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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  January 11, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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♪ breaking news overnight rock icon david bowie died after a 18 month battle with cancer and fans with heart break around the world. facing justice mexico extradites el chapo to the united states. jury selection underway regarding freddie gray on his fateful way to his death. a princess trial underway for tax fraud. ♪
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his voice and art industry were an emblem in the 70s but the rock music spanned from that era to today from freddy mercury to west and showed us how to dance has died after a long bout with cancer and welcome to your world i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm delve walters and shocking everyone and age of 69 released an album and poised for a come back and we have more. ♪ david bowie had style and repeatedly reinvented himself over five decades. ♪ born david jones in 1947 in south london bowie rose to international fame with the 1969 space oddity.
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♪ from cult figure to rock star he took pop in a new direction with his alter egoziggy star dust with decadance and took on iconic roles in movies also starring as the goblin and inducted in the rock and roll hall of fame in 96, in an interview in 2003 he acknowledged what his ever changing image meant for the evolution of his music. >> most people they get to 20 and they stay 20. it didn't happen for me though i just went on and on and suddenly i'm 56. so i have to write from this unique perspective of somebody who never stopped being 20 and i went on, isn't that weird. >> reporter: last friday on his 69th birthday david bowie released the 25 studio album
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black star and praised the sounds and his death gives new meaning for the video lazaruth. ♪ he died after a 18-month battle with cancer, his son film director duncan jones writing on twitter sorry and sad to say it's true and david cameron called him a master of reinvent who got it raid -- right and was a game changer and tweeting out and may god's love be with you david bowie. >> remarkable to hear from the vatican on david bowie and received a lot of honors in his career and one he turned down a knight hood from the queen of england in 2003, he said he had no intention of accepting it and didn't know what it was for and not what he worked for all his
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life. >> thank you very much. well as mentioned the tributes are pouring in from around the world for david bowie and paul lester writes for the guardian newspaper compared his impact to john lennon. >> it's a very long period to be creatively brilliant. and talking in terms of the beetles as being the only other artist who managed to sustain the very creative along with that and he has gone longer a 10-12 and the period he did his best work and those records he released during that period like ziggy star dust allowed the young americans and heros and they had an astonishing impact on the development of popular music. bowie was one step ahead defining the next big thing in pop music.
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mexican authoritys want to talk to sean-penn with el chapo and guzman is in custody and "rolling stone" published a secret interview he gave to the actor while on the run. the interview was given exclusively to sean-penn and mexican artist at an undisclosed ranch and guzman answers questions by penn how he got involved in the drug business and history of violence. "rolling stone" says penn and guzman met in october and drug lord agrees to be interviewed at a later time when another face-to-face meeting proved impossible and magazine said guzman provided video answers to
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questions he was sent and "rolling stones" agreed to give guzman the right to approve the article about him and interview and although the magazine says the drug lord did not demand any changes. on friday mexican authorities said guzman's communications with producers and actors helped lead them to him. over the weekend mexican authorities began the process of extraditing the drug lord to the united states something the u.s. has wanted for a while now and charges against him here date back years and the obama administration criticized the interview with guzman and white house calling the interview maddening. jury selection beginning with the death of freddie gray and facing the severe charges of six officers on trial and he drove the van that carried gray to the police station after arrest and al jazeera john is live for us in baltimore and john what should we expect this morning from the new trial? >> good morning del and good
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morning stephanie on this chilly morning in baltimore where jury selection is about to get underway in the next couple of hours in the second trial associated with the death of freddie gray and this trial is already marred in controversy and unsettled business. officer junior faces the most serious charges of six officers indicted in the death of freddie gray, second degree murder. and he drove the police van in which freddie gray suffered a lethal spinal cord injury and a death after his arrest sparked antidemonstrations and riots. >> according to prosecution he was aware from officer porter that freddie gray asked for medical help and he didn't get it for him and he was in control of the van. >> reporter: the six involved in the arrest were criminally charged and contend that he was told that freddie gray asked for medical help and instead of calling paramedics goodson made a stop to pick up another det n detainee and they were not
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called until the station 25 minutes later when police found gray unresponsive. to convict him prosecutors according on fellow officer william porter and trial on criminal charges including involuntary manslaughter ended in a mistrial last month. news the jury made up of whites and blacks had skirmishs but it was mostly peaceful. >> we are still watching and a statement to show we are still watching and nothing is going to slip past us. >> reporter: intend to retry porter in june but could be center stage again as a witness in goodson's trial. >> porter is being forced to testify. it's against his will but the judge is ordering it and if he doesn't do it he can face contempt charges. the prosecution needs him and they came up with a solution. they are giving him limited or use immunity for his testimony,
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anything he says on the stand against goodson cannot be used against porter at trial later this year. >> reporter: attorneys appealed in a higher court stayed the order putting porter testimony in limbo and the state's case in potential jeopardy until a decision is made. and after 9:00 this morning judge barry williams here will have a pool of 150 potential jurors to choose from and last time it took him two days and expected to take at least that this time around. >> the case of the first officer tried william porter ended in a hung jury and what does that mean for this case? >> well, this is where the controversy comes in because it's possible that this trial won't get underway this week or a long time and here is why the judge barry williams compelled william porter to testify as a key prosecution witness in this trial but what has happened is william porter who is the guy whose case was a mistrial before in december and who won't be
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retried until june, his defense team have taken his case to the court of special appeals in annapolis, maryland and court blocked him as appears as a witness for the time being so it's perfectly possible del we could have a jury selected by mid-week but the trial can't get underway and there is no way of knowing when the court of special appeals may hand its decision down, delve and stephanie. >> in baltimore thank you very much. food aid is finally arriving to starving people in syria. convoys are getting to modaya right now and syrian government had blocked the rebel held town for six months, going to idlib besieged by rebel groups and hundreds of residents in madaya huddled in the freezing cold waiting for trucks to arrive and carolyn malone has details. >> reporter: we are talking in the region of 50,000 people here who are getting aid today and 500 tons and 335 tons of mainly
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food from madaya an and 175 for idlib places that is 50,000 people but there are 400,000 people in syria who really desperately need aid and around 200,000 of those is where i.s.i.l. is holding siege and aid not getting to them either and also many other places in the country being held siege mainly by government forces and smaller rebel groups as well and it's incredibly important this delivery is done simultaneously and aid arrives in those places at the same time as part of a general agreement being made with many of the groups that are involved here. so we have not just got the syrian government involved but obviously the u.n. as well and the rebel groups that have been holding siege on the areas in idlib and also the government forces and allies including hezbollah in the agreement. the government laying siege outside damascus and duria,
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iraqi officials say bomb disposal teams will begin work in ramadi and pushed i.s.i.l. out two weeks ago and officials say the streets are lined with bombs that were planted by the group meaning much of the city is still un inhabitable and the are optimistic against the fight against i.s.i.l. in iraq and troops are working harder in ramadi than they have ever seen. no claim of responsibility for the bombing this morning in yemen that hit a doctors without borders hospital. the attack killed four, injured ten, the organization saying more victims may be trapped in the rubble and the third time in four months a doctors without borders have been bombed and meeting in pakistan all of them trying to revive the afghan peace process and afghanistan and u.s. at the table but taliban not invited and islamabad will offer list of officials that are willing to negotiate. al jazeera's jamie mcintyre has more on the challenges that lie
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ahead. >> reporter: there are many obstacles to reaching a peace accord especially since it was revealed last summer that taliban leader omar had died two years earlier and his death had been covered up. now it's reported that there is a lot of in-fighting in the ranks and it's not entirely clear who is in charge even as the taliban appear to be gaining ground. the u.s. strategy in afghanistan is essentially to build up the afghan military to the point it can hand the taliban enough defeats on the battlefield to drive them to the peace table. but after a fire fight last week in afghanistan's southern helpman province in which taliban fighters killed a u.s. army green baret and wounded to others the top spokesman conceded afghan forces are not there yet. >> better at defending their country but not at a point where they are able to operate
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entirely on their own. >> reporter: on paper the u.s. trained and equipped 350,000 afghan soldiers and police. about two thirds the size of the u.s. army but on the ground they still need a lot of help. >> the u.s. army has been around 240 years, afghan army for seven or eight years and put it in perspective and trying to build an airplane in flight. >> reporter: on advise of general campbell the top commander that president obama in october reluctantly agreed to delay the plan to withdraw 10,000 u.s. troops by the end of this year. >> it should be clear to the taliban and all who oppose afghanistan's progress the only real way to achieve the full draw down of u.s. and foreign troops from afghanistan is through a lasting political settlement with the afghan government. >> reporter: the current plan calls for 9800 u.s. troops to stay through this year and then to gradually reduce the number to 5500 next year although
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general campbell hinted in a resent interview he might ask for another extension telling usa today my intent is to keep as long as i could for as long as i could. efforts to reinvigorate is high profile attacks in and around the afghan capitol kabul including last month's suicide bombing that killed six u.s. personnel by agram airforce base and the report to congress characterized the over all security situation as deteriorated, noting the taliban insurgency is resilient and calling security fragile in key areas and at risk in others. the u.s. and afghan governments have jointly set some tough conditions for peace and call on the taliban to end violence, break with international terrorist groups and accept afghanistan's constitution including its protections for the rights of women. the last part is important
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because some human rights groups fear the afghan government eager to strike a deal with the taliban might be willing to give away women's rights. jamie mcintyre the pentagon. a trial against a member of spain's royal family underway and she is accused of being an accomplish to embezzlement in a case involving her husband and 16 other defendants. court documents say they used front companies to back roll or bank roll a lavish lifestyle and the first trial since 1975. chinese markets closed down again this morning and helped drive down stocks across asia and lost 6.6% after rough trading last week and asian stocks dropped 2% this year to the lowest levels in more than four years. u.s. power still being restored in florida after a
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tornado touched down and hitting cape coral not far from fort myers and roofs torn off and trees taken down and only a few minor injuries were reported. early cold temperatures moving across the nation now and let's bring in kevin for more, good morning. >> the storm system that caused tornados is causing problems with temperatures and i'm going to show you that right now. a big area of low pressure here across much of the lake ontario and eerie and the front pushed past florida and thunderstorms moving through and recovering in terms of that power. behind that system is that cold air and you can see up towards minnesota we are talking about minneapolis seeing about minus eight degrees. fargo seeing minus 11 there. but factor in the wind chill it feels more like minus 20 for fargo. all of that air is making its way towards the east and temperatures are dropping drastically. considering what we saw
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yesterday new york right now is at 32 degrees. the difference between now and 24 hours ago we are 15 degrees colder and philadelphia is 28 degrees colder than it was this time yesterday and cleveland is 36 degrees colder and this cold air is going to be staying in place today. most of the areas along the coast will get just above freezing but tomorrow we are going to be seeing those temperatures dipping back down and when i come back later we are going to be talking about that lake effect snow because when you have cold air like this coming over the lakes it dumps it. >> i opened the door for the dog this morning and he just looked at me. >> not going out today. defining a presidency. >> we will tell you why president obama's final state of the union address is expected to go beyond the typical laundry list of accomplishments. golden moments busy award season kicks off with a surprising big winner. ♪ and remembering david bowie news coming in overnight that the
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rock icon died from cancer and josh tweeting he never seened him of the earth and left it and bent rules and genre, minds and david bowie one of a kind and again dead at the age of 69. ♪
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♪ today president obama is preparing for his final state of the union address. >> goes before congress to deliver what the white house says is a different kind of speech and correspondent mike has a preview. >> reporter: president obama delivers his final state of the union address on tuesday and likely to be a combination victory lap for what he sees as the successes of his seven years
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in office and instance this last year won't simply be a lame duck session and much work to do with or without congress and enter the chamber on a wave of good economic news, employment rate is up and so are wages and expect the president to talk about cuba and nuclear deal with iran and of course what he sees as the success of the affordable care act and all and all the president wants to burnish his legacy and aid high profile successes and for 2016 congressional acceptance of a big trade deal with pacific rim known as tpp and could be tough to get with democrats in opposition. and he will push for something that has by partisan support, criminal justice reform and reducing mandatory minimum sentence and reducing prison population and one promise for early in president obama's term that has not been filled, closing the military prison at guantanamo bay. mr. obama still wants to work
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with congress to do that but that is not likely to happen and the president has made it clear that he will go around congress if he has to as he did with guns and immigration. and like many presidents before him mr. obama is expected to spend much of his last year in office overseas and the state of the union defending his approach to syria and the fight against i.s.i.l. all in all president obama will make the case at the state of the union on tuesday that he has turned things around especially on economy since he took office seven years ago but much more to do in the final and 8th year, mike with al jazeera. special coverage of the state of the union begins tomorrow night at 8:00 p.m. eastern. 911 dispatcher from san bernardino is going to be with the president during his final state of the union address and administration he was invited after directing the emergency response to the mass shooting that left 14 people dead and says her whole team played a huge role in fast reaction to the crisis and the city police
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chief and boyfriend of one of the victims is also going to be attending that speech tomorrow night. talk more about the actions to protect the home land at san bernardino and christopher swift is here and national security of s studies at georgetown and good morning and thank you for your time and as you know it has been over a month since san bernardino and what has changed in the country in terms of security? >> well in terms of the overall security situation not much has changed which is to say that there are still organizations and individuals operating on u.s. soil who would like to perpetrate these sort of attacks and still domestic law enforcement and intelligence agencies that are working to find and intraidct and punish groups and the difficulty is the context has changed and the way we are thinking about these issues politically is starting to interfere with our ability to solve these issues in a more practical fashion. >> can you be a little more
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specific about what you're talking about which political debate are we talking about the refugee crisis? >> well, it's the refugee crisis, it is some of the nativism that has come out in the presidential election. what we have right now in terms of operations that are being undertaken by the joint terrorism task forces and cities and communities around the country is pretty much similar to what we had prior to san bernardino. the difference is we now have this very over inclusive political discourse that put us in a situation where we are seeing religion as a proxy for radical ideology. the difficulties when you look at people like the san bernardino perpetrators it was their ideology that was driving them, not necessarily their religious affiliation or national origin and by linking those things with radical actions we are sort of getting an over inclusive approach and over inclusive understanding of what the actual problem is and as a result we target people like refugees who are easy to
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identify rather than targeting the groups that are much more nefarious and able to hide within our society. >> doesn't change the fact that one of the san bernardino attackers was her on a k1 fiancee visa and an on going debate of whether the vetting processes from refugees where i.s.i.l. operates syria and iraq specifically is robust enough, as you know last week iraqi refugees arrested and charged with terrorism and waiting to see evidence on the charges but somebody who researches national security how concerned are you the asylum or visa process are being exploited? >> i don't just research national security and represent a lot of people from fleeing conflict in the middle east in asylum cases and look at it as a lawyer and professor. look when i put those two experiences together my judgment is we are much more at risk from individuals who are already in the united states who are radic
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radicalizing online with their own or guidance from recruiters from organizations like i.s.i.l. but those types of individuals present a much higher risk than refugees who are fleeing the conflict and persecuted by the same organizations we consider to be our adversaries and being over inclusive in terms of our political discourse about the problem by linking the problem to religion and national origin rather than looking at the psychology and ideology that drives people to take that idea out the street and kill their neighbors. >> thank you so much and we appreciate your perspective this morning. on the subject of politics all eyes of course on iowa. >> the race for president tightnesss with just three weeks for the chance for voters to speak out. a landmark trial and gm over facility ignition switches with deaths and countless injuries. remembering the rock icon known as the camalion dead at 69 and the different looks at david
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bowie through the years, we will be right back.
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unconstitutional policing that stretches back through generations. >> it was a coverup for what had happened. >> the absence of any accountability just speaks so loudly. >> fault lines: al jazeera america's hard-hitting& >> today they will be arrested. >> firing canisters and gas out of& >> emmy-award winning investigative series. welcome back to your world this morning. it is 7:30 eastern. taking a look at today's top stories. ♪
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just one of the songs from the legendary david bowie. word of the iconic star's death came overnight. he was 69, battling cancer for the last 18 months. his career included hits with "dance," space odyssey, under pressure and life on mars. tradition proceedings begin in the case of el chapo. he'll be brought back to the u.s. to face charges. he escaped from jail in july and recaptured friday. mexico also looking into whether it will investigate the actor, sean penn. he interviewed guzman while he was still on the run. jury selection begins in baltimore in the second trial in the death of freddie gray. veteran officer caesar goodson drove the van that drove gray after the arrest. six officers have been indicted. goodson faces the most severe charges. gop going on trial in new
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york. an oklahoma city man saying he was injured in his saturn eye on. al jazeera's bisi onile-ere has the story. >> today's g.m. will do the right thing. >> last year, general motors shelled out $600 million a settle hundred was claims in connection with its faulty ignition switch scandal but as part of a massive civil lawsuit, hundreds of plaintiffs are still waiting for their day in federal court. >> this is a very high stakes trial happening in new york. >> this week, g.m. facings the first of six bellwhether trials to decide whether to continue litigating or settle. the first involves an oklahoma man who blames the defective ignition switch from the air bag dough applying. >> the engineers when they were designing it in 2001, they knew they had a problem with it and
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yesterday they went ahead with a faulty design. >> general motors was aware of the faulty switches for more than a decade but waited until february, 2014 to issue recalls on more than 2 million vehicles. g.m. knew that ignition switches could switch out of position, dozens were injured and more than 100 people died. >> our daughters, mothers, fathers, wives and husbands are gone because they were a cost of doing business g.m.'s style. >> laura christian's daughter was killed when her chevy cobalt crashed. she settled her case against g.m. the following year. when the automakers reached a $900 million settlement with the justice department to avoid criminal prosecution years later, christian was outraged. >> i mean 900 million sounds like a not to you, but to a
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massive corporation like g.m., this is riding their way out of a bad situation and that's all there is. that's hundreds of families just like myself that are left wondering how is it that they are able to get away with this? >> so far, there have been no criminal charges filed against any current or former g.m. employees. >> a jolt or your knee hitting it would very readily turn the switch to the off position. >> clarence did it low with the watchdog group the center for auto safety say evidence presented at trial could shed more light on who knew what and when. >> what it can lead to is a tremendous amount, billions of dollars of additional damages, and it could and should lead to homicide charges against individuals within the corporations that were responsible for these decisions that led to the deaths. >> as g.m. worked to move on from the ignition switch scandal, it can't avoid the past.
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on the same day that the north american international show gets underway in detroit, automakers will be front and center in the new york federal courtroom. bisi onile-ere, al jazeera, new york. a trial lawyer with more than 20 years of experience handling personal injury and malpractice cases joins us, thanks for being with us. how much is g.m. on the line here? how bad could this be? >> i think this could really be bad for g.m., because the must not active damages that are on the table now that we haven't even in previous cases could really hurt their company. punitive damages are different than compensatory damages in it's the purpose to punish the company and really make them feel the pinch for what they're doing. >> there was that woman in the story just a seconding a saying our daughters, our sons, our sisters, bothering, mothers, fathers, wives and husbands gone because they were a cost of
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doing business g.m. style. what exactly is g.m. style and how is that going to be a factor in this case? >> g.m. like every other company is in the business to make money. there's no morality involved, they don't make decisions like human beings do. in this case, they made an economic choice to let people die. they knew people would be dying from this defect in their car that would shut off, the brakes and steering mick nix and prevent the air bags from coming out. that is clearly, they knew people were going to be dying and they made an economic choice saying it would be cheaper for them to pay them off in the long run. >> this case is going to be going on for years for victims and their families, it's going to be a case that's just not going to go away. will they be tied up in court for the rest of their lives and isn't that what big companies like g.m. want? >> well, i'm not sure if that's what big companies want. i'm not sure that this will not go away.
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right now, they have bellwhether case, six of them this year. >> what is that, a bellwhether case? >> a bellwhether case is basically trials setting up to give both sides where these cases are going to fall so they get an idea of the value of these cases and how much g.m. is really going to be on the hook for so they can start dialogue about settling future cases. >> e.o., mary barra, will she survive? >> i don't see why she would be stepping down now if she hasn't already stepped down. >> g.m. has already paid out $600 million. are they going to be asked to pay more? >> i think very easily they could be asked to pay more. it depends on the punitive damages. it is much more than compensatory damages. those payments were mostly for compensatory purposes. punitive damages, again is for the company to feel the pinch
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and g.m. is a big company, so they're going to be looking at their assets and what they will feel. that's for each case going forward. it's not just a one time thing. >> it used to be said that when g.m. caught a cold, the rest of the world caught the flu. how closely are other automakers watching? >> i think everyone is going to be watching what happens in these bellwhether case. >> there was that time less than a decade ago when g.m. and the other big three came to washington saying we need a bailout. does the fact that these companies almost fded pay any role in whether or not the public gives them leeway in saying they were trying to survive as well as i guess protecting the corporate assets. >> that's really up to the jury and if that's what they're going to argue, but this was 90 cents per car. you know, when you're talking about millions of cars, yes, that's substantial, but per car,
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90 cents to save lives, i don't think that's really a question. >> thanks for being with us this morning. >> thank you. the white house says it is monitoring the water contamination crisis in flint, michigan. the federal government sent three fema officials to michigan at the state's request. govern reich snyder declared a state of emergency after toxic levels of lead were found in the drinking water. snyder is facing criticism for not seeking help sooner. sixty schools are closed in detroit as part of an odor teacher sickout, part of an effort by teachers to demonstrate frustration with on going problems in the district. a group called detroit strikes to win says teachers are unhappy with pay and the district's poor finances. two schools were closed friday due to similar sickouts. today the supreme court is hearing arguments that could affect public unions in this country. it started with 10 public school
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teachers from california. >> winter break is over. teachers in california are back in the classroom today but they will no doubt have their eyes on the nation's top courtroom. arguments begin in one of the biggest cases on the supreme court docket this year, a case that could decide the future of teachers unions around the country. >> we could wind up in a world where there is no bargaining. >> 10 teachers are suing the california teachers association, the state's largest union. >> the plaintiffs argue that they should not be required to pay dos to the union that bargains on their behalf and that requiring them to pay those dues is a violation of their free speech rights. >> it includes the pacific legal foundation which released a statement saying the court's decision to take this case is welcome news for everyone who
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values first amendment freedom of speech, which includes your freedom not to underwrote a politically active organization that you don't agree with. >> this is about all hour collective voice in society to be part of this future. >> david goldberg taught near the housing projects in east los angeles for 10 years. he is now secretary and treasurer of the california teachers association. >> all the stuff that's collectively done in your behalf, you pay your fair share. that's what collecti organizations do. it's all of us working together to have a collective voice. >> goldberg believes the lawsuit is nothing more than a power play to undermine all public unions which he says helps protect the rights of the working class. >> it is a real frontal attack on one of the last groups capable of really mount an offense against these oligarchs and ruling elites who are
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basically trying to take over our country. >> there is a group of ores and people who would like to limit the ability of the unions. even if all of the workers want the unions, then the workers will all have an incentive to not pay the dues, let other workers pay the dues then nobody pace the dues and the union doesn't have the means to pay for the bargaining. >> similar laws rewarding mandatory fair share fees will likely spend the season holding their collective breaths. a ruling by the justice won't happen before june, jennifer london, al jazeera, los angeles. the latest presidential poll shows some of the races are getting tighter with just three weeks to go before the iowa caucuses. le wall street journal poll giving hillary clinton a slim lead over bernie sanders.
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in new hampshire, it is sanders with the edge, 50 to 46%. cruz leads trump in iowa. marco rubio is trailing with 13% and in new hampshire, trumps lead is bigger, 30%. trump is still questions whether rival ted cruz is eligible to be president because he was born in canada, trump quoting a harvard law professor saying the issue is not settled. >> i think i'm going to do great in iowa. it's going to be interesting. i think i'm going to do good. they have me essentially statistically tied but a lot of people say you know, he's going to do much better than the polls are even saying. >> frump focused on the citizenship issue at rallies all weekend, adding bruce springsteen's born in the u.s.a. at his events.
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>> hillary clinton's campaign, this weekend she responded to trump's recent attacks against her husband. >> if he wants to engage in personal attacks from the past, that's his prerogative, you know, so be it. i can't run anybody else's campaign. they can say whatever they want, more power to them. i think it's a dead end, blind alley for them, but let 'em go. >> clinton picking up a new endorsement from gabby giffords who supports clinton's stance on gun control. in a statement, giffords said the lobby had a stranglehold in washington and intimidated some into action or not into action. >> in des moines, bernie sanders insisted he is no friend of the n.r.a. and says he has the voting record to prove it. >> i have a lifetime voighting record from the n.r.a. of d
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minus. mass killings are unacceptable and we've got to do everything we can to get a handle on them. >> hillary clinton is hilting him on his reward, knocking sanders from a past senate vote to give manufacturers immunity from prosecution when a gun is used in a crime. louisiana getting a new governor, a democratic will be sworn in this morning. he becomes the state's 56t 56th governor, also the first democratic to hold the post since 2008, the republican, bobby jindal is the outgoing governor. he served two terms. women in oregon now have the option to purchase birth control without a doctor's prescription. the state is the first to allow pharmacists to prescribe birth control. >> oregon is the first state in the nation to allow pharmacists to write prescriptions for women's birth control pills and patches, another new law here ensures they will receive a 12 month supply and that it will be covered by insurance. >> because we know from research
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from studies that have been done, that consistency of use of birth control, particularly hormonal birth control such as pills or patches, is the most important factor in the effectiveness of the medication, and by having available in her medicine cabinet or wherever she stores it a full 12 month supply of birth control, that woman can give herself a chance at a 30% reduction in the likelihood of an inintended pregnancy. that's a very big advance for women. >> what's happening in oregon is considered the most direct step to date in a for ambitious push by women's health advocates to make oral contraceptives legal to sell over-the-counter and still covered by insurance. al jazeera, portland, oregon. you can see much more of catherines report on the impact of the law in oregon tonight.
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the armed group occupying a national wildlife area in oregon is asking supporters to send supplies as its standoff with authorities enters the second week. the leader of the occupation is still rejecting calls to leave buildings at the wildlife refuge until he sees a plan to transfer the federal land into local ownership. officials called on the group to leave but have not tried to force them out. new york looking at lake effect snow. a month ago, we were in flip-flops and shorts. >> that's actually several feet of snow, not several inches of snow. >> i didn't want to hear that. >> we are talking about lake effect snow and i'm going to explain lake effect snow. let's look at big picture over the great lakes. i want to explain this a little bit. over to the west where you see the white, this is not clouds, this is actually snow on the ground. the reason we know that is because you can see the rivers, you can see the terrain across the region.
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over here towards the east, all of this area, that's the clouds of the storm pushing through right now. where you see the lake effect snow is right now toward lake superior and make michigan. the lakes are not frozen yet, so it is being dumped on the other side of the lake. that is what we are seeing here in lake erie and ontario, looking at that moisture being picked up and then dropped. this is going to continue for several days where we could see two to three feet of snow by tonight and as we go toward thursday, that number could go up to three and a half to four feet of snow in some of these locations. i want to go back and show you how far that snow is extending all the way here to the berkshires, to parts of vermont. that's how far the snow can travel. possibly in new york city, we could get a little lake effect snow coming in towards tuesday
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night as well as into wednesday morning. it's not going to cause any accumulation but that is however it will travel. for boston, snow on tuesday, for new york, we could see a little snow, as well. temperatures are going to be staying quite low on wednesday and really not getting above freezing, but by friday, things are going to get better at 41 degrees. >> very chilly today for much of the country, thank you. honoring hollywood's best, at times it gotness city. >> memorable moments from last night's globe awards. ♪ remembering the music master, the musician who was a master at reinventing himself, tributes pour in for david bowie. >> whoopi goldberg writing: david bowie, leaving a lasting legacy.
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hard break in minnesota on sunday, vikings kicker walsh missed a 27-yard field goal allowing the seattle seahawks to escape in the wild cart contest 10-9. the green bay packers had an easier time with the redskins winning 35-18. it's the first time in nfl history that every single road team winning in the playoffs that. the packers now face the cardinals, the kansas city chiefs take on the patriots, last year's superbowl champs. sunday, seattle faces the panthers. in arizona, the clemson tigers take on the alabama crimson tide. that's a big rivalry there. volkswagen c.e.o. apologized for
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the emission scandal plaguing his country. >> we know that we have let down customers, authorities, regulators and the general public here in america, too. we are, i am truly sorry for that. i would like to apologize once again for what went wrong with volkswagen. >> hundreds of thousand was vehicles by the germany automakers were sold in the u.s. with secret software designed to cheat emission tests. he denies he and other corporate leaders knew of the issue. he is in the u.s. for detroit's annual auto show. household's awards season began with surprises, the biggest names in television and film gathered for the annual golden globe awards. >> the winners could signal what's ahead when it comes time to give out the oscars. >> the golden globe goes to: >> it was the final act of the
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night with the bloody frontier thriller taking the award. it upset the field, winning every major category, including a best actor globe for leonardo decaprio, but a night that ended with applause began with hesitant laughs as a result of host rick. >> i gervais. >> i want to do this monologue, then go into hiding. not even sure sean penn will find me. >> that was just the beginning as he began his friend of ridiculing hollywood's elite. the night belonged to the stars. kate winslet won for her work in steve jobs. >> really, actually, i'm extremely surprised and overwhelmed. >> moments later, matt damon won for his role in the martian. >> it's been 18 years since i've been here doing this, and with a little more context, i know how lucky i am.
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>> sylvester stallone. >> the moment of the night went to sylvester stallone, honored for his role in creed with a thunderous standing ovation. >> i want to thank my imaginary friend rocky balboa with a for being the best friend i ever had. >> the race to the oscars is now officially underway. other notable winners include lady gaga who took home a best actress award. oscar nomination will be announced thursday. everybody was excited to see sylvester stallone do so well, because he wrote the screen play for rocky and refused to give it up. he could have sold it for $200,000, said no, i want to star in it, too. a very different commute in a lot of cities compared to sunday. thousands of people rode around in public with no pants. this is part of the annual no pants day. the ritual was started by an
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improv group here in new york city 15 years ago. this is now a global phenomenon. in lot ve with a, it became so popular it was banned. >> ahead in our next hour, getting ready for the second trial in the death of freddie gray. jury selection begins for the officer who was behind the wheel for gray's final ride. >> we are back in two minutes with more of your world this morning including the latest on the aid that is now arriving in syria. >> we do these things because ultimately they will make us safer. >> president trying to figure out just which course to take. >> this is how you can fight the republicans, and he's putting them where they have to respond. >> and after the address...
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♪ >> tributes for david bowie web word breaking of his death after an 18 month battle with cancer. in baltimore, an officer going on trial for driving freddie gray the day he died. el chapo is apprehended as
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questions emerge about sean penn. >> aid sent in to help thousands of syrians that have been starving under a government siege. ♪ he was a musician, actor and the voice of a generation. david bowie's profound influence is felt all around the world with tributes from the likes of madonna to kanye west. >> his death at the age of 69 coming as a shock. he didn't make public the cancer he had battled for 18 months. we have more. ♪ >> david woe wee transcended
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styles and repeatedly reinvented himself over five decades. born david jones in 1947 in south london, he rose to international fame with the 1969 single spade oddity. ♪ >> from cult figure to rock star, he had a character of avantgarde sound and deck dense. he took on iconic roles in movies, starring in labyrinth. he was inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame in 1996. in an interview in 2003, he acknowledged what his ever changing image meant for the evolution of his music. >> most people, they get to 20 and they stay 20. it didn't happen for me, though. i just went on and on and on and
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suddenly i'm 56, so i to have write from this unique perspective, somebody who never stopped being 20, but i went on. isn't that weird? >> just last friday on his 69th birthday, he released his 25th studio album black star. critics praised its innovative sounds and his death gave new meaning for lazarus. bowie died after an 18 month battle with cancer. his son film director duncan jones writing on twitter very sorry and sad to say it's true. british prime minister david cameron called bowie a master of reinvention who kept getting it right. madonna called him talented, unique, genius, game changer. >> tweet be part of the lyrics,
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and the former commander of the international space station and british astronaut who's on the space station now sent out tributes, saying he was an inspiration. >> they played his music from the i.s.s., as well. a lot of people did not realize david bowie was not his name. >> he was born david jones, but one of the members of the monkees had that name, so he chose bowie. >> a lot of people remembering david bowie this morning. next hour, jury selection gets underway in baltimore, the second trial in the connection with the death of freddie gray, the most severe of the charges the six officers will face. he is the person who drove the van to carried gray to the police station the day he died. al jazeera is live in baltimore. sell us more about the case they
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are building against officer goodson. >> on this sunny freezing morn in baltimore and jury selection is about to get underway in the second trial associated with the death of freddie gray, but this trial is already mired in controversy and unsettled business. >> officer good sunni faces the most serious charges, second degree murder. he drove the police have not in which freddie gray suffered a lethal spinal cord injury. gray's death sparked anti police demonstrations and riots. >> according to the prosecution, he was aware from officer port their freddie gray asked for medical help and he didn't get it for him and he was in control of the van. >> the six officers involved in gray's arrest were criminally charged. prosecutors contend that good son was told that freddie gray asked for medical help. instead of calling paramedics, good son made a stop to pick up
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another detainee. paramedics were not called until good son reached the police station 25 minutes later when gray was found unresponsive. prosecutors are counting on testimony from fellow officer william porter. his trial ended in a mistrial last month. news that the jury made up of seven blacks and five whites were deadlocked sparked some schism issues at the courthouse, but protestors were mainly peaceful. >> we want to be clear that we're still watching. this is a statement to say we're still here and watching and nothing is going to slip past us. >> prosecutors decided to retry porter. he could be a witness in goodson's trial. >> officer porter is being forced to testify. it is against his will, but the judge is ordering it. if he doesn't do it, he faces contempt charges. the prosecution needs him and they came up with a solution. they're giving him limited or
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use immunity for his testimony. anything he says on the stand against caesar goodson cannot be used at his trial later this year. >> porter's attorney and a high court stayed the order, putting the testimony in limbo and the state's case in potential jeopardy until a decision is made. >> jury selection gets underway within the next hour. there's 150 potential jurors to choose from. last time it took two days to choose the jury. it's expected to take that at least this time. >> the first case of officer william porter ending in a mistrial last week, how that is going to affect the outcome of steven goodson's case? >> the judge has forced william porter, the first officer who's trial collapsed in september and who will be retried in june to be a key prosecution witness in this trial of the driver caesar
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goodson. his defense team has taken his case to the court of special appeals and they have temporarily blocked him from appearing as a witness. it's possible that we could have a jury selected by mid week and then the trial unable to get underway because officer porter is not allowed to testify. you know, del, and stephanie, there is no way of knowing how long it will take the court of special appeals in annapolis to hand down a decision. >> john, thank you very much. this morning there are big questions for actor and activist sean penn. mexican authorities want to talk to him about his meeting with he will chap know. guzman is now in custody and the magazine rolling stone has published the secret interview that guzman gave to the actor while on the run. >> the interview was given exclusively to sean penn and a
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mexican actress. el chapo guzman answers questions sent to him by penn, ranging from how he got involved in the drug business to his history of violence. rolling stone saidperson and guzman met in october and drug lord intrad to be interviewed at a later time when another face-to-face meeting proved impossible, guzman agreed to provide video answers to questions he was sent. rolling stone also agreed to give guzman a right to approve the article and the interview, although the magazine said the drug lord did not demand any changes. on friday, mexican authorities said guzman's communication witness producers and actors helped lead them to him. over the weekend, mexican authorities began the pros of extraditing the drug lord to the united states, something the u.s. has wanted for a while now.
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charges against him here date back years. >> the obama administration has criticized sean penn's interview with guzman, a white house official called the interview maddening. stock futures are up in the u.s. after the turmoil on the markets. the dow losing 6.2%, now hovering near 12 year lows, 32 and a half dollars a barrel for oil. the chinese markets closed down again, driving down the stocks across all of asia, the shanghai losing 6.6% after a week of rough trading last week. asian stocks have dropped 2% this year. four nations are trying to revive the afghan peace process today in pakistan. officials from afghanistan, pakistan and the u.s. are at the table, but taliban representatives were not invited. islamabad is expected to offer a
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list of taliban officials willing to negotiate. we have more from peshawar. >> the quadrilateral meeting in pakistan is seen as a real hope for afghanistan. the last quadrilateral meeting happened in july of 2015, but then talks broke down when news came out that mullah omar had died a few years earlier, this time, the meeting will be mulling over who is ready for those talks and who is not. the afghan taliban have already said that they want friendly relations with the rest of the world, so the americans, the chinese, the pakistani's and the afghans will be trying to discuss as to which taliban are ready for those talks. the talks are extremely important, because pakistan is host to over 3 million afghan refugees. half of them were registered by the government in order to regularize their movement, however their registration cards
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have run out in december of 2015. many of them are living under difficult conditions. they cannot go back to their country because of the on going conflict and therefore, they will all be keeping their eyes on the quadrilateral talks with a real hope and perhaps some cautious optimism that coming back to the negotiation table may pave the way for return of peace to afghanistan and that of course would also pave the way for many of these refugees to go home. >> al jazeera reporting from peshawar. the united nations condemning a bombing in yemen has hilt a doctors without borders hospital that attacked killing four injuring 10. there's been no claim of responsibility. the group said more victims could be tracked in the rubble. it is the third time a doctors without borders hospital has been bombed in yemen. thousands of starving syrians will be getting aid today. the syrian government blockading
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that rebel held town for six months. trucks are also going into towns in idlib province which has been besieged by the rebel groups. hundreds have been huddled in the freezing cold all morning, waiting for those trucks to arrive. al jazeera is live in the valley right over the border from syria inside lebanon. what's the latest that you're hearing? >> that's right, that be aid is on the way and soon to be delivered to those areas to people who desperately need it. we are talking 350 tons of aid going to madaya, another 725 tons going to the towns in idlib. the last time the u.n. was able to get aid into those places was about three months ago and people are literally starving there. in the convoy, it's mainly food, wheat and flour, also drinking water, but kits and medical
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supplies, doctors and medics saying they really don't have any supplies left and desperately need that kind of aid in those praises, as well. >> what can you tell us about the blockades that led to so much starvation that we saw? >> this is just one small example of how people are actually suffering across the whole of syria. we're talking about something like 400,000 people that are living in towns and villages and cities that are under siege by different forces, so you've got government forces holding people under siege, about 175,000 people under siege in government force areas. you've also got 200,000 people being held in places by isil groups. while the u.n. wants to be able to negotiate with everyone and deliver as much aid as possible, it's incredibly difficult dealing with all these groups. they tried last year to deliver, the reality was they were only able to get as much as 10% of
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those people access to aid. >> as you see, the winter is setting in, as well. thank you very much. back in the country, a storm system that brought severe weather to the south last week is now ushering bitterly cold temperatures. let's bring in kevin for more on that. definitely feeling that this morning. >> we are definitely feeling it, the temperatures are dropping. this storm that made history, we saw a tornado in florida, california, flooding there, as well. snow across the mountains and fatalities in parts of oklahoma as well as missouri because of weather related snow on the ground. it's the temperatures up here towards the north, minneapolis, right now you're at minus eight degrees, fargo at minus 11. this is about the coldest time during the day, right before sunrise in this area. wind chills feel like this, minneapolis and minus 10 degrees. all of this cold air is shifting east, and we are seeing those temperatures going down. new york, you are 31 degrees
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last hour, 30 degrees now. the difference from yesterday at this time, we are 20 degrees colder. philadelphia's at 29 degrees colder than 24 hours ago and cleaved is at 37 degrees colder. we're back to normal temperatures for this time of year, but of course, because of all the warm temperatures that we have, these temperatures right here are quite a slap in the face for many people this morning, especially with the wind. >> i'm still cold from watching the football game in minnesota. the newest poll shows ted cruz holding his lead over donald trump in iowa barely. >> that has the billionaire stepping up questions about just where ted cruz was born. it's about all of us working together to have a collective voice. >> union membership, teachers turn to the supreme court as it considers whether workers should be forced to pay dos. ♪ >> remembering the music legend
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date bowie, the new said coming in over night that he died from cancer. singer gene simmons tweeting you will be sorely missed. your songs were a major influence for me. david bowie dead at the age of 69.
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the latest presidential poll show race getting tighter three weeks before the iowa caulk suss. >> hillary clinton is given a slim lead in iowa, 48 to 45% over bernie sanders. new hampshire, sanders has the edge 50 to 46%. >> senator ted cruz leads donald
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trump 28 to 24% in iowa, marco rubio trails with 13%. in new hampshire, trump's lead is 30%, rubio with 14%, cruz with 10%. >> donald trump is asking whether ted cruz is eligible to be president because he was worn in canada, quoting a harvard law professor saying the issue is not settled. >> i think i'm going to do great in iowa. they have me essentially statically tied, but a lot of people say you know, he's going to do much better than the polls say. >> trump focused on the citizenship issue, adding bruce springsteen's "born in the u.s.a." to his play list at events. >> that is not subtle. >> joining us from chicago is
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political columnist at u.s. news and word support. thank you for being with us. 22 days until the first contest. do the latest poll numbers show ads that sanders that been spending on are starting to work? >> yeah, i don't doubt at least for the moment, at least working on the coffers positively of local television stations throughout iowa, in some case, 150% more revenue than in the past year. they are so loaded with ads, they are making deals with campaigns to shovel some of their ads on to their digital products, but yeah, this is not a total surprise but clearly the hillary clinton battle plan was to win fairly easily with a much superior others in iowa, and then perhaps in what's pretty close to sanders home turf may be have a difficult time in new hampshire. >> the polls show they are
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running neck and neck in iowa and new hampshire. let's turn to the gop. donald trump continued over the weekend to question his main rival ted cruz's eligibility to be a candidate because he was born in canada to an american mother. is it my imagination or are those questions that trump is raising actually gaining traction? >> it is donald trump's imagination, stephanie. talk about the limits of fact checking, which we love to do, they've had no impact here. the case is really sort of closed on the legality here of his citizenship, but i guess in a brilliant machiavellian fashion, trump has again touched upon a subject that's had some resonance with some core group of folks and he throws out this idea not particularly poll tested, i don't think and it seems to have stuck, certainly at least in the imagination of some of us folks in the media,
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who of giving him tons of free publicity everywhere on the subject, but legally, no, he can find a harvard law professor, i can probably find 100 others who will say what, this is not an issue. >> and yet he is having the impact on another candidate, hillary clinton, having to deflect attacks on her hugs's past sex life, this time from trump. listen to what she said on cbs's face the nation. >> if he wants to engage in personal attacks from the past, this is his prerogative, so be it. i can't run anyone else's campaign. they can say whatever they want. i think it's a dead end blind alley for them, but let 'em go. >> is trump going to be able to control the narrative for hillary clinton as well, or all the issues about her husband's school past in the past? >> it's somewhat a brilliant
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demagoguery. hillary clinton can say i'm talking about the president of the future, but in the background is, you know, not just the oddity of a former president as prospective first spouse, but also some of the lingering ethical questions in bill clinton's background, even though his own polling since he left office has been pretty sky-high. what is most interesting, if you have hypothetically speaking a trump versus a hillary clinton race, what would be the resonance? i think it would have some. there would be nothing positive for hillary clinton if trump hammered away on this subject and it would i think color some less group of folks who might say on the democratic side, more clintons, haven't we had enough, some small group, but i think would have some impact for trump. >> that is one question you raised, whether some democrats fight defect to trump if he wins the nomination. thank you so much.
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both sides are going to be watching this, a battle over unions and the dues they collect going before the supreme court today. the case has started with 10 public schools and teachers from california. >> winter break is over, teachers back in the classroom today, but they will no doubt have their eyes on the nation's top courtroom. arguments begin in one of the biggest cases on the supreme court docket this year, a case that could decide the future of teachers unions around the country. >> we could wind up in a world where there's no bargaining, where you function like a private sector employer without a union. >> 10 teachers are suing the california teachers association, the state's largest union.
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>> the plaintiffs argue that they should not be required to pay dos to the union that bargains on their behalf and that requiring them to pay those dues is a violation of their free speech rights. >> it includes the pacific legal foundation which released a statement saying the court's decision to take this case is welcome news for everyone who values first amendment freedom of speech, which includes your freedom not to underwrite a politically active organization that you don't agree with. >> this is not just about teachers, it is about all our collective voice in society to be part of this future. >> david goldberg taught near the housing projects in east los angeles for 10 years. he is now secretary and treasurer of the california teachers association. >> all the stuff that's collectively done in your behalf, you pay your fair share. that's what collective organizations do. it's all of us working together to have a collective voice. >> goldberg believes the lawsuit is nothing more than a power play to undermine all public unions which he says helps protect the rights of the working class. >> it is a real frontal attack on one of the last groups
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capable of really mounting an offense against these oligarchs and these ruling elites who are basically trying to take over our country. >> there is a group of organizations and people who would like to limit the ability of the unions. even if all of the workers want the unions, then the workers will all have an incentive to not pay the dues, let other workers pay the dues for them, then nobody pays the dues and the union doesn't have the means to pay for the bargaining. >> similar laws rewarding mandatory fair share fees will likely spend the season holding their collective breaths. a ruling by the justice won't happen before june, jennifer london, al jazeera, los angeles.
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g.m. facing lawsuits that could cost the auto giant millions. brutal attacks in germany have angela merkel defending her open door refugee policy.
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>> meet the unsung hero of social change. >> i feel like i'm suppose to do something, >> breaking down barriers. >> sometimes i have to speak when other people say be quiet. >> shaping our future. >> i actually am committed to a different, better, stronger, healthier america. >> i lived that character. >> we will be able to see change.
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welcome back. time to take a look at today's top stories. the stunning news breaking overnight, electedry singer divide bow whee died, he has been battling cancer for the past 18 months. his five decade career included all the hits we know, dance and space odyssey. he released his 25th album saturday. it was his 69th birthday. convoys are getting into syria with food aid. the town was long blockaded by the syrian government. aid is also arriving in two towns in idlib. jury selection beginning in baltimore in connection with the second trial in the death of freddie gray. veteran observer officer caesar good sunni driving the van that carried gray to the police station after his death. he is now facing second degree murder charges. a big trial gets underway
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involving general motors and faulty ignition switches involving one man injured. the outcome of his case could affect hundreds of other claims against the auto giant. bisi onile-ere is live outside the courthouse here in new york. explain why this case is so important to all the victim. >> this case is important because people claim that they have either been injured or killed in general motors vehicles. jury selection is expected to start in about an hour here behind me in federal court. as you mentioned, this case is one of several that will test the boundaries are hundreds of cases against general motors. >> g.m. will do the right thing. >> last year, general motors shelled out $600 million a
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to settle hundred was claims in connection with its faulty ignition switch scandal but as part of a massive civil lawsuit, hundreds of plaintiffs are still waiting for their day in federal court. >> this is a very high stakes trial happening in new york. >> this week, g.m. facings the first of six bellwhether trials to decide whether to continue litigating or settle. the first involves an oklahoma man who blames the defective ignition switch from the air bags deploying during a crash. >> the engineers when they were designing it in 2001, they knew they had a problem with it and yesterday they went ahead with a faulty design. >> general motors was aware of the faulty switches for more than a decade but waited until february, 2014 to issue recalls on more than 2 million vehicles. g.m. knew that ignition switches could slip out of position,
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suddenly shutting of the ignition. dozens were injured and more than 100 people died. >> our daughters, mothers, fathers, wives and husbands are gone because they were a cost of doing business g.m.'s style. >> laura christian's daughter was killed when her chevy cobalt crashed in 2005. she settled her case against g.m. the following year. when the automakers reached a $900 million settlement with the justice department to avoid criminal prosecution years later, christian was outraged. >> i mean, 900 million sounds like a not to you and i, but to a massive corporation like g.m., this is writing their way out of a bad situation and that's all there is. that's hundreds of families just like myself that are left wondering how is it that they are able to get away with this? >> so far, there have been no criminal charges filed against any current or former g.m. employees. >> a jolt or your knee hitting it would very readily turn the switch to the off position.
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>> clarence ditlow with the watchdog group the center for auto safety say evidence presented at trial could shed more light on who knew what and when. >> what it can lead to is a tremendous amount, billions of dollars of additional damages, and it could and should lead to homicide charges against individuals within the corporations that were responsible for these decisions that led to the deaths. >> as g.m. worked to move on from the ignition switch scandal, it can't avoid the past. on the same day that the north american international auto show gets underway in detroit, automakers will be front and center in the new york federal courtroom. >> the presiding judge has made rulings recently that may make it more difficult for general motors to settle or dismiss many of these cases. for example, general motors is said to have asked the judge to exclude some evidence and arguments and the judge refused.
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>> on this question about who knew what when, do we expect g.m. executives will take the stand? >> i've inquired and told that it is a possibility this bellwhether trial that starts today, this is one of six as i mentioned. there's another five and those will take place over the course of the year. back to you. >> bisi onile-ere, live outside the courthouse, thank you. earlier this morning, trial lawyer marie napoli telling us that many g.m. decisions in the case appear to have been motivated by business, not people. >> in this case, they made an economic choice to let these people die. they knew that people would be dying from this defect in their car that would shut off the brakes, it would shut off the steering mechanism and prevent the air bags from coming out, so that is clearly, they knew that people were going to be dying and they made an economic choice saying it would be cheaper for them to pay them off in the long
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run. >> g.m. has paid out $600 million, are they going to be asked to pay more? >> i think very easily they could be asked to pay more. it all dependency on the punitive damages. it is much more than compensatory damages. those payments were mostly for compensatory purposes. punitive damages, again, is for the company to feel the pinch, and g.m. is a big company, so they're going to be looking at their assets and what they will feel. that's for each case going forward. it's not just a one time thing. >> so far, g.m. has settled nearly 1400 injury and death cases. >> volkswagen c.e.o. was in the u.s. and apologized for the emission scandal plaguing his company. >> we all know that we have let down customers, authorities, regulators, and the general public here in america, too. we are, i am truly sorry for
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that, and i would like to apologize once again for what went wrong with volkswagen. >> hundreds of thousands of vehicles by the german automakers were sold in the u.s. with secret software designed touched emission tests. he denied he and other corporate leaders knew of the issue. he is in the u.s. for detroit's annual auto show. german police investigating attacks on a pakistani man in cologne, part of a gang, a manhunt or foreigners. authorities want to know if it is connected to the assault of dozen was women on new year's eve, a minister saying people of foreign descent are responsible for nearly all that violence. we are live in berlin this morning. what is the latest on the investigation into these attacks on foreigners? >> there were two separate
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attacks that have been reported. the first involved a group of around 20 people who had apparently coordinated on social media a way of attacking or what they said patrolling the streets, which in fact actually meant attacking a group of six pakistani citizens, two of whom were injured significantly to require treatment. in a separate attack, five people then attacked a syrian man, a 39-year-old, again left likely injured. we understand that he did not require any kind of medical assistance, or hospital assistance. the police later saying that they had held a number of people, and that they expected to be file charges at some point. we don't have any confirmation of that as yet, but that's certainly what they were saying earlier on today. >> german chancellor angela merkel is going to be speaking in just a few hours. what do we expect to hear?
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>> angela merkel is going to be speaking to a group of industrialists, so the lion's share of what she has to say is likely to be about the economy, about industry. she has spoken before about the plead for refugees with professional experience to be able to integrate into society as part of a wider welcoming culture that the germany is proud of, but earlier today, we've been hearing from one of her cabinet cleanings, the interior minister who said that he was addressing the issue of what happened on new year's eve and about whether there was a change in attitudes and society towards refugees. he said that it was important to stress that people should not suspect all refugees of having mo line intentions, and that what happened on new year's eve in cologne was a one off event in that sense, but equally, he said that it was important that people felt able to question those who might have been responsible for such events, so that gives you a sense of the issues that are being debated
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certainly in germany so far. one more point toed a, del, end we understand that he with his justice ministry colleague will be talking this week about intensifying the measures that can be taken against asylum seekers found guilty of serious offenses. back to you, del. >> dominic cain in berlin, thank you very much. a criminal trial against a member of spain's royal family got underway this morning. princess christina and her husband face charges. she is accused of being an accomplice to embezzlement in a case involving 16 other defendants. they are caused of using public companies to bank roll a lavish lifestyle. louisiana gets a new governor today in just a few hours, john bell edwards is going to be sworn in, becoming the state's 56th governor, the first democratic to hold the post since 2008.
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the outgoing governor serving two terms in office. women in oregon have the option of purchasing birth control from a local fortunately sift without a doctor involved. >> oregon is the first state in the nation to allow pharmacists to write prescriptions for women's birth control pills and patches, another new law here ensures they will receive a 12 month supply and that it will be covered by insurance. >> because we know from research from studies that have been done, that consistency of use of birth control, particularly hormonal birth control such as pills or patches, is the most important factor in the effectiveness of the medication, and by having available in her medicine cabinet or wherever she stores it a full 12 month supply of birth control, that woman can give herself a chance at a 30% reduction in the likelihood of
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an unintended pregnancy. that's a very big advance for women. >> what's happening in oregon is considered the most direct step to date in a more ambitious push by women's health advocates to make oral contraceptives legal to sell over-the-counter and still covered by insurance. al jazeera, portland, oregon. >> we will have more on this topic at 8:00 p.m. eastern time. new york can see eight feet of snow. >> it's feet! >> it's feet. in buffalo last year, remember how in december at this time, they were snowed in. >> they were buried. >> we're going to get quite a bit. i'm going to explain lake effect quickly. here's an image yesterday when we were seeing lake effect over superior and lake michigan. you get some very very cold air moving over relatively warmer
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water, the lakes are not frozen over yet. they will be later on. until they do, we get lake effect snow. what that is is the mainly's picked up, sent downstream and then dropped on the south side or east side of the lake. you can see strands of clouds pushing down. yesterday, they were getting the lake effect, today it is new york. you can see it working out right here across lake ontario and lake erie. the cold air is picking up the moisture, taking it to the eastern part, taking it in land and dumping it. what's happening, we're getting quite a bit coming into vermont as well as massachusetts. we're going to be watching this very carefully. they've actually extended some of the lake effect snow warnings a little more towards the east, as well as into the time, we're talking tuesday a.m., as well, we're talking two to three feet of snow locally in some areas, especially when with those bands of snow stay in one area for too
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long, that's where you get the real big pileup. the interesting thing about lake effect snow, you can have two to three feet of snow and go five miles to the north or south and it's only five inches. >> guys get snow blowers for christmas, we love that type of stuff. >> absolutely. more than 50 schools in the city of detroit are closed this morning as part of an organized teacher sick out. the informal strike is part of an effort by teachers to demonstrate frustration with on going problems in the district. the group called detroit strikes to wins teachers are unhappy with their pay and district's poor finances. two schools were closed friday. preparing for his final state of the union.
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♪ we like so many are paying tribute today to what is arguably one of the biggest musicians of the last half century. people of taken to twitter, kanye west calling him one of his most important inspirations, writing: >> the actor mark ruffalo said
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farewell to the father of all us freaks. pop will stand before congress tuesday night to therefore what the white house is calling a different kind of speech. al jazeera's mike viqueira has a preview. >> president obama delivers his final state of the union address tuesday and it's likely going to be a combination victory lap for the suctions of his seven years in office and insistence that this last year won't simply be a lame duck session, but that is much work to do with or without congress. he'll enter on good economic news, the unemployment rate up and so are wages. we can expect the penalty to tout the opening to cuba and nuclear deal with iran and of course what he sees as the success of the affordable care act. all in all, the president wants to burnish his legacy anded a to it with high profile successes, on the agenda for 2016, congressional acceptance of a
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big trade deal with pacific rim nation, the t.p.p. that could be tough to get with democrats in opposition. he'll push for bipartisan support on criminal justice reform, reducing mandatory minimum sentences and reducing the prison population. there's one promise from early president obama's term that hasn't been filled, closing guantanamo bay. mr. obama still wants to work with congress today that but that's not likely to happen. the president made it clear he'll go aren't con if he has to as he did with guns and immigration. like many presidents before him, mr. obama is expected to spend his last year in office often overseas, defending his approach to syria and the fight against isil. all in all, president obama will make the case in the state of the union that he's turned things around especially on the economy since he took office seven years ago, but there's much more to do in his final and
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eighth year. al jazeera special coverage of the state of union begins tomorrow night starting at 8:00 p.m. eastern. a 911 dispatcher from last month's attack in san bernardino is going to be in the audience with the first lady during the president's final state of the union address, the administration saying she was invited after directing the emergency response to the mass shooting that left 14 people dead. her whole team played a huge roam in the fast reaction to the crisis. the city's police chief and the boyfriend of one victim will also attend that speech tomorrow night. >> among his top priorities before leaving office, president obama has been phishing for changes to the criminal justice system, as mike reported m repo. he said the country needs to break the cycle of poverty and incarceration and give people a second chance. we have more. >> one in 85 duties in louisiana is in prison and in this tough on crime state, many low level drug offenders are serving lengthy sentences. >> we're talking about
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individuals who are not accused of possessing with in tent to distribute, but merely having small amounts of drug for their own consumption. >> g. park is a new orleans public defender representing bernard noble, a man whose case has drawn national attention. he is serving a 13 year sentence for having what amounted to two marijuana cigarettes because of two other convictions, one more than 10 years prior he was given the mandatory minimum sentence under louisiana law. >> given his family history, character, his work history, the 13 year sentence is incredibly excessive as applied to him. >> the case highlights what president obama and reform advocates say is a key failure of america's criminal justice system. >> it just has not proven true that the threat of jail has been a particularly good deterrent for people who are addicted to crime or to low level offenses like marijuana. and in a country where we don't have treatment available at the
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level that's necessary, instead, we just cycle people through jails. >> the president made criminal justice reform a key initiative in the past year. the u.s. justice department released more than 6,000 federal prisoners in november as part of an effort to reduce overcrowding. most were inmates hood received harsh sentences in drug cases. >> we are going to do our part in changing this. the president announced new education, job training and housing grants to help exinmates reenter society. you urged congress to limit mandatory minimum sentences for non-violent drug offenders and called for so-called ban the box legislation. >> the federal government should not use federal history to screen out applicants before we even look at their qualifications. we can't dismiss people out of hand simply because of a mistake that they made in the past. >> following a national trend of reducing drug sentences, last month, louisiana made second offense marijuana possession a misdemeanor instead of felony.
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sometime the state sentencing laws are among the harshest in the country. with increasing bipartisan support to revamp the nation's criminal justice system, there's increasing political will on the state level to follow suit. >> you'll see more steps and it will be partly over issues of justice, but mostly over issues of saving money. al jazeera, new orleans. what can only be called gridiron collapse. minnesota fans brave sub zero temperatures but are left in the cold despite their determination. who won big at the golden globes as the awards season now kicks off.
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minnesota vikings fan still talking about that missed field goal. the green bay packers had an easier time with the redskins winning 35-18. >> the parkers face the cardinals. the kansas city chiefs take on the new england patriots. sunday, set a faces the carolina panthers. the steelers take on the denver broncos. hollywood award seasons kicking off last night with surprises, the biggest names in television and film gathering for the annual golden globe awards. last night's winners could signal what is ahead for the oscars. >> the golden globe goes to...
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>> it was the final act of the night with the bloody frontier thriller taking home the award for best motion picture drama. it upset the field, winning every major category, including for leonardo dicaprio. it began with laughs at host ricky gervais. >> i'm going to do this monologue, then go into hiding, ok? not even sure sean penn will find me. >> that was just the beginning as he continued his trend of ridiculing hollywood's elite. the night truly belonged to the stars, jennifer lawrence took home her third golden globe for the movie joy. kate winslet won for her best supporting actress in steve jobs. >> i'm really actually extremely surprised and overwhelmed. >> matt damon won for his role
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in the martian. >> it's been 18 years since i've been here doing this and with a little more context, i know how lucky i am. >> the moment of the night went to sylvester stallone, honored for his role in creed with a thunderous standing ovation. >> i want to thank my imaginary friend rocky balboa i can't for being the best friend i ever had. the race to the oscars is officially underway. >> lady gaga taking home best actress, cookie won best actress for the hit fox show empire. the oscar nominations will be announced on thursday. coming up from doha, more on the debt press situation in syria, food and medicine finally arriving near damascus where thousands said to be starving. we are back tomorrow morning.
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we will see you then. addition prettily needed aid finally on its way to starving syrians, but thousands are people are still under siege. give us an education, yuck africans call on the government to open universities to more students. talks get underway in islamabad to try to revive the afghan peace pros. we are live in pakistan. ♪

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