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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  January 14, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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a deadly attack in indonesia's capital. explosions rocking central jakarta leaving several people dead an issue in turkey flint's water crisis getting worse from contaminated water in michigan not one, not two, power ball winners settle in three states after winning the biggest pot in history well domestic your world
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this morning we begin this morning with that breaking news coming out overnight in indonesia six explosions rocked the city. at least seven people are dead the coordinated attacks taking place in a major shopping and business area, it was close to embassies, the united nations office and star bucks and i.s.i.l. is claiming responsibility to our correspondent in jakarta. what is the security situation like where you are right now? >> reporter: well, as you can imagine the security situation here in the central business district in jakarta is extremely tight. we have military tanks here on stand by. they're parked literally on the main thoroughfare off jakarta, the capital of indonesia. it's all very near a few - not even april hundred metres-- a hundred metres away from the intersection where the attacks took place earlier this morning where six bombs have been found by police, one small one and one
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medium sized bomb and where a full attack was taking place with different attackers attacking different parts of this intersection. one of them went into the star bucks café. the situation is cleared. there was a complete lock down earlier but police have now secured the area and they have said it's all secure and ready for the cars and pedestrians to come back into the central district of jakarta, but the situation was a lot more tense earlier as you can see in our report. >> reporter: the blast through the down town area, at least six separate explosions and then gunfire. a multi pronged attack close to the sarinah shopping mall. >> translation: for about ten minutes he did that mass killing. he was on his own.
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>> reporter: indonesian television has released these pictures of a suspect who was carrying a gun. a one bomb went off near a café and a police post was destroyed. the president joko widodo cut short a visit to overseas. >> translation: we cannot be afraid. we cannot be defeated by these terror attacks and i urge people to stay calm because everything is under control. >> reporter: the attacks were concentrated around tamrin street, which is close to the u.n. offices and the presidential palace. the traffic and people which normally clog these streets are gone replaced with heavy security. i.s.i.l. has now claimed responsibility through the internet and there was also what a lot of people were, of course, speculating about, that it wasn't an i.s.i.l. coordinated attack.
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apparently the police says there were competition going on among the top leaders of i.s.i.l. about control in south-east asia and that's why this attack has happened here today. the police chief has also said that he knows the people behind the attack and he is going after them. there's several groups in indonesia who have pledged alliance to i.s.i.l. we have also around a few hundred, maybe 700 people have left for syria and iraq to join i.s.i.l. and a few hundred have already come back. of course, those last people, the people who have come back from syria and iraq are much of concern for police and they have been watching them carefully, but they haven't seen this one come al jazeera's correspondent with the latest. thank you. jam residents have been coming together on social media to respond to the attacks. the editor for global voices has been monitoring the response.
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>> what happened today, there has been some very interesting remarks from the previous incident. for example, there has been massive flow of information which is online, but with the good and bad of social media, people are helping one another and they're informing one another, for example, through hashtag jakarta safety check on twitter and i find it very, very positive and it's a great show of how humanity works in jakarta today. what the terrorists want this time is showmanship and the people understands that. even though there are users who happen to be eyewitness on the ground, people are much more
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wise compared to what happened to the attack back in 2009, 2004 and 2001. what i can tell you is that people are explaining that they are not afraid of terrorism. it's a way to make people afraid and importantly paralysed also we're learning that indonesian police say several attackers are among the dead. there has been a bombing in turkey. this time six people were dead. the kurdish separatist drove that truck into a building causing what you see here, the extensive damage. rescue crews are still searching for bodies. al jazeera's correspondent has more from istanbul. >> reporter: the quarters in cinar towns, security forces were the target but civilian
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families took the brunt of this attack because a building housing families collapsed nearby. it was a devastating blast that took out the front of the police headquarters. there were desperate scenes of rescue workers trying to get children and families out of the building at the same time dealing with casualties at the police headquarters. amongst the dead was a police officer. the rest were either from police families or the civilian families. three children were reported amongst the dead, one of them a baby. it was the pkk according to the government, that's the kurdistan workers party, responsible for the attack. all the hallmarks are there. this is an area where they are active, the pkk. it is 30 kilometers from diabica city also many towns in this area are subject to strict curfew since the ceasefire with the pkk which collapsed last
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july. the situation there is very tense, indeed, and this, a very vivid illustration of just how much of a threat in security terms of turkish government faces in the aftermath of the attack here in the center offise tap-- istanbul by islamic state thank you for that. traders on wall street may be looking for a rebound after wednesday's big losses, but they're not getting good news from overseas markets. most asian markets closed down. the markets have been down most of the day. allow oil prices and global economic slow down continue to lead to volatility since the start of the year several power ball winners. winning tickets in that 1.6 billion dollars sold in three
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states. one lucky ticket sold at this 711, hundreds of people going to the store celebrating after the word spread that the winning ticket was sold there. the store gets a million dollars because it sold the ticket. the others were sold in florida and tennessee. the numbers were 8, 27, 34, 4, 19 and the power ball of 10, and also several tickets sold in nearly two dozen states matched all five winning numbers to win the second price of about one million dollars law makers in michigan began considering legislation to try and consider schools. they were reacted a couple of days sick-outs that closed thousands of students to stay home. it calls for a nine-member school board. the teachers are protesting crumbling conditions in many schools, including rags and mould as well as teacher pay and
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class size. people in flint michigan are dealing with a new revelation this morning. there has been an outbreak of a dangerous disease that may or may not be related to the water supply. our correspondent has the latest. >> reporter: as national guard troops, he called in were beginning their day passing out battled waters and filters in flint. the man many claim >> schneider did this. he is responsible. >> reporter: me made an announcement >> over the course of 2014 and 15 we saw a spike in legionaires disease. >> reporter: at least 87 cases over the past two years. officials confirm 10 of those people died. it is a respiratory infection most often spread through the middle of the of a contaminated water source. it is said not all of those cases reported have any contact with flint's water supply >> we have already put out a set
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of recommendations about filtered water, bottled water, a number of other items. we're not making recommendations for changed behaviour by the residents of flint because of this. >> reporter: a federal investigation is already underway into the larger water crisis in flint. >> i don't discourage the u.s. attorney from investigating. i think taste good thing. it should be investigated. let's get the answers >> reporter: starting in 2014 the manager switched flint's water supply to the closer flint river. it was an effort to save 19 million dollars, but residents almost immediately complained about discolored ill-smelling and bad tasting water. it was found it was contaminated with led. it wasn't until a year later that authorities declared the wour supply unsafe. this week flint parents began taking their kids to the fist of 15 scheduled testing events to see how much damage has been done to the city's youngest
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residents >> what if something happens to your child? the governor said he didn't learn about the crisis until last october. he admits not enough got accomplished in the aftermath of that revelation to solve the problem and help the residents. >> reporter: is the governor asking washington for any help? >> reporter: he is. he said he has reached out to the homeland security secretary and to the white house and fe ma. fe ma has approved the request for assistance it didn't come soon enough for those in michigan, flint it is cold in new york. the governor activated a state of emergency center. take a look at the area getting two feet of snow. combined with high winds that has led to a rash of accidents in western hamburg. it is frozen next to the lake.
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the owner had to use 350 pounds of flaked calcium to melt the ice enough to get the car out. he says there wasn't any major damage i wondered how they were going to do that. a potential north-easter could be heading in. >> reporter: so we have to clear out of one and then we get another almost right on its heels. we have the snow moving through the great lake and with the wind affecting that, a lot will be tapering off and then we will watch south ward too. places like water town, as the snow winds down and by this afternoon a lot of places will be clearing. that's great news. still windy through the day. with that snow visibility could go down to a quarter of a mile. still some problems this morning. this will be the next area that we're watching. you can see some highways tour and definitely more cloud cover coming towards the gulf coast. you will see a low pressure continue to develop in this area.
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as this is put into motion in the forecast, you will see that pick up by foam tomorrow. friday this will call its way up the coastline and get off the coastline continuing to develop into eye north-wester. so between those two things, we get probably saturday morning more of that moisture into the north east as well, but then by saturday night cleared out. that is important because stephanie is celebrating her birthday. here is that forecast as we get into the day tomorrow. then another system into the north-west. more of that in the next half hour. in the meantime, moderated or even cooler in some cases. we go from the 30s today to the 20s tomorrow. up and down the head of the coastline new york will go from 37 into the 40s before all of that goes through. definitely it has been the end of some of that extreme warm air that we've seen over the last couple of weeks.
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back to you guys thanks for that some sad news. al jazeera america is going to be ceasing its operation by april 30. a statement from our ceo to the company's the decision by the board is driven by the fact that our business model is simply not sustainable and like the economic challenges in the u.s. media marketplace, al jazeera america has done a great job: al jazeera in the last two and a half years we have been honoured by an emi, two awards, two grace ee awards, page award and many other awards the doha based media network
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also issuing its press release stating to expand its existing digital footprint. we have been very proud of what we have done we will continue to be on the air until april 30 getting the health care the cost of medicate could be a problem counting down to iowa's head to head.
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in chicago a judge could rule today on whether to make public another video of police shooting an unarmed black team. it is no longer going to try to stop the video being released,
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this one showing the fatal shooting of a 17-year-old back in 2013. the video is evidence of a wrongful death lawsuit that was filed against the city and the two officers involved a few days into his first term the democratic governor mass made about on a promise. he is expanding medicate in his state. it is something the former governor choose to do. >> reporter: a long time trumpeter is like most. he has no health insurance. he is among 300,000 people in the city falling into a coverage gap. they make too much to qualify for medicate but not enough credits for obamacare. >> even though i'm needing help, i say don't worry about it. don't worry about. i will be all right. just pray to god that they keep
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me going. >> reporter: terry has reason to be hopeful. >> i don't look at this as some revolutionary thing. this is the right thing to do. >> reporter: within hours of being sworn in monday, the new governor signed an executive order that begins the process of expanding medicaid in the city. previously republican bobby jindall had refused to accept money nor expansion. the new plan will cover people with an income at or below 138% above the poverty level. that's about $16,000 for a single person and just over 30,000 for a family of four. >> and the 30 states that have done this, 14 are presided over by republican governors. this is not a partisan thing either. this is right versus wrong, not left. >> reporter: they want it to start by july 1, but the state will have to hire more than 200
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new department workers to handle the enrollment >> verifying and enrolling all the people in six months might be ambitious. >> reporter: this man says the biggest challenge will be to find the way to pay for the expansion. it faces a billion dollars budget deficit. while the federal government will cover the initial costs of the expansion, starting in 2017, louisianna will have to pay 10%. >> whether it means reducing taxes, closing some loopholes or generating new taxes. >> congratulations. >> reporter: he plans to meet with the department of health and human services to ensure a smooth transition. he hopes to sit down with president obama on thursday. medicaid expansion is expected to be a key focus of the president speech. he says he is grateful the
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government nor is making a health care a priority and have insurance >> i'm a married man with a wife and two kids as you heard said, president obama is going to be holding that meeting this morning taking themes from the state of the union measure on the road on wednesday he was at the university of nebraska. he is spreading a message of optimism >> we have got to make some choices. do we respond to these changes with fear and do we turn on each other or do we face the future with confidence in who we are and what we stand for and you will the incredible things that we can get done together during a speech the president covered everything some republicans are reacting with less than enthusiasm. paul ryan said the political tone the president took towards donald trump and the republican
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field degrades the presidency. he also said the president's speech was divorced from reality when it comes to i.s.i.l. informed policy in syria. the republican presidential candidates face off with three weeks to go before the iowa caucus. the rise is tightening. as al jazeera's david shuster reports, the timing of today's debate could be good for one considered an underdog. >> whoa >> reporter: with just over two weeks into the iowa caucus bernie sanders seems to be surging. the latest poll indicates he is now ahead of hillary clinton 49 to 45. in new hampshire the most recent poll suggests he is up by 14 points, 53 to 39. where hillary clinton had a 20 point edge over sanders just a month ago now, according to a cbs new york time poll, it's 48
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po 41. throughout his campaign he has promoted economic popularism >> let's have the courage not to pete up on mexicans or muslims but to take on the billionaire class >> reporter: he p wants to break up the biggest banks and impose new regulations on wall street. his plans are more progressive than hillary clinton's who has big donors on wall street, a point sanders have mentioned repeatedly. >> the truth is you can't change a corrupt system by taking its money. i'm bernie sanders. i have proved this message. join us for real change >> reporter: in the face of the latest polls this week, hillary clinton has stepped up her attacks on sanders >> but we have differences on guns, on taxes, on health care and i think people should have that information before they go to the caucus or the primary. >> reporter: on tuesday in new hampshire even chelsea clinton hit sanders.
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>> sanders want to dismantle obamacare. >> reporter: the bernie sanders says he wants to go beyond obamacare. another said: the republican presidential contest also appears to be getting tighter. the latest g.o.p. indicates donald trump and ted cruz are running even. now trump is ratcheting up his claims that kruz is not qualified for the presidency because he was born in canada >> people think you have to be born here >> reporter: the issue is nonsense said by most, but kruz is on the defensive >> i have never breathed a breath of air on this president when i was not a u.s. citizen. it was the process of being born that made me a u.s. citizen >> reporter: kruz largely
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ignored donald trump. not any more >> donald trump comes from new york and he embodies new york values. he seems to be rattled. >> reporter: it matters to most because it is the first time people pay attention to the race. as it stands now, donald trump and hillary clinton seem to be facing the growing chance of opening with a headline grabbing law. david shuster also in politics there is a bid to the to impeach the governor of main. nine law makers asked to investigate. page has offended a lot of people with his remarks. last week he complained of drug dealer with names like getting white girls pregnant. it is abuse of power. the governor says it is privilege allows an end to the out break the who says africa free of
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ebola after two years a clean up in southern california, efforts to clean up a gas leak making hundreds of people sick.
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unconstitutional policing that stretches back through generations. >> it was a coverup for what had happened. >> the absence of any accountability just speaks so loudly. >> fault lines: al jazeera america's hard-hitting& >> today they will be arrested. >> firing canisters and gas out of& >> emmy-award winning investigative series. welcome back to your world this morning.
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taking a look at today's top stories. i.s.i.l. has claimed responsibility for a series of coordinated explosions in indonesia's capital. at least seven people were killed. the attackers detonated explosives in a shopping area and fired at police officers. the situation is now under control in south-eastern turkey at least six people are dead following an attack near a police station. a truck was driven into a building. 39 people were injured. that has a resur generals of fighting in-- resurgence in recent months south africa is ee bol afree. it has been 42 days since the last patient testing negative. the who is saying countries should be prepared in case of flir ups >> it is a disease that comes and goes. one thing i can tell you, report
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the two year outbreak killed more than 11,000 people. liberia was first declared bowl afre in may but it resurfaced six weeks later there were four confirmed cases in u.s. there say new report out from the homeland security that found major gaps in the ebola screen process. customs fishlts failed to take the precautions. it released people without taking their temperatures and presumed some were, empt from the screenings. -- exempt. what did we learn? >> i think we've learned about how the virus can linger in the human body over long periods of time. this is why the pho is warning we could still see flare-ups. we have seen patients, the nurse, who came back who had a
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relapse months later of the disease, another who still had the virus lingering. men up to nine months, about 20% of them, will have virus in the semen when it occurred we had an official. he said we over exaggerated the threat on the erp west african continent. who do we trust when it comes to future outbreaks and do we trust the pro? >> it is a good question. politically speaking it is the only organization that is still positioned to intervene in a way that is perceived as diplomatic. while others may be better resourced, it is the who that the responsibilities fall to. it is concerning that they remain vastly underfunded. do i have a good answer to that? not really is it cynical to believe,
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and a lot of people are suggesting this particular question, is it cynical to believe that it didn't get the world's attention until it reached the u.s. and europe? >> i don't think that's cynical at all. i think quite frankly having westerners affected by the disease is really what it took for the media to take attention. it faded out of the media over a year ago well before it faded out of these countries and it was a reflection of what was happening here and not over there when does africa get to let its guard down? >> i don't think ever. the conditions leading up to the aoutbreak, really weak economy, people having to be in close contact with the animals that carry the disease in the first place, deforestation, weak health systems, these things are all there. you have the ongoing risk of some flare-ups and if those are not contained immediately you could have transmission chains when we first were exposed
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it was the movie outbreak. everybody was dying. do we now have a better understanding of ebola and i guess that has that veil of fear been taken away? >> i think clearly it is not always deadly. i think it depends on what kind of access you have to medical care. if you look at the americans who developed ebola, they've survived. it is because we had very high level icu level medicine where we can be very aggressive. what is possible on the ground in these countries, it's not that level of care. you're still looking at 30 to 50% mortality rate thank you for that. the ebola crisis might be over, but the outbreak is having effects on some west africans. men that face the grim task of burning the victims are now shunned by society and living in
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squalor. >> reporter: the crematorium, or what is left of it. it is a place that people come to at great reluctance. these men set fire to the dead. for four months they burned close to 2000 bodies. >> i just have to live with what i have to do. >> reporter: many people continue to blame others for cremating the dead. experts recommended cremation to stop the spread of ebola. in these deeply religious nation, they believe the dead will come back to haunt the living if they're not well buried.
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>> my house was pushed in because of this. i had to move. i had a portable. >> reporter: that is not what the young men expected. they thought they would be rewarded, hailed as heros and receive apologies from the people who shunned them. they're still waiting. the banishment from the community in what was already a terrible time for them. a year after the cremations were stopped, their lives remain virtually destroyed. their time is spent drinking alcohol and taking drugs, habits they acquired, they say, to get through their macabre task. >> i did it for my country. it was to be something i do.
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y yes. >> reporter: the men are now forced to live together, sharing the same room in a house not far from the crematorium. the place they hated so much has become a home of sorts. nowhere else will accept them the u.n. is launching investigations into allegations its peacekeepers sexually abused children. the investigation focusing on the car where at least four peacekeepers paid as little as 50 cents for sex with underage girls. this is the most recent in accusations as many as 200 refugees and migrants could be kicked out of their temporary camps in the coastal town of calais. there are bulldozer on sites because the government plans to dismantling the camp. >> reporter: there is the expectation that at some stage
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up to 1500 people will be asked, taken forth, we're not sure what the modalities will be, from the tents in which they have been living until now, these structures that are surrounded with mud and huge puddles of rainwater and then moved into this facility which is being built, i think just coming into shot now you can see these white containers and that crane behind them, the crane at the moment is lowering more containers into position. the idea is that the refugees should go and live inside there. some people have already been registering to move in. others are reticent and cautious about the idea of leaving their tents behind because, as you can also see, this looks a little bit like a prison camp. there is a metal fence around the perimeter, there are these lights and also security guards.
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we've noticed two different private security companies operating here and crucially in order to move in, the refugees have to have their fingerprints taken and they're afraid that this is a way of controlling them, possibly forcing them to register and apply for asylum here in france. above all they're worried that this offence and the gates may prevent them from going out p at night and trying to jump on lorries, get onto the train or the euro tunnel because most of the people awho have come here, the reinthey've come to the north of france is to cross the channel and go to the united kingdom an estimated four thousand people currently live in those camps austria has turned away three thousand migrants there in the last 20 days. police say it's because people lied about any nationalities. thousands of migrants cross-claiming from being from iraq and syria. translators have been checking
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them, turning them back if they're determined not to be telling the court the supreme court is considering a case of two billion dollars in relation to the bombing of u.s. marine barracks. the money is said to be the viksz' families. >> reporter: these arguments come at a particularly sensitive time as we' wait for the nuclear deal to be fully implemented. 1983, buy root, lebanon, 241 u.s. marine sailors, soldiers on a piece keeping mission killed. four stories reduced to rubble crushing the men inside. a group claimed to iran claims responsibility. more than two billion dollar judgment was won. three years after the bombing they're at the u.s. supreme
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court still trying to collect that money. lyn smith's brother was among those who died. >> i want those who killed my brother and the others to be held actable. they keep doing it. i want accountability. >> reporter: the arguments come at a politically sensitive time for iran and the u.s. the issue that the supreme court justice has to deal with is whether congress violated the u.s. constitution by dictating the outcome of this case. the lawyer for iran central bank argued congress went too far when in 2012 it passed a law saying that iranian money should go to pay off the judgment. the justices appeared split about whether congress interfered with the courts. it was agreed saying their job is to pass is laws and our job is to decide a case.
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ted olsson argued for the families >> the money is in the u.s. it's here illegally. it belongs to the government of iran that sponsored these terrorist attacks it should be available. >> reporter: paul rivers survived the barracks bombing >> this has been an emotional roller-coaster ride for me because my friends are gone and they can never stand here and talk about this a ruling is expected in june those families have waited a long time. it is unclear if the ruling in june will give them the relief they seek it has been a week since california governor declared a state of emergency. it is in a suburb of loss angesel. the gas leak knows no boundaries. >> reporter: it is hard as a parent. you want to protect your
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children. you want to not have them sick, but i can't take care of the air. >> reporter: this woman rarely lets her boys outside to play. if she does, they have to wear protective masks. the air, she says, is making her family sick. this is for my older boy and this is what he is taking for migraines. this is my younger son's inhaler because he has asthma attacks. he had one last night and one today. >> reporter: at this woman as house >> it is reckless, irresponsible to play around with people's health and my child's health means more to me than anybody >> reporter: three miles away methane gas has been leaking since october 23. nearly three months and counting. in the first few weeks the focus was on the 30,000 residents who live down wind in porter ranch, authoritiesed of l.a. thousands have fled their homes. thousands more are waiting to are moved into temporary
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housing. every day you will find long lines outside the community resource center. what about residents like brenda and jennifer who live in neighboring communities? >> we were told that porter ranch residents have priority with being relocated. so anyone outside the porter ranch zip code were at the bottom of the list. >> reporter: how did that make you feel to be told that you're at the bottom of the list? >> it made me feel invisible, like they didn't care that they didn't understand that the gas didn't just stay in porter ranch, it actually moves with the wind. >> reporter: the owner of the storage facility has put in weather industrialing and so-called air scrubbers and that has helped a little. home owners say it is like putting a small band died on a ruptured room. it didn't have a shut off safety valve. it means the only way to stop the leak is to drill a relief well. that will take months >> why wasn't there a safety
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valve on the well so that it could be stopped immediately and not have to wait months and months for a relief well to be drilled >> this well was in total compliance with its regulations at the time of the leak and those kinds of valves are not required on these kinds of wells. >> reporter: in hindsight that doesn't sound like a very good argument given what is currently going on >> it would be purely speculative to try and ascertain whether a safety valve like that would have made any difference on this well >> the regulation s are are so old, they're older than the facility itself which was built-in 19 is 70. -- 1970. they don't have the shut off valves that should be required on every single well. it is ridiculous that we're living in this, in this day and age when it's in our backyard and these rules are so old and draconian, they don't protect the people in the community. that needs to change >> reporter: residents from all
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over the valley are also demanding change, but they want more than just new regulations >> i will not be happy until that entire facility is shut down and those wells are either moved to some other place where it's not around the community like anybody should never be subjected to this >> reporter: is the gas company willing to consider shutting this facility down because it doesn't appear to be safe? >> this is an integral facility to the energy security of southern california. you have to think of this facility much like a water reservoir, just like we maintain water supplies. >> reporter: why does it poison people? >> natural gas doesn't poison people either. if you look at the science you will see that natural gas is nontoxic >> reporter: but people are sick right now. >> well, they are feeling symptoms and we're sorry for that >> reporter: after a brief visit last week, the governor declared a state of emergency. something the city and county of
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l.a. did last month. many living with the stench and sickness say the governor's long awaited proclamation means little. has anything changed that you can see? >> no. not one thing except headlines that says he was here and put in a state of emergency >> how long does this have to be? how long does my son say i can't breathe. i can't take a deep breath >> reporter: it is a question thousands are asking but with no immediate relief in sight, it will be month before residents here can start to breathe a little easier from hurricanes to tornadoes and draught a super computer that can forecast weather that can save lives.
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storms are rolling into the west coast and hitting the pacific north-west again. let's bring in nicole mitchell for more on that. are we getting more rain? >> yes. we've been very active. it has shifted to the north-west. here is the pattern. this goes back 24 hours. this will be the next system that we're watching well out in the pacificened you can see it as they put this in motion. the rain is to the coastline. behind this another system. you can see the spotty queue behind this. that is an indication of cold air. this will keep things colder, especially that next one. as they put this into motion again on the forecast, you can see the first one brings more snow, the second one gets us into saturday. a lot of rain across the area and again the snow for the higher elevations. an advance of all that. we have chances for rain for the
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next few days, a lot of that next week, and for the higher elevations, we can see easily six to 12 inches of snow. that's why we have those different winter weather advisories up. we're already getting some of that snow. another disturbance, but nuisance stuff as you're heading off this morning. it's january you might want to listen to the next story. a powerful tool could give forecasters a better look at patterns going forward. >> reporter: the new super computer is said to provide a faster better way to know what's happening in the earth's atmosphere. the computer is called shyan and researchers say it can do twice the number of calculations that the current one does. >> you're going to get clear pictures of what's going on in
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the physics of the atmosphere, the ocean's hydrology. all these areas that we study. it's like getting more mega pixles on your camera >> reporter: so far it has provided simulations of clouds to the patterns of water droplets that develop inside a cloud to solar storms. the computer can even detect heat on the ocean floor which leads to the creation of waves which then affect the atmosphere. >> we're having a very strong el nino. people would like to understand whether this is the new normal or is this just an out liar event for example. we know that there are a number of events that happen in the weather that people are affected by. being able to predict those and understand how they work and make correct preadditions about what's going to happen is really critical to saving property and more importantly saving human lives.
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>> reporter: last year the federal government responded to at least 77 disaster declarations, deadly floods, tornadoes and massive droughts in california. scientists say super computers have already made better forecasts further in advance, forecasts that can help save lives. >> reporter: the future of transportation front and center at the detroit auto show are putting those self-driving cars to the test. there are still some kinks to work out. >> reporter: these are the cars that think they're better drivers than you are >> this is the camera that will track the lines >> reporter: for years we have seen the creep of self driving elements. now auto makers are taking the trend one step further. some cars like this qx 60 include lane departure warning and prevention, a camera on the
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front windshield tracks the line on the road >> if you drift out of your lane, you will get an audible and visual alarm on your dashboard alerting you that you're leaving your lane. if you don't take action, it prevents you. on the opposite side of the vehicle the brakes will try to pull you back. >> reporter: we tested one car last year. it works well. if you know how to use it. >> i'm operating the gas and brake, but this car is steering itself. no hands. but it doesn't brake itself. >> reporter: the company is now going further and announcing earlier this month that it will triple its test flee to 30 hybrids. >> it is a two pronged approach. semiautonomous features, that will allow you to park your car or help you get in and out of traffic jams, those type of things, keep you in your lane, but we're also working on level
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4 autonomy, which is in a defined area. the driver will not have to be prepared to step in. >> reporter: the upcoming 20017 lincoln continental can park and unpark step and detects pedestrians in traffic jams >> so you're on a busy freeway and travelling at 70 and in a mile you're at full stop, the car can stop you, take you to full stop without you having to do anything. >> reporter: here necessity north american international auto show in detroit they're showcasing their model. technology is moving fast. these cars could be on the road in two years and by then much of this could be seen outdated. >> reporter: googles camp pass are betting big. >> this is fun and affordable. >> reporter: general motors invested 500 million dollars in
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the ride sharing lift word just in that british actor alan richman has died. he passed away last night at his home in london. he had cancer. he launched his career in 1988 with the film die hard and gained popularity in another film i.s.i.l. claiming responsibility for a deadly attack in the capital city of jakarta a new health threat in flint michigan as the city deal with their continued water problem. movers and shakers. >> we will be able to see change. >> gripping... inspiring... entertaining. no topic off limits. >> 'cause i'm like, "dad, there are hookers in this house". >> exclusive conversations you
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won't find anywhere else. >> these are very vivid, human stories. >> if you have an agenda with people, you sometimes don't see the truth. >> "talk to al jazeera". monday, 6:00 eastern. only on al jazeera america.
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breaking news over night. i.s.i.l. is claiming responsibility for a deadly attack in indonesia's capital. >> reporter: turkey on high alert after another attack there, a truck bomb killing several people a new threat in flint, a spike in legiionnares disease. >> reporter: we have a winner. people in three states picking
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the right numbers in the power ball drawing welcome to your world this morning i.s.i.l. is claiming responsibility for a series of coordinated attacks in indonesia at least seven people are dead after six explosions rattled jat. it happened at a-- jakarta. it happened to a number of places. a report from the scene of the attack. >> reporter: as you can imagine, the security situation here and the central business district in jakarta is extremely tight. we have military tanks here on stand by. they're parked literally on the main thoroughfare of jakarta, the capital of indonesia. it is all very near a few - not even a hundred metre away from the intersection where the
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attacks took place earlier this morning where six bombs have been found by police, five small ones and one medium sized bomb and where a full-blown attack was taking place with attackers attacking different parts of the intersection. the situation has been cleared. there ways complete lock down earlier, but police have now secured the area and they have set it's all secure and ready for the cars and all pedestrians to come back into the central district of jakarta, but the situation was a lot more tense earlier as you can see in our report. >> reporter: the blast through the down town area. at least six separate explosions and then gunfire. an attack close to the office of the united nations and the
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popular sarinah shopping mall. >> translation: he was on his own. for about ten minute he did that mass killing. >> reporter: indonesian television has released these pictures of a suspect who was carrying a gun. one bomb is known to have gone off near a star bucks café and a police post was destroyed in one of the blast's. the president cut short a visit to over see operations. >> translation: we cannot be afraid. we cannot be defeated by these terror attacks and i urge people to stay calm because everything is under control. >> reporter: the attacks were concentrated around tamarin street, a busy area which is close to the u.n. offices and the presidential palace. the traffic and people which normally clog the streets are gone, replaced with heavy security. i.s.i.l. has now claimed responsibility through the internet and there was also what a lot of people were, of course, speculating about that. it wasn't i.s.i.l. coordinated
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attack. apparently the police chief says there was a competition going on among the top leaders of i.s.i.l. about control in south-east asia and that's why this attack has happened here today. police chief has also said that he knows the people behind the attack and he is going after them. there's several groups in indonesia who have pledged alliance to i.s.i.l. we have also around a few hundred, maybe 700 people have left for syria and iraq to join i.s.i.l. and a few hundred have already come back. of course, those last people, the people who have come back from syria and iraq are much concern for police and they have been watching them carefully but they haven't seen this one coming that al jazeera stef dawson in jakarta. people have been coming online for the attacks. an editor has been monitoring
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the response >> what happened today, there has been some very interesting documents compared from the previous incident. for example, right now there has been massive flow of information which is online, but with the good and bad of social media, people are helping one another and they're informing one another, for example, through hashtag jakarta safety check on twitter and, yeah, i find it very, very positive and it's a great show of how humanity works in jakarta today. what the terrorists want this time is showmanship and the people understands that. even though there are users who happen to be eyewitness on the ground, people are much more wise compared to what happened
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to the attack back in 2009, 204 and 2001. what i can tell you is that people are explaining that they are not afraid of terrorism. it is a way to make the people afraid and paralysed, but we are resilient community police say several attackers among the dead in turkey at least six people are dead in the south-eastern part of the country. officials say kurdish separatists drove a car into a building. rescue teams are still searching for bodies at the scene of this latest attack. andrew simmons reports. >> reporter: this was an attack on the police headquarters in cinar town of the. the police forces were the target but civilian families took the brunt of this attack because a building housing families collapsed nearby.
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it was a devastating blast that took out the front of the police headquarters. there were desperate scenes of rescue workers trying to get children and families out of the residence at the same time dealing with casualties at the scene of the police residences and the headquarters. amongst the dead was one police officer, the rest were either from police families or the civilian families. three children reported amongst the dead, one of them a baby. it was the pkk according to the government responsible for the attack. all the hallmarks are there. this is an area where they are active, the pkk. it's 30 kilometers from diabika city. many of the towns in this area are subject to strict curfew since the ceasefire, the two-year ceasefire with the the pkk collapsed last july. the situation there is very
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tense, indeed, and this a very vivid illustration of just how much of a threat in security terms the turkish government faces in the aftermath of the attack here in the center of istanbul by islamic state andrew simmons reporting. skroo >> reporter: the state department looking into whether those ten u.s. sailors were treated inappropriately. they were detained after drifting into iranian waters after having mechanical issues. they were released in less than a day. the initial examination says they were treated well. officials are looking at videos while futures are pointing down, most asian markets closed down today. china did buck the trend to close up almost 2%. european market have been down most of the day. low oil prices and an economic slow down have led to volatility
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since the start of the year. >> reporter: at least three people will be looking for investment advice after winning the power balance jackpot. -- ball hundreds of people going to the store afterwards celebrating when the news of the winning ticket being sold there. the store gets one million dollars. the winning numbers were 8, 27, 34, 4, 19 and the power ball 10. also several tickets sold in nearly two dozen states matching five of the winning numbers. they will claim the second price of 1 million dollars law makers in michigan begin considering the reaction to several days of teacher sick-outs that forced thousands
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of students to stay home. the legislation calls for a nine-member school board appointed by the governor and detroit mayor. the teachers are protesting crumbling conditions in many schools, including rats and mould and teacher pay and class size. residents in flint michigan reeling if from a water crisis are dealing with a new revelation there has been an outbreak of a dangerous disease that may or may not be related to the problems with the water supply. >> reporter: as national guard troops he called in were beginning their first day passing out bottled water and filter in flint, the man many blame for the water crisis >> schneider did this. he is responsible >> reporter: made a stunning announcement >> over the course of 2014 and 2015 we saw a spike in legionairess disease >> reporter: at least 80 cases
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in the past few years. ten people had died. it is a respiratory infection. not all of those 87 cases reported having any contact with flint's water supply >> we have put out a set of recommendations, a number of other items, so we're not making any recommendations for changeed behaviour by the residents of flint because of this. >> reporter: a federal investigation is already underway into the larger water crisis in flint. >> i don't discourage the u.s. attorney from investigating. i think it is a good thing. it should be vested. let's get the answers. >> reporter: started in 2014, the manager switched the water supply to flint river. it was an effort to save 19 million dollars, but residents almost immediately complained about discolored, ill-smelling and tasting water. it was discovered that the water
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supply was contaminated with led. it wasn't until a year later that authorities declared the water supply unsafe. this week flint parents began taking their kids to the first of 15 scheduled testing events to see how much damage has been done to the city's youngest residents. >> what if something happens to your child? >> reporter: fe ma have announced the request for federal assistance governor says he didn't learn about the flint water crisis until last october and he admits not enough got accomplished in the immediate aftermath of that to solve problems if the city has deemed and stopped getting water from the flint river, why has the tap water not been deemed safe yet? authorities in michigan say the led in the flint river has damaged flint's pipe system and until something can be done by those pipe, the levels of led in the water will still be unsafe
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wherever they're getting the water from in chicago a judge is expected to rule today whether to make public another video of police shooting an unarmed black teen. it will no longer try to prevent release of the video. it shows the fatal shooting of 17-year-old back in 2013. the video is evidence in a wrongful death lawsuit filed against the city and the two police officers it is a cold morning in up of the north-east today. you know that if you have walked out your door, but it is particularly bad in western new york. the governor is declaring a state of emergency as the conditions continue. that area getting at least two feet of snow combined with those high winds it has led to a lot of accidents just west in ham burring a frozen car is freed. it was completely frozen. the owner had no use 350 pounds
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of flake calcium to melt the ice and get the car out without major damage more snow for the north-east. >> reporter: i can tell you about the cold air that's coming in next week. we've got some snow moving to the northern area, and a developing system in the south and then a new system in the north-west. i will more on the new system in half an hour. the snow that we've had, and you can see a disturbance coming through, the lake affected area is going to wind down this morning and into this afternoon. it could reduce visibility down to a quarter of a mile. we will have problems with in. we are watching more in the southern tear of the country. we will have a developing low pressure area and that is going to take shape over the next couple of days, off the coast,
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start moving up the coastline, develop into that potential north easter. tomorrow we're starting to see some of that rain in the mid atlantic. it does clear quickly and then another disturbance bringing that together to bring chance for not only snow. some colder air after that. this is tomorrow's forecast. a lot of this clears out by saturday afternoon, saturday evening so at least there is that, but if we look at the long-term forecast, so do you see that most of that rain is tomorrow, tempt 52. look at getting into monday, though. 29 even colder in other parts of the northern tier and east coast. be prepared for that as well thank you. we are just getting word now that a short time ago actor alan richman died. he passed away last night. he had cancer. he was a member of the royal shakespeare company, but he got international attention for his
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role as that villain in die hard, new fans with his role in harry potter film >> reporter: he was in love actually. republican presidential hopefuls set to face off tonight more time to discuss the issues >> reporter: ebola free, the major mile steen in the fight against the deadly decease-- milestone in the fight against the dead lie disease.
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republican presidential candidates will debate tonight
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in south carlina. with just three weeks to go before the iowa caucuses. the rise is tighten-- race it tightening between donald trump and ted cruz. joining us from washington this morning, good morning and thanks for being with us. ted cruz holds a nor owe leads right now over ted cruz in iowa. he has recently characterised mr trump as a new yorker. do you expect this to be a shrug fest tonight? >> definitely. it is one interesting story line that will take shape. ted cruz has refused to go on the offensive against trump. he has said he has no interest in levelling attacks against the front runner. however, with these claims that
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ted cruz is not an american citizen and not fit to run for president, you can see the impact this is having on his psyche as he goes into the debate. we are expecting to see really pointed attacks from kruz to trump speaking of new york, the new york times is out with a story on kruz and how he did not disclose he had taken out a loan for gold man sachs. his wife was an executive there. how much is that going to work against the narrative that he is espoused of being an outsider. doesn't that make him look to be beholden to new york's donor class. >> what he has been able to do brilliantly is position himself like you say as an outsider. this is someone who graduated from princeton, harvard law,
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convince the electorate he is a chan i don't know of the grass roots. with revelations like these, he is opening himself up to lines of attack from people like trump from candidates like marco rubio, those right in the skrum with him to say you are not as much as an outsider as you say you are and this is yet another example of you levelling attacks against other when it's hypocritical i was reading an article from your publication as kruz being a king. since the first debate his star has really risen. is he the one candidate that has the most to gain from these debates? >> i don't know if i would say kruz. i would say donald trump. you have to remember that he at
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the end of the day is a reality star. he is a performer. he benefits well in these settings. you see a direct contrast between donald trump and jeb in that respect. kruz is someone who really, really caught fire in the first few debates. wisconsin was an incredible showing for him. he is a tacktician. kruz levelled an attack at him that was so veiled that if you weren't paying attention, you wouldn't have caught it. that's where kruz is going to succeed in the end. subtle attacks that become full-blown attacks, that his opponents can level for him and he can step back and watch it marco rubio is polling around 14%. he is in third place. most others are in the single digits. who will you be watching closely
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tonight? >> i think other than double-stranded and kruz, the most interesting dynamic is going to be between the governors, casic and bush bush. they think it's going to give them a head win where they're actually positioned for a strong showing because you have more establishment friendly voters out in new hampshire. as i viewer i would pay close attention to how those three go at it for one another. we haven't seen pointed attacks, but i think tonight you're going to see a break out of that because they're going to be challenging each other's records pointedly thank you so much for your insights this morning. >> reporter: democrats will be debating sunday also and for vermont bernie sanderss it couldn't be at a better time.
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>> wow. >> reporter: with just over two weeks until the caucus, bernie sanders appears to be surging at the right time. the latest poll of democrat crates indicates he is ahead of hillary clinton 49 to 45. he is up by 14 points, 53 to 39 in new hampshire. where hillary clinton had a 20 point edge over bernie sanders, according to a poll it is 48 to 41. throughout his campaign sanders has promoted economic popularism >> let's have the courage not to beat up on mexicans or muslims but to take on the billionaire class. >> reporter: he wants to break up the biggest banks and impose new regulations on wall street. his fiscal plans are more progressive than hillary clintons who has big donors on
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wall street, a point bernie sanders has repeatedly referred to. >> you can't change a corrupt system by taking its money. i have proved this message. join us for real change. >> reporter: in the face of the latest polls this week, hillary clinton has stepped up her attacks on sanders. >> we have differences on guns, on tax elizabeth, on health care, and i think-- taxes-- and i think people should have that information before they go to the caucus. >> reporter: >> he wants to dismantle obamacare. >> reporter: the campaign says it's not true. he want to go beyond obamacare. it was said: >> reporter: the republican presidential nomination contest also appears to be getting tighter. the latest g.o.p. polls indicate
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donald trump and ted cruz are running even and now donald trump is ratcheting up his claims that kruz is not qualified for the presidency because the tax as senator was born in canada >> that means people think you have to be born here >> reporter: the issue is nonsense says most, but kruz has been put on the defensive >> i have never breathed a breath of air on this planet when i was into the a u.s. citizen. it was the process of being born that made me a u.s. president. donald comes from new york and he embodies new york values and the donald seems to be rattled >> reporter: the kau causes matter because it is the first time americans will pay attention to the race. double-stranded and hillary clinton seem to be facing the growing chance of opening with a headline grabbing law
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a state of emergency seeming to help things with the gas leak. >> reporter: we go back to porter ranch to see what has changed in a toxic situation looking at a new technology, a new computer to help better predict mother nature. mother nature.
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welcome back to your world this morning. it is 8.30 eastern taking a look at today's top stories. i.s.i.l. has claimed responsibility for explosions in indonesia. at least seven people were killed. explosives were detonated in a shopping area and firing at police officers it has happened again, this time in turkey. at least six people dead following this attack near a police station officials saying that kurdish separatists drove a trauk into a building. 39 people were injured there west africa is officially
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ebola free. more than 11,000 people have been killed an infectious disease physician is with us. she said there is a silver lining. >> a bit more about how the virus can lyn beaumont:lyinger in the bodr a longer time. we have seen patients like the nurse who came back who had a relapse months later of the disease. we had another who had lingered. 20% will still have virus in semen when does africa get to let its guard down? >> i don't think ever because the preexisting conditions that led to the outbreak emerging in
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the first place, so really weak economy, people having to be in very close contact with the animals that carry the disease in the first place, deforest station, weak health systems. these things are all there. you have the ongoing risk of some flare-ups and if those are not contained immediately, you could have new transmission chains. it depends on what kind of access you have to medical care. if you look at the americans who developed ebola, they have survived. it is because we have high level medicine where we can be aggressive. what is possible on the ground in these countries is not that level of care. you're still looking at 30 to 50% mortality rates the doctor said that flare-ups in west after road accidentry ka rest africa during the outbreak the who urged the country to burn the
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bodies of the victims. the men who did the grim task is living in squalor. >> reporter: this is a place that this man returns to at great reluctance. as bodies were piling up in the streets, he and another group of young man set fire to the dead. for four months they burned close to two thousand bodies. >> i just have to live with what i have to do >> reporter: many people continue to blame franklin and others for krem-- remating the death-- cremating the dead.
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people here believe the dead will come back to haunt the living if they're not well buried. >> my house was vandalised because of this. i had to be in a transportable now. >> reporter: that is not what the young men expected. they thought they would be rewarded, hailed as heros and receive apologies from the people who shunned them. they're still waiting. the banishment from the community is at a time when their lives are destroyed. their time is spent drinking alcohol and taking drugs, habits they acquired to get through their macabre task. >> we had to be, you know, do
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things for the better. >> reporter: the men are forced to live together sharing a house in the same area as the crematorium. the place they hate so much has become home a supreme court is considering a case that involves two billion dollars in iranian bombs. relatives of some of those killed say the money is theirs. iran central bank doesn't want to pay >> reporter: these arguments come at a particularly sensitive time as we wait for the deal to be fully implemented. in 1983 buy root lebanon, 241 u.s. marines sa sayers and soldiers on a peace keeping mission killed when a truck bomb explodes their barracks.
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four stories reduced to rubble. a group that is linked to iran claims responsibility. the families of those killed sued iran and in 2007 won more than two billion dollar judgment. they're at the supreme court trying to collect that money. lyn smith, her brother was among those who died >> i want the people who killed my brother and the other 240 men to be held accountable for that murder so far they have not had any actablity, so they keep doing it and i want accountability >> reporter: the arguments come at a sensitive time for iran and the u.s. the issue that the supreme court justices have to grapple with is whether the outcome was appropriate. >> reporter: congress went to far it was argued when in 2012
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it passed a law saying that iranian money at frozen accounts should go to pay off the judgment. the justices appeared split whether congress interfered with the court, but the just seems to agree saying that their job is to pass laws, our job is to decide a case. ted olsson argued for the families. >> the money is in the united states, it is here illegally, it belongs to the government of iran that sponsored these terrorist acts and it should be available to satisfy these judgments >> reporter: former marine paul rivers survived the barracks bombing. >> it has been a roller-coaster ride for me because my friends are gone. >> reporter: a ruling is expected in june. those families have waited a long time. it is clear whether the supreme court ruling in june will give them the relief they seek the obama administration backs the victims in this case
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it has been one week since jerry brown declared a state of emergency over a methane gas leak. it is located in porter ranch, a suburb of l.a. our correspondent has been covering this story. she went back to find that the gas leak seems to have no boundaries. >> reporter: it's hard as a parent. you want to protect your children. you want to not have them sick, but i can't take care of the air. >> reporter: brenda rarely lets her boys outside to play. if she does, they have to wear protective masks. the air she says is making her family sick. >> reporter: this is for my older boy and this is the medication he is taking for migraines. this is my younger son's inhaler because he has been having asthma attacks. he had one last night and another one day. >> reporter: at jennifer's house >> it is reckless, irresponsible
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to play around with people's health. the health of my child means more to me than anybody >> reporter: three miles away methane gas has been leaking from the storage facility since october 23. nearly three months and counting. in the first few weeks following the leak, the focus was on the 30,000 residents who lived down wind in porter ranch north of l.a. thousands have fled their homes. thousands more are waiting to be moved into temporary housing. every day you will find long lines outside the community resource center. what about residents like brenda and jennifer who live in neighboring communities. >> we were told that porter ranch residents have priority with being relocated. so anyone outside the porter ranch zip code were at the bottom of the list. >> reporter: how did that make you feel to be told that you're at the bottom of the list? >> it made me feel invisible, that they didn't care and they didn't understand that the gas didn't just stay in porter
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ranch. it actually moves with the wind >> reporter: the owner of the security has put in weather stripping and so-called air scrubbers and that has helped a little, but home owners here say it is like putting a small band aid on a gaping wound. it didn't have a shut off safety valve which means a relief well needs to be drilled. >> reporter: why wasn't there a safety valve on the well so that it could be stopped immediately and not have to wait months and months for relief wells to be drilled? >> in well was in total compliance with its regulations at the time of the leak. those kinds of valves are not required on these kinds of wells. >> reporter: in hindsight, that doesn't sound like a very good argument given what is currently going on. >> it would be purely speculative to try and ascertain whether a safety valve like that would have made any difference on this well. >> the regulations are so old,
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they're older than the facility itself that was built-in 1970. they don't have the shut off valves that should be required on every single well. it is ridiculous that we're living in this in this day and age and when it is in our backyard and these rules are so old and dra cone i can't that they-- draconian. that needs to change >> reporter: residents are also demanding change, but they want more than just new regulations. >> i will not be happy until that entire facility is shut down and those wells are either moved to some other place. >> reporter: is the gas company willing to shut this facility down because it doesn't appear to be safe. this is an integral system so the city. you have to think of this facility much like a water
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reservoir. just like we maintain water supplies. >> reporter: what is the point of people if there is a leak. people are being poisened. >> if you look at the science you will see that natural gas is non-toksics and it does not poison people >> reporter: people are sick now >> they are feeling symptoms and we're sorry for that >> reporter: after a brief visit last week, jerry brown declared a state of emergency something the city and county of l.a. did last month. many living with the stench and sickness say the governor's long awaited proclamation means little. has anything changed? >> no. only a stage of emergency but it's too little and too late. how long is this going to be? how long do my children have to suffer? how long does my little boy have to get up and say mum, i can't breathe. my chest hurts. i can't take a deep breath >> reporter: it's a question thousands are asking, but with
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no immediate relief in sight, it will be months before residents can start to breathe a little easier. >> reporter: it is frigid in western new york and the snow keeps piling up. so-called lake effect storms keep rolling in off the lakes. winds as much as 50 miles an area creating blizzard like white-out conditions the north west, bracing for another storm system that could bring even more wet rain to that region that has been drenched in recent weeks. >> reporter: the last kind of pattern was a little bit more california. the next couple of storms are more into the north-west and this takes us back about 24 hours. so that's a system that we're watching in the pacific as they put this into motion. you can see this very close to the coastline and then behind that another system already lined up. we're going to stay in that active pattern now for at least the next several days. here is the first one coming in.
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higher elevations we're looking at parts of the cascade, possibly even getting down into that, but definitely northwards six to 12 inches, up to a foot of snow. the second system a lot of rain with that as well. the lower elevations will be dealing with the rain and the wind and the couple rounds as i mentioned. in the meantime what we will watch for is some of those higher elevations. it is going to be challenging in terms of driving. we really don't get a break. this is seattle's forecast. rain for almost every day until next week. the temperatures around the country for this section of the country where we're getting the moisture, it is keeping things moderated, but we will see changes across the northern area of the country. look at this 30. tomorrow it's down by 22. some of this cold air as we get into next week, monday, tuesday, for example, is going to the north-east. it will be a reversal in terms
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of some of those temperatures in addition to the rain that we're following up the east coast especially for tomorrow thank you very much a powerful tool could give forecasters weather patterns going forward. it's a super computer. >> reporter: the new super computer is said to provide a faster better way to know what's happening in the earth's atmosphere. the computer is called shyan and researchers say it can do twice as much as the current machine. that's 5.34 qudrrillion calculations per second >> you're going to get pictures of what is going on in the physics of the atmospheres, the ocean's high drology. like getting more mega picks els on your camera. >> reporter: so far the model sz have provided scientists with
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everything from simulations of clouds over the earth and hurricane formations to the patterns of water droplets that form inside a cloud to solar storms. it can detect heat on the ocean floor which can affect the atmosphere. >> if we're having a strong el nino, people would like to know if this is the new normal or an outliar event. we know that there are a number of events that happen in the weather. that and being able to predict those and understand how they work and make correct preadditions about what-- predictions about what will happen is important in saving property and more importantly lives. >> reporter: 77 disaster declarations were responded to. deadly floods causing billions in damages. super computers have already helped make better forecasts further in advance, forecasts
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that can help save lives when we come back, making their way to the u.s. how one major city is preparing for thousands of cuban migrants looking to start a new life there.
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a bit today to impeach the governor of mayne. nine law makesers will ask for a vote to investigate paul lepage. he has offended many with some of his remarks. most recently last week when he complained of drug dealers with names like demoney ee smoothy and shifty, getting white girls pregnant. the chief allegation against him is abuse of power.
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of the governor's office calls that privilege allows nearly-- frivolous cue bans have begun their their journey to the u.s. many are expected to head to miami. more on how they are bracing for their new arrivals. >> there are six beds over there. >> reporter: you are going to put bunk beds there? >> yes >> reporter: this woman says she is running out of time to turn this into a temporary shelter for up to 200 migrants. >> reporter: how many days do you have to get ready? >> 20. >> reporter: they are among thousands that have been stranded in costa rica. she is in touch with some of them defr day >> reporter: he is coming to miami? >> yes. >> reporter: she says groups are not prepared to support so many
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so fast. >> i don't receive any help from the city, from the state, from nobody. the only help we are receiving is from the community >> reporter: is this a crisis? >> yes. >> reporter: south florida ask already home to the largest number of cubans outside cuba. thousands of fled here in the past year alone. many fearing that as relations improve between washington and havanah, their wind to get special immigration status in the u.s. will close. the mayor says local resettlement agencies will struggle to handle and house even more cuban migrants. >> the agencies are telling us, mayor, we cannot take any more people. we are running out of funds, we are running out of places to house them. >> reporter: this area has accepted thousands in just the last year. what's a few thousand more? >> it's not human for us as a city to have people living in
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the streets for several weeks just waiting for the papers. >> reporter: the county fish says the region is prepared-- official-- especially since he expects they won't came at the same time or the same place >> we have a lot of ability to absorb a population or in case of the migrant population we're talking about, quite well here. >> when you hear somebody saying that this is a crisis or that they're worried about this influx, are they exaggerating? >> reporter: i don't know. i don't know that it's exaggerating for the mayor in the circumstances in the city of miami. we have this expectation that the federal government is going to make sure that the money and services are here to support these folks. >> reporter: how confidence are you that the federal government will step in? >> i am not confident at all. they have not responded to our
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calls. >> reporter: this woman agrees. so she is relying on eem like these cuban immigrants from miami to step in with donations. >> translation: i want to give back what i receive when i got here >> reporter: they leave her with the words "keep fighting" still ahead, suddenly millionaires where the winning tickets were sold in the historic power baul and where all that lottery is really going - ball.
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this morning at least three people are a lot richer. they were the three winning tickets for that huge 1.6 billion dlaur jackpot. the winning numbers were: several tickets sold in almost two dozen states matching the five winning numbers to win the second price one million dollars each. the huge jackpot creating a power bal frenzy. the big winner in the end, a closer look where the money goes. >> reporter: with cash out of their pockets and stars in their eyes, power bal players are imagining what they would do? >> i would help a lot of people in the homeless community. i'm really big on helping people, so it would be a lot of
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people to help >> reporter: in one office pool the entire company of eight workers might cease to xipt exist if she picks the right numbers >> we will leave the doors open and all the computers on and just leave. >> reporter: states don't pick up quite as you might think. about 60% of the ticket money goes back to the winner, about 5% is shaved off for administrative costs and commissions for of the stores that sell the tickets leaving 35% for the 44 states, washington dc and two u.s. territories that play power ball. >> many people found that the pricing, the way they structure the lot re, appears to maximise state revenues. >> reporter: necessity have the option-- they have the option of replenishing funds. in texas spending on education
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is mandatory and some 70 million dollars has been generated for the schools >> i can tell you that the money goes t things like classrooms, books, equipment, furniture, everything that it takes to run public education. >> reporter: while at least power bal statements know they will be getting something, there's no such guarantee for the players. >> we're all like, well, you know, are we going to go to new york, or - where are we going to go to? so i don't know. it's a fantasy after facing criticism lego says it will agree to sell its building blocks in bulk. the decision comes months after the company said it would not fill a large order placed by an artist. lego refused to fill the order because he was planning to use it for a political work of art.
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they will now privilege them the awards, revenants has one. many others, the martian and others are going to be announced on february 28 i have some catching up to do on some of those movies. that's for it on new york next from our news room, the latest on those attack new zealand jakarta. at least seven people are dead. i.s.i.l. is claiming responsibility >> reporter: your world this morning is back tomorrow beginning at 7ameastern. april reminder at any time you can go on to our website and checkout the latest news, aljazeera.com. have a great day. great day.
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attacker set off suicide bombs and battled police in the streets of indonesia capital, jakarta. you're watching al jazeera live from our headquarters in doha. also coming up, an explosion in turkey killed at least six people where the army is fighting rebels. liberia is declared ebola free, one of the world's worst epidemics is over. >> relief in madaya as more aid arrives to the syrians caught in the c

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