Skip to main content

tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  December 11, 2015 7:00am-9:01am EST

7:00 am
defendant is guilty of the crime of sexual battery. >> abuse of power, a former police officer convicted of raping more than a dozen women while on duty. >> tonight they step off the plane as refugees but they walk out of this terminal as permanent residents of canada. >> early morning welcome to canada by the prime minister as refugees arrive in toronto. clues and combing the bottom of the lake for the san bernardino shootings. a tornado touchs down in washington state. ♪
7:01 am
a former oklahoma city police officer is now facing life in prison after being convicted of sexual assault including rape and welcome to your world this morning i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm in for del walters and daniel preyed on a dozen of women using his badge to victimize them while on patrol. >> and we have the story. >> reporter: on his 29th birthday daniel found out he will spend the rest of his birthday behind bars. >> guilty of the crime of sexual battery and sets punishment at eight years. >> reporter: ex oklahoma guilty of rape and 14 other counts and facing 36 criminal counts in total. >> defendant guilty of the crime of oral sodomy and punishment is
7:02 am
set at 20 years. >> reporter: they said he used his position of authority to sexually abuse 13 african/american women while on du duty. >> in our neighborhood and warning no one to look at them, i believe justice was served. >> reporter: all accusers were african/american women from the low-income neighborhoods he patrolled and a former star college football player is white and asian. he was an all white mostly male jury who returned the guilty verdicts and recommended penalties up to 263 years in prison. >> the african/american community i'll say this to them as well i appreciate you trusting us and standing down and making sure nothing foolish happened during the investigation of this case and during the trying of this case. you trusted us and we appreciate that, the oklahoma city police department did the right thing and so did we. >> the latest police officer
7:03 am
nationwide to lose his badge for sex crimes. the associated press says over the last six years a thousand officers have lost their jobs sentencing in this case has been set for january 21st and the judge will decide that day whether he will face those 263 years consecutively or whether the sentences will overlap. >> how did the oklahoma city police department react? >> the department put out a statement saying that it firmly believes justice was served and he was fired in 2014 and back then the chief of the city called it the greatest abuse of police authority he witnessed in his 37 years as a member of the agency. >> john thank you. in louisiana two police officers have been indicted in the shooting death of a six-year-old boy last month and derrick and greenhouse are facing murder charges, the boy jeremy was sitting in the front seat of his father's truck when stafford and greenhouse opened fire and officers said at the
7:04 am
time the father tried to run them over as they were trying to serve a warrant and authorities have not released any more details about what they believe really happened. more protests planned in chicago today and they will meet at city hall demanding that mayor emmanuel resign and angry over the shooting death of mcdonald by police officer last year. on thursday 100 medical students laid on the sidewalk for 16 minutes, that is one minute for each of the bullets that hit mcdonald. emmanuel has apologized for how that shooting was handled but says he will not step down. next week al jazeera takes an in-depth look at chicago from local politics to the financial divide, a series five days in chicago starts monday right here on al jazeera america. more people are dead after a medical helicopter crashed in california and it was on its way to a hospital in bakersfield and there was heavy fog and rain in the area but it's not known
7:05 am
whether the weather caused the crash, the dead include a pilot, a nurse, a par medic and the patient on board. more than a dozen syrian opposition groups agreed to take part in u.n. sponsored peace talks with the syrian government. more than 100 representatives of syria's armed and political opposition groups put out a joint statement saying they will go to the talks next month and they insist that president bashar al-assad has to step down at the start of any transition period and the u.s. state department says it we comes news of the agreement. after years of waiting, screenings and processing the first group of syrian refugees to be resettled in canada as part of a new government plan has arrived in toronto and families got a warm welcome this morning at the city's main airport and a major canadian newspaper is greeting the group in english and arabic with the canadian flag flying in the background and robert ray reports. >> reporter: it was late thursday night when 163 syrian refugees arrived in toronto and
7:06 am
the long journey from the war-torn country was finally over. unlike some areas of the united states and many other countries syrian refugees are being warmly welcomed in canada. >> this is a wonderful night where we get to show not just a plane load of new canadians what canada is all about but get to show the world how to open our hearts and welcome in people who are fleeing extraordinarily difficult situations. >> reporter: in resent bloomberg poll nearly 65% of canadian citizens support syrian refugees taking up a new life here in canada. that is compared to just 27% in the united states. it took hours to process the group. the first of 25,000 refugees to enter the country by february of next year. he runs a sponsorship program in
7:07 am
toronto. to those that say, you know, these are people that are coming in to canada or the u.s. that we really don't know a lot about, we are afraid, what do you say? >> well, it goes right back to that us versus them mentality. i think it's important that we don't play into the hands of these terrorist organizations because that is a tactic they use, the fear and divide. more than 5700 miles from home and a world apart the syrians have a chance at a new life in a country where they now have status as permanent residents, robert ray, al jazeera, toronto. pentagon says the u.s. led coalition against i.s.i.l. has killed the group's financial head. >> we recently conducted strikes against three leaders in i.s.i.l.'s financial and leadership network. their removal will degrade i.s.i.l.'s ability to command and control troops and disrupts their ability to finance their
7:08 am
efforts. >> reporter: abu-saleh is the third official killed in the past three months and pentagon says they killed two other i.s.i.l. operatives. investigators said to be expanding their probe into the san bernardino shootings looking at more people connected to the couple that killed 14, police and federal authorities are now taking a close look at a lake still searching for evidence. a week later and a new lead in the deadliest mass shootings since new town and searching the lake at the scene of the rampage. >> the reason we are here searching this lake today is because we did have a lead that indicated that the subjects came into this area. we are seeking evidence of anything that had to do with this particular crime. >> reporter: officials also urged patients for the people in the community. >> this investigation as i've mentioned many, many times is massive. and that is going to take time
7:09 am
so i know it's a little bit of a disruption to the area, it would not be uncommon for us to do neighborhood canvass. >> reporter: as this unfolds the focus intensifies on the couple behind the massacre, syed farook and tashfeen malik who the fbi says appear to have been radicalized before they met. earlier in the day f.b.i. director james comey briefed lawmakers of the status of the investigation. >> the f.b.i. can keep it but no it's a dangerous world. and the f.b.i. is conducting a thorough investigation and it's far from over and we are not going to leave. >> reporter: investigators have not found any direct links between the couple and any violent groups. according to reuters in months before the attack the couple tried and failed to contact armed islamic groups and the groups ignored them the report says, probably because they were afraid of being caught in a u.s.
7:10 am
government sting. meanwhile investigators are continuing to monitor the role, if any of marquez, syed farook relative by marriage and neighbor and says he purchased two of the rifles used in the shooting. marquez a muslim convert checked himself into a mental health facilities after the shootings and all of this as officials meet with families of victims and those who were injured. >> the emotional and physical scars that were suffered by them will take years to get over and many of them will never get over some of the emotional scars. >> reporter: investigators also believe that syed farook may have been plotting attack as far back as 2012 but that attack was called off when several men were arrested in nearby chino, california on terrorism charges. a new poll shows majority of americans are against donald trump's plan to ban muslims from
7:11 am
entering the u.s. and found 57% of americans disagree with trump but among republicans the sentiment is mixed 42% support trump's proposal and 36 oppose it and frontrunner hillary clinton responded to the latest comments on late night with seth myers and says it plays directly if the hands of terrorists and trump has crossed the line. >> i no longer think he is funny. >> yes, i will say i started feeling that way. >> you know, i think for weeks you and everybody else were just bringing folks to hysterical laugher and all of that but now he has gone way over the line and what he is saying now is not only shameful and wrong it's dangerous. >> reporter: clinton says other politicians and the republican party need to take action against trump and this morning's washington posts reports republicans are preparing for the possibility of a brokered
7:12 am
convention next summer and what is when no one candidate has the delegates needed to win the nomination. breaking just a few moments ago a major merger between two giants in the chemical industry, dupont and dow chemical announced they will join forces, this is a deal valued at $130 billion. with that new company eventually splitting in three entities and the deal is expected to face some intense scrutiny from u.s. regulators and this year is on track to top 2007 as the biggest for mergers and acquisition. congress hoping for a few more days to hold off a government shut down, the senate unanimously passed a stop gap budget deal the day before the deadline, and under this plan lawmakers have until wednesday to reach a long-term deal, the bill now goes to the house for a vote which is expected later on today. citidel suspended over an image posted on line and they
7:13 am
surfaced on social media earlier this week and shows cadets dressed in hoods and all white clothing and said it was for a christmas skit and were dressed as ghosts of christmas past. >> i think they know what they were doing and i think it's a shame they did it and pitiful and speaks to the mindset of a lot of people that are still out there today and people like to deny that kind of stuff exists but everything points to reality and simply under scored the reality with an explanation point. >> the pictures are not consistent with the school's values and the school says it is launching an investigation. dozens of homes damaged in washington after a tornado touched down and hit the city of battleground last night about 25 miles north of portland and you can see ripped up trees and took off the roofs of some homes and no injuries reported. >> more extreme weather could be on the way for the pacific northwest, this week that region has been slammed by record downpours and flooding, the storms being blamed for at least
7:14 am
two deaths and al jazeera allen reports from deval, washington. >> heaviest rainfall out of this system is probably behind us at this point but we are going to see more rain into the weekend in the northwest and water like this is not going any where soon. it's not an immediate scientific word for this but this area is a mess. the pacific northwest is drenched a series of storms causing widespread flooding and landslides and power outages in washington and oregon and major roads are under water or blocked by mud and rock including interstate 5 northbound the main transportation corridor. >> this is what was forecasted a strong el nino. >> reporter: the strongest el nino conditions in nearly 20 years, warm water at the equator which effects pacific storm tracks and west coast weather. hard to tell though if el nino
7:15 am
is to blame for the current misery. >> it's really hard to connect specific storms to that. it's part of the picture but it's just a small part. even during el nino years we can have a lot of variability where it can be wet, it can be dry as in my year. >> reporter: some low-lying areas have been evacuated and people forced from their homes by local flooding or rivers spilling their banks. washington governor jay ensley declared a state of emergency. in the river valley outside seattle low-land flooding is a familiar site this time of year but this week is extreme. >> it is bad, very bad. >> reporter: we come across chris rushing helping a stranded driver hub cap deep in water and he hauls her out of the river where she knows she shouldn't have been in the first place. >> it's just difficult, yeah, but i was trying to be daring and go there and then he saved
7:16 am
me. >> reporter: the rain has done much to alleviate drought conditions west of the cascade mountains, federal water experts say and has been a huge help in the dry eastern regions of both states, if this is el nino at work it can be a preview for drought california where it usually has an impact later in the winter. >> they could use our weather right now. >> yes, that need the snowfall and rain as much as the east side does and unfortunately it can kind of be a feast or famin sort of thing and so be careful what you wish for and they might get too much and these kind of el nino kind of patterns flooding then becomes an issue. >> a change in conditions will be hardly welcomed here and a change for the cold would be good news for a shivering tina tupin. >> snow, i would like snow, yeah. it's a little bit easier than this. >> reporter: the storms this week pushing the region past the
7:17 am
annual rainfall average as the soaking wet northwest still a week and a half from winter lives up to its rotten weather reputation. all over western washington and oregon we still have situations like this, roadways flooded out and impassible but the real area of concern in the next 24 hours is the coast where we have high winds, high tides, huge waves predicted and of course coastal flooding in the rivers, allen with al jazeera, outside seattle, washington. it's going to be another day of rain for that area of parts of california are also getting the brunt of the storm and let's bring in metrologist nicole mitchell for more on that good morning nicole. >> located right on the pacific northwest, now the latest system because what we have seen over the last week is system over system rolling in and has not been one big storm but multiple and this is moving more of the rain into central california and that was expected but still definitely not only some heavy
7:18 am
amounts of rain but snow in portions of the see ar-sierra and we have warnings up through portions of this morning and it's a drought area and that is great, the snow pack is beneficial but tricky getting around. you can see the hazards. only of these have diminished from the widespread coverage we had because one system is moving inl interior and see the effect in the rockies tomorrow and in the plains we start to get this system but still there is so much residual moisture and a little bit even more today to add to that that we have the flood concerns but it's really the next storm tomorrow when we will start to get the heavy rain once again so today it's a slight break, i'm not saying the rain is over but not just as heavy so one pushes in and you can really see that spiralling in the atmosphere but we already have one kind of right on the cusp so we will get that break then the next one, that one the heaviest rain will be northern california and into oregon. >> soaked in the pacific
7:19 am
northwest, nicole mitchell thank you. the count down to reach a climate deal. >> negotiators in paris pushing back the deadline as they work through the night. and no fly list, no guns, connecticut denies firearms to people on the federal watch list but will it actually make a difference? sure, tv has evolved over the years.
7:20 am
it's gotten squarer. brighter. bigger. it's gotten thinner. even curvier. but what's next? for all binge watchers. movie geeks. sports freaks. x1 from xfinity will change the way you experience tv. tand that's what we're doings to chat xfinity.rself, we are challenging ourselves to improve every aspect of your experience. and this includes our commitment to being on time. every time.
7:21 am
that's why if we're ever late for an appointment, we'll credit your account $20. it's our promise to you. we're doing everything we can to give you the best experience possible. because we should fit into your life. not the other way around. ♪ and welcome back, connecticut is taking new steps to control the flow of guns into that state, governor dan maloy will deny guns for people on the no fly list and calls it common sense a person considered too dangerous to fly should not be allowed to buy a gun. >> the executive order would add an additional level of protection and require those who apply for a permit to be
7:22 am
screened against government watch lists. that would prevent any one on the list of the ability to purchase handguns, shotguns, rifles and ammunitions, assault represents already outlawed in connecticut. house speaker paul ryan is those opposing the move and says the government puts people on watch lists without due process and that means there is no legal reason to deny them the ability to buy guns. and the white house also says it started working on a new proposal to expand background checks and advisors to the president says the administration is trying to find a way around congress to remove the loophole that allows people to purchase firearms on line without any checks. >> that ready access to guns and that proliferation of violent weapons of war has not led to fewer gun deaths. >> reporter: congress earlier this month blocked an effort to
7:23 am
tighten gun rules. the nra and some republicans are calling the president's latest effort an over reach. a retired detective in nassau county new york and now runs a private security firm and lou good morning and thanks for being with us and the push for advocates is blocking people from the no fly list and first of all they are only people suspected being involved in terrorism, never convicted, what is your take on that, would it make a difference? >> well, i think clearly it would. i think but the problem with the proposal is that out of the roughly 700,000 individuals on the no fly list that they have identified for us, they are reporting that approximately 40% of those, 280,000 of them don't belong on the no fly list. i think the they were able to put in a mechanism that was a little more efficient other than putting former senator ted kennedy on the list it may be helpful. the concept is a good concept.
7:24 am
>> the list is flawed, you are not the only one who says so and 10,000 american citizen are in the mix of some 280,000. what about tighter background checks and the obama administration's attempts to do that through executive action, could that make a big difference, that loophole? >> i think that is very important and i think the polling across the nation has indicated that americans overwhelmingly support that. the exercise that the president is alluding to is one that would close what we call the loophole at gun shows for example or a casual transfer of firearms that takes place at times in yard sales so i think that would be advantageous. >> how easy is it to lie during a background check? >> how easy is it to lie. >> yes. >> this is normally the process when you are subjected to a background check. you fill out a form which is called a 4473, it's a federal firearms form and there are a number of boxes that you need to check, for example the first one asks if you are the actual buyer
7:25 am
or user of the firearm and that addresses what we call straw purchases which is a little bit of what is attached right now to san bernardino county. and they ask you under penalty of perjury at the conclusion to sign it at which point they take your pedigree, name and date of birth and social security number and submit it to the federal government to see if you have been convicted of a felony and if you have you may not vote, you may not own a firearm and if the background check comes back positive in your favor they will allow you to purchase a firearm. >> talk about gun control from a police officer's perspective, dozens of officers are killed by guns every year, last year that number rose substantially, you have been on the front lines are things like increased background checks enough in your view? >> no, absolutely not and we are so polarized on the topic we are incapable of coming to a truthful resolution to the problem and what you might find
7:26 am
interesting is as a law enforcement agent prior to us acquiring a firearm or even being appointed to a position in law enforcement we are vetted differently, in other words, we go through psychological screening, minnesota multi phasing screening and interviews with psychologists or psychiatrists. when you get through that phase we now background check you criminally to make sure you have no criminal history. then you are appointed to the police department or law enforcement agency that you seek employment through. >> my understanding is you believe every citizen that owns a gun should go through that process? >> in light of what is going on today and to help address this mental illness issue which is a common denominator to i would say almost every single mass shooting the ones on the college campuses, movie theatres, shopping malls and the common denominator is mental health and why are we not addressing that? what i find interesting for me to acquire a firearm to protect the society i go through an
7:27 am
intensive vetting process, firearms training, classroom education as far as the use of force which is critical for the public to understand clearly, you walk into a store and you present your driver's license and walk out with the same capacity semiautomatic pistols we have. that is flawed. the problem we have here is everyday is afraid to give ground and compromise. the nra operate from the standpoint the minute they make a concession once you have opened up pandora's box. >> thank you so much for your insights this morning, adam. breaking silence and pow bergdahl walked away from the post and into enemy hands and rebuilding the bayou and how a food is helping to protect the coastline.
7:28 am
7:29 am
7:30 am
>> it's the biggest question out there. >> go inside the groundbreaking research. >> are you ready to have your brain scanned? >> ready to go! >> challenging your deepest beliefs. >> feeling the spirit is very subjective. >> i don't buy that. >> techknow's team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> can affect and surprise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow - where technology meets humanity. >> welcome back to your world this morning. it is 7:30 eastern, taking a look at today's top stories. a former oklahoma city police officer is facing life in prison after convicted of sexual assault, including rape. he preyed on more than a dozen women using his uniform and badge to victimize them while on patrol. he'll be sentenced in january.
7:31 am
>> 163 syrian refugees settling into new homes in canada this morning. they arrived in toronto overnight, they're the first of 25,000 syrians to be resettled in that country as part of the government plan. a second plane is due to land i understand montreal tomorrow. >> investigators are trying to figure out what caused a medical helicopter to crash in california. four died, including a pilot, nurse, paramedic and patient. there was heavy fog and rain in the area but it's not clear this that caused the crash. >> we are hearing from army sergeant bowe bergdahl. a new pod cost is all about him and his case. >> he speaks about his capture by the taliban and controversial prisoner exchange that set him free. we have the details. >> my name is bowe bergdahl. >> publicly recounts his captivity for the first time.
7:32 am
>> how do i explain to a person just standing in an empty dark room hurts? i couldn't see my hands. i couldn't do anything. the only thing i could do was touch my face. >> bergdahl is speaking in interviews on the pot cast sir yell, a spinoff from the popular m.p.r. radio show this american life. he suggests he didn't go awol or flee but planned to go missing a highlight a series of concerns he had to highlight concerns about leadership command within his unit. >> all's i was seeing in afghanistan was basically leadership failure to the point that the lives of the guys standing next to me were literally from what i could see in danger of something seriously going wrong and somebody being killed. >> he popped up at another base
7:33 am
days later, likening himself to a fictional action hero. >> what i did was me saying i am a jason bourne. >> he has the skills of a dangerous man. >> i need to know what went wrong. >> i had the fantastic idea that i was going to prove to the world that i was the real thing, you know, i could be, you know, what -- i could be what it is that all those guys out there who go to the movies and watch those movies. >> bergdahl was set free in may, 2014 as part of a white house brokered exchange for five taliban leaders in guantanamo bay who were sent to live under loose supervision in the gulf state of qatar, which partly owns al jazeera. bowe bergdahl has a clerical job in san antonio texas.
7:34 am
after a three day hearing, the army recommend that he not be court martialed. he is now awaiting a decision. al jazeera, new york. the pentagon is changing what's printed on military identification tags known as dog tags. the metal cards will no longer include the social security numbers of men and women, instead randomly generated 10 digit numbers currently used for i.d. cards. the pentagon said it will help prevent identify theft. in the weeks following the paris attacks, muslim leaders in this country have seen a big increase in threats of silence and actual violence. thursday, the washington, d.c. office of the council of islamic american releases had to be evacuated. officials said they were sent a suspicious envelope with a white powder. the powder was found to be harmless. the f.b.i. is investigating. the imam at the mosque is
7:35 am
virginia said his mosque was targeted. tell us what happened to your mosque following the paris attacks. >> well late at night, we got the news that a young man just about four or five years out of high school threw a fire grenade bomb over the 7r. fence into the premises that caused a lot of smoke and some damage, and passer byes were able to observe him and called him. they called the police and the police is investigating. >> why do you think so that happened. >> people have a lot of anxiety about islam because of the rhetoric against islam calling every crime that's committed by a muslim a terrorist or islamic
7:36 am
terrorism. this heightens the fear among young people and mentally ill people. >> some members of the mosque have had ties to iraq. as an imam, do you think you are doing enough? >> there is no apology for violence or crimes by any community, but so far, i have not known yet nor is it an issue, timothy mcveigh's church, nobody knows it and there are so many others like him that we don't know their mosque or church but when a muslim immediately does anything wrong, you immediately go to the mosque and that's why the mosque has become a lightning rod for good or for bad, definitely that's not good, but we got some information directly from the f.b.i. after 9/11 when they came
7:37 am
to visit with the administration and they showed some i.d. card for the -- one of the highjackers saying that he put the address of our center on his driver's license, and when we look carefully at the license, it was issued september 12, so there's a lot of things that you cannot interpret. there is nothing wrong with defining the terrorists or the attacker or the crime or the criminal, but attaching him to his religion has not been the norm until it is a muslim. >> the question is what are you doing to ease those concerns if you go on line and you read from some white ring bloggers there is criticism of mosques including your own. what do you do to ease concerns? >> what we're doing is what we're doing all along, we're teaching people the faith, serving the people in the
7:38 am
community. we have opened food banks and opening our mosques for the public to come and see. we are in touch with all of our local and national jurisdictional leaders and we are not a closed community. the bloggers have their political agenda and they know that. one of the bloggers could be x, y. or z. who have political agendas like making votes out of our own conferences. all of this is what it heightens the fear of islam. >> opening dialogue always a good start. thanks for joining us this morning. world leaders may be getting close to the finish line for a global agreement to solve climate change. negotiators at the climate conference in paris have been working all night on a draft and have now extended the talks for an extra day. key players including china and india are worried they are targeted over the growth in their industrial economies.
7:39 am
jacky rowland is live in the conference in a paris. i should correct myself. i think we oversold it in saying this agreement was ever supposed to solve climate change. are delegates optimistic a deal with teeth can be reached? >> good morning, stephanie. here there is quite a degree of optimism among participants that there will be a deal. obviously the fine print is still being hashed out but there has been a significant amount of interest on some important points, the key one the temperature. the text as it stands is now saying that the temperature should be kept to well below two degrees celsius above preindustrial levels with a target to aim rather towards 1.5-degree, so that is a very important step forward, particularly for island nations and those very vulnerable
7:40 am
nations who are feeling firsthand the effects of climate change. >> i should translate that, that's about 6.7 degrees foreign. this is not an enforceable agreement necessarily. what are the major sticking points to hammering out a deal? >> one of the main sticking points is the whole question of how you measure emissions and how you monitor progress towards targets. up until now, developing countries have been given greater latitude in carrying out those measurements than has the developed world. one of the big arguments going on behind the scenes here is developed countries are saying -- >> ok, i apologize. it appears we have lost the feed from paris. we'll have much more on paris and the climate change deal coming up in our next hour.
7:41 am
we might as well stick with weather, a major storm is on the move. let's bring in meteorologist nicole mitchell and so many concerns about el niño this year, as well. >> yes, you don't look at one individual storm, but sometimes a pattern. the west coast will see more storms december through february. we've seen some. you don't know this as an individual one as el niño, but looking at the pattern, we'll have a much wetter season and we've lard started to see that. it's been system after system, not one storm. across the northern tier of the country, adam and i were bonding finding out we were both from minnesota. family was telling me how amazing it was to get rain in december instead of snow. this next one is pulling out into the central u.s., so more people will feel the changes. this one finally has colder air
7:42 am
with it. that's going to cause changes, as well. you can see this system. as it pulse out, it taps into more gulf moisture. places like the accident into oklahoma, we could see stronger storms with that. we have enough dynamic even this time of year and heavier rain moving through the central portion of the united states. tomorrow, you can see the rain in the midsection want of the country and the next system coming in to the northwest, so we have a couple of rounds. i mentioned the temperatures, ahead of this, some temperatures 20 to 30 degrees above average especially 60's up the coastline, but we've started to see temperatures drop. denver at 53, by tomorrow, 33 and just a couple of dice ago, we were in the 60's, so we'll definitely be noticing those temperature changes, even though they really just bring us back to normal. >> 40 in minnesota, our relatives will probably be wearing shorts up there. >> rain in southern california, we're not going to know how to
7:43 am
drive in that. nicole mitchell, thank you. we want to go to the west bank now, clashes are erupting right now there between palestinian protestors and israeli security forces. this is a live feed out of bethlehem. friday prayers just let out and protestors are throwing stones and police firing back with tear gas, as well as rubber bullets. you can see one of the israeli security forces there in the foreground of your screen. sings the uptick in violence, at least 105 palestinians and 19 israelis have been killed. louisiana is about to get more than $52 million to help restore the state's disappearing coastline. the money comes from fines paid after the 2010 deep water horizon rig explosion, as jonathan martin reports, one organization is using a louisiana staple to build what's been lost. >> in new orleans french
7:44 am
quarter, it may be tough to find a restaurant where out of theres around on the menu. the oyster how else shucks millions a year. the shell's used to end up in the trash, now they're being recycled and sent back to the see. >> we are at a turning point for coastal louisiana where not taking action is just not an option anymore. >> jenny bird is with the coalition to restore coastal louisiana, collecting tons of oyster shells from dozens of restaurants. they'll end up in wire containers used to build a half mile long barrier reef along the marsh, a partly of the mississippi river delta that has seen significant erosion. >> it knocks down high wave energy and propose land growth behind it by allowing the sediment in the water to settle out. >> they go through a natural curing process, sitting here in piles for months allowing the sun and bacteria to remove any remaining bits of food.
7:45 am
>> shell oil gave $1 million to fund the recycling program. volunteers are also helping. he's watched miles of marsh land his family used to fish on disappear. >> so much has contradicted to the loss of south louisiana, starting over 100 years ago when we leveed up the mississippi river and including dredging oil field and transportation canals. >> the reef should be finished by next summer, a massive project for what may eventually be just a tiny step in saving the shoreline. >> not in my wildest dreams do i think this i shovel a thousand pounds of shells will i save louisiana but with efforts and projects on the books right now with fresh water and headment diversions, we've got a shot. >> jonathan martin, al jazeera, louisiana. for folks on the gulf coast,
7:46 am
they are just concerned about their local environment. >> sometimes it's hard to see the big issue. you've got to focus what's on the ground. bringing war and peace back to the people. >> a cast of hundreds joining in for an epic reading of that classic novel. banned from bag only. largest airlines saying no to one of the season's hottest gifts. sure, tv has evolved over the years.
7:47 am
7:48 am
it's gotten squarer. brighter. bigger. it's gotten thinner. even curvier. but what's next? for all binge watchers. movie geeks. sports freaks. x1 from xfinity will change the way you experience tv. tand that's what we're doings to chat xfinity.rself, we are challenging ourselves to
7:49 am
improve every aspect of your experience. and this includes our commitment to being on time. every time. that's why if we're ever late for an appointment, we'll credit your account $20. it's our promise to you. we're doing everything we can to give you the best experience possible. because we should fit into your life. not the other way around. >> one of the biggest gifts this season is hover boards. the scooters are selling out, but overstock.com has stopped selling the device. the three biggest u.s. airlines banned them, all saying that they are no longer allowed in checked or carry on baggage because of concerns over the lithium battery which could
7:50 am
overheat be explode or fire, as if that's the only danger. >> trying one of those is a dang i have itself. a congress committee is considering new rules to drug pricing control. there's been more attention to the problem as the public is learning more about one drug executive. >> at 32, martin quickly became the poster child of corporate greed when he raised the price of a decades old drug from $13.50 to $750 a pill. he drew the wrath of the public. donald trump called him a spoiled brat. he was accused of price gauging a life-saving drug. the drug is used to treat h.i.v. in cancer patients with weak immune systems to fight a parasitic infection.
7:51 am
in september, he backed down, saying he'd lower the cost. last week at a forbes health care summit, he talked about second thoughts, but not the kind you might think. >> i probably would have raised the price higher is probably what i would have done. >> why? >> i think health carey prices are elastic. i could have raised it and made profits for shareholders which is my primary duty. >> we made a request to speak with him but got know response. the price was discounted to some hospitals by up to 50%, still leaving the drug at $375 a pill. john dixon calls that discount a joke. his organization represents aids drug assistance programs nationwide. last month, he met with ask.
7:52 am
r.scraley joining groups demanding a drop in price in the drug. >> they speculated with patient's lives. they bought a drug they knew wouldn't have competition and held people hostage for it. that's now how we do drug developing and pricing in the u.s. >> he said profits will go to research. doctors say the current drug is working just fine. >> the people who do the kind of work that i do are creative and we're not going to stand by and just say well we're not going to be be able to use this medicine, so people are working on macgyvering workarounds. >> a one dollar alternative is offered by express scripts. the drug itself is not f.d.a. approved buff ingredients are.
7:53 am
>> would we rather have deraprim? yes. if we can't get it, we have to make our own. >> scraley has been taunting critics like hillary clinton, tweeting her, you use my name a lot but refuse to meet with me and come up with a solution. don't politicians have a compromise. >> try to be a c.e.o. yourself and see how it goes. try to max i'm profits and not get kicked out of a company and let me know how that goes for you. >> a new strain of antibiotic resistant e comby in in china and even in malaysia and germany. it cannot be killed by a drug except by a drug of last resort that is used in agriculture in
7:54 am
china. for any length of time, reading war and peace probably gives you an arm cramp. the novel is being read in its entirety on russian television. >> and so it began, both a literary and a broadcasting marathon from moscow, st. petersburg, the arctic circle, from london, vienna and paris. famous russians, ordinary russians, even a russian in space, they are all taking a turn to read for the cameras a page from leo toll stays magnum open pus. a t.v. presenter, a great great granddaughter of toll stay is one of the driving forces behind this project. >> toll stay is uncomfortable, russian society within because he questions a lot of key rules of the -- how society is built. he questions the power, the government. when you read war and peace, the
7:55 am
battles, you understand the idea that more is the awfullest thing in the world. >> it is distributed as not a novel, what hats is epic, overfour volumes it tells the author said interpretation of napoleon's disaster invasion have russia. for the book's fans some of who were chosen to read, the work's historical setting doesn't limit it's timeless qualities. >> the questions he raises are still rely now and the answers, well, russian literature doesn't generally give answers. it asks questions and we're still trying to solve them. >> it feels like he is still nearby, advisedding us on life. in the book, there are simple people and he shows us a chain of mistakes that everyone makes mistakes and we should be able
7:56 am
to overcome them. >> to great fanfare, this reading of war and peace has been broadcast live on russian television, radio and on line. the project's creators call it a democratic event and a unifying one, saying that great literature can bring people together in troubled times, whoever they are, wherever they are. >> of course i couldn't do a report on doing war and peace without having a go myself. here goes. he gripped the pummel, spurred his horse and gathered off under a hail of bullets that poured down on but luckily missed him. he wanted one thing, to find out what wind chills going on and help rectify at any cost. if you want to know what happens next, read the book. it will take four days and four
7:57 am
nights. >> took me longer than four days. international space station crew members are on their way back home. it left the space station after spending 143 days in space. nasa's chief of human space flight said nasa is closer to no longer using the i.s.s., concentrating on travel. they are brainstorming ideas for a space hotel. >> we need to get a spaceship first. >> that would help, right. >> canada stays up late to welcome its first wave of syrian refugees. that and much more coming up. >> i felt like i was just nothin'. >> for this young girl, times were hard. >> doris' years in a racist, impoverished setting had a major impact. >> but with looks, charm... >> i just wanted to take care of my mom. >> and no remorse... >> she giggles every time she
7:58 am
steps into the revolving door of justice. >> she became legendary. >> the finer the store, the bigger the challenge.
7:59 am
8:00 am
>> tonight, they stop off the plane as refugees but they walk out of this terminal at permanent residents of canada. >> a warm overnight welcome for syrian refugees in toronto, canada, how that country is marking its differences with the u.s. >> convicted of rape and abuse, a former oklahoma city police officer could go to jail for the rest of his life. >> they're diving for clues, the f.b.i. scouring a lake where the
8:01 am
two san bernardino shooters were seen on the day of the attack. >> assessing the damage after a tornado that touches down in washington state. >> welcome to your world this morning. i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm adam may. a group of syrian refugees is waking up in canada after waiting years through screening and processing. >> dozens of canadians welcomes the group overnight. they handed out winter coats and canadian flags as the families waited for hours to get through customs and into their new country. al jazeera's robert ray was also waiting there and is live in toronto. robert, good morning. where do these families go now and do they have homes waiting for them?
8:02 am
>> yeah, good morning, stephanie, an exciting day at the airport, especially for the 163 syrian refugees who landed late last night, were processed, got out of the airport at about 4:00 a.m. and they're going to sleep with this jet lag off this morning and head out with private sponsors later today to homes, homes around the toronto area, and over39 communities within ontario, so exciting for them, a brand new life, but certainly last night, full of anxiety as they landed here at pearson international airport. >> it was late thursday night when 163 syrian refugees arrived in toronto, their long journey from the war-torn country was finally over. unlike some areas of united states and many other countries, syrian refugees are being warmly welcomed in canada. >> this is a wonderful night, where we get to show not just a
8:03 am
plane load of new canadians what canada's all about, but we get to show the world how to open our hearts, and welcome in people who are fleeing extraordinarily difficult situations. >> in a recent bloomberg poll, nearly 65% of canadian citizens support syrian refugees taking up a new life here in canada. that is compared to just 27% in the united states. >> it took hours to process the group. the first of 25,000 refugees to enter the country by february of next year. >> he runs a sponsorship prom. >> to those who say that these are people coming into canada or the u.s. that we don't know a lot about, we are afraid, what do you say? >> it goes right back to the us versus them mentality. it's important that we don't play into the hands of he's
8:04 am
terrorists organizations, because that's a tactic they use, this fear and divide, you know. >> more than 5700 miles from home, and a world apart, they now have a chance at a new life in a country where they now have status as permanent residents. >> stephanie, talk about a hands-on prime minister, justin trudeau, just elected a couple of months ago, waiting for these syrian refugees to land, shaking hand and talking to them, a pretty cool moment, if you ask me to see the head of a country standing there welcoming people into canada. >> it definitely makes a statement, robert. you said that these refugee trips were privately funded. what does that mean? >> well, privately funded means there are organizations within the toronto area and around canada that helped these people go through the application process when they were in lebanon and jordan in those
8:05 am
camps that they were awaiting to come over to canada. now what it means when they get here is they transport these people to their sponsorship homes, where they'll be for approximately a year until they can get on their feet. they'll help them get a job, through the health care system, help them simulate into being a canadian as i say send whether with language and schools for the kids, so essentially it is the ultimate helper a family or person that sponsors a family of man, woman and children, to help them really try to dig in to this canadian society and get their flew life going. pretty interesting scenario where you consider that people will extend their hands for a year to help people come in. >> robert ray, thank you from toronto. the u.s. led coalition against isil, the upon the again said has killed that group's financial head. >> in iraq, we recently
8:06 am
conducted strikes against three leaders in isil's financial and leadership network. their removal will degrade isil's ability to command and control troops and disrupt's their ability to finance their efforts. >> it is the third isil financial official killed in the last three months. two other operatives were killed. peace talks with the syrian government, he negotiations will take place during the first 10 days of january, as the group wraps up discussions in saudi arabia, they have put conditions on president bashar al assad. they want him to step down at the start of the transition period. aal jazeera reports from istanbul. >> when the international powers met in vienna in november last month, they've agreed, they've asked the opposition to come up with the united front, so now
8:07 am
the opposition has done so. they've also wanted the representatives of the government of bashar al assad to sit down with the opposition and then negotiate first a ceasefire, then a transitional period. now, this is what they've agreed on. however, they didn't agree on the fate of president bashar al assad, will he stay in power, will he leave his post by the start of the transitional period. this is something that we'll have to agree on. i think as it stands now, the regional powers and national powers disagree on the fate of president assad and mainly russia, iran, they are the main backers of president assad, you have america, you have the saudi's, turks, qataris and others, they want assad gone. it's not only syrian opposition physician disagreeing, but also the regional and international
8:08 am
pours. this is not going to be an easy process. >> the u.s., russia and the u.n. are holding talks today in geneva, trying to set the framework for an international conference on syria next week in new york. clashes this morning in the occupied west bank between palestinian protestors and israeli security forces, protest ears are throwing stones and police are firing tear gas and rubber bullets. since the uptick in violence since the beginning of october, 105 palestinians and 19 israelis have been killed. back here in america, a former oklahoma city police officer could spend the rest of his life in prison after convicted of sexually assaulting several women while on patrol. prosecutors say he preyed on women using his uniform and badge to rape more than a dozen victims. al jazeera's john henry smith has the story. >> on his 29th birthday, he found he would likely spend the
8:09 am
rest of his birthdays behind bars. >> the defendant is guilty of the crime of sexual battery and set punishment at eight years. >> a jury found the exoklahoma police officer guilty on four counts of first degree rape, as well as 14 other counts, he had been facing 36 criminal counts in total. >> the defendant is guilty of the crime of forcible oral sod my and punishment set at 20 years. >> he used is position of authority to sexually abuse 13 african-american women while on duty. all of his accusers were african-american women from the low income neighborhoods he patrolled. a former star college football player is white andation she been. it was an all white mostly male jury that returned the verdicts, recommending 263 years in prison. >> i'll say this, i appreciate you custing us and standing down and making sure nothing foolish
8:10 am
happened during the investigation of this case and during the trying of this case. you trusted us and we appreciate that. the oklahoma city police department did the right thing and so did we. >> he is just the latest police officer nationwide to lose his badge for sex crimes. the associated press says over the last six years, 1,000 officers of lost their jobs for sexual assaults, sentencing in this case has been set for january 21 and a judge will decide whether he will face the 263 years consecutively or whether those sentences will overlap. >> this is a big case. obviously the defense was unsuccessful, what was their strategy? >> most of it seemed to focus on south america the character and fitness of his accusers. many of those women had petty crime records and histories of drug use. also the defense pointed out that the officer had a good record on the o.k.c. police force but those arguments didn't
8:11 am
hold sway with the jury. a former sheriff's deputy in ohio is indicted on murder charges. prosecutors say he shot and killed a driver after a high speed chase in march. he is charged with shooting and killing a neighbor when off duty. he is the eighth officer nationwide to be charged with an on duty shooting this year. family and friends are remembering two more victims of the san bernardino attacks today. a memorial service is planned for the worker in the health department and a county food inspector. on thursday, another was remembered at her funeral. at investigators expand their probe into the shootings here, that left 14 people dead. >> a week later and a new lead in the deadliest mass shooting since newtown, police divers search a lake near the scene of the rampage. >> the reason we're here searching this lake today is because we did have a lead that
8:12 am
indicated that the subjects came into this area. we're seeking evidence of anything that had to do with this particular crime. >> officials also urged patience for the people in the community. >> this investigation as i've mentioned many, many times is massive. that's going to take time. i know it's a little bit of disruption to the area. it would not be uncommon for us to do neighborhood canvass. >> the focus intensifies on the couple behind the massacre, sayed farook and tashfeen malik, who the f.b.i. said appears to have been radicalized before they met. earlier in the day. f.b.i. director james comey briefed lawmakers on the status of the investigation. >> we're as safe as the f.b.i. can keep us, but it's a dangerous world. director comey made it clear the f.b.i. is conducting a thorough investigation. it's far from over and nobody is
8:13 am
certain where it's going to lead. >> investigators haven't found direct links between the couple and any violent groups. according to reuters in the months before the attack, the couple tried and failed to contact armed islamic groups. the groups ignored them, the report says, probably because they were afraid of being caught in a u.s. government sting. meanwhile, investigators are continuing to monitor the role, if any of enrique martez, farook's relative by marriage and a former neighbor. the f.b.i. said he had purchased two of the rifles used in the shooting. marquez, a muslim convert checked himself into a mental health facility after the shootings. all of this as officials meet with the families of victims and those who were injured. >> the emotional and physical scars discovered by them will take years to get over and many of them will never get over some of the emotional scars. >> investigators also believe
8:14 am
that sayed farook may have been plotting an attack as far back as 2012, but that attack was called off when several men were arrested in nearby chino, california on terrorism charges. >> in louisiana, two police officers have been indicted in the shooting death of a 6-year-old boy last month. derrick stafford and norris greenhouse are facing murder charges. the boy was sitting in the front seat of his father's truck when the officers opened fire. the officers said the father tried to run him over as they tried to serve a warrant. authorities have not released details about what they think really happened. in washington state, dozens of homes damaged after a tornado touched down. it hit the city of battleground last night, 25 miles north of portland. the storm ripped up trees and took the roofs off some homes. the tornado was rated an e.f.1, meaning that winds top 104 miles an hour, luckily, no injuries
8:15 am
were reported from this tornado, but residents there, a busy morning cleaning up after that storm. >> that is the same storm system bringing heavy rain and flooding to washington state, as well as oregon. let's bring in nicole mitchell for more on that. >> we've been seeing storm after storm hitting the coastline for the last week. this current one, the severe weather is just an indication how dynamic this pacific storm system is going to be, because that will bring more widespread chance for severe weather to the central portion of the united states tomorrow. in the meantime, believe it or not, flooding takes a lot more lives in general than even tornadoes or some other weather elements. that's a tongue twister. because we've had persistent storms for the last week, we're really sad rated. flooding will continue to be a concern. rain has moved into california and the snow we're getting in
8:16 am
the sierra right now, this is that system. you can already see another round behind it, so more of the heavier rain will come back in tomorrow. we can put that oh into motion. you can see one moving in and for tomorrow, the heavy stuff builds up again. for the next couple rounds, the core of heaviest more into oregon and california, if we look into the next do you days, some of it along the border can get eight, nine, 10 inches, building up more tomorrow. there will be more snow with the next rounds because this current round finally has some colder air along with it, as well. so we'll start to see a little more snow than rain. >> that could be unpleasant. >> marathon negotiations extended at the climate conference in paris. >> the sticking points holding up the deal, which is 20 years in the making. >> guns in america, as president obama and allies work on new gun restrictions, we look at why more americans are getting armed. sure, tv has evolved over the years.
8:17 am
8:18 am
it's gotten squarer. brighter. bigger. it's gotten thinner. even curvier. but what's next? for all binge watchers. movie geeks. sports freaks. x1 from xfinity will change the way you experience tv. tand that's what we're doings to chat xfinity.rself, we are challenging ourselves to improve every aspect of your experience. and this includes our commitment to being on time. every time. that's why if we're ever late for an appointment, we'll credit your account $20.
8:19 am
it's our promise to you. we're doing everything we can to give you the best experience possible. because we should fit into your life. not the other way around. >> good morning, welcome back. world leaders are going into overtime trying a reach a climate deal in paris. negotiators at the climate conference have been working all night on a draft and now have extended the talks for an extra day. jacky rowland has more from paris. >> the document is a lot smaller than the first draft and crucially if you look at what we call the square bracket test, how many words in brackets, the number of words in brackets has gone from 1600 to just 50, so that does indicate that these
8:20 am
areas of controversy and disagreement are starting to be narrowed down. we're going to talk more about issues surrounding the deal and all the various other initiatives going on on the subject of climate change with nigel. he is the c.e.o. of we mean business, a coalition of organizations dealing with the question of climate change for thousands of businesses. i start by asking you straight away, if you listen to a lot of the pressure groups and environmental activists, they say that, is a part of the problem, they're the bad guys always thinking about the bottom line and not about the environment. how would you respond to that? >> well, i think we're all partly of the problem. every country, every citizen, every business is not the problem, it's the way we constructed our global economy, unintended consequences of all of the good that available energy has given to allow development at a great pace. >> thank you very much.
8:21 am
he was talking to us about the angle from the point of view of businesses as we approach hopefully a deal on climate change. >> we should have more information later on today. i want to get into this more with jessica green, an assistant professor of environmental studies at new york university. jessica, good morning, thanks for being with us. they're still trying to draft a final deal. i want to show a picture of flooding in india last week. a major paper in india argues that india's losses and damage from climate change including intense weather change are attributable to the greenhouse gases that countries like the u.s. are emitting. a lot of disagreement is who should finance the impact of climate change. hat u.s. stepped up? >> that's right. this is a long standing argument or debate between the developed world and developing world. the same concept comes up over and over again.
8:22 am
the u.s. is trying to step up. i kerry pledged another 1 million increase in funding to help developing countries deal with climate change. developing countries are telling up. the debate is whether newly developed countries should be required to help fund the effects of claims change. >> the other effect is compensation. some countries want to claim that. here is what an n.g.o. out of south africa said about the last draft. b>> that a fair point? >> well, it is a fair point, but it's not i think politically a feasible point. this is what's called a loss in damage mechanism in the negotiations right now, and there's a very reasonable
8:23 am
argument by especially low lying countries and small developing countries that they are going lose parts of their countries if not all of them and the developed world is responsible for that. the u.s. has produced 27% of all global emissions since the industrial revolution. >> and per capita is still the highest, correct? >> it's up there. i think there's a very valid argument for this. the question is about causality. we can't tie any one specific weather event to climate change. therefore when developing countries claim that this loss or damage is the result of climate change, there's a debate about whether or not that's the case. developed countries don't want to be on the who can for bad weather. >> india keeps becoming the fall guy in popular press. this is a cartoon that ran in the new york times at the start of the talks. it shows an elephant, india sort of blocking the tracks to a
8:24 am
climate change deal. a lot of people have painted india as a spoiler in these talks in the west, but there are 300 million people in india that don't even have electricity yet and they have made efforts toward renewables in that country. is it fair? >> that's an over simplification. india is rapidly developing, the coal capacity that it's installing right now is insane, and that's something to be really concerned about. >> coal is dirty. >> coal is dirty and puts a loss more emissions in the air. we want the developed world, the whole world wants them to develop cleanly and yet india is rightfully saying we have the right to develop, so i don't think it's fair to put them on the hook. they have a difficult, but they're in a difficult position because -- >> but you wouldn't take them total off the hook sounds like what you are saying.
8:25 am
>> i think they need to make commitments to develop more cleanly and in fact they have done that. there was an announcement about a new solar alliance with france and i think they are making efforts. modi spoke on it. >> what are you seeing in the early drafts that this deal will actually have any teeth? >> i think there is a lot of optimism and of course as everybody says, nothing is agreed until everything is agreed. it looks like it's going in the right direction. i don't think teeth is really the issue. the reality is the legal status doesn't really matter, countries are only going to do things that they want to do. we can't chem pell them. we are not going to evade india because it's emitting too much carbon dioxide.
8:26 am
the review america nix is what is important for countries to be transparent about their pledges, review them on a regular basis and then be publicly influenced or maybe even shamed into rash ratcheting up over time. a major merger between two giants in the chemical industry has been announced this morning, dupont and dow will join, eventually splitting into three parties. the deal is expected to face intense scrutiny from u.s. regulators. regulators. the clock is ticking as congress works to avoid a government shutdown. lawmakers say the latest deadline is giving big money way too much influence. bowe bergdahl in his own
8:27 am
words, his story playing out in a podcast.
8:28 am
8:29 am
>> water pressure hitting faults and making earthquakes. >> there were a lot of people that were telling me i need to be careful how i say things. >> how many lives have to be lost? >> "faultlines". >> what do we want? >> al jazeera america's hard-hitting... >> today the will be arrested. >> ground-breaking... >> they're firing canisters of gas at us. >> emmy award-winning, investigative series. >> welcome back to your word this morning. it is 8:29 eastern, taking a look at today's top stories.
8:30 am
163 syrian refugees are settling into new homes in canada. they arrived in toronto overnight. they're the first of 25,000 syrians to be resettled in that country as part of a new government plan. a second plane is due to land tomorrow. >> the state department is welcoming the announcement by syrian opposition groups that they will take part in peace talks with the assad government, but they insist that president bashar al assad has to step down at the start of any transition period. those talks are expected to start next month. a former oklahoma city police officer faces the likelihood of life in prison after convict of sexual assault including rape. prosecutors say daniel holtzclaw used his victim and badge to victimize women while on patrol. he'll be sentenced in john. u.s. congress expected to get something done today and pass a short term spending bill to avoid a government shut down.
8:31 am
>> this is a trillion dollars, hard working taxpayers work hard to send us their tax dollars. we have to respect that. we have to make sure that how we spent the hard working taxpayer dollars are done in a way where we are scrutinizing every dollar and we're not going to russia it. we're going to get it right. >> it already passed the u.s. senate, giving lawmakers until wednesday to make up their minds on the budget and some say they want to wider debate over side items attached to the bill, including a provision that could undermine the consumer financial protection bureau. al jazeera's libby casey has more. >> democrats won the battle to create the consumer financial protection bureau five years ago, but the fight isn't over yet. >> as long as congress is as influenced by the financial sector as they are, they're going to be trying to find a way to keep the cftd from protecting consumers from one thing or another. there's just a lot of money
8:32 am
involved. >> former representative brad miller said it's hard for a politician to buck the big banks that fuel washington and wall street. >> someone elected to congress, even idealistic, the first thing they're told by their port leadership and by everybody in washington is to be respected, you've got to be a big money raiser. >> a top place to get that money, the financial sector. it showers lawmakers with donations. miller said its influence grows and grows to the point we are now a massive spending bill that may get peppered with seemingly unrelated riders. >> washington has become the bridge troll of bills that congress wants to pass. if you want for government not to shut down, keep the national parks open, you've got to give wall street something they want. >> those riders wouldn't stand on their own. >> these are in most cases little more than just earmarks
8:33 am
to specific constituencies and in some cases, the biggest contributors to the republican party. >> one of the most powerful voices against the consumer financial protection bureau is the chairman of the house financial services committee. he called it an unaccountable agency hurting the financial industry. he's a top recipient of donations from the financial sector. open secrets reports that as of september, his campaign had received this election cycle more than 150,000 from commercial banks and he's supported by the insurance industry, securities and investment firms, other financial sectors and real estate companies. he has major support from companies like j.p. morgan chase and the american bankers association. it's not just republicans. the banking sector finds its interests aligned with. new york city democratic gregory meeks has been a defender of the payday loan industry. campaigns to him include from
8:34 am
the security and investments field and donations from the insurance, banking, accounting and real estate industries. meeks gets major support from nasdaq members and goldman sachs. regardless of whether the financial sector rewards members of congress, or congress rewards the financial sector, wall street that powerful friends on capitol hill. libby casey, al jazeera, washington. >> house speaker ryan says that congress will include a 9/11 health bill when it votes on a spending plan next week. comedian john stewart has been leading the fight for the doe ao be renewed. >> if i am elected, and i will be elected, i will build a wall around politics and make politics pay for it.
8:35 am
tweet with the has she to go worst responders. tell them donald said pull up your big boy pants and make america great again. pass the act, congresstogether,dipthemingoldan dwearthemaroundmyfreakingneck. >>stewartonthelateshowwithsteven >>stewartonthelateshowwithstevel dtrump. theacthelpsfundhealthtreatmentfo r9/11firstresponders,themeasure ex theacthelpsfundhealthtreatmentfx piredinseptemberandmoneyrunsout n theacthelpsfundhealthtreatmentfn extyear. takingsteps. >> the as he can order would add an additional level of protection and require those who apply for a permit to be screened against government watch lists. that would prevent anyone on the
8:36 am
list of the ability to purchase hand you know, as to the guns, rivalerivaled and ammunition. >> gun rights advocates say that the government puts people on watch lists without due process. they say there is no legal reason to deny them the ability to buy guns. the white house is working on a new proposal to expand background checks. advices to the president say the administration is trying to work around congress to remove the loop hope that allows firearms to be purchased on line without checks. >> that ready access to guns and that proliferation of violent weapons of war has not led to fewer gun deaths. >> congress earlier this month blocked an effort to tighten gun rules. the n.r.a. and some republicans calling the president's latest effort an overreach.
8:37 am
sings the attack in san bernardino, detroit's police chief has been encouraging citizen to say legally arm themselves. firearms training schools are seeing an increased demand. we have more from detroit. >> gun training classes take place almost every day of the week at some schools and cost $80 to $100. the gun safety experts say since the san bernardino attacks, their training classes have been taxed. >> you can only use deadly force to save human life. >> the class is sold out. >> we couldn't even close the website out fast enough, because people were registering so fast. it's definitely, i'd say at least doubled right now. >> other schools in the detroit area have also seen a spike. this one saw an increase of 30%. this school's classes sold out until christmas. many students say they are
8:38 am
coming out of fear prompted by the san bernardino attacks. >> it's hitting really hard, the sitting home. >> deborah is taking the eight hour class as a prerequisite to get her gun treatment. >> i'm doing it for me. i'm basically alone a lot of times in the house. >> she is also concerned about the possibility of new gun laws being passed following the attacks. larry said with two children and a wife, he thought long and hard before applying for a gun. >> in a situation like san bernardino, i don't think i'm going to jump up and think that i can take out two people with assault rivals with my pistol. it's not really about defending the community at large, but defending myself and my family. >> robert ackermann, a law professor said they may all be chasing a false sense of safety. >> people are more likely to be shot on the streets of a major
8:39 am
american city, or in their homes, sometimes at their own hand, than they are in say the classrooms of a major university, or in the public schools. >> you just don't know it. you're not a fortune teller, you can't predict the future, but it's good to be prepared. >> students are training for the worst case scenario hoping it never happens. >> michigan recently passed a law streamlining the application process for gun licenses and it transfers that process from the counties to the state. it also eliminates in-person interviews with the applicants. proponents of the law the this takes away a layer of red tape. opponents say it makes it easier for guns to get into the wrong hands. al jazeera, detroit, michigan. congressional republicans this morning are accusing the obama administration of misleading congress over the swap of five taliban fighters
8:40 am
for sergeant bowe bergdahl. the republicans say the white house didn't properly notify them about the swap and we're hearing from bergdahl publicly for the first time since his release in may, 2014. >> bowe bergdahl publicly recounting his captivity for the first time since being released by the taliban. >> how do i explain to a person just standing in an empty dark room hurts? i couldn't see my hands. i couldn't do anything. the only thing i could do was touch my face. >> bergdahl is speaking in interviews on the podcast serial, a spinoff from the popular m.p.r. radio show this american life. he suggests he didn't go awol or flee but planned to go missing a highlight a series of concerns he had to highlight concerns about leadership command within his unit.
8:41 am
>> what i was seeing, all's i was seeing in afghanistan was basically leadership failure to the point that the lives of the guys standing next to me were literally from what i could see in danger of something seriously going wrong and somebody being killed. >> he alarmed his colleagues, but popped up at another base days later, likening himself to a fictional action hero. >> what i did was me saying i am a jason bourne. >> he has the skills of a dangerous man. >> i need to know what went wrong. >> i had the fantastic idea that i was going to prove to the world that i was the real thing, you know, i could be, you know, what -- i could be what it is that all those guys out there
8:42 am
who go to the movies and watch those movies. >> bergdahl was set free in may, 2014 as part of a white house brokered exchange for five taliban leaders in guantanamo bay who were sent to live under loose supervision in the gulf state of qatar, which partly owns al jazeera. bowe bergdahl is currently an active duty soldier with a clerical job in san antonio texas. after a three day hearing, the army recommend that he not be court martialed. he is now awaiting a decision. al jazeera, new york. the pentagon is changing what's printed on military identification tags known as dog tags. the metal cards will no longer include the social security numbers of servicemen and women, instead randomly generated 10 digit numbers currently used for i.d. cards. the pentagon said it will help prevent identify theft. >> a rapidly growing number of people in england want to keep donald trump from entering the
8:43 am
country. more than half a million people signed a petition asking parliament to ban the presidential candidate. it is said to be the most signed petition ever. a no poll shows a majority of americans are against trump's plans to ban muslims from entering the u.s. 57% of americans disagree with trump. 42% support trump's proposal while 36 oppose it. hillary clinton responded to trump's latest comments on late night with seth myers, saying the rhetoric "plays directly into the hands of terrorists, and that trump has crossed the line." >> i no longer think he's funny. >> yes, i will say i started feeling that way. [ cheers and applause ] >> you know, i think for weeks, you know, you and everybody else were just bringing folks to historical laughter, and all of
8:44 am
that, but now, he has gone way over the line, and what he's saying now is not only shameful and wrong, it's dangerous. >> clinton also says that other politicians, especially the republican party need to take action against trump. the washington post is reporting that republicans are preparing for the possibility of a brokered convention next summer, that's if no one candidate has the dell gets needed to win the nomination. >> the storm that brought a tornado and floodings to the northwest is moving east. let's bring in nicole mitchell to find out what's happening with this. >> we mentioned that tornado earlier. if you're looking at washington state in general, that's not a common occurrence. of the systems that we've had hitting the coastline this week, a lot of them have moved across that northern tier of the country. as they spread, not only bringing areas of snow to the higher elevations as all of this
8:45 am
gets colder and more rain with the next system, but now all of this is going to pull out into the central united states. we've already had a couple of the prefers systems move through the northern tier, but more of this is going to get into the heart of the country. that next system already by tomorrow pulling out more chance for severe weather as we get into the midsection of the country. oklahoma into texas, this is tomorrow's forecast and this ends out as i put it back into motion for saturday and into sunday, a lot more people are going to feel the changes with this next one versus it just being located on the west coast. more widespread areas of rain and the temperatures, most of the country has been above average. denver, this is today's forecast, a lot of 70's above this or ahead of this already down into the 30's, a big dividing line for the midwest tomorrow as that front pushes through. >> if that big line of rain was snow and colder, we would be in
8:46 am
for a doozy. >> it would be a big winter storm. clamping down on the rising cost of prescription drugs. >> the backlash over one price hike and how congress is looking to act. ♪ >> the first lady's campaign to get young americans to go to college. sure, tv has evolved over the years.
8:47 am
it's gotten squarer. brighter. bigger. it's gotten thinner. even curvier.
8:48 am
but what's next? for all binge watchers. movie geeks. sports freaks. x1 from xfinity will change the way you experience tv. tand that's what we're doings to chat xfinity.rself, we are challenging ourselves to improve every aspect of your experience. and this includes our commitment to being on time. every time. that's why if we're ever late for an appointment, we'll credit your account $20. it's our promise to you. we're doing everything we can to give you the best experience possible. because we should fit into your life. not the other way around. ♪
8:49 am
having some fun at the white house, get educated is what the first lady is saying with that rap video, encouraging teens to go to college. >> michelle obama's rapping skills went viral. part of a campaign, initiative that's supposed to help americans pursue higher education. she's no missy, but i get it. a congressional committee is considering new rules to regulate drug pricing in response to the skyrocketing costs driven mostly by private drug companies. al jazeera's mary snow says there's been more attention to the problem as the public learned more about one drug executive. >> at 32, martin quickly became the poster child of corporate greed this summer when he raised the price of a decades old drug
8:50 am
from $13 to $750 a bill. he drew the wrath of the public. donald trump called him a spoiled brat. hillary clinton and bernie sanders accused him of price gouging a life saving drug used to treat h.i.v. in cancer patients with weak immune systems to fight a parasitic infection. he said he'd lower the cost. last week at a summit, he talked about second thoughts, but not the kind you might think. >> i probably would have raised the price higher is probably what id have done. >> why? >> i think health carey prices are inelastic. i could have raised it higher and made more profits for shareholders, which is my primary duty. >> we made a consider to speak with him but got no response.
8:51 am
it would reduce the cost to some hospitals by up to 50%, still leaving the drug at $375 a pill. sean dickson calls that discount a joke. his organization represents aids drugs assistance programs nationwide. he met with the c.e.o. demanding a restoring to the original price of the drug. >> i think they engaged in speculation and speculated with patients' lives. they bought a drug where they knew there wouldn't be competition and held people hostage for it. that's not how we do drug developing and pricing in the u.s. >> doctors say the current version is working just fine and now health professionals are taking matters into their own
8:52 am
hands. >> the people who do the kind of work that i do are creative and we're not going to stand by and just say well we're not going to be be able to use this medicine, so people are working on macgyvering workarounds. >> that workaround has come in the form of a one dollar alternative is offered by express scripts. the drug itself is not f.d.a. approved but the ingredients are. >> would we rather have deraprim? yes. if we can't get it, we have to make our own. >> scraley has been taunting critics like hillary clinton, tweeting her, you use my name a lot but refuse to meet with me and come up with a solution. don't politicians have a compromise? >> try to be a c.e.o. yourself and see how it goes.
8:53 am
try to maximize profits and not get kicked out of a company and let me know how that goes for you. the hacking group anonymous expects people to join helping it attack isil. they want people to put you will insulting photos and pictures in hopes of getting the group banned from the internet. isil has responded to the threat by anonymous calling the hackers i had i don't get. >> the last time anonymous did this, it gained quite a bit of traction. russia honors one of its great literary masters. >> war and peace is read across nine time zones.
8:54 am
8:55 am
8:56 am
so it began, both a literary and a broadcasting marathon from moscow, st. petersburg, siberia, the caucuses, from london, vienna and paris.
8:57 am
>> he questions key rules of how the society is built. he questions the power, the government, when he reads war and peace, the battles, he understands this idea that more is the awfullest thing in the world. >> it is distributed as not a novel, what it is is epic, over four volumes it tells the author's interpretation of napoleon's disastrous invasion of russia. for the book's fans some of who were chosen to read, the work's historical setting doesn't limit it's timeless qualities. >> the questions he raises are still relevant now and the
8:58 am
answers, well, russian literature doesn't generally give answers. it asks questions and we're still trying to solve them. >> it feels like he is still nearby, advising us on life. in the book, there are simple people and he shows us a chain of mistakes that everyone makes mistakes and we should be able to overcome them. >> to great fanfare, this reading of war and peace has been broadcast live on russian television, radio and on line. the project's creators call it a democratic event and a unifying one, saying that great literature can bring people together in troubled times, whoever they are, wherever they are. >> of course i couldn't do a report on reaing war and peace without having a go myself. here goes. he gripped the pummel, spurred his horse and gathered off under a hail of bullets that poured down on but luckily missed him. he wanted one thing, to find out
8:59 am
what was going on and help rectify at all cost any error. if you want to know what happens next, read the book. it will take four days and four nights. >> adam was so bothered by that reading that he actually took out his cell phone during that piece. you might want to pay attention, this is a good one. we all enjoy a good joke, including early prime mates. at a zoo in barcelona, he reveals the cherry inside the cup. the orangutan takes a second look before bursting into laughter. this video has gotten a million views. that's it for us here in new york. i'm stephanie sy. >> coming up next, we go to the
9:00 am
room in doha for the very latest. trying to bring stability to libya, we will have a live report. you're watching al jazeera live from our headquarters in doha. also on the program, syrian president bashar al assad says he is willing to negotiate with opposition groups but not ones involved in military action. under pressure, climate change talks in paris are extended, but delegates say they're on the verge of a landmark deal. bringing one of the greatest novels in russian literature to the people.

96 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on