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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  December 17, 2015 7:00am-9:01am EST

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justice is not a burden. justice is a process that we have to protect mistrial prosecutors in the case of a baltimore police officers charged in the death of freddie gray will have to try again after viewers did not reach a verdict. >> a russian leader grilled about the crisis in syria, and the moscow relationship with turkey and the u.s. five years later, the arab spring uprising, we look at what started it. plus... >> self-driving restrictions. google's rules for operating
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driverless cars. welcome to your world, i'm stephanie sy i'm del walters. calm on the streets of baltimore. >> small groups demanded justice after a judge declared a mistrial in the case against a police officer. william porter was the first of six officers to go on trial. jurors were deadlocked and could not reach a verdict. >> john terrett is live in baltimore, it appeared protesters heeded the calls for calm, didn't they? >> seemed to have done. >> it looked as if the city got off lightly. there was a serious but small scuffle outside the courthouse when news of a mistrial came through yesterday. the protest continued around the
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city hall area, and then the protesters moved up to west baltimore, and there was a large rally close to the c.b.s. which was burnt out. driving around the city, walking here, we have been up early, and there are police men everywhere. that's the difference, the police service got a jump on this, rather than being caught on the hop which happened since last april. they were not expecting what happened. reinforcements have been brought in early. deployed overnight. what happens next in the case of officer porter? >> a very interesting meeting is going to take place in the same courthouse involving the same judge, barry porter, barry williams, a no-nonsense judge. he has called all the attorneys toot. they'll have to have more than
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one scheduling meeting. what they'll talk about is the possibility of retrying officer porter. the privilege of doing that lies with the prosecution. if they want to go ahead and retry him. they'll talk with the judge, discuss a new date for picking a new jury. >> what about the cases of other officers charged in this. does porter's mistrial affect the time lines? >> if the prosecution has the privilege of deciding whether to prosecute officer william porter again. then it is the judge who has the privilege of deciding when the case will take place, there are about three scenarios talked about. one is there are six individual trials, and this of officer porter was the first, and they picked the sequence for a reason, there's the option of shifting them down. baltimore will have to put up with this way into the early
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part of next summer, and start on january the sixth and with a new jury and officer porter. or they can go ahead with the driver of the wagon, and tack officer porter's trial on the end went the trials happen. the third option talked about is the possibility of a plea bargain, so officer porter can be a witness he's supposed to be in two of the upcoming trials. people we have been speaking to may not want to do that, if he takes a plea bargain, it's tantamount to admitting guilt and he says he wasn't guilty and did everything he could to help. >> protesters calling for justice. john terrett live in baltimore. thank you, john stock futures are up. wall street is reacting to the fed decision to raise interest rates, they'll go up a quarter point. the first time in seven years. leading to high interest rates on credit cards and mortgages. the feds say they plan to raise
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them gradually. the house votes on parts of a $1.1 trillion bill, a package likely to pass avoiding a shut down, and will make permanent credits for tax care. it extends a popular tax through 2019, and delace some things that were part of the affordable care act. neither side got everything that it wanted. >> after weeks of brinkmanship both sides used what was a disirty word to make the team. >> that is the compromise we have. >> reporter: republicans want an end to crude oil. the ban dates from a time of anger and anxiety during the oil shock of the 1970s. many say the ban was never
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effective in keeping domestic prices down and strong. with a glut of oil, lifting it will not do much to lift the price at the pump. >> i doubt it will go down 2-3 sent. >> in return, democrats got extended grid its for renewable technologies in wind and solar. republicans gave up the goals. >> funding for planned parenthood, a target for conservatives that accused the group of selling tissues of aborted foetuses continue. >> and republicans came away with nothing. >> in the wake of mass killings, democrats pushed for gun control measures. >> compromise doesn't mean doing away with principles, but people
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cannot be big headed or doing anything unreasonable. the measure includes life-time health care for responders and workers spending time on what was called the pile, the pulverized ruins after the attacks on 9/11. >> i owe them a great debt. >> advocates had lobbied for the funds and cite research suggesting exposure to a toxic haze at the sites resulting in an increase in cancer and lung disease. not everyone sees the bill as a victory. conservatives work to line up the votes against the measure, and civil libertarians are angry, encouraging companies to share information on cyber threats with the government. the president will sign the measure into law if it passes congress. >> the president is pleased with the product even if it reflects the compromise that is necessary
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when you have a democratic president negotiating with large majorities of republicans and this morning the pentagon confirming the defense secretary used his own email for work related business and a statement to the pentagon says it was a mistake. the "new york times" reporting that ash carter used the account, and that was after hillary clinton was criticized for doing the same thing as secretary of state. the statement saying carter never sent classified material from his account president obama will discuss effort to prevent attacks on u.s. soil and is visiting the counter-terrorism center. tomorrow the president travels to san bernardino. the white house says he plans to meet privately with those injured in the attack, and the families of 14 people that were killed. after that, president obama heads to hawaii for a vacation with the vamly the head of fbi
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revealed details about the san bernardino shootings. lisa stark reports from washington. >> reporter: the department of homeland security issued its first ever public terrorism bulletin, which dhs says is designed to reveal what the government nose and is doing about it. the head of the fbi says the couple behind the attacks were not part of an organized terrorism sem. >> as the government investigates the san bernardino attack. the head of the fbi discounted reports that the shooters posted support for i.s.i.l. on social media. >> the communications are direct private messages. so far in this investigation we have found no evidence of posting onsocial media by either of them at that period of time, and therefore reflecting their commitment to gi hard. >> the shootings on the heels of
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the attacks left americans on edge. the don't of homeland security is modifying the terror alert system, an attempt to better communicate the threats americans face. >> in my view it highlights the new environment we are in. which includes the very real prospect of terrorist inspired attacks that can happen with little or no notice. >> after the 9/11 attacks homeland security used colour-coded threat levels, replaced in 2011 with the national terrorism advisory system, which has never been used, because it requires a credible for specific threat to trigger an alert to the public. dhf added a bulletin that can be used when threats are more vague. the first one issued wednesday says:
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it advises the public to watch for signs of radicalization and report anything suspicious. >> if you look at the bulletin, there's nothing in the bulletin that the public has not been told 1,000 times. there's nothing knew or accessible justin kat is a former c.i.a. officer and calls the bup tin a pia move. >> it's a marketing campaign, it's a feel good, trying to show the american public they are trying to do something. >> a poll by the pew research center suggests 29" of americans say terrorism and i.s.i.l. are the biggest problem, up 4% from a year ago. confidence fell sharply. 46% say officials are doing
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well. as the shutdown of school underscored fear, justified or not, has consequences. asked about the public's apparent lack of confidence in the government. secretary johnson insisted officials are stopping people getting on airplanes, arresting suspect and doing things that the public is not aware of. >> secretary johnson says the public should expect for security and place at public places. >> we are following breaking news that drug company c.e.o. who raised the price of the life-saving drugs has been arrested and is facing fraud investigations in relation to a former hedge fund and a drug he shedded. he is the chief of touring farm suit equals calls, and they --
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pharmaceuticals and raised the anti-infection drug by 5 thus%. it is snowing, br 5,000%. lack of snow is rare for minnesota. >> in an average year the state would be blanketed in snow and ice. no one knows that better than minnesota native nicole mitchell. it is headed east. >> coming from minnesota, my dad likes to ice fish. the lakes are not frozen over. i hear the complaints about the weather. this is where you see the snow moving into canada. remnant behind. it's light stuff. that will not be the trouble maker now, it is rain up and down the east coast. mostly lighter rain. we can get places near the mid-atlantic, we are not talking a lot of flood concerns, it's nuisance rain. the front is bringing in cooler
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temperatures, by the day tomorrow, most is offshore. behind that the flow, plus another little disturbance is enough to bring snow through the great lakes. we might see a couple of bans form up. the rain coming through today. chances for freezing rain, and the lake effect and advisories, the next behind the system that we can watch for that. i mention the temperatures, they have been spectacular for the east of the country. it targeted to erode. look at atlanta. we have been in the '70s, goes to average. the average is 53. it's not until tomorrow we get below that. it warms up. if we look at the extended outlook for next week, we get into a similar pattern, where the east of the country is likely to be above average. you could be in a situation where you travel from new york to california thinking it would be warmer, and it's warmer back
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home. >> i think we'll have to buy your father a boat. thank you, nicole in new orleans, the city council planning to vote on taking council controversial memor yams, the mayor says they are a nuisance, others say they are history. jonathan martin reports perched 607 feet high in the heart of downtown new orleans, this bronze statue of general robert e lee is a lightening rod. >> it's a white supremist in the city. >> people can say anything is a symbol of racism. >> more than 100 years after it went up, there's a plan to remove the monument, along with three others in the stay. the mayor is leading the charge, calling them reminders of racial oppression and slavery, not reflective of a majority black
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city. >> we pay taxes, you are not to have a city, majority jewish with a statue of hitler. >> position has been stiff with 30,000 to keep them up. lesley lived in northerly your, and says removing the monuments would hurt the city. >> yes were not hurting anyone. they create revenue for the city. for people that create history. primarily want to say that new orleans is not a racist city. that is good and fine. don't take my heritage away. >> original documents rejected to the statues are held in archives. there has been outcry over the liberty place monument honouring members of the white league.
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>> it represents the effort on the part of those ex-confederates to take back the government of louisiana by force. >> some state republican leaders argue that the confederate general. as they honour men who act according to the standard of their time, when slavery was widely accepted. as the issue divided the city, it seems to have split the council, which is said to vote on thursday, not before a public hearing questioning vladimir putin. right now russia's president taking questions of the government. he is talking about the u.s. >> and as a cuban migration, thousands arriving in the nation, most for a city that might surprise you.
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us to lose a job. we're just a family that's trying to make it. >> a real look at the american dream. "hard earned". sunday, 10:00 eastern. only on al jazeera america.
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russia is demanding that turkey play compensation for downing a jet last month. this morning the deputy foreign minister telling reporters that russia expects an apology from ankara. the turkish military shooting down the war plane in november. killing the two pilots. turkey says it crashed into an air plane from syria. it is one of the issues that vladimir putin was asked about during a news conference. the moscow event wrapped up. it lasted three hours. syrians must determine who rules. and political settlement is the only way to end the conflicts. >> we have the author of the
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upcoming back, the democracy promotion paradox and joins us to talk about vladimir putin's news conference. thank you for being with us. vladimir putin - let's start with turkey, we have harsh words for ankara, accused of cow towering to the u.s. does it up the ante, the shooting of the russian jet. >> he came out hitting hard on turkey, which i don't think was entirely expected. the thing about cow towing to the u.s. turkey and the military had an ape lines to n.a.t.o. it's not like turkey discovered the u.s. the language - it's important to remember that russia does not have a free media. when vladimir putin says something, here in the west you may say that's strange, it's not my understanding of what happened. >> that's not how the russian people are processing it. we know a russian plane went into air space, and they have
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been going into n.a.t.o. air space and other parts of the world as well. >> in the balkans. >> yes, in the baltics. vladimir putin said they went and murdered two russians. a loss of life is tragic. when you are in the air force, flying over foreign air space that is a member of another major military alliance, that is a different thing. what does it mean that he had harsh words for turkey. when you consider that talks about syria are to begin tomorrow in new york to include russia, that vladimir putin met with cary. russia is not going to be asive. i never thought russia would be cooperative. there's two major thinks. the data shows that's support
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for vladimir putin. there's basis of that support, a protector of the state, the russian nation. five years ago it was more the bringer of prosperity. a hawkish sabre rattling approach by the president of what is almost equivalence to a state of union speech is a strategy. when you look at the vladimir putin-kerry meeting. secretary of state john kerry walked in and walked out saying we are no longer committed to bashar al-assad must go. russia, that's a victory. you are going into the discussions feeling good about yourself. john kerry said at that meeting on deuce, we see syria fundamentally similar with russia. does that jive with what we heard from vladimir putin. and we don't see them fundamentally. bashar al-assad is a client of
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russia. vladimir putin is committed to keeping bashar al-assad in power. it is a fundamental difference between the russian view on syria and the american view an syria. >> just a quick question. vladimir putin says the economic outterm peaked. what does that say about the evocation of western sanctions. >> because vladimir putin says it has peaked doesn't mean it has. western sanctions are effective. you could argue that that is not enough. and evidence suggests that it hasn't been enough. one thing we have not talked about was ukraine, it was touched upon, they mentioned the presence of military advisors, and we know that russia has gone and grabbed crimea, destabilized southern and eastern ukraine, and would not have happened without russia, the sanctions have not reversed that. have they had an impacts on the russian economy? >> the answer is yes. they have not done enough
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lincoln mitchell. thank you for your insights this morning, that u.n.-backed plan to form a unity government in libya is in jeopardy. the pact would unite the self-declared parliament in tripoli and the internationally recognised one in tobruk. the president of tripoli's government says he has not authorized his representatives to mover forward. the u.n. human rights commission is holding a special session. 87 in burundi have been killed. it has been in turmoil since the president announced in april he would be seeking a third term. today is a year since the u.s. and cuba announced plans to restore relations. negotiations are working to restore commercial airline flights into havana. the lack of flights is not stopping cubans coming to the u.s. as our correspondent reports
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they are arriving through mexico. >> these are the steps that 20,000 cooun you cubans took, seeking refugee status in the united states. across the country it's higher. 43,000 cubans entering the u.s. under a cold war provision allowing them parole into the country, and permanent residents status. >> the number of cuban asylum seekers is up 78% from last year. a jump out of president obama, after he announced the opening of ties from cuba claudsio says cubans are seeing this as a last opportunity to gain legal entrance into the u.s., and she travelled by boat from cuba to cannes can -- cannes can, crossing into texas.
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many are stranded into costa rica, unable to cross into nicaragua to continue north. with the situation there a humanitarian crisis. costa rica's president says the country is praying for the immigration policy towards cuban. >> a spokesman tells al jazeera that the administration has no plans to change its policy towards cubans. that assurance is falling on death ears for the cubans that crossed the bridge tunisia, five years later. >> what has changed in the country to spark the arab spring movement. >> privacy concerns. attacks adding to the debate over surveillance. encrypted messaging.
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>> these people have decided that today they will be arrested. >> i know that i'm being surveilled. >> people are not getting the care that they need. >> this is a crime against humanity. >> hands up... >> don't shoot. >> hands up... >> don't shoot. >> what do we want? >> justice. >> when do we want it? >> now. >> explosions going on... we're not quite sure - >> is that an i.e.d.? >> welcome back to your world this morning, 7:30 eastern time. breaking news, drug company c.e.o. martin shrely arrested. making headlines after he substantially hiked the price of a life saving drug earlier this year. >> lawyers will be in court today trying to set a new trial date for a baltimore police officer charged in the death of
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freddie gray. there were small demonstrations after the judge declared a mistrial. jurors were unable to reach a verdict. >> this morning, president obama going to the knoll counter terrorism center to talk about the fight against isil with his national security team. he plans to visit san bernardino on friday and visit with the victims of the mass shooting there. there are concerns in san bernardino after the attack, fear. muslims fear anti muslim backlash. al jazeera has more. >> i'm an attorney. >> i am a certified nurse assistant. >> i work to provide social services for families in need. >> they live and work in southern california's in land empire east of los angeles. they are professionals, caring citizens, husband bands and fathers. they are also muslims, shocked that a terrorist attack happened in their community, while at the same time facing fears that an
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anti islamic backlash is brewing. >> i do have family members and good friends who had issues and have been threatened. >> there's this horrible political environment taking place and that does spill over into our personal lives. >> he is talking about donald trump's announcement at a recent campaign stop following the mass shooting in san bernardino. >> damaged gentleman trump is call for a total and complete shutdown of muslims entering the united states until our country's representatives can figure out what the hell is going on. >> we wondered, what would happen if trump's call to ban muslims became a reality? what would be lost if an entire group of people were suddenly shut out? health care providers, attorneys, social workers, religious leaders, gone? >> the idea of it is ridiculous, but even ridiculous ideas can
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still be dangerous. >> mark manly is the religious leader at the middle ground muslim center. >> if you were to take donald trump's comments and that actually happened, then what would this community look like? >> what if there were no mexicans? what if there were no vietnamese? what if there were no jews? right? it would look like we have a gaping hope in it. it would be swiss cheese. it would be incomplete. >> although the size of the muslim american population is difficult to measure in parse because the u.s. census doesn't track religious fill areas, it's estimated california hat largest muslim community, accounting for 1% of the state's total population with the majority living right here in southern california. one is health care worker david williams who also volunteers to help feed the homeless wasn't allowed into the country because of his faith? >> you can imagine if those services weren't there to the
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people who needed it and that's something that we offer for number one reason, because we care, we're human beings, but also because our faith teaches that. >> what about the work this man does helping needy families? >> you're taking away a lot of social receives, a lot of people helping the community, a lot of people out there serving people. we're just an average person trying to go to work, go to school, provide for our families, provide for the community and do what we can in this world. >> back in the middle ground muslim center, afternoon prayers are offered. he is unapologetic about his faith and his followers who contradict to this community. >> i think we should stand up not just for the selfishness of protecting ourselves, but also saying when we do, we're protecting perhaps some other group in the future. i'm not somebody who really wouldn't to live in fear. james brown said it past, i'd rather die on my feet than live on my knees.
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>> al jazeera. >> let's dig deeper into the politics of fear. that is laura brown, professor at george washington university joining us live from washington, d.c. thanks for being with us. america i guess afraid. this is not the first time, because who can target f.d.r. and that famous speech during world war ii. >> let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself. >> but the question that we ask you this morning is this latest round of fear based on fact or is the political process being used to drum up fear to drum up votes? >> first, thanks for having me on this morning. i think what's important to really understand about our current moment is there are a lot of fears that are coming together. as a nation, we have really never sort of gotten over the 9/11 attacks. i mean, we are still kind of
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reeling from those and uncertain about what this war on terrorism, which began so long ago and still hasn't seemed to have any conclusion and in fact appears to be in some ways spinning out of control. i think that's a big part of what's happening -- >> is it that -- >> long term reality. >> excuse me. is it that we haven't gotten over it or that we're not allowed to be over it? >> well, i think that's a great point, because there is no doubt that both the politicians and the media have sort of an interest in continuing to drive fears, because it basically engages people, and what you see is that people watch television and they pay attention to politicians when they are talking about things that scare them. >> how can you tell when fear is being used, though, for political purposes? i want to play for you that
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infamous statement preceding the war in iraq. take a listen. >> knowing these realities, america must not ignore the threat gathering against us. facing clear evidence of peril, we cannot wait for the final proof, the smoking gun that could come in the form of a mushroom cloud. >> so america went to war based on the fear that we should attack them before they talked us. now we have a candidate who is basically calling for a ban on all muslims coming into the country, but we did some research, the u.n. saying isil is directly connected to more than 10,000 deaths in iraq, most of them are muslims, so what is fact, what is fiction and why so much fear? >> well again, i mean, i think one of the things that we do have to do as we sort through these things is understand that americans are sort of justified in they're fears of not understanding terrorism. you know, as a country, this
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country has not been attacked on its soil. 9/11 really was that sort of first, you know, instance where, you know, we felt wow, the homeland is not safe. you can go back to pearl harbor, but pearl harbor was a military installation and it was in hawaii, so there was a sense that something new had changed, and something that we did not know has changed, so there is that, but of course, you also have this desire of politicians to make sure they gone issue votes and nothing goners votes like a profession of strength. >> which party -- >> like somebody proclaiming. >> full. >> i think what you see is obviously the last time that the republicans won and they won on this security issue was in 2004.
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one of the problems for democrats is that if republicans have an opportunity to use that issue to frame an election, they will. >> so then let me -- i've got eei've got. >> i don't have a good response. >> i've got 20 seconds left. how do we know when we're being snookered for political reasons? >> again, i think in the immediate aftermath of any attack, you have to realize that people are going to be afraid. as we move toward an election cycle, you also have to realize that politicians are going to say what they need to guess the votes they want and that's where
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you just have to be sort of thoughtful about what the probabilities are of being attacked. >> laura brown for us in washington, d.c., thank you very much for being with us. >> thank you. >> today marks five years since the arab spring. celebrations are underway in several countries, the protests five years ago brought down the countries dictator and began with a street vendor light himself on fire. leading to demonstrations from syria to egypt. al jazeera is live this morning in tunis. muhammed, what is the atmosphere like there on this anniversary? >> there's not much going on here in tunis. this is where so many of the protests that really rocked this country and set in motion those chain of events five years ago happened. really, what's going on today, there are as her moneys that are
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commemorating what happened in another town here in tunisia where the tunisian fruit vendor set himself on fire five years ago today to protest the lack of economic opportunity. we found there is still a lot of complaints about the lack of economic opportunity in this country. >> there are still a lot of activists. there's still a long way to go. there needs to be more opening up here, more business opportunities. there is a frustration here that is still very much palpable, even today and although better, saying that the youth here can get jobs, that people can support their families that they can ensure a better future for
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themselves. >> based on what you just said, people in the west wide by call tunisia the success story of the arab spring. do tunisians feel that they are part of that success? >> tunisians are happy that the government has come together here the last year and come from the brink of civil war. they are happy about the fact that the national dialogue quartet won the nobel peace prize. they see that as encouraging, more democracy that is encouraging, that the country remain secular. this his one of the most secular countries in this region, but at the same time, they are worried about the threat, the specter of terrorism. there have been three attacks in the past year, one of them attacked the bardo museum,
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another tourists on a beach resort that killed dozens was people. this country is neighbor to libya where there is a civil war still raging and where there are isil members that are taking over parts of that country. that is the concern, it is close to tunisia. where we are, this is a very centrally located secure part of the capital. we're very close to the interior ministry and just in the last month, you had a major attack in which a suicide bomber blew himself up and 12 people died in that attack. certainly the specter of danger, of more terrorist attacks, that is something that is really on the mind of tunisians, even though they are happy that the country has stepped from the edge of civil war. >> muhammed reporting from tunis, muhammed, thank you. >> a professor at an evangelical
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college in chicago on leave after a show of support for muslims. she has been wearing that head discover in solidarity with muslims "out of her love for jesus." school officials say they have no position against wearing headscarves but took issue after she drew similarities between islam and christianity. students want her back. officials in ferguson, missouri are nearing a deal with the justice department including new training, better record keeping and federal oversight. the force has been under investigation over the 2014 killing of michael brown and the protests that followed. the justice department found guy i can't say against african-americans. officials from the justice department will meet today with chicago's mayor. attorney general loretta lynch said the investigation will look into the fatal shooting of
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laquan mcdonald to see if it was a pattern of civil rights violations. in brazil, what's app has been shut down for two days because it failed to cooperate in a criminal investigation. in our report, the apps are secure and investigators don't like it. >> if someone wanted a secure application to plan an attack, they would have no end of options. what's app would be a logical first choice. in the aftermath of the bangkok bombing in august, it was discovered that the culprits used what's app to communicate. that's not because what's app is the preferred means of communication for bad guys. it's because it's the preferred means of communication for nearly one seventh of the world's population. what's app reports it has 800 million monthly users. the word uses what's app to send 30 billion messages.
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it's a free alternative to text messaging and voice calls. >> in its early days, what's app had a somewhat weak security reputation so after the company was acquired by facebook in november, 2014 opinion it embedded new encryption, one the company itself cannot decode. basically when i send a message on what's app, my phone did the jen crypting and the phone on the other end the decrypting. they basically arc a sort of handshake that doesn't involve any central server. as a result, what's app does not have access to my message. it cannot decrypt it even if it wanted to. there is no back door or master key it can offer the intelligence community. it's that kind of encryption used by other competing platforms that has members of the intelligence community complaining that it makes their jobs more difficult if not impossible. >> speaking just after the paris attacks, the c.i.a. director said this.
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>> intentional gaps that have been created in the ability of security services to protect the people that they are asked to serve. >> david cameron in the aftermath of the paris shootings in january of this year even called for banning encrypting messaging apps in britain, struck down by the high court in england. it's important to remember while we discovered again and again that people use these apps to plot violence, it's also in retrospect we find that out. there's pry no available evidence that any intelligence agency that thwarted an attack by monitoring these communications. security expert say current encryption schemes make a master key impossible and such a key would compromise everyone's security. >> what we current have, there is no way to say oh and here's the master key and you would know for sure if there were, that would be a target of every single hacker in the world. >> more access to data may not be the answer here.
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>> a russian effort to warn the united states about tamerlan tsarnaev that should have stopped him at j.f.k. airport was missed because his name was misspelled in a database. multiply that by 30 billion daily what's app information, it's not a matter of gathering the information. it's a matter of what to do with it. >> so the debate vince. >> believe it or not, a new storm is hitting the northwest today. let's bring in nicole mitchell. i was away for a couple of days. i thought this would be over. >> it's exactly the same as when you left. >> exactly the same. >> we got little bits of breaks and some of the rivers finally started to go down a little bit and now this is going toed a to all of i have the. we will see more recresting over the course of the weekend, more rain coming in and snow, because we finally had cooler air move in, as well, so this will be more of a snow component than recent stuff we saw. right along the coastline where it is rain, just today, he could
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have some places go a half a foot and then into the higher elevation, the snow about a half foot. either way you look at it, definitely a lot of precipitation across the region, that's the region we have widespread flood watches to the winter storm warnings in the higher elevation. we stay pretty saturated for the next few days. this comes in, a little breaks but moisture behind this. it takes into southern and central california until possible saturday that any of this moves in. for the rest of the united states, it takes until the second half of the weekend, so a lot of the country after that east coast rain today has a dry break, except for the northwest. >> nicole, thank you very much. california is out with some new rules for those self driving cars. one tech giant kind of concerned. >> it's concerned regulations could put the brakes on innovation. john henry smith hat story. >> look, ma, no hands. >> people who have tried the
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company's self driving car say they like having the vehicle do all the work. >> if i had a self driving car, i could spend more time hanging out with my kids or helping them with their homework, finding out how their day was and not waiting until you get home and have dipper. pretty good. >> the department of motor vehicles won't let people completely relax behind the wheel. the d.m.v. would require that a licensed driver with the special certification sit in the driver's seat and be prepared to take control if necessary. stanford researcher was considered a pioneer in studying how humans interact with technology. he washed that immediately taking control of a self driving car is not easy. >> drivers are totally disoriented and they're being asked to absorb an enormous range of activities, an enormous range of things going on to get what we call situational awareness where there was none and that turns out to be an
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extraordinary challenge. >> among the other guidelines proposed by california's d.m.v., drivers could still get ticketed even if the car is on auto pilot. manufacturers would have to put the car through third party safety tests, and automakers could only lease the self driving vehicles, not sell them outright. google says it is greatly disappointed in the regulation and said the goal is to let people who can't drive have cars, but some researchers welcome the new rules. >> this is actually a big step toward public deployment of self driving vehicles. in every day driving under conditions, what is it that people are going to do. that's important to understand how self driving cars are designed to be safe for everybody. >> we've only been talking about the proposed guidelines from the california d.m.v. regulators and manufacturers will meet early next year in sacramento and l.a. to discuss the guidelines further before they become law. analysts expect driverless cars
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to hit the roads in six years or less. get ready. >> that decision could resonate beyond california, right? >> absolutely. we've all heard of california emissions on new cars. in many ways, california sets the standards for a lot of vehicles and right now, no other states have rules like this, but since we know apple and pretty much every major foreign and domestic car make you can think of are working right now on that self driving technology, they will change the way they think about the cars. >> when we come back, rock and roll royalty. >> the names of the rock and roll hall of fame inductees has been released, see who made the cut. why the biggest star wars payday won't be at the box office.
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>> a real thriller for michael jackson fans, the album the first record to ever sell 30 million copies in the u.s. >> it has sold more than 100 million worldwide since released in 1982. guinness called it the best selling album and make keel jackson the best selling artist ever. the latest inductees in the rock and roll hall of fame, chosing chicago, chosen by fans at the rock and role hall of fame foundation. other include deep purple, kiss, cheap trick and steve miller. the induction ceremony will be held in april in new york. thousands of americans are expected to head to the theaters today to see star wars, the force awakens. security at theaters nationwide has been ramped up. there are new rules, like no facemasks or face paint. replica weapons are also banned. $100 million in tickets have
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been presold. that is a record. it is a fraction of the money the movie will make. the film is expected to make millions more from merchandise. >> surprised to hear that janet jackson did not get in on first ballot for the rock and roll hall of fame. a mistrial in the case against the baltimore police officer. some nations are worried about overreach handle the immigration crisis. we are back in two minutes with more of your world this morning. >> there is so many changes in my life... i was ready for adventures. >> from burlesque dancer to acclaimed artists. >> art saved my life. >> reflections from her new memoir. >> no no no no no... i'm way to dysfunctional to have an ordinary job. >> see what lies ahead for molly crabapple. >> who emerges from life unscathed?
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>> i lived that character. >> we will be able to see change.
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my reaction is how? how with all the testimony and the evidence, how? >> anger after that mistrial in baltimore, prosecutors pledging to try again in the case of a police officer there. congress closes in on a new trillion dollar budget deal with tax breaks for average americans and big business. >> why did they need to do it? i just don't understand why. why did they shoot it down? >> the russian president's anger over turkey's downing of a fighter jet.
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what that means with relations with the u.s. concerns over the proposal to create a new multi-national defense force. >> good morning, welcome to your world this morning. i'm del walters. >> i'm stephanie sy. the streets of baltimore are quiet this morning as prosecutors head back to court to set a retrial. >> there were demonstrations last night after jurors failed to reach a verdict against officer william porter. john terrett is live in baltimore. john, take us back, what was the immediate reaction to news of the mistrial? >> well within good morning, dell, stephanie. the news came through at half past three yesterday afternoon. the immediate reaction was the very small protest, very peaceful up until that time outside the courthouse, suddenly
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swell in numbers and there were more people than throughout the trial protesting and they got into a struggle with the court deputies trying to prevent them running into the building. there were two arrests, one young man was dragged away. he was holding a bull horn and shouting at the top of his voice in the face of the deputies. the traffic started flowing again and then protestors moved around the town for a little bit, around the courthouse, around the city hall and protested in front of the media, actually getting in between us and our cameras and equipment but that dissipated as well and the protest ended this part of baltimore mid evening. >> what happened overnight in baltimore? >> well, i think that it was in a sense quite a lucky escape from the city. i think there was a good chance at one point yesterday that we might have seen some kind of
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widespread rioting. that did not happen. there was no major issue throughout the entire evening. there was a larynggathering up in west baltimore, which was called a unity rally, but that was very, very peaceful. driving around the city this morning, there are policemen everywhere. i think that's the difference between april and now. they got a head start on it this time around. april they were caught by surprise. this time, police had been in the city for a long time, including officers and armed equipment and all that kind of stuff from and you said the area. once the news of yesterday's mistrial was known, they basically flooded the city and it seems to have worked. i think a lot of people here are just tired of the fighting. they don't want the rioting and i think they see all these incidents involving young black men all over the country and i think they are exhausted by them. i think that plays a part. >> we heard from the attorney for the family. take a listen to what he had to say. >> i'm not going to second guess
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the prosecution. i'm not going to second guess the defense. they are all confident, hard working lawyers who did the very best they could and i'm sure they are all disappointed, but i don't buy the nonsense that this is somehow a victory for either side. it's not. it's just a bump on the road to justice and the road to justice has no lack of bumps. >> what's next for the porter trial and will that mistrial affect the other cases going forward. >> just quickly, i think those modifying words by billy murphy and the by the mayor i think helped, i really do, rewarding no violence overnight. what happens next, judge barry meets with the attorneys today to discuss a new trial date. it will be sometime in the new year, we assume, new trial, new year, new jury. what we don't know is what this is going to do for the other five trials yet to start. the next valving the driver of the wagon is due to start january 6.
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it could be that they slip all the trials down and slot officer williams back in january 6. we will know more at the end of today. this morning, the pentagon conference the defense secretary has used his personal email for work related business, in a statement calls that a mistake. "the new york times" reported that defense secretary ash carter used the personal account during his first few months on the i don't know. hillary clinton was criticized for doing the same thing at secretary of state. carter never sent any classified material from his personal account. president obama will be going to the national counter terrorism center this morning to discuss efforts to prevent attacks on u.s. soil. tomorrow he travels to san bernardino, california, the white house says there he will meet privately with those injured during the shooting attack and with the family of the 14 who died. after that, the president goes to hawaii for vacation with his
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family. the house plans to vote today on parts of a one dollar and one cents trillion spending bill. the package is likely to pass to avoid a government shutdown. it will make permanent tax credits for child care, low income family and college costs and renew a corporate tax break. the package will delay some taxes dealing with the affordable care act for two years. neither side got everything it wanted. >> after weeks, both sides used what has become a dirty word in washington to describe the deal. >> it's a compromise. i understand some people don't like as spents of this but that is the compromise we have. >> republicans want an end to the 40 year ban on exports of crude oil, an effort to find new markets for a resurgent u.s. oil industry. many experts say the ban was never effective in keeping
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domestic prices down and supplies strong and with a worldwide oil glut, lifting it won't do much to lift the prices at the pump now either. >> i doubt you see them go down two or 3 cents, so it will be a wash, although not negative for u.s. consumers. >> democrats got tax credits for renewable energy technologies, wind and solar. republicans gave up cherished goals, federal funding for planned parenthood, a target of conservatives who accuse the group of selling tissue for aborted fetuses will continue. after pushing for restrictions on syrian refugees entering the u.s., republicans came away with nothing. >> democrats pushed for gun control measures. they came away empty. >> compromise means people can't be bull headed and have to be
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reasonable to doing what they're doing to accomplish their goals. >> it includes lifetime health care for those who were on what's called the pile, the aftermath of the 9/11 attacks. june stewart lobbied for the funds and research has shown an increase in health problems from the incident. >> civil libertarians are angry over a cyber security provision that would encourage companies to share information on cyber threats with the government. president obama spokesman claimed victory, and said the president will sign the measure into law if it passes congress. >> the president is pleased with the final product, even if it does reflect the compromise necessary when you have a
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democratic president negotiating with large majorities of rums in both house and senate. russian president putin wrapping up a news conference, covering a lot of ground, including that russian military operation in syria. putin saying that the operation will continue until a political process begins. >> i have said on many occasions and i want to repeat it that we will never agree with the idea that somebody from outside, whoever it is, should impose the idea of who should rule another country. it simply doesn't fit with any kind of common sense or international law. secretary of state kerry asked me about this, i told him our position hasn't changed. >> a russian jet was shot down near the turkey syrian border last month, sparking tensions between moscow and ankara.
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he came out hitting pretty hard on turkey which i don't think was entirely unexpected. the language there, it's always important to remember that russia does not have a free media. when putin says something that here in the west, you might say wow, that's strange, that's not my understanding of what happened. that's not how the russian people are prosing it. putin's statement that this came out of nowhere. i think he said murdered two russians, well, look, a loss of life is a tragic thing no matter what, but when you're in the air force, flying planes over foreign air space that is a member of another major military
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alliance, that's different than being murdered if you're walking down the street. >> what does it mean that he had such harsh words for turkey considering talks about syria are to begin tomorrow in new york to include russia that putin met with kerry four ours suicide. does that mean that russia is not going to be as cooperative at we might think when it comes to political solution? >> i never thought russia was going to be very cooperative. it's two major things, first, the data, the public opinion polling shows strong support for president putin, but it is the basis of that support is him the protector of the state or russian nation. five years ago, it was more him as the bringer of prosperity. a hawkish saber rattling approach by the president in what is almost equivalent to the state of the union speech is a domestic political strategy to rally support. the putin kerry meeting earlier this week, secretary kerry
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walked out and said we are no longer committed to assad must go. clearly if you're russia, that's a victory. >> western sanctions against the kremlin have been effective in dampening russia's economy, but he said it hasn't achieved the goal of getting putin to reverse course in ukraine. >> more snow expected today in minnesota after several inches fell overnight. that is the first significant snowfall of the season and that lack of snow is very rare for minnesota. in a usual year, the state would be blanketed in snow and ice and nobody knows that better than nicole mitchell who goes ice fishing with your father. >> i'm more the cross country skier, he's the ice fisher. people like those winter sports and it's been hard in these cases with the warm weather. it's felt more like spring or fall versus a winter, technically. continuing this forecast, we
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were just looking at duluth, you can see the snow remnant. the leading edge of this front, much more main, because it's getting into that warmer section of air we've had recently, so the coast all the way up to the east coast, the gulf coast northward, we're dealing with areas of rain. not too many problems, it is lighter, but there are low clouds, too, there are charlotte if you're connecting through that big airport hub, could have delays. we've got some and other places could see it later today. a lot of this clears out later tomorrow. on the backside with wind flow and colder air coming in, lake effect plus a little disturbance that will enhance things, so around the great lakes chance for snow and lake effect areas, we could watch for that. with today's rain, the very northern end could be cold enough just to get freezing precipitation in places like maine. those are the main concerns over the next couple of days but that warm air that has diminished a
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little bit doesn't stay gone too long. memphis if the 60's yesterday, 50's today. we can see that's receded some. the cooler pocket is definitely over the rockies, because we've had a couple rounds of that reinforcement, but even somewhere like atlanta where it's felt very spring like recently into the 60's today, finally the normal is 53. we get to that the next couple. look at that starting to right back up. for next week, christmas week, looks like that similar trend that we have had recently, the eastern half of the country could be well above average while the west remains a little cooler. >> all right, nicole mitchell, thank you. >> following breaking news this morning, that drug company c.e.o. who made headlines after raising the price on a life saving drug has been arrested, taken into custody by the f.b.i. he now faces fraud charges related to a federal investigation into his former hedge fund and a drug company he once headed. jelly is now the c.e.o. of the
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company that raised the price on that life saving cancer drug. the fed will raise interest rates gradually over the coming year after a rate hike yesterday. >> i'm in the city in northeast china, a key economic center where business leaders like business leaders elsewhere in the country are now trying to assess the likely impact of this rise in u.s. interest rates. the last time it happened, barack obama an president xi were yet to become president of their respective countries, china was set to host the olympic games. the good news for china, this rise in rates will help exporters, because chinese goods
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will be cheaper because the value of the yuan will fall against the dollar. the chinese owe some $1.2 trillion of treasury bills that are now sitting in its sovereign wealth fund and the value of that fund is going to go up. the bad news, a lot of big chinese conglomerates have borrowed in u.s. dollars. also countries that china exports to in the developing world are also badly exposed to u.s. dollars. also, china's economy is continue to go slow. the government has been cutting interest rates here, not raising them, and that's caused the u.n. to fall in value. what really worries the leadership is not this rise. it is the timing and size of future rises in u.s. interest rates. >> aid brown reporting from beijing. >> when we come back, the birth place of the arab spring five years later. >> tunisia marks the start of
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its revolution and celebrates the democracy that grew from it. >> european leaders meeting in brussels, belgium. we'll talk about a proposal to protect the borders that is dividing the nations there.
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>> european leaders meeting in brussels today to talk about the war in syria. the summit is going to talk about how to deal with that influx of refugees and protect borders. european commission proposing the creation of a special force that would patrolle borders if the nations can't do it themselves. our guest is with the european council on foreign relations
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joining us from berlin. thanks for being with us. did this proposal to create a multi-national european force to deal with the migrants come as a surprise? >> well, let's start with saying that this is not a new proposal. they have been trying to change its role since 2011. it wasn't successful because of the financial crisis, because it requires a lot of additional funds. it's something that most european member states have wanted to do for quite some time, so the principle and the theory behind the proposal is something that everybody's in agreement with, and been discussing for a long time. the problem is the clause that technically bypasses the sovereignty of member states if they refuse toe cooperate with the suggestions placed for improving or responding under certain situations, emergency situations, like the one we're facing now in greece, so this is
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where the problem lies right now. >> in fact, it says, the proposal says the guards will be able to intervene even if there is no request for assistance from a member state. isn't that fraught with problems? >> it is fraught with problems. it's fraught with problems in purely technical terms if you like. even if this were to come true, guards were deployed on the ground, how would they perform their tax if they don't have cooperation from the national authorities. what these border guards is essentially going to be fingerprinting, screening arrivals, you cannot undertake these tasks unless you have the cooperation of national authorities. this is implicitly recognized by the commission. if you look at the language of the text, it says that frontex would have the right to intervene, but that member state
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still has to cooperate with would. >> france and germany back the measure, greece and poland opposed to it. who wins, who loses? >> that's true, but, you know, throughout this refugee crisis, we've seen divisions emerging within the european union. france and germany back it up, because france obviously after the paris attacks is much more concerned about security. greece and poland are much more concerned about their national sovereignty. for greece, it becomes an issue of the joint patrols in the aegean. the greek authorities were very negative for that for obvious reasons. it has to do with the historical dimensions of the greek relations. in principle, none of the member states disagree with having a european coast guard and border
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guard. the disagreement is entirely within that specific clause and the president has says he doesn't agree with the idea behind the clause, but recognizes its necessity. it's likely we might seattle races in the final text. >> thanks for joining us this morning from berlin. breaking news, just moments ago, both sides in the conflict in libya announced they have signed a peace deal. we are looking at live pictures of this announcement. the agreement will unite the self declared parliament in tripoli and the nationally recognized government in tobruk. it took more than a year to put the deal together. >> this signing of the peace agreement is the start of building the new libya to open the way and to increase the hopes of the libyans, and peoples of the region. >> rival factions have been battling for power in libya for years and a power vacuum allowed isil to make gains there
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recently. >> also, the united nations egg spect to vote today to sanction businesses that have ties to isil. the agreement reset sanctions that had been in place for more than 12 years. it prevents isil from using international banks today their business. >> here in the u.s., homeland security is out with its new system for notifying americans about the potential for attacks. at the same time, the head of the f.b.i. revealed new details about the san bernardino shootings. lisa stark reports from washington. >> as the government continues to investigate the san bernardino attack, the head of the f.b.i. discounted reports that the shooters, sayed farook and tashfeen malik had posted support for isil on social media. >> those communications are direct private messages, so far in this investigation, we have found no evidence of posting on social media by either of them at that period of time and thereafter reflecting their commitment to jihad. >> the san bernardino shootings on the heels of the paris
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attacks have left americans on edge. the department of home land security is now modifying its terror alert system, an attempt it says to better communicate the kind of threats americans now face. >> in my view, it highlights the new environment we are in, which includes the very real prospect of terrorist-inspired attacks that can happen with little or no notice. >> after the 9/11 attacks, homeland security used color coded threat levels. that was replaced in 2011 with the national terrorism advisory system, which has never been used, because it requires a credible or specific threat to trigger an alert to the public. d.h.f. now added what it calls a bulletin that can be used when threats are more vague. the first one i should wednesday says we are in a new phase in the global threat environment
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with terrorist groups using the internet to inspire and recruit and with self radicalized individuals. it advises the public to watch for signs of radicalization and report anything suspicious. >> if you look at the bulletin, there is nothing in that bulletin that the american public hasn't already been told a thousand times. all right? there's nothing new. there's nothing actionable. >> joshua is a former c.i.a. officer. he calls the new bulletin a p.r. move. >> this is a marketing campaign. it's a feel-good, trying to show the american public that they're doing something. >> a new poll by the pugh research center suggests that 29% of americans say terrorism and isil combined are the nation's biggest problem, up sharply from just 4% a year ago. confidence in the government has fallen sharply. only 46% say officials are doing well in reducing the terror
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threat, the lowest level since 9/11. as this weed shut down of los angeles schools underscored, fear, justified or not, has consequences. lisa stark, al jazeera, washington. >> tunisia marks five years since the birth of its democracy. >> that revolution we saw kicked off a wave of revolutions across the region, the lasting effect social media has had on the new tunisia. >> new orleans consider as shift from its part, a vote that could remove relics of the civil war.
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>> every day is another chance to be strong. >> i can't get bent down because my family's lookin' at me. >> to rise, to fight and to not give up. >> you're gonna go to school,
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so you don't have to go war. >> hard earned pride. hard earned respect. hard earned future. >> we can not afford for one of us to lose a job. we're just a family that's trying to make it. >> a real look at the american dream. "hard earned". sunday, 10:00 eastern. only on al jazeera america. welcome back to go your world this morning, now 8:30 eastern time. lawyers in baltimore will be back in court today trying to set a new trial date for that baltimore police officer charged in the death of freddie gray. there were small demonstration last night after a mistrial was declared. jurors couldn't reach a verdict against officer with my porter. the house begins voting on portions of a tax and spending tan, extending tax credits for low income americans. the package called for $66 billion in new spending for 2016. we're following breaking
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news. just moments ago, both sides in the conflict in libya announcing that they have now signed a peace dole. the agreement will unite the self declared parliament in tripoli and internationally recognized government in tobruk. today marks five years since events in tunisia ignited what people now wall the arab spring. celebrations are underway in several cities across that country.
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the protests five years ago brought down the countries dictator and began with a street vendor light himself on fire. leading to demonstrations from syria to egypt. al jazeera is live this morning in tunis. >> the tunisia food vendor set himself on fire to protest lack of economic opportunity and government corruption. that was five years ago today. that really set in motion a change of events that brought down this government and inspired so many other revolutions in the arab word in this region. one key component of the uprising in this region and especially here in tunisia was the role of social media. activists were able to upload and share videos of things going on here that they had never before shared with the wider word. we spoke with a prominent blogger and here's what he had to tell us. >> five years later, he remembers very well when he realized things had changed for good in tunisia. >> i had a discussion with a
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friend, i think during the second week of the revolution. and we were discussing politics, and of course, we were discussing i was saying no, it's impossible that this regime will not fall. my friend was telling me no, it will and we had this very open and public discussion and then with he went home. no one, not a single policeman came and told us you cannot speak about this. >> in 2011, like many other young citizens, cherif placed great importance on the role of on line activism. >> many people lost their fear through twitter and facebook, each one writing a little sentence or a word, and someone else reading that and saying oh, he said that, i can say a little bit more. >> it's a belief the activist turned analyst holds as strongly now as he did then. >> even at protests in 2008 in
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the center of the country, but by then, social media was still limited in its spread, and so barely no one knew about what was going on. in 2011, where more than a million tunisians were on facebook and the videos of people daring to confront the security forces, people thought wow, this is really happening. >> the protests in tunisia grew as quickly as the anger and soon calls for reform were as loud on line as they were on the streets. >> while many here still contend that it was the power of the people rather than the power of the internet that allowed the movement to take route by posting and sharing videos, the state media would never have dared to broadcast. >> videos like this one, showing the aftermath of brute force from a government trying to suppress its population.
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cherif, who still posts on social media sites as much as he monitors them tells us on line activism has helped break the fear barrier in a way he could never imagine 2011. >> we now have new activists, especially the younger generation and you see the results of the uprising when you see how free they feel and how whenever there is an issue, they raise their voice. >> voices, he tells me, from both the actual world and the digital one that will continue to resonate and that can never again be sigh lengthsed. >> one thing he told me is that there are those that are a little bit afraid that things can go back to the way it was
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before, when activism wasn't allowed. he's gratified to see the new generation coming up, experiences a lot more freedom of expression the past five years and hopes that is something that will continue. he does believe that it will. >> there's another fear that people we've spoken to there talk about and that is the continuing terrorist attacks especially aimed at foreigners they've seen there. i'm sure you have heard by now that a peace dole has been struck in neighboring libya. i wonder if people there expect that that may mean a more secure libya, and a more secure tunisia. >> well, the security situation is certainly a concern here. practically everybody i've spoken with the past few days in tunis, even if they are happy with the fact that the national dialogue quartet won the nobel peace prize, even if they believe the atmosphere has gotten better for the people of tunisia, they are quite worried about the specter of more terrorism happening here.
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there have been three attacks this past year, two very big ones, one at museum here in the capital in which over 20 were killed, one in a resort town in which over 30 people, tourists were killed and then you had this past week here, the main thoroughfare, a very secure area close to the interior ministry to our left in which a suicide bomber blew himself up on a bus full of presidential guard and 20 were killed. the fact that there is fighting going on next door against isil in libya, terrorist threats here in tanaka tunisia, people are worried that's only going to get worse if the government doesn't crack down and do something more about it now. june the u.n. human rights commission holding a special session today on the escalating crisis in burundi. burundi is on the urge of all out civil war.
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ate seven people died there in the past week. the central african country has been in turmoil since the president announced he would seek a third term. >> a deal is almost in place to reform the police department in ferguson, missouri, officials saying they are close to an agreement with the justice department. that agreement would call for new training, better record keeping and government oversight. that force has been under investigation for rampant bias after the killing of michael brown and protests that followed. in chicago, a justice department probe into that city's police department is underway. justice officials will immediate today with the chicago mayor, looking into the fatal shooting of laquan mcdonald to see if that is a part of a pattern of civil rights violations. a vote today over controversial memorials that honor conservative leaders, the mayor calls the statues a nuisance. others say they are part of history. we have this report.
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>> 60 feet high in the heart of downtown new other loans, this bronze statue of general robert e. lee has become a lightning rod. >> it maintains a system of white supremacy in the city by maintaining these statues. >> people can say anything is a symbol of racism. >> now there's a controversial plan to remove the monument, along with three others in the city, all tied to the civil war. the mayor leads the charge, calling them reminders of racial oppression and slavery and not reflective of a majority black city. >> we pay taxes here. we're the majority. we want these statues down. you're not going to have a city of majority jewish with a statue of hitler. >> opposition to removing the statues has been swift with 30,000 signing a petition to keep them up. leslie has lived in new orleans all her life. she said removing them will hurt
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the city. >> those statues weren't hurting anybody, doing anything to anybody but do create revenue for the city from people who want to learn about history. >> people who want to bring the statues down rhyme article want to say that new orleans is not a racist city. those that want to keep it up say that that's good and fine, but don't take my heritage away. >> a history professor at too lane university where original documents related to the four too muchs are held in archives. there is been particular outcry over the city's liberty place monument honoring members of the white league that tried to overthrow louisiana's government. >> it represents the effort on the part of those excon fed receipts to take back the state of louisiana by force. >> some argue that the statue of the general and jefferson davis, president of the confederacy should say stay up as they honor
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a man who acted in accordance with his time when sleighry was widely accepted. just as she issue divided the city, it split the city council set to vote on thursday, but not before a final public hearing. jonathan martin, al jazeera, new orleans. the texas teen at the center of that infamous of a fluency does a isis missing. his defense was his lifestyle was caused by parents who never disciplined him. he went missing after a drinking party. the fed raised interest rates, a decision that will likely raise the cost of borrowing. how the fed's decision will affect those just starting out. >> lets see, like nine years ago. >> plenty of college students
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today were in he will elementary school the last time the federal reserve raised interest rates. >> what is the trickle down effect. what does it mean for me? sometimes i don't understand. >> i'm sure in a few years it's going to be a huge deal. i'm trying to learn more about it as the years go, just sort of camp up. >> interest rates on things like credit cards and auto loans are likely to go up. robert johnson says for young people, the rate increase will hammer home the dangers of debt. he said young folks may actually be in better shape than their parents. >> generally because a lot of the credit regulations and the fact that many young people started their careers later because of the great recession, all that kind of held people back from taking on a lot of debt. >> in terms of homes and things like that, we are still trying to get jobs. we're not buying anything on credit anytime soon. >> then there are people like 28-year-old kate brayden, the envy of her friends. she thought ahead during those low interest rate years and
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bought her own place. >> that is definitely a big component, knowing that at least at that time, you know, interest rates were manageable, and knowing that that wouldn't last, i wanted to kind of jump on the opportunity. >> this has been in the works for over two years. >> jose and kat met with a mortgage consultant in hopes of buying their first home. >> i think we're learning. wore figuring out what we can afford and the interest rates on top of the mortgage and the insurance and all that, we're trying to figure out what we can afford. >> jose's father always told them to take advantage of low rates. >> that was what, 10 years ago, almost 10 years ago, way different scenario now. now we're trying to take advantage. >> oh, nice. >> here's a break for young homebuyers. fannie may is rolling out its home ready program. if you're about to boy a home on your own and a family member helps you out with a couple hundred dollars a month towards the mortgage payment, that is
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counted as part of your qualification for the loan. >> this is huge, i mean huge. that means that with the rate hikes, we're still going to be able to keep the affordability factor at the same level. >> mortgage consultant's message to young homebuyers today, don't be afraid of interest rates. >> the rate hike should not be the motivator or demote have or not to own a home. >> al jazeera, chicago. 2015 now the most expensive wildfire season on record. the u.s. forest service saying more than $1.7 billion spent so far. nearly 10 million acres have burned this year alone, most of it out west and alaska. that is the second highest total since records began back in 19 sitting. seven firefighters dying this year fighting those wildfires. the west coast is in for another storm and possible floods. let's bring in nicole mitchell. >> the fires, because we had such an incredible brought
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drought up and down the west coast, the recent storms eroded especially into washington state some of that area, but still a lot of this area from interior washington southward through california has the dry conditions. we can use this moisture. it's just been a lot of it recently. already, the rain and snow starting to move in. what we'll see during the course of the die, usually stops at si. the rain could be a problem, along the coastline, six inches of that bringing flood concerns. the break between recent rounds of rain, rivers starting to crest and go down, with the new stuff will go back up especially into this weekend. watch for more of that flooding potential. we have the winter storm warn ins up, that is because of the snow that will move through the higher elevations. the skiing has been much better versus the warm stuff out east where some place haven't been able to get and stay opiate. it's not just one round, we have
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moisture behind that. it's going to be a couple of different rounds of weather. it's not until probably saturday that some of this makes it farther south into places like nevada and california, so we'll watch for that. that's definitely some beneficial rain. meantime, the northwest like seattle stays every single day. sunday or monday. some of that next round of moisture moves out. >> last name at this year we were talking about no skiing out west. >> a reversal of fortune. the unintended affect of the thaw in cuban-american relations. we're hours away from the opening of the biggest movie of the year. it could mean big money outside of the theater p.m.
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[ laughter ] look at the expression, a lot of love for that mom from the surprising shot on the court happened in minnesota. she was trying to earn a $5,000 scholarship for her daughter at a private school, bethany academy. >> she was understandably shocked. the school says if you think this is fair or not, they say
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hey, they're going to give the daughter a scholarship. there has been a new surge in unaccompanied minors crossing the u.s. into mexico. more than 10,000 children crossed in october alone, that is more than a 100% increase from last year. most of them are coming from honduras, el salvador and guatemala. travel between the u.s. and cuba could get easier for americans. negotiators are working to restore commercial airline flights into havana. there are reports a deal is close but not done yet. it could take months before regular flights begin. >> the lack of direct flights isn't stopping cubans coming to the u.s. as heidi zhou castro reports, many are coming through texas. >> we are on the laredo international bridge crossing from mexico into the united states. these are the very steps that 28,000 cubans took this year here at the busiest port of entry for cubans seeking refugee
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status in the united states. across the country, that number is higher, 43,000 cubans entering the u.s. under a cold war provision that allows an immediately parole into the country and permanent resident status after one year. the number of asylum seekers from cuba is up 78%, a jump past president barack obama announced an opening of tie witness cuba last december. claudia said cubans are seeing this as a last opportunity to gain legal entrance into the u.s. she traveled by boat from cuba to can could not mexico, then crossed into testimony this week. meanwhile, 5,000 refugees in route to the u.s. of strandedden costa rica, unable to cross nicaragua to continue their journey north. with the situation there now a humanitarian crisis, costa rica's president says his country is paying for the u.s.'s
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immigration policies toward cubans. >> a spokesman for u.s. customs and bored herb promise tells al jazeera the administration has no plans to chain its current immigration policies towards cubans. that assurance falling on deaf ears for the cubans who already crossed this bridge. al jazeera, texas. we'll talk about the future of transportation. california has new rules over self driving cars and google isn't happy about it. the voters have spoken, the rock and roll hall of fame new inductees when we come back. >> this coral is not dead. >> techknow's team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> can affect and surprise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow - where technology meets humanity.
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♪ >> a real thriller for michael jackson fans, the album the first record to ever sell 30 million copies in the u.s. >> it has sold more than 100 million copies worldwide since released in 1982. guinness called it the best selling album and michael jackson the best selling artist ever. the latest inductees in the rock and roll hall of fame, including chicago, chosen by fans at the rock and role hall of fame foundation. other include deep purple, nwa, kiss, cheap trick and steve miller. the induction ceremony will be held in april in new york. thousands of americans are expected to head to the theaters today to see star wars, the force awakens. security at theaters nationwide has been ramped up.
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there are new rules, like no facemasks or face paint. replica weapons are also banned. >> that takes the fun out of it. $100 million in tickets already sold. that is a record but just a fraction of the money the movie is going to make, the film expected to make more from merchan dieing toys and collectibles. on: colorado out with new rules for self driving cars and the companies behind those futuristic vehicles are concerned that those new rules could put the brakes on development. >> people who have tried the company's self driving car say they like having the vehicle do all the work. >> if i had a self driving car, i could spend more time hanging out with my kids or helping them
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with their homework, finding out how their day was and not waiting until you get home and have dinner. pretty good. >> the department of motor vehicles won't let people completely relax behind the wheel. the d.m.v. would require that a licensed driver with the special certification sit in the driver's seat and be prepared to take control if necessary. this stanford researcher was considered a pioneer in studying how humans interact with technology. he warned that immediately taking control of a self driving car is not easy. >> drivers are totally disoriented and they're being asked to absorb an enormous range of activities, an enormous range of things going on to get what we call situational awareness where there was none and that turns out to be an extraordinary challenge. >> among the other guidelines proposed by california's d.m.v., drivers could still get ticketed even if the car is on auto pilot. manufacturers would have to put the car through third party
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safety tests, and automakers could only lease the self driving vehicles, not sell them outright. google says it is greatly disappointed in the proposed regulations and said the goal is to let people who can't drive have cars, but some researchers welcome the new rules. >> this is actually a big step toward public deployment of self driving vehicles. in everyday driving under conditions, what is it that people are going to do? that's important to understand how self driving cars are designed to be safe for everybody. >> we've only been talking about the proposed guidelines from the california d.m.v. regulators and manufacturers will meet early next year in sacramento and l.a. to discuss the guidelines further before they become law. analysts expect driverless cars to hit the roads in six years or less. can you imagine that? >> how is this going to effect the research into the testing of the cars? >> it's not clear, but many
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companies trying to develop these vehicles are based in california and some say google wouldn't even be able to test the cars without running afoul of the proposed new rules. many test cars don't have steering wheels or pedals and the company doesn't appear to be eager to install such devices. >> i bet the jetsons didn't have to go through these regulations. >> they had astro. >> the national zoo's youngest giant panda cub made his big debut yesterday. he is nearly four months old. he was so relaxed, he fell asleep and drooled on the examination table. he only protested when zoo keepers tried to open his mouth and cut his teeth. >> that is it for us here in new york. i'm del walters. >> coming up next from doha, more on russian president vladimir putin's news conference and his comments.
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thanks for watching. >> at a state level, i can't see any prospects for improving our relationship with turkey. >> vladimir putin launching another verbal attack on turkey over the downing of a russian military jet near the syrian border. you're watching al jazeera live from our headquarters in doha. also ahead, new report examines a vast cache of evidence committed by the syrian government on its own people. the wish government will intensify scrutiny in

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