince someone to walk into a conference room or a cafe or a concert hall and open
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fire and why are the people who take up arms against the united states and others so mad and if i can compound that question, what separates them from the person has opens fire at a church or elementary school? >> well, that's the interesting thing. somebody opened fire at a restaurant and that person was a homeless person or released from a psych ward, we would somehow change policy to make sure we were able to put more people in, make sure they get the treatment they need but once that person is labeled a lone wolf or terrorist, isis becomes a completely different dynamic, panics the population. it's easy to get people to do things when there are a lot of examples that you can use. i think the penalty's in action in syria isis is' largest recruiting tool. you show an unwed military male
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children being barrel bombed by syria saying the u.s. doesn't care about the middle east, doesn't care about these things. you can get that person riled up and make that person feel justified in what he's doing based on what he sees, an innocent child killed by a dictator like assad, the international community doesn't light up their building with the syrian flag with syrians are killed and that can motivate a male to do something, you get enough people telling him through the religion that it is the right thing to do. >> why not talk the saudis and egyptians who aren't carrying out the fight. >> why wouldn't this person attack them? >> why is the u.s. the target for not coming total rescue as opposed to others in the region and have a bigger stake in the game itself. >> i think they just have a better intelligence capabilities than we do.
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they speak the language, know the culture, they know who the certain groups or certain cells in their countries are, they monitor them and each case, saudi arabia, egypt, jordan has been able to round up a group that's linked isis whenever they want to. it's always after a brutal killing such as the jordanian pilot, after the christians were killed in the sinai, they're able to wrap up the cell soon after that. they're intelligence are better than ours. that's why they are not attacking these countries, the u.k. in paris, the u.s. are softer targets, we don't understand the language and don't know who's operating in our midst. >> no pal jesus for giving you that promotion, you probably should get it. >> thanks a lot. >> we'll talk more about the syrians push for the american dream. >> one organization defies state ban on refugees.
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a record number of americans can't pay their rent trying to make ends meet after that recession.
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>> images matter. >> innovative filmmaker, spike lee - on his controversial new movie. >> the southwest side of chicago is a war zone. >> taking on the critics. >> and another thing... a lot of the people have not seen the film. >> and spurring change through his art. >> we want this film to save lives. >> i lived that character. >> we will be able to see change.
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a senate committee talking about new restrictions on foreigners coming into the country. the house passing changes to the visa waiver program tuesday. those changes will force people who have been to iran, iraq or sudan to go through extra screenings. a third bomber has been identified in the paris attacks. the man who attacked the bataclan concert hall was from strasburg, trained in syria in 2013. he and two other men all french are belgian citizens died on the night of the attack. after 24 hours, the taliban seen on a base in kandahar is over. 37 people have been confirmed dead, including hostages. the military saying another 10 taliban fighters died, as well. investigators are trying to figure out just how those attackers managed to get through security. >> donald trump is pushing back on fellow republicans and outrage over his proposed ban on
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muslims. >> trump seems to hint if he is shunned by the party, he could always run as an independent. david shuster reports despite the anger directed at donald trump, this is not the first time political campaigns have turned to extreme rhetoric. >> in the wake of the isil inspired rampage in san bernardino and amidst public concerns that more attacks are coming, president obama sunday night urged americans not to overreact. >> let's not forget that freedom is more powerful than fear. >> soothing public fears about violence can be difficult. less than 24 hours later, donald trump went the other way. >> we can be politically correct and we can be stupid, but it's bog to get worse and worse. >> at dramatics as donald trump's rhetoric about muslims may seem in this campaign, the exploitation of fear has been growing. >> i want surveillance of certain mosques, ok?
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if that's ok. i want surveillance. you know what, we've had it before and we'll have it again. >> i would not advocate that we put a muslim in charge of this nation, i absolutely not not agree with that. >> some political analysts point out in the early republican nomination contest, the sentiment could be beneficial. >> i think particularly in states like iowa and south carolina where you have a lot of white evangelical christians, i think a lot of those voters are probably likely to be among the voters who are most suspicious of islam, not just asistic terrorists, but you know, the religion as a whole. >> after 9/11, the bush administration sold america on a war against iraq by repeatedly warning of potential attacks on the u.s. homeland involving weapons of mass destruction. >> we don't want the smoking gun to be a mushroom cloud. >> we cannot wait for the final
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proof, the smoking gun that could come in the form of a mushroom cloud. >> even during the 2008 presidential campaign on 60 minutes, democratic hillary clinton seemed to stoke false claims about barack obama's faith. >> you don't believe that he's a muslim. >> no, why would i? no. there is nothing to base that on, as far as i know. >> and clinton tried to ratchet up public fears about obama's relative lack of experience, most famously in this television ad. >> it's 3:00 a.m. and your children are safe and asleep, but there's a phone in the white house and it's ringing, something is happening in the world. your vote will decide who answers that call. >> the danger for donald trump in this campaign that is fear can go both ways. he now faces a republican establishment that is increasingly arguing americans have reason to fear him. david shuster, al jazeera. >> one of donald trump's business partnerships in the
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middle east appears to be cutting ties with him. lifestyle is a major home decor chain based in dubai. the retailer is removing trump brand products from its 195 establishments across the middle east. national business reporter jason told us earlier here that losing that deal won't mean much for donald trump. >> i don't think that those licensing agreements will turn out to be a big part of his income. certainly it's a big part of it and nobody is going to turn their back on that kind of money and certainly because trump's brand name is so synonymous with his business, anytime people desert that it hurts the core of what he's trying to do but as far as dollar amount isis not a big deal. >> can you picture a muslim golfer going to a golf course labeled trump? his company is developing golf courses in dubai with dumac. we have a picture of its chief
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executive who reportedly is standing by trump, calling him a good friend. are we hearing that money will talk louder than trump's rhetoric on muslims? >> we have seen that happen before, certain types of people will talk a big game but when it comes to breaking ties or giving up on business deals, it can take a lot to really stop that. certainly trump seems to be approximate usualing people that way. somebody abandoning a deal like his furniture business, again a relatively small part is symbolic of where things are heading. if he keeps this up, i'm sure they'll ask themselves if the trump brand name gets damaged, what's the point of being in business with him. >> do you think it has been damaged in some quarters already? >> it is. obviously the damage is done right now but three months or three years down the line, we'll see if people feel that way. >> he said if trump does not end up the nominee i will come up on top in business because his name recognition increased. there is a fight between
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security and helping foreigners playing out in two states with conservative governs saying they will not accept syrian refugees. a charity that has resettled families in bolt states anyway. john henry smith has more. indiana were among dozens of state leaders who vowed their states would refuse any new syrian refugees after the september 13 paris attacks. >> i have no higher priority than the safety and security of the people of the state of indiana and i'm going to continue to uses the authority that we have to take a stand. >> catholic charities has taken its own stand. tuesday, the group helped settle a syrian family of six in houston, another family of six in the dallas area, and a family of four in indiana. indianapolis archbishop joseph tobin declined al jazeera's request for an interview but said in a statement:
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>> i'm disappointed with the decision by catholic charities. >> indiana governor mike pence had asked the archbishop not to resettle any syrian refugees in his state but now says he will allow the family to take advantage of state services, despite his order barring state agencies from helping. >> this is not about families or about catholic charities. this is about an administration and a congress that should take decisive action to pause this program and review it to ensure that we can go forward. >> in texas, a lawsuit challenging the resettlement is making its way through the courts, but that state dropped its demand for an immediate injunction barring any syrians
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from being brought there. >> under federal law, states have no power to block the refugees. texas governor greg abbot joined with presidential candidate ted cruz to announce a bill that would give states the right to turn away any refugee they believe to be security risks. if approved in congress, that would vital international law. >> that's true. does catholic charities in indiana receive any state money? >> they receive state money to the tune of about $3 million, about half the organization's budget last year now. these are federal funds followed through the organization to the state. catholic charities hasn't commented publicly about that and the governor has given no indication that he might cut off the money spigot. the canadian government is gearing up for the arrival of new syrian refugees arriving this week from camps in jordan and turkey. the refugees are the first select since prime minister
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justin trudeau said he wants to resettle 10,000 by the end of the year and another 15,000 by february. time magazine is out with its choice for pepper of the year, german chancellor angela merkel. it cites her leadership over refugees, russian ukraine conflict and debt crisis in europe. the supreme court wading into the debate over affirmative action, the justice for a second time will hear the case of a white student who said she was denied admission to the university of texas because of her race. al jazeera has the story. issues of race have been front and center on campus this fall from the ivy league to the heartland. now, before the u.s. supreme court, a key question in the debate over college diversity. >> whether tax tear funded universities can consider race
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as one among many factors in putting together an incoming class. >> the case was brought by abigail fisher who applied to university of texas in 2008. she claimed the pro diversity admissions policy cost her a spot and violated her right to equal treatment. >> i was taught that any kind of discrimination was wrong and for an institution of higher learning to act this way makes no sense to me. >> u.t. automatically admits texas high school grads in the top 10% or so of their class. fisher fell just below that bar. some 25% of admissions set aside
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for holistic review where talents to family circumstances are considered alongside academics. one of those criteria is race. >> there aren't any quotas or targets, so it's not affirmative action in the sense a lot of people think about it. it's a much more holistic approach to admissions to make sure that you get a class that's reflective of the community that you're trying to serve. >> that's not to say anyone is smarter than another, people come from all back grounds, but as a university, it's important to have people from across the spectrum to build a better view of the world. >> the case went to court in 2013 after the fifth circuit court of appeals ruled against fisher. the high court didn't settle the issue. instead, it sent the case back to the circuit for a second look. that court against ruled against fisher, who again has asked the supreme court to step in. >> should you treat people differently because of their race? >> this professor has taught at the university law school for five decades. he said any consideration of race in admissions is
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both unconstitutional and counterproductive. >> so you say they have different experiences. so what? do you really think admitting a few blacks with lower scores than the whites that you don't admit with higher scores is educationally beneficial for anyone? i personally don't know how anyone could think that. >> voices on the other side of the argument are no less passionate. >> the director of the texas civil rights project in favor of affirmative action to level the educational field spoke to us. >> we need to acknowledge that the way we have structured the education system has this baggage, just to focus on that one moment of walking in the door of the college isn't true to the whole history that comes before that. the supreme court is wrestling with another topic, the principle of one person, one vote, justice heard arguments over redistricting in texas, the
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current system based on population count, something that state's attorney general defended after making his case inside the court. >> texas did not he engage in discrimination. what it did was provided fair representation by ensuring that an equal number of residents were in each district. >> opponents argue that if the plaintiffs win, it will shift power from cities to more rural areas where voters tend to be older, white and republican. members of the congressional hispanic caucus said that could reduce the influence of the growing latino community. many americans say their rent is too high. a record number of americans are spending more than 30% and in some cases 50% of their income on rent. researchers blame falling homeownership rates and better employment prospects for mill len yells for a rental market boom. an aging population also spurring more demand for rented
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homes. much of the country will be unfamilily warm. let's bring in nicole mitchell. >> this is one thing i haven't heard sue many complaints about, 20 degrees above average in some cases, 60's from denver toward billings, even where we have seen the rain in the west coast we saw a number of records set yesterday with reports easily into the 50, places like portland you set records for rain and temperatures. a lot of the country, minneapolis is slightly above average, it's just some places way above average. looking at 65 in rapid city, 66 for denver, 20 degrees above average and we keep a lot of that into the day tomorrow. the system coming on the west coast has got some mild air with it, not the normal cool down and then ahead of that, a warm flow. even where we do have a front in the great lakes, it was already warm so didn't cool it down that
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much, just bringing it a little more to average. >> with everything else going on, warm air influences this, as well, but moisture, clear skies, light winds, fog especially around interstate 10, you might be seeing that this morning and otherwise except for the west coast, a fairly quiet forecast. i mentioned that little system going through the great lakes. that is mostly rain because of the warm air. the next one that will finally pull into the midwest isn't on top until this weekend with the rain. for now, if you've got the warm air, you've got a few days ahead of it, enjoy. >> that fog in some places is like pea soup. >> yes, it is. the man who started the brand north face has died. douglas tompkins was a business tycoon and environmentalists. he had to be airlifted to a hospital following a kayaking accident in southern chile. he spent his time between oh chile and argentina concentrating on conservative efforts in both countries.
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he was 72. >> remembers a dark chapter in america's history. >> we'll talk about a man who spent millions trying to convert the sugar plantation into the countries first museum on slavery. a dangerous chemical that could have long-term effects in e-cigarettes.
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>> the video reaching more than 1 million views on line. >> chipotle is on the defensive this morning, the chain said it was norovirus to blame tort illness affecting at least 80 boston college students. they had all eaten at a chipotle near campus. it is dealing with an e-coli outbreak that sickened people in nine states. >> a special ceremony will mark 150 years since the abolition of slavery. >> in louisiana, a museum opened on thon the grounds of what wase a plantation. it shows the reality of slavery.
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>> it was never in my education, ever. s-l-a-v-e, the word was there, but the story was not. >> a self described rich white guy and trial lawyer, john commings said he didn't learn about slavery until he bought a sugar plantation and came across old documents. >> mama sent for us in the fields and told us to come to the quarters, to the slave quarters because we're going to texas. that's when mama told us that papa couldn't come, because he belonged to another plantation. >> cummings spent 16 years and $8 million of his own money transforming the 250-acre former plantation into the countries first museum dedicated to slavery. >> people here will say i can't apologize for something i didn't do. i said first of all, nobody's asking you to apologize. we just want you to understand
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what happened. >> this historian serves as the academic director. >> here the emphasis is on slavery. it is our philosophy to focus on the people whose blood, sweat and tears made all the wealth possible and made these masters very comfortable. >> statues of slave children help connect visitors to life on the plantation. in the house, guides talk about house slaves, women separated from their children. you won't find memorials to the family who owned the property. the wall of honor pace homage to the slaves they owned. elsewhere on the property, the names and stories of 107,000 slaves brought to louisiana between 1719 and 1820. >> this country was built on the sweat and tears of african
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slaves and their descendents. we have to know it, own it, not to be ashamed about it. >> he does own it, along with the criticism that his exhibits are too provocative. >> i have no pride of authorship and don't have the sensitivity of an african-american. >> for cummings, the dialogue is the important part, the education, understanding history as a means to move past it and fix the problems the country faces today. jonathan martin, al jazeera, wallace, louisiana. a chemical in e-cigarettes is linked to severe respiratory disease, harvard research hers saying cigarettes and refills contain a chemical associated with a condition known at popcorn lung. it often requires a lung transplant. that is used as a favoring agent. agent. in san francisco, trying to
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get bikes to replace cars.
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>> world leaders are said to be getting closer to a climate change deal in paris. these are live pictures of secretary of state john kerry speaking at the paris conference. i apologize, we just loft that feed. president obama is actually making calls to other nations to discuss the potential deal and this morning, secretary of state john kerry said climate changes deniers will soon have to change their minds.
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>> these people are so out of touch with science that they believe rising sea levels don't matter because in their view, the extra water is just going to spill out over the sides of a flat earth. >> kerry said the united states is doubling it's climate grants to $800 million a year by 2020, going to help nations prepare for the impact of climate change. >> there's also a climate change battle shaping up in california, pitting two wheels against four, cars against bikes. al jazeera's jacob ward reports. >> adam smith learned to fix bikes from his father. >> i would just find like abandoned bicycle frames and collect them and take them into my room, a tire here, a spare pedal there, and i would just go into my room and i'll spend literally like all day after school just trying to put it together until i finally got one. >> the bike became his outlet
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he says. >> i would get upset for something would be going wrong at home and i just ride my bike until i couldn't ride anymore. >> now he's teaching his children how to fix bikes at this regular gathering in san francisco called bisi's el pueblo, teaching families the skills not just to ride a bike but make it their primary mode of transportation. this isn't just a matter of fun and convenience for the people that are here. this can have a global impact. this organization has a representative at the paris climate summit right now and that's because if everyone traded in their car for public transportation, biking or walking, a new study has found, we would actually hold global emissions below 2010 levels all the way to 2050 in major metropolitan areas, saving trillions of dollars in health care, manufacturing and fuel costs.
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as china grows wealthier, the bike fleet has shrunk between 35%. there are echos of that pattern here in the united states. organizers say it's not just the difficulty of trying to get someone to learn something new or to take some exercise. in low income communities, there's often stigma attached to riding a bike. >> bicycling is considered something that poor people do. it's something that we strive to get a car, you know, that whole coming of age, of can't wait until i drive, can't wait until i get off the bus. we're trying to make it cool in our community, it's for every day use, it's for commuting. it's for weekends. it's for wherever you're at, let's get you on that bike. >> adam smith says the benefits are obvious. >> it has zero emissions.
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it's self-powered, you know, i just think it's a better alternative than polluting the world with gas and fumes. >> this is a very old form of transportation. as we look to reduce emissions and improve global health, maybe bicycles need a closer look. it could be the vehicle of the future. jacob word, al jazeera, san francisco. coca-cola is apologizing for a christmas ad some call offensive. >> the video show sad faces of people in mexico, sharing statistics of how they feel rejected for not speaking spanish. then you see the happy people,le young people coming to their town with coca-cola as gifts. they put up a christmas tree. coca-cola said it did not intend for the ad to be offensive. coming up, more on the attack at an air base in afghanistan that left at least 37 people dead. >> your world this morning back tomorrow morning beginning at 7:00 a.m. check us out at aljazeera.com.
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at least 37 die in a taliban attack on an airport in afghanistan, civilian hostages are among those killed. hello, you're watching al jazeera live from doha. alleges in the next 30 minutes, hundreds of rebel fighters and their families are allowed to leave the syrian city of homs after a brutal two year siege. police in france identify the third attacker during the ta

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