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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  January 8, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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♪ i think it's really important for us not to suggest that if we can't solve every crime we shouldn't try to solve any crimes >> seeking support for his executive actions on gun control and the town hall meeting with supporters and critics. >> china rebounds after a week that wiped away billions, will it mean a better day for stocks in the u.s. pushing propaganda and south korea blasting music to the communist neighbors to the north days after north korea's nuclear test. new copies of mind go on sale for the first time in 70
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years. ♪ welcome to your world this morning i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm del walters and in two hours tucson, arizona will by tribute to a mass shooting that happened five years ago when it was over six dead and 13 injured. >> among the critically wounded was gabrielle giffords and president obama had proposals for gun violence and mike says the president insisted it's possible to find common ground on an issue as decisive on guns. >> follow-up to the executive actions and town hall on guns in this time there were no tears but there were some tough questions. this time it wasn't just supporters in the crowd but also opponents of president obama's actions on guns.
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>> i have been unspeakably victimized once already and refuse to let it happen again to myself or my kids. >> reporter: kimberly is a rape victim and she told mr. obama his policies were making her and her family less safe. >> nothing we are proposing that prevents you or makes it harder for you to purchase a firearm. >> reporter: the widow of chris kyle whose movie was in american sniper and shot and killed by a mentally unstable acquaintance and kyle challenged the president citing statistics and shows while gun open ship is up gun crime is down. >> i think part of it we have to recognize that we cannot outlaw murder because people who are murderering right who are they are breaking the law but also don't have a moral code that we have. >> reporter: mr. obama says he understands his new initiative is not going to stop gun violence completely. >> i think it's really important for us not to suggest that if we can't solve every crime we
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shouldn't try to solve any crimes. >> reporter: a sharer from arizona paul took issue with analogy often used by the president, if cars, toys and aspirin bottles can be safe through regulations then why not guns. >> aspirin, toys or cars they are not written about in the constitution. >> reporter: just before the president took the stage at the town hall in nearby northern virginia he published an ad in the "new york times" and included a new pledge. i will not campaign for, vote for or support any candidate even in my own party who does not support common sense gun reform. when asked by the program's host cnn cooper to respond to charges he is out to confiscate guns from american citizens mr. obama bristoled. >> are you suggesting the notion that we are creating a plot to take everybody's guns away so we can impose marshal law? a conspiracy? >> reporter: three years ago the
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daughter was killed with a bull bullet in a chicago park with friends. >> how can we have looser gun laws or tougher gun laws because i believe that is the case often in chicago and possibly the source of the gun that shot and murdered my daughter. >> reporter: mr. obama concedes his plan is not a cure all but with republicans and congress unwilling to go along he says his executive action is a step in the right direction. >> we cannot guaranty that criminals are not going to have ways of getting guns but for example it may be a little more difficult and a little more expensive. >> and what about the national rifle association the nra whose headquarters after all is a few miles from where the town hall took place in northern virginia the organizer of the town hall cnn says they are invited but nra rejected that invitation tweeting that they would not be
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part of a pr stunt orchestrated by the white house, back to you. >> mike thank you. two men are due in court this morning facing federal terrorism charges both came from iraq as refugees in 2012 and sacramento he was arrested, prosecutors alleged he traveled to seer yo to fight along extreme groups and lied to u.s. thoughts about travels and in houston indicted on charges he tried to provide material support to i.s.i.l. and texas lieutenant governor said the houston arrest is why his state wants to block resettlement of syrian refugees saying texas may have prevented quote a catastrophic terror related event in the making and saved countless lives. details behind the paris attacks and found a fingerprint in an apartment they searched last month and also said they found three handmade belts maybe
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used to carry explosives and on the run that killed 130 people in paris in november. south korea is once again broadcasting loud anti-government messages across the border into the north and that is considered an act of war by pyongyang and part of the reaction to the north claims it carried out a hydrogen bomb test and scott reports from the border. >> reporter: it's a tactic not used since august and one the north koreans call an act of war. exactly at midday friday south korea restarted its loudspeaker propaganda broadcast and a former military officers defects to the south ten years ago and says the broadcasts are effective. >> translator: there are people who defect after listening to the broadcasting, the soldiers who are at the front line listening to the loudspeakers and soldiers with fully armed weapons and the soldiers get a
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lot of education but now they are exposed to propaganda broadcasting. >> reporter: loudspeaker propaganda broadcast with 250 long border here are not just antinorth korean government and also include global new, weather and even k pop popular music from south korea. there are more than ten speaker locations and some are mobile. the south korean government here says the broadcasts will continue indefinitely. british foreign secretary phillip hammond urged them to show restraint and said they are rising to the bait but not clear how north korea will react. >> the north may respond taking hostages among tourist or ngo workers who operate in north korea and humanitarian groups who work there and not known and they are sometimes taken hostage and picked up for pseudo crimes against the state and north korea may respond like that. >> reporter: so for now the military and the people of south korea wait for the response from its northern neighbor along with
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the rest of the world. scott with al jazeera, south korea. it will be several more days before food and medical aid arrives in a syrian town where more than 40,000 people are starving and seeing harrowing images on the outskirts of damascus and children have not eaten in more than a week and what they look like and under siege by government forces for months, aid groups say supplies won't get there until sunday now the assad regime has allowed aid in. the chinese market up almost 2% today and trading halted twice to stop rapid sell offices and in china having a positive effect on most markets and european markets opening higher and u.s. stock futures trending up and positive news not carrying over to the markets of australia, japan and south korea all of which closed lower and adrian brown has details. >> reporter: in china red is
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the lucky color and tells you shares are up. nine months ago there was a lot of red, chinese investors were buoyant and share market was as its highest level since 2007. but for now that winning streak is over. the market is in a slump. since june stocks have lost more than 40% of their value. and some small investors are less than happy. don't film, we don't want to talk about it. we need to go back to play cards. >> reporter: they blame their problems on foreign speculators as well as the measure that was supposed to calm markets but actually had the reverse effect. >> translator: the government is trying to protect individual investors but to be honest the system is not perfect and the system needs to be improved. >> reporter: authorities responded to that criticism suspending the circuit breaker rule that halts trading when shares fall sharply which happened twice this week as a result the market rose on
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friday, partial recovery, panic was subsiding but the start of 2016 has set a patent for what is expected to be a very difficult year for the world's second largest economy. >> we do think there is a chance of a hard line of course just like in any economy, there is always a chance there is substantial slow down and china we put it at one in four. >> reporter: the stock market is an indicator but not the indicator of china's economy. the leadership here has more pressing issues right now namely local government debt, growing housing bubble and over capacity in state-controlled industries like coal and steel which threaten job losses in the coming months. there is what china can't control beyond is borders in neighboring north korea the military this week claimed to have successfully tested a hydrogen bomb. the markets worry about deepening diplomatic tensions between iran and saudi arabia. last week china's president
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seemed to allude to challenges confronting his country and told fruitful gains come with efforts and his way perhaps of saying it's going to be a tough year. adrian brown al jazeera beijing. landmark settlement in new york over illegal surveillance of muslims to stop investigations that are based solely on race, religion or ethnicity, a new civilian representative with political or religious activity and some ending several lawsuits of police surveillance of muslims after september 11 without evidence of criminal activity. the mother of the fugitive teen is due in court and tonya couch is in texas this hour and arraigned on charges she helped her son escape the country and extradited from mexico where her son is there and he received probation despite being convicted of killing four people driving drunk and lawyers argued
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his parents never taught him right from return. murder charges for killing an unarmed man, an officer robert olson responding to a call of a man acting er radically and opened fire on airforce veteran anthony hill even though hill was not unarmed and naked and the county da says he will seek indictment on murder charges when he presents the case to a grand jury later this month. mother of sandra bland responding to who arrested her daughter and says it's not enough a grand jury indicted the trooper for lying about the circumstances of the traffic stop and arrest. bland's mother wanted the trooper charged with battery and false arrest. >> you don't indict the folks who last saw my daughter, hand to hand contact with her but then i'm supposed to be excited about your misdemeanor? i'm not going to go start a riot but i'm absolutely angry abs
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and the whole would should be and it's put out and say it's right, it's done. no. no one should be okay with this, no one. >> reporter: arraignment date has not been set for trooper encina but began termination proceeding and arrested in july and later died in her jail cell and they ruled it a suicide. talking about the west coast a lot but a series of storms bringing risk of severe weather to the plains and nicole mitchell it has been a busy weather week. >> the storms hitting california and west coast moving across the country and the broad picture and system one is what we now have more to the east coast, little hard to see it pulling out of the four corners region but that is number two and another one off and we will talk about the next one for the west coast in the next half hour but let's get to the other two areas and we have predominately rain with this and warm enough to do it from heavy rain in kentucky down to portions of florida back behind that where it is already
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rained we have some dense fog especially louisiana and texas this morning closer to the coastline and will want to watch for that but that is also the set up with the next system pulling out and enough warm air we have a slight risk for severe weather in the louisiana and texas and hail is the primary risk but anything is possible then on the northern end of in this is mostly light but snow for places like the up of michigan for today. so one system pulls out of the eastern half and the next one develops and a couple active days in the weekend, as i said there is another one behind this. and some dramatic temperature drops coming for some parts of the country with all this going on and i'll have more in the next half hour. >> nicole thank you. oklahoma being rattled by earthquakes and the most resent and largest of 4.8 that struck fair view a few miles north of oklahoma city this past week 70 small quakes shaking the state and the problem is getting
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worse, researchers linking it to fracking and 2014 oklahoma had more than 5,000 earthquakes. u.s. troops in afghanistan. >> they are in harm's way, that is clear. >> reporter: the dangers they face and effort to clarify their mission and ahead a farmer nato commander james is going to weigh in on the situation. and hitler's manifest to after a 70 year ban and copies are back on the shelves in germany. ♪
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this morning there are new questions about the u.s. role in afghanistan, an american green
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baret killed in afghanistan. >> to help the afghan military not to be involved in direct combat and al jazeera jamie mcintyre has more from the pentagon. >> reporter: officially u.s. special operation forces are only training, advising and assisting afghan forces not fighting alongside them as they battle to retake territory from the taliban in afghanistan's southern helman providence as they explained it to al jazeera in an e-mail they travel with the afghan special operations forces up to what we usually refer to as the last covered and concealed position or an over watch position but he wrote our forces do not go on the objective with the aftghans and in the case of the combat death this week a 30-year-old staff sergeant mcclintock and two barets back to safety it pus u.s. forces directly in the line of fire advising on a clearing operation where taliban forces
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attacked pinning down u.s. and afghan troupes in a force 20-hour fire fight. >> they are in harm's way that is clear. >> harm's way you used several times. >> sure. >> the u.s. military doesn't have any reservation about saying u.s. troops are in combat in iraq. do you have any reservation about saying the same thing about afghanistan? >> this was clearly a combat situation. >> reporter: unlike iraq where u.s. air strikes are acknowledged daily and opened design for ground offensives the air strikes in afghanistan are not routinely announced and rules of engagement are far more restrictive. air power is authorized for three contingencies so protect u.s. troops on the ground and prevent casualties if afghan forces are in extreme distress and pursue remnants of al-qaeda but not the taliban so the one dozen air strikes carried out over two days by us16s from the
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air base were justified protecting those under fire not supporting the afghan forces the americans were with. the air strike rules are not just occasionally bent but sometimes unambiguously and and take the doctors without borders last october and a little noticed finding of the u.s. military investigation into the attack was that it was in support of an afghan offensive operation and therefore as the top u.s. commander in afghanistan later admitted in direct violation of the rules of engagement. >> we found under the circumstances the u.s. soft commander lacked the authority to direct the air crew to engage the facility. >> reporter: pentagon can obscure the truth of what is happening in afghanistan by saying routine missions under the veil of super secret operations. >> special operations forces we don't disclose much if anything
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about their activities in part because of the operational security. >> reporter: as the fighting flairs anew the u.s. commander in afghanistan has hinted he may ask that the draw down and eventual departure of u.s. troops already delayed once be delayed again. there is a well-known term of art for military mission that starts out very limited, largely benign and then slowly over time sometimes with the best intentions goes into something far more ambitious and dangerous and that term is mission creek. al jazeera, the pentagon. admiral james is the former nato allied commander and the dean of the fletcher school at tufts university and is from massachusetts and thank you as always for being with us and you are nato commander when they rested control of taliban and many parts of afghanistan and based on resent losses by afghan forces and american casualties
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how concerned are you that the taliban is staging a serious come back? >> i'm concerned but i am not yet at the point of believing that this entire project in afghanistan is going to fail at all. let's try and keep things in perspective here, three years ago we had 150,000 nato and american troops in afghanistan on high tempo combat mixes and losing up to a hundred soldiers killed a month. last year in afghanistan we are down to under 15,000 troops, 90% reduction, we will see losses around 30 for the entire last year. so this is not mission creep you are seeing. this is, in fact, a deflated mission, now we are seeing the taliban push back, they are showing some effectiveness but i think we will maintain our ability to continue forward in afghanistan. >> you have argued some 15,000
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foreign troops including american forces should remain there and not be withdrawn. how do you continue to make a compelling argument that the u.s. should continue to commit blood and treasure to the fight in afghanistan? >> well, let's again put things in perspective, 70 years after world war ii the u.s. still has troops in south korea, in japan, in germany, in other parts of europe. >> not active. >> and the balkins we still have troops in the balkins and think there is merit to keep them coming out successfully and think we should. >> not active insurgencys in those places. and so you know again i think the argument of keeping troops in afghanistan especially when it appears they are in certain cases engaged in combat do you believe there is a compelling case that has been made to the american people?
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>> i think there is a compelling case. i'm not sure at this point the american people are really focused on afghanistan stephanie. they are much more focused on what is happening in syria with the islamic state and what is happening in north korea at the moment. but all the more reason that we maintain this minimal level of troops who are in fact conducting some level of combat operations so let's not pars words here they are fighting but compared to where we were three years ago we've made enormous progress and should not ignore that. >> want your opinion on some of the shake ups in the world order we seem to be seeing just one year into 2016 starting with the fracture between saudi arabia and iran, what will the greatest and immediate impact in your view be? >> well, first of all, the first casualty of this will be the syrian peace process, it's very difficult to envision a diplomatic political solution where we can't have both iran and saudi arabia at least at the
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table. at the moment that seems to be impossible. they will be further knock on effects in yemen where the proxy war will continue to heat up, perhaps in lebanon and in a place to watch that folks are not talking about is the arab yanukovich persion forces where the maritime forces of persia and iran could come in conflict and buckle up with a difficult year in the middle east. >> predictions at the beginning of the year don't see people talk about north korea and claim to have tested a hydrogen bomb how dangerous is the north korean threat? >> it is incredibly dangerous. a year ago i wrote an article entitled the most dangerous country in the world. it's clearly north korea. the young, unstable, medically challenged, haircut challenged leader who is in possession of at least 5-7 nuclear weapons and increasing his ability to deliver them at range.
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whether or not that was a hydrogen bomb it shows a regime that wants to continue to push the edges, i would say north korea as i said a year ago is the most dangerous country in the world. >> really appreciate your insights and time this morning, thank you. thanks, stephanie. stephanie for the first time in decades one of the most controversial books in history is about to be republished in germany. hitler talks about beliefs and the copyright just expiring and as al jazeera dominick cane reports some are asking whether it should be on the shelves at all. >> reporter: it's author is long dead as is the party he created. but hitler's book remains. in more than 700 pages of mind camp the nazi dictator puts across communism and desire for a german dominated europe and anti-semitism and following his death in 1945 the state assumed
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the copyright to mind camp and prevented its publication in germany. but that copyright has now expired and a new annotated edition is to be published, that prospect provoked anger among some members of the jewish community. >> translator: yes the copyright has expired, so what, do i have to republish all garbage and motivate people in a negative way? i'm at a lost for words why the stupid book is being republished. >> reporter: the nazi party made great use of propaganda during 12 year rule using films, books and devices to project views and decenting voices. >> that was part of the propaganda and they have mind camp and it made an unimportant person hitler important. >> reporter: the legacy of national socialism is so long it
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can still be seen on the streets of germany today. thousands of brass plaques or stumble blocks have been laid across germany to commemorate the victims of naziism, at one address the family is remembered. they were murdered in 1944. such public reminders of the dark past illustrate the gulf between the evils of nazi germany and the liberal values of modern democratic germany. >> germany is a multi cultural society, germans are used to foreigners and germans are very well aware of their past and all the -- everything that is done wrong with the regime of the third richt and all the cruelties. >> reporter: nevertheless in resent times right wing movements such as the anti-islam
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eccgroup pagita staged regular rallies. in this context the institute of contemporary history believes it is important to publish its annotated version of mind camp so future generations are educated about the evils of national socialism, dominick cane, al jazeera, munich. mind camp was never ban for publication here in the united states, we will talk about this more by the way in the next hour. and when we come back we will talk about prayer versus productivity. muslim workers who say they were fired because of their faith and the company says they should not have walked off the job plus. >> they impregnate a young white girl before they leave which is a sad thing then we have another issue. >> we will talk about the controversial comments catapolting the maine's governor back in the spotlight.
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welcome back to your world this morning. taking a look at today's top
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stories. stock futures are high up. the shanghai closed up nearly 2% today after days of major declines. the european are higher but others closed lower south korea have stop protesting. it comes days after the north korea hydrogen bomb test. it includes everything from pop music president obama says he will only vote for a presidential canned daylight who supports common sense gun reform during a town hall hosted by cnn he defended his expanded situation on gun purchasing a firearm. >> all of us can agree that it makes sense to do everything we can to keep guns out of the
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hands of people who would try to do others harm. or to do themselves harm the meeting took place in fair faction virginia with 100 people invited by cnn the nra was also invited but would not take parliament the president also highlighted the situation in chicago where gun violence has become almost routine. as al jazeera's correspondent tells us, getting a gun in that city is easy. >> reporter: the epidemic of gun violence in the u.s. is, perhaps, at its worst in the president's home town >> it happens on the streets of chicago every day. in chicago on average someone is shot every three hours. last year 487 people were killed in nearly 3,000 shootings. >> my son ricky pike was gunned down on august 3 2012.
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when he passed, he - the church was overrun. there were people standing outside and they were all young people. >> they just can't be seen >> reporter: amanda pike is a group to which no-one wants to belong, a group that grows less exclusive every day >> my job is to make sure that nobody else joins my club, but they do. >> reporter: many of the gunmen in the mass shootings that inspired president obama to require background checks for every gun sale in the u.s. bought their weapons legally, but here in chicago police say most guns used in street violence are bought elsewhere illegally. >> i felt something hot on my leg and realized i got shot >> reporter: there are no gun stores in the city of chicago. >> there are illegal guns mainly coming from indianna no the
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streets of chicago >> reporter: the laws don't really matter here >> they don't. >> reporter: activists say gang sisters have no problem bringing weapons into the city >> everybody is focusing on background checks. that's a good measure, but you have to stop the flow of illegal guns. >> reporter: many of the victims end up here. >> each day on average at least one patient arrives with a gunshot wound in this hospital. more on friday and saturday nights. they treated 550 be patients for gunshot wounds last year. many are saved, but many dry before they make it through the front door. the violence is growing worse >> you get a lot of patients up to 30/40 patients in a 24-hour period. the middle is not necessarily shrinking. >> reporter: after returning to dangerous neighborhoods some patients come back to the hospital again and again.
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they are victims of gun shots and a black market that funnels a never-ending supply of legal weapons into the president's own town michelle is a florida state representative. she is also a gun owner and an advocate and she joins us from florida. thank you for being with us this morning. first of all, your reaction to the president's appearance at the town hall meeting. >> you know, i think it was very brave of him to do that. i think any time an elected official appears in front of a town hall it is an open-ended situation. i think it's a brave thing to do. i don't necessarily agree with how he is approaching this, so we can talk about that as you go forward what are the notions that-- one of the notions that emerged the thought that the president wants to seize all of the guns out there. as a gun owner is that something you believe the president wants to do? >> i don't think he really wants to do that, but i do think that
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there is sort of a tone deafness that he has with regard to middle america. even were his own admission, he talked about being the sort of gun culture. i think that that is something that we really need to grasp because there seems to be two americas here. as the president, i think he needs to be a uniter and not a divider. i think some of the things he is doing is hitting people as being with divisive there's a difference between tone deafness and this notion out there that the president wants to somehow seize all of the guns. there was the question from the husband of the representative gabby gifford. she was wounded in an attack. he asked how could the government do it. you work for government. in your opinion is it something to be done? >> it couldn't be done today, but i think with regard to the second amendment, people are very concerned about the slippery slope idea. i think some folks that are on
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the other side might need to look at this with an analogy to the first amendment. if we were making inroads into the first amendment this way and looking at licensing journalists, for instance, i think there might be a whole different approach to this. so i think the president is a little bit tone deaf when he compares guns to other products like televisions and toys and those kinds of things. the second amendment is in the u.s. constitution. people take that very, very seriously in this country and i think that's where i think he really runs afoul of middle america journalists have limits. we cannot slander people, we can't go on the air and say something mean about people. so when we talk about the first amendment, which is also sacrscant in this country you have to be realistic with regards to what you do and don't want >> you make a point.
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i get that. i think you could is a lot of elected officials whether journalists are mean or not, but the idea that we have no gun control, that's not true either. we do have gun control and we do have laws that are in place that are not being fully utilised. i guess if i was to advise the president or about be in the president's shoes, what i would say is this is a moment in time where people are focused on mental health and i think that's a place where everyone who is a descent emergency both on the conservative side and liberal side and any place in between, can look and say this is what we want to solve at this point you're a democrat. you're also a gun owner and you fought off an attacker in college because you had a gun. you say you want guns on college campuses and the p stchlt says he won't support people like that. do you think he will support
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you? >> god bless the president, that's great. i ran and i've been elected four times almost overwhelmingly each time except for the first time. i didn't need the president's help them and i don't think i will need it in the future do you think he is going to show up? >> no. that's okay. that's all right. i don't know whether he weed people to team up behind elected officials - we need people. i want to run on my own record. i think that's important. that's where i stand. that's great that the president is using that as a threat to some democrats, but for me i didn't get elected with his help and if i seek election again, i don't necessarily want his help and god bless him for having the ability to help other people thank you for that always t
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>> thank you hillary clinton is expected to officially accept planned parenthood's assessment. her endorsement is the first ever in a presidential primary. they vot she said she will conte to defend women's wishes on reproductive health care during a meeting last night this was said. >> these are people that take drugs. they're the ones named smoothy, shifty, these guys. they come up here, they sell their heroin and then they go back home. incidentally, half the time they impregnant a young white girl before they leave. which is a real sad thing because then we have another issue that we've got to deal with down the road spokesman for the governor
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says he wasn't talking about race, but one said it is one of the most offensive statements yet from the governor while hillary clinton said he had a racist rant. all this week ali velshi was looking at haiti. it was five years ago that the country was devastated by an earthquake. our correspondent went back there to see what happened to all the money that poured into that island. >> reporter: six years ago security cameras captured this scene from inside haiti's presidential palace. when the dust timely settled-- finally settled, more than 150,000 people will have perished from a massive earthquake which ripped through the hemisphere's poorest nation. the only bright spot, massive
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world attention. aid groups descend on haiti. in the u.s. and across the globe people and governments pledge more than 13 billion dollars in relief at the urging of those like michelle obama. >> we can all do something. we can help american red cross as it delivers the food water and medicine to save live. >> reporter: and sean pen >> reach deep and then deeper. >> reporter: double the yearly economic output of haiti before the quake. half a decade after the devastation, a number of scathing reports poses the question where did all the money go? to try and get some answers, we went to meet the person running much of the relief effort. head of the united nations mission in haiti. where is the united nations in terms of achieving some of its goals in terms of housing and
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water sanitation because when you drive around different parts of the capital, there are still tent cities, $13 billion in aid that came after the earthquake >> if i'm not mistaken, the number of people now in these camps is 60,000. so this is ongoing >> reporter: that's a huge number. 60,000 internally displaced people nearly six years after the earthquake >> when you consider that after the earthquake there were some 1.5 million people living in camps for the internally displac displaced. >> reporter: is yufr message to someone who is still in this camps, hold on a couple more years more months and we will get to you? >> no. we are already working on programs and plans to move these people out of the camps
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he has been covering the crisis in haiti since 120. he joins us now. i was there two months after the earthquake. i looked at your report and i think the thing that was the saddest to me was that it looked almost like nothing happened. so tell me that there has been progress >> there has been. if you go down town you will see the rubble is gone now. six years on there's new construction, a hotel in the area. there is investment powering into the capital. a lot of that is fostered by the clinton foundation and other partners. have that international donors are looking to get involved with. in the outskirts of the city, just on the periphery, there might be one toilet for many people. if you're one of these residents who lost their home in this terrible earthquake back in january 2010 and you've been
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living in tents since then, there is a growing frustration amongst these. you see some of the protests in the elections going on now, that it's just - you just wonder how this could happen with 13 billion dollars pledged and yet there's still an excess of 60,000 people living on the streets. >> reporter: so much money poured in. big international projects, the american red cross project is a perfect example that was parliament of a 24 million dollar initiative. what is there to show for that? >> reporter: when you look at the donations, 13 billion pledged, that whittles down to 9 million allocated, but only 7 billion disbursed. so of the money that was sent it is not clear that all was well spent. we travelled to an area where it was indicated there were six houses built with this 24 million dollars. it's not clear if that's the case. the red cross sort of provides
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these numbers in terms of what they constitute as permanent houses and what are temporary houses. they will muddy the waters a little bit in terms of building infrastructure there wasn't anything that caused you to say wow, this is six billion dollars worth of work. >> reporter: when you see that kind of money being poured into a country which represents twice the gdp of the country prior to the quake, many people say it should be tokyo with that kind of money in the circumstance. yet you still have these people living on the streets. on the other side, there are serious land tenure issues that have really plagued these well developed efforts. it is not all that clear who owns what there, so getting the tenure to put permanent houses in place has just been stymied with red tape from the government or the donors thank you for being with us and going back. you can watch more of david's series on haiti, haiti on shaky
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ground, . >> reporter: tensions were going over whether muslim workers should be allowed to pray on the job. a meat packing plant fired nearly 200 workers. they say they were fired because of their faith. the company says it acted after the group walked off the job. our correspondent reports. >> reporter: in a small room in a run-down strip mall, men gather to pass the time. they are somali immigrants who moved here no work in a-- to work in a meat processing plant. instead of breaking down sides of beef, they practice their bank shot. >> reporter: how many of you work there? these men and almost 200 more muslims at the plant are out of work. fired in december for walking off the job in a dispute over access to prayer time. >> these employees needed to pray >> reporter: this man says he
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supervised the workers at the plant for part of the nine and a half years he worked there. >> management needs to do a better job and understand people more and work with these people more instead of trying to get rid of them or pushing them out the door. they're human. we're all human. >> reporter: this is the nation's largest employer. about 210 worked there before firing almost 30% were somali. they fled violence from their country and drawn here for jobs that if you americans are willing to take. their presence sometimes brings presence here. this man worked there for nearly six years before he was fired last month over the prayer dispute, with only $70 in the bank he is putting his trust in god to provide for his wife and their eight young children.
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do you regret walking off of your job? he is quick to answer. he tells me no, absolutely not. i believe in my religion. he and other fired workers won't be able to reapply for their job for six months. that means finding work somewhere outside of the city or scraping by on unemployment. they apply for government assistance in the back of an empty somali grocery store where the owner says he won't be able to make rent come february if his customers can no longer afford to buy. a few blocks away, the owner of the strip mall, frets over the prospect that fired workers will leave >> i don't have lots of customers because if necessity leave, all my customer, i have to close my business. >> reporter: the council on islamic relations is negotiating to reinstate the table.
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the company did tell al jazeera it made every effort to accommodate prayer at this plant as long as it didn't disrupt beef production. it told the workers it couldn't guarantee prayer every day. there is a glimmer of hope. in a statement they say: >> reporter: this man is the local imam. he is also one of the fired workers. >> translation: i remind people we can live without work, but we cannot live without prayer. especially if you're a muslim. the life without prayer is nothing. >> reporter: about 400 muslims still work at the plant, but the help wanted sign is out and people are starting to apply to fill 200 open slots
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new rules for what you eat the government is out with the latest guidelines and some foods, let's just say, are getting a pass.
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the obama administration has release $its latest guidance on what americans should and should not eat. they're updated every five
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years. what makes the list can also be influenced by politics. >> reporter: limit your sugar just one of the recommendations in the new federal dietary guidelines. they say americans should take in no more than 10% of the daily calories in added sugars. the guidelines recommend a mix of food and vegetables, proteins, grains and oils >> foods that are good for you and taste good too. >> reporter: school programs. >> we're out of milk. >> reporter: they're also recommend low fat diary products even though recent stipdz show americans may be better off with whole milk products >> we have these guidelines that have pushed people away from eggs and butter and milk and they come back and say we're wrong. my question is for both of you, what are we going to do to make sure it doesn't happen in the future
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>> reporter: with the exception of colonel ester ol, most issues haven't changed. critics say the recommendations may not be the most healthy and they allege the guidelines often tip toe around the agricultural industry. >> we hear cryptic chemicals, major source of fatty acid. how about eat less cheese or drink less soda or eat less meat, particularly processed meat >> reporter: an advisory committee suggested cutting back on red and processed meats but that was dropped from the final guidelines. instead the recommendations say teen boys and adult men are consuming too much protein and advises them to reduce meat, poult bring and examples 69th award nomination s are out. this drama leading the way.
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>> don't go boy scout on me. don't tell me there's no rule book despite receiving nine nominations, the 1950s lesbian romance received nine nominations and wilderness adventure received eight nominations ahead in our next hour we're awaiting the latest jobs report due out in half an hour. will it be enough to revive stocks cut off in syria, many towns lay siege we're back in two minutes with your world this morning. is morning. >> meet the unsung hero of social change. >> i feel like i'm suppose to do something, >> breaking down barriers. >> sometimes i have to speak when other people say be quiet. >> shaping our future. >> i actually am committed to a different, better, stronger, healthier america.
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>> i lived that character. >> we will be able to see change.
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heading higher, stocks climb in china after a volatile week. traders are hoping the good news continues this morning. >> if something is harder to get and it's more expensive to get, then fewer people get them making the case for his executive actions on gun control, critics say the president has gone too for far under siege, starving as the government, rebels and i.s.i.l. all fight for control revisiting a dark past.
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hitler's manifesto goes on sale in germany for the first time in decades welcome to your world this morning right now stock futures in the u.s. are pointing up towards a higher open. that is an about big reversible from the day and week we saw on global markets over night it closed up nearly 2% trading in china was halted twice this week to stop a rapid sell off and this morning u.s. traders are anxiously aawaiting the monthly jobs report. it is out in 30 minutes with most analysts expecting numbers to come in above 200,000 getting to it with our correspondent and first of all let's talk about what, if anything, we can take out of the fact that there was some good news coming out china >> reporter: it is because the authorities took the
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circuit-breakers off. we saw volatility at the open. they're also rumors circulating that the authorities went in and bought share. when you do that and you engineer that, that lifts the price of shares. what you can take is that the authorities wanted a positive we shouldn't read too much into that. going back to what started this, which is sentiment in china that the economy is slowing and that the government is maybe mismanaging how to address those concerns. >> reporter: exactly. sentiment backed up by economic reports because the week kicked off with a report showing that manufacturing had contracted for the 10th straight month and it was weaker than expected. that's what really kicked off this route in stocks if you will. there were also very serious concerns around the world about whether chinese authorities really have a handle on the situation. you saw circuit-breakers be introduceed and then they took them away. the big thing that really is
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worrying people as well are the kurn seep de-- currency devaluations. it was set higher today, but when you see a country devaluing its currency, what does it signal? necessity want to export their way out of trouble. they're trying to engineer this massive turn out an investment and manufacturing-driven growth model to an economy that is driven by consumer spending. they're not pulling that off. it signals they're looking desperate and that with a desperation was basically circled the globe one thing is people see the chinese markets and the global markets and they think it means the health of the u.s. market is bad because the to stock market with falling. it is supposed to be better. >> reporter: we're going to see how the jobs market did last month and the u.s. jobs machine has been going at pace. the u.s. economy is growing steadily. can it be an island of stability
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in a world where the global economy is not looking very strong this year. there are all sorts of problems with the global economy. china has been a major one because it was the engine of global growth. its economy has been slowing down for years remand it looks like it may be slowing down far more sharply than people expected, even expected in august. we also have the weight of very low oil prices. oil prices also bottoming out this week because of the global glut. that drags down prices which seems like a great thing but not really because it's really bad for emerging market that depend on those exports. it can be deflationary precious. if we get a job report over 200,000 thanks for being with us see you in half an hour. south korea is continuing it's propaganda battle with the north blasting loud anti-government audio messages aimed at the north. this is the international community as increasing pressure
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over claims that it carried out a hydrogen bomb test. >> reporter: it's a tactic not used since august and one the north koreans call an act of war. exactly at midday south korea started it's propaganda broadcast. a military officer defected to the south 10 years ago. she says the broadcasts are effective. >> translation: there are people who after listening, they soldiers equipped with weapons. they get a lot of education but now they're exposed to propaganda praud casting. >> reporter: those laud speaker propaganda along the 250 kilometer border here aren't just anti north korea government. they include global news, weather and pop music from south korea. there are more than 10 speaker
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locations and some are mobile. the south korean government here says the broadcasts will continue indefinitely. british foreign secretary urged south korea to show restraint and said that the broadcasts are rising to the bait. it's not clear how north korea will react. >> the north might also respond by taking hostages among tourists or the ngo workers. there are humanitarian works that work in north korea. these guys are sometimes sort of taken hostage and picked up for pseudo crimes against the state. they might respond like that >> reporter: so for now the military and the people of south korea wait for the response from its northern neighbor along with the rest of the world two men are due in court this morning facing federal terrorism charges, both of them coming to the u.s. from iraq as refugees in 2012. this man was arrested. he travelled to syria to fight
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alongside groups and then lied to u.s. authorities. in houston this man has been indicted on charges that he tried to provide material support to i.s.i.l. the governor of texas saying the arrest is one of the reasons why his state wants to block the resettlement of syrian refugees saying that texas might have prevented a catastrophic terror-related event in the making and saved countless lives. new details about the search for the fugitive in the paris att k attack. they found the fingerprint of abdel hamid abaaoud. they found three belts. abdel hamid abaaoud has been on the run since the attacks in november later today touson will mark five years since the shooting of five people. a senior washington
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correspondent reports. >> reporter: it was a follow-up to president obama emotional announcement on his executive action. this time there were no tears, but there were some tough questions. this time it wasn't just supporters in the crowd, but also opponents of president obama's actions on guns >> i have been unspeakably victimized once already. >> reporter: this woman is a rape victim. she told mr obama his policies were making her and her family less safe. >> nothing that we're proposing that prevents you or makes it harder for you to purchase a firearm. >> reporter: this is the widow of the man who was shot and killed by a mentally unstable acquaintance. gun crime is down >> i think we have to recognise
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that we cannot out law murder because people who are murdering, right, are the - they're breaking the law but they don't have a moral code that we have. >> reporter: mr obama says he understands it is not going to stop gun violence completely >> i think it is important for us not to suggest that if we can't solve every crime, we shouldn't try to solve any crimes. >> reporter: a sheriff from arizona took issue with an analogy often used by the president. if cars, toys and as by rin bottles can be make more safe, then why not guns? >> aspirin, toys and cars are not written about in the constitution >> reporter: before the president took the stage in nearby virginia, he included a new pledge:
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>> reporter: when asked by the program's host cnn's cooper to respond to charges that he wants to kon any indicate guns >> are you suggesting that the notion that we are creating a plot to take everybody's guns away so that we can impose marshall law is a conspiracy? >> reporter: three years ago this girl was killed by a bullet while standing in a fashg >> how can we stop trafficking of guns from one to another state ch state. >> reporter: mr obama concedes his plan isn't a cure-all, but with republicans in congress unwilling to go along, he says his executive action is a step in the right direction >> we can't guarantee that criminals are not going to have ways of getting guns.
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but, for example, it may be a little more difficult and a little more expensive. >> reporter: what about the national rifle association, the nra whose headquarters, after all, is just a few miles from where the town hall took place in northern virginia. the nra rejected the vision to attend tweeting that they would not be part of a pr stunt orchestrated by the white house. back to you thank you very much. the new york city police department is promising changes after reaching a settlement over a controversial practice, monitoring muslims. our correspondent has more. >> reporter: the reports that the new york police department had been monitoring muslims sparked protest and lawsuits. >> what is the lead that sends them into organization for 10 years at a time >> reporter: now a settlement in two of the three cases against the nwpd will mean tighter restrictions for the police.
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as part of this settlement the nwpd will reinstate an independent torn attorney to monitor the unit. the department has fled to place shorter time limits on its investigations and put in writing that investigations into religious or political activity have to be based on evidence rather than affiliation. the department has agreed to remove a report called radicalization in the west from its website. the report has been discredited and some consider it discriminatory. the city of new york and the the nwpd will not have to admit any wrongdoing. they have long maintained they never acted on any information gleaned from those surveillance activities. in a statement the aclu said:
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new york mayor also reacted to the agreement saying: >> reporter: the nwpd says these new mopped any indications bring the department's surveillance guidelines closer to those used by the f.b.i. the settlement is now in the hands of a federal judge who must give it final approval you said this is affecting two of the three law sites that have been filed. what about that third? about that third, it involves 11 people who have been accused by - or have accused the nwpd of crossing state lines to profile them. that case was initially thrown out by a federal court. it is reinstated and remains ongoing thank you very much storms of that battered california that week are making their way east
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>> reporter: we have seen them pull out. this is the first storm that we've been monitoring all over the country. there's a second one out of the four corners region. it is harder to see the organization over the mountains once this moves away and gets more moisture from the gulf. that will be very clear. another one that is starting to approach the west coast that will have to be watched. this number one causing problems right now and that is rain. anywhere from about the different great lakes region all the way down to the south-east. there's some theirs of dense fog in the same places that we can see some storms. especially along the coastline. later today it's more of a hail risk, but anything is possible. a risk for some stronger storms. the new system will be pulling out. on the north side of system number one we have some areas of snow. most of this is light.
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we're talking two or three inches. we do have enough cold air to support that. as one lifts away, another one with develops south ward and that will keep things active even as we head into the weekend. in the meantime, with all of this going on, we're going to see some temperature changes again. warm enough air to support that severe weather today. here it is 33, but i'm jumping forward to monday morning, the pattern changes some of the coldest air of the season, especially for portions of the mid west. we could be starting the day, again this is into next week, but i'm just making you think about it now so you can start digging out all the warm clothes out again, below zero it is going to be more days before food and medical surprise arrive in a syrian toup where more than 40,000 people are
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starving-- town. we are seeing frightening images coming out of madaya. some children are saying they haven't eaten in more than a week. the bashar al-assad regime has allowed aid to get in the situation is desperate in several towns nearby. 185,000 people in and around damascus are cut off. the u.n. says 42,000 people are trapped in madaya to the south. allies of bashar al-assad government has besieged that town since july. the u.n. says i.s.i.l. have trapped 200,000 people have been trapped in a town. other towns have been blocked. around 12.5,000 people are trapped elsewhere. our correspondent from the beqaa valley in neighboring lebanon >> reporter: we've spoken to the u.n. office in syria and damascus earlier today. they told us that there is going to be an opportunity to get aid
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into some of those besieged areas, particularly in madaya. however, it is going to take a few days to get that aid in. they're predicting monday or later than that. it's all part of a four-stage deal that was started back in september. it was a u.n.-brokered deal. turkey and iran helped to negotiate on different sides there. it's to help initially a ceasefire in an area to the border, but also idlib in some shia villages that have agreed to the ceasefire. last week some people were released from those areas as well. now we're hearing the third part of the deal and that is the aid the aid going to syria won't get there until sunday an indication of the power of television because those images being broadcast worldwide yesterday over the last 48 hours. so much change, so fast so good.
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hitler's manifesto back in germany. tribal leaders are calling for an end of the wildlife refugee in oregon. why they have no claim to the land. -- they have no claim to the land.
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a dangerous search in southern new jersey. crews are looking for hundreds of unexplode world war ii shells. they are digging up an area where 300 unexploded shells were found. the search is expected to go on until mid-february
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one of the most controversial books are back on the shelves. mein kampf, the copyright expired and some in germany are asking why it was printed at all. our correspondent is live in germany. what has the reaction been? >> reporter: to give you a sense of perspective, there were around 780 journalists here-- 780 journal - diabetes 80-- 80 journalists here. this is the volume of mein kampf. it is far bigger than the original second volume that was written by adolf hitler. it is full of an notations and critiques of nazi policy, of the ideology put forward by adolf hitter. there are many who are vehemently opposed to the
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republication of this. i spoke to the jewish community and one lady told me she felt this was garbage and why should it be republished. she was speechless. she could not find words to describe her feeling at the prospect of this book beak republished. then that same - this same book, the annotated version of it, the authors here say it is necessary to publish this book because the copyright laws have changed here in germany insofar as this is concerned. the copyright law has expired regarding adolf hitler which meant they felt they had to publish this book to in some way undo the damage that mein kampf has done and may do in the future. that's what they say why they believe that this book, their version should be published live for us in germany, dominic, as always thank you
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a curator at the permanent museum, joining us from washington this morning. steven, good morning. thank you for your time. as you know in germany there are stricter laws on what is called dangerous speech and it is particularly sensitive about speech and symbols that harken back to the nazi past. what is the lift on the ban of mein kampf signify if anything? >> i think after 70 years of the ban, which was initiated first by the allies in 1945, i think it raises a lot of issues about how we address this particular dangerous speech. particularly at a time in which you have rising anti semitism, rising racism and zeen phobia in europe. i think it is going to be a challenge for how this will be addressed throughout europe around the world the world jewish congress is
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one of the groups that want a continued ban on the publication. in your view is the concern then warranted, especially as you point out of the recent rise of far right groups in germany? . i think there is a real concern about the rise of anti semitism, the rise of racism and whether mein kampf will actually fuel some of this extremism and radicalisism. but i think the challenge is how do we deal with that. is banning it the answer or is it confronting it directly. i think this is a challenge particularly in our contemporary environment. anybody that wants in book can go to the internet and download it for free. you can download it in a variety of different languages. the way to best address this is to really confront it in public
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forums, in education and in scholarship i think that's an important point because mein kampf has never been banned for publication in the u.s. does the rise of groups like pegita, and i don't to drew a too fine a point between them and nazis, does it stop - mein kampf was only a small part of nazi propaganda, imagine if they had the tools that i.s.i.l. has. >> you raise a very good point. even though, for instance, the bav remarks ian government had held copyright for mein kampf and used it to prohibit the rehad you beenly indication of the book-- republication, it was often ignored in europe, in the middle east. it was still being published in spite of the fact that legally
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the government had the copyright is there a danger in having it banned, in not having it taught in some way in context and ignoring that part of history in germany? >> i think this has been the subject of some concern, particularly among german educators and others that if you continue to ban it, it packages forbidden fruit-- becomes forbidden fruit. so young people will go to the internet, they will get a copy without any an notations or critical commentary and they will read it and imbibe some of those ideas. that may be a more dangerous issue than actually - and that i think is a greater danger thank you for your insights this morning. >> thank you very much when we come back, we're going to talk about a different
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truth of what is happening in afghanistan a look at pentagon's veiled language and what it could moon for afghanistan >> reporter: el nino's devastating impact on the homeless population of l.a.
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>> still living in these tent cities. >> we're back to square minus one. >> the city is a powder keg at the moment. >> you see transactional sex and no one is held to account for that. >> the united nations has never accepted responsibility for this. >> an ali velshi on target special:
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welcome back to your world this morning. it is 8.29 eastern taking a look at the top stories. obama says he will never support any candidate who does not support common sense gun reform. the president defended his executive actions adding more background checks on gun sales. he says it will not make it more difficult for law aabiding people to purchase a firearm south korea continuing with brought casts across to the north reports today that nearly two dozen people have died of starvation in the syrian town of madaya. these images have been emerging from the town on the outskirts of damascus
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this morning are new questions about the u.s. role in afghanistan. an american green beret was killed during a fight against the taliban. an increase of about 30% of died from last year. our correspondent has more from the pentagon. >> reporter: officially u.s. special operations forces are only training, advising and assisting these afghan forces, not fighting alongside them. as they battle to retake territory from taliban in the helmand province. as a spokesman explained, they travel with the afghan special operations forces up to what we usually refer to as the last covered and concealed position or an overwatch position. but he wrote: >> reporter: still in the case of the combat death this week of 30-year-old army staff sergeant matthew mcclintock and two
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wounded soldiers, that assist policy put u.s. forces directly in the line of fire. advising of a clean operation where taliban forces attacked in a fire fight >> they are in harm's way. >> reporter: you used the word in harm's way several times. >> sure. >> reporter: the u.s. military doesn't have reservation to sending troops in combat in iraq. do you have any reservation about saying the same thing about afghanistan? >> this was clearly a combat situation. >> reporter: unlike iraq where u.s. air strikes are acknowledged daily and openly designed to facilitate ground defenses, the air strikes in afghanistan are not routinely announced and the rules of engagement are more restrictive. air power is authorised for three contingencies. to protect u.s. troops on the ground, to prevent casualties if
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afghan forces are in extreme distress and pursue remnants of al-qaeda but not the taliban. the one dozen air strikes carried out over two days by u.s. f 16s from bagram air base were justified as protecting the u.s. commando,s who were under fire, not supporting the afghan forces the measures with. the air strike rules are not just occasionally bent but sometimes unambiguously broken. with the attack against the doctors without borders in october, it was in support of an afghan offensive operation. therefore, the top u.s. commander later admitted, in direct violation of the rules of engagement. >> the report found that under the circumstances, the u.s. commander lacked the authority to direct the air crew to engage the facility. >> reporter: the pentagon can obscure the truth of what is
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happening in afghanistan by having the vale of super secret operations. >> with regard to special operations, we don't disclose much, if anything, about their activities in part because of operational security. >> reporter: as the fighting continues anew, the president in afghanistan hinted that he may is the that the draw-down and departure of troops already delayed one p once be delayed again. >> reporter: there's a well-known term of art for a military mission that starts out limited, largely benign and slowly over time sometimes with the best intentions, morphs into far more ambitious and dangerous, and that term is mission creep i spoke with former nato supreme allied commander earlier here on your world this morning. he disagrees that this is mission creep. he also says that the current number of american troops stationed in afghanistan is
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necessary to keep the country out of taliban control. >> let's try and keep things in perspective here. three years ago we had 150,000 nato and american troops in afghanistan on high tempo missions. we were losing up to 100 soldiers killed a month. last month in afghanistan we're down to 15,000 troops. we will see losses around 30 for the entire last year. this isn't mission creep you're seeing. this is, in fact, a deflated mission. now we're seeing the taliban push back. they're showing some effectiveness, but i think we will maintain our ability to continue forward in afghanistan you have argued that the sum 15,000 foreign troops including american forces should remain there and not be withdrawn. how do you continue to make a compelling argument that the u.s. should continue to commit
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blood and treasurer to the fight in afghanistan? >> well, let's put things again in perspective. 70 years after world war ii the u.s. still has troops in south korea, in japan, in germany, in other parts of europe they're not active insurgencies in those places >> we still have troops in the balkans. they certainly have troops in long-term to make something come out successfully they're not active insurgencies in those places. so again i think the argument of keeping troops in afghanistan, especially when it appears they are in certain cases engaged in combat, do you believe there is a compelling case that has been made to the american people? >> i think there is a compelling case. i'm not sure at this point the american people are really focused on afghanistan, stephanie. they're more focused on what is happening in syria with the
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islamic state and north korea at the moment, but all the more reason that we maintain this minimal -- minimal level of troops who are cubing some level of combat exercises. we have made enormous progress and we should not ignore that the top u.s. commander in afghanistan says he wants to keep the current number of troops there as long as possible. >> reporter: there has been strong reaction from the mother of sandra bland about the charges filed against the texas state trooper who arrested her daughter. it is said that it is unjust that the grand jury only indicted for lying over the traffic stop the mother wants him to be charged with battery and false arrest. >> he had hand to hand conduct with her and i'm supposed to be excited by your miss demeanour.
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i am absolutely an greechlt the whole world should be to think that this would be just put out here and we would be okay and say all right, it's done. no. no-one should be okay with this. no-one a date has not been set, but the police department has gun termination proceedings. bland was arrested in july and she later died in her cell another group is calling on those armed protesters in oregon to leave the federal wildlife center. they have been there for nearly a week. local tribal leaders say enough is enough. >> reporter: on the burns indian reservation about 800 acres of land just outside town, a message. >> go. we don't need you here. you're on our burial grounds.
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get the hell out of here. >> reporter: his ancestors make the high desert home for thousands of years before being scattered by the west ward expansion. their land taken by white settlors and the government. they didn't gain formal federal recognition until 1972. about half the tribe, 200 people or so, live on the current reservation >> we have to look at the planning down the road, not just at this moment because each of us have got grand kids coming up >> reporter: tribal leaders were among these who spoke up at the emotional community meeting called by the county sheriff >> they have no understanding. they have no concept of what - i mean, did the world just start back in the 1860s when the first settlors came into this area? no. >> reporter: the issue of native american lands and sovereignty are clearly not part of the occupying group's stated plan to
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return current federal property to the control of local ranchers. >> i really don't know much about that, so that is interesting and they have rights as well. i would like to see them be freed from the federal government as well. they're controlled and regulated by the federal government, very tightly, and i think they have a right to be free like everybody else >> reporter: as the armed presence continues, they question how the take over is being handled. >> if i was out there with my guns and rifles and went to my native brothers, what would happen? >> reporter: it is still anybody's guess what will happen. despite the tone of the meeting, the occupiers say they're still getting support and encouragement from locals. it is clear little of that support is coming from the original residents of this land
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the original locals they certainly do have a claim. the labor department's monthly job's report. the jobless rate is unchange at 5% what do they mean? >> reporter: it is a fantastic headline number. 292,000 jobs were created last month. that was well ahead of expectations and well above that crucial 200,000 mark. markets are absolutely going to love that. we had a good showing on construction jobs up 45,000, professional and business services at a 73,000 jobs of which 43,000 were temporary and that brings us to average hourly wages. this is the bit of the report that there's not very much good news in average hourly wages. they declined one cent to $25.24 an hour. so the job machine is going, but we're not seeing that wage pressure build up and that was a
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concern of officials that's why such a focus on the political discourse on the presidential election as well. when you talk about markets, is this great jobs number going to be enough to balance out the jittery sentiment coming out of china? >> reporter: yeah. givenment dow and market is up, yeah. this is a big warm blanket around the market. go the jobs machine is moving the pace. that is a knee jerk reaction. probably what they will look at is the beginning of the earning season. we're going to see how things like low commodity prices, especially how a strong dollar is eating into corporate profits because we're hitting a point now in the american economy where productivity, the amount of goods output for worker per hour has been going down and margins are tight. in terms of skreezing every
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little built, that is becoming harder and harder to do. we may see corporate process get hit because the dollar is so strong always bringing us the big picture. thank you you soon be able to buy stock in one of the largest oil company. the state owned company that owns 15% of the world's oil is looking at the option, the stock sale will bring billions which is facing a 100 billion dollars shortfall because of the lower oil prices. el nino storms leaving those in l.a. with fewer options. >> reporter: it doesn't seem to be working press cue to the bri p pe sse uee .
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>> we're making history right now...
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>> al jazeera america storms are bringing what has been a rare sight to southern california. snow. that's how excited i am about this. 30 inches of snow has fallen in last few days. it is the first time the area has seen that much fresh powder in six years. another two feet of snow is expected by the weekend nicole mitchell you were out there in the frozen area where you call home. you say it's going to be colder there. >> yeah. definitely some cold air coming in. the systems that are rolling off the coastline are keeping things
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cold. eventually will lead to a pattern change early into next week. that will change some of those temperatures. it has been a mild season, though. so relatively not unexpected in january. the latest system is coming here. you can see it's pulling out of the four corner. a little bit of a break for the west coast. a little bit of initial moisture coming in. there have been a couple of spring kels. then more widespread into the day tomorrow. tomorrow's forecast and you can see that moisture moving in. not quite as heavy rain for southern portions of california, for example, still some great snow for some areas. the system moving out is still creating some winter woes, and then right along the southern california, the coastline with the pattern high surf, high waves and coastal flooding this
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morning. here is the broad picture, though. we talked about those temperatures. not only a little cooler in the west coast where we have had system after system, enjoy it while you have it because early into next week we could have subzero temperatures. winter a little more ingrained the storms that are generated by el nino are putting the homeless population at l.a. for risk. for months the city has been trying to convince the homeless to move away from the dangerous river banks. our correspondent reports. >> reporter: the water, it will take up down in seconds. >> reporter: powerful el nino driven storms have been pounding southern california for days, but months before the down pour started, the danger of floosh flooding have been pounded into the minds of the county's hundreds of homeless people who live on the water beds. >> i look at the water, i look
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down and think, please god, i hope it's not me or any of my friends >> reporter: michael and the other homeless on the river have moved to higher ground, but keep a very wary eye on the skies are. for the past five months officers have been patrolling the river beds directing the homeless to temporary shelters. >> we're not allowing people to come back to camp in the waterways, in case a flash flood. >> reporter: break in the rain on thursday gave this officer and his men a chance to convince the few to stay behind to get to a shelter >> we would like you to be out of the waterway. would you come up for me? >> reporter: brian smith knows the danger. >> i went to the shelter and they wake us up at 5 and drop us off at 6 o'clock and i had nowhere to go the next day. so i went under the bridge
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>> reporter: with more than 200 beds available, this is one of the special shelters set up by the county where homeless can escape el nino. >>way set these up to be able to protect as many homeless persons as possible during the el nino rains and the unpredictable winter season >> reporter: on wednesday a report was issued that said the county's efforts to help the homeless had been unconscionable and grossly inadequate. the shelters are in addition to 16 others that can serve some 3100 people but that's a drop in the bucket for the 34,000 homeless. this is one. lucky ones. >> as far as the winter shelters, they're very significant for me. i'm very, very grateful to have it. >> reporter: with more rain on the way, officials know they have a lot more work ahead of them.
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>> it's hard for us to leave. we can't go and live because right here we're happy, you know, and it's like our community, our house the govp nor of mayne is making headlines over what he said about drug dealers in a town meeting on wednesday night >> these are not guys that take drugs. these come from new york. they come up here, sill the heroin and then-- sell the heroin and then go back home. half the time they impregnant a white girl before they leave, which is a sad thing because then we have another issue that we've got to deal with down the road a spokesman for lepage said he was not making reference to race, but one strategist called the comments one of the most offensive statements yet from
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this governor and hillary clinton called what he said a racist rant this animal is on an endangered list. they have recovered so it can be consider just threatened not merely extinct. they have been listed as endangered since 1967. a balanced diet taking on a new meaning what to eat to stay healthy.
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medical marijuana. they're wondering how they will give. 23 out of 23 states where marijuana is legal. officials are starting to take a look at the effects of legal marijuana on the state's economy. the editor says the effect in color, ada has been slow. >> it certainly started out slower than the state expected. it had anticipated a certain amount of marijuana revenue coming in, in 2014. that was just impacted by a small number of stores that were opened early on in the process.
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certainly this has made an impact on small communities, towns, schools, an even the cities. everybody is seeing an impact, though. it's worth noting they're not seeing as much as an impact as was promised by some of the activists who pushed through it was said the crime rates have stayed relatively unchanged. the obama administration has released guidance on what americans should and should not eat. the guidelines are updated every five years based on the latest nutritional science. what makes the list can be influenced also by politics. >> reporter: limit your sugar, just one of the recommendations in the federal dietary guidelines. they say americans should take in no more than 10% of daily calories in added sugars. it recommends a mix of foods. >> foods that are good for you
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and taeft good too. >> reporter: foods chosen for school lunch programs feeding 30 million children a day. >> we're out of milk >> reporter: they also recommend low fat dairy products even thoep recent studies show americans may be better off with whole milk products >> we have these guidelines that have pushed people away from eggs and butter and milk and so forth. then they come back and say we're wrong. so my question is for both of you, what are we going to do to make sure that doesn't happen in the future >> reporter: with the exception of colonel ester ol limits, their positions for most issues hasn't changed. the recommendation may not be the most healthy. critics allege the guidelines tip toe around the agricultural history >> we here kriptive, mashlg sources of acid. how about eat less cheese or
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drink less soda or eat less meat, particularly processed meat >> reporter: an advisory committee suggested cutting back on red and processed meats but that was dropped from the final guidelines. instead, the recommendations say teen boys and adult men are consuming too much protein and advises them to reduce the overall intake of meat, poultry and eggs there is a saying that everything in moderation, but i have to admit i agree with it really is getting complex yes. eat food, not too much, mostly plants. i'm going to take that to the bank i think that is so simple it makes sense. the 69th annual british award nomination. the cold war drama is leading the way. >> we need to know what russia was telling you >> we're not having this conversation. >> don't go boy scout on me. >> don't tell me that
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receiving nine nominations, car ol that 1950s lesbian romance 9 nominations. the best picture category along with the revonett i like beast of no nations which was not nominated i have not seen most of those films except for spotlight they're a precursor to the awards. so many being made here in the u.s. as well that's it for us here in new york new information concerning the paris attack investigation coming up. belgium authorities say they have details found at the abdel hamid abaaoud home a reminder for the latest
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news any time. go to our website, al jazeera.com. have a great weekend. salvation as a weapon of war, 400,000 syrians under siege says the u.n. hello, this is al jazeera live from doha. also on the program south korea turns up the volume, propaganda broadcasts begin again across the border. there are many, little to celebrate in a birthday

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