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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  January 19, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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♪ boiling points, growing calls for michigan's governor to step down for the water crisis in flint. china suffers its weakest growth in 25 years and could slow down the world's economy. >> begging for acknowledgment or even asking diminishes dignity. >> oscar protest, why actress jada smith will sit out this year's academy awards. parade of planets, the event that is set to light up the night sky. ♪
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more national garlingedsmen are heading to flint, michigan today helping to distribute thousands of bottles of water so residents do not drink the contaminated water coming out of the tap, welcome to your world, i'm erica. >> and i'm delve walters, and the governor will deliver the state of the state address and the water mess is expected to dominate the speech and andy is live for us in flint, michigan today and andy this problem started after they left detroit's water system trying to save money and there are calls for the governor to resign and why is he being blamed and what is he doing do to fix the mess? >> he is blamed because he passed the emergency management law a few years ago to appoint a city manager in the financially troubled cities like flint, a manager who has near absolute powers in the city and it was that manage ner 2015 to change
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over the water site and they apologized and working as hard it can to fix the problem with no end in sight and for the residents the misery just goes on. the red cross is in full fledged crisis mode going block by block knocking on doors seeing who needs bottled water and just about everyone does. >> thank you again. >> reporter: and the mood here is just as bitterly cold as the weather. >> i'm not sure what to make of it and pretty sure i can't say on t.v. what i really think of it but we are afraid. we are very afraid. we don't know what damage has been done to us. >> reporter: governor rick snyder apologized again for the crisis but in a series of tweets the governor also took aim at some presidential candidates accusing hillary clinton and other force what he said were attempts at politicizing the crisis and pointed out the remarks clinton made on sunday. >> and i said it was outrageous that the governor had not acted
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within two hours he had. >> reporter: regardless of the blame residents are looking for answers. >> we don't know what to do you know the governor has given us this and that and whatever else but we are still here. we are still hurting and we still need a lot more help. >> reporter: and as people scrambled monday to get cases of water from the national guard they are still feeling the effects. >> out of the shower and we start itching and can't eat it orally and you will start itching and having little problems. >> reporter: national guard set up in fire stations in the city cannot keep track of the number of water it has dolled out. >> surprised of the amount of the bottled water on the ground and filters and how fast they are getting here and how fast they are going out. >> reporter: marsh is a flint resident and so moved by the crisis he just joined the volunteers on monday. >> people can't leave their homes and some just don't know
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where to go and some don't even watch the news. >> reporter: residents are wondering how long this crisis will go on. >> it's terrible. we live in america. >> reporter: the red cross and the national guard dolled out over 26,000 cases of water last week alone. now at the state of the state address the governor snyder will give tonight there are protests expected as well, del so this controversy is far from over. >> and it's cold and a state of emergency and fema turning down the governor's request for a declaration of major disaster why and what affect will that have on the resources there? >> well, fema's decision comes because they said this is not a natural disaster like a big flood or hurricane but the difference in cash is huge. the city will get about $5 million from the declaration of disaster from the president but it's tens of millions more available through fema if that
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other declaration remains. the governor probably will appeal that decision, del. >> andy is live in flint, michigan and andy thank you very much and stay with us and coming up, in about 15 minutes we will be talking to one of the investigators from the american civil liberty union who uncovered the flint water crisis in the first place. new worries over china's economy and reported the growth fell to 6.9% in the last quarter. that is the slowest rate in 25 years and today the imf cut the global growth forecast citing great challenges and we have the story from beijing. >> reporter: for jeers china has been the world's factory, relying on low manufacturing costs to make goods sold worldwide. more than 20 years of record breaking growth has propelled china from connichl communism to
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consumerism and it's hurting communities worldwide and relied on china as a buyer for years are now struggling. analysts say a slow down is inevitable given how much the chie chee needs economy has grown in years and it's unstable and a reset is needed. >> translator: china is indeed in a moment of momentum transferring from old to new, traditional industries are big in size and the emerging ones are smaller and even though they are growing fast emerging industries cannot makeup for the slow down so the over all economy is facing downward pressure. >> slower growth is expected to be the new normal for china, already analysts say it will cool and increasing spending and cutting interest rates are not expected to help much. chinese government leaders are encouraging everyone to spend more, hoping to ship the economy
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from export dependent to a consumer driven model and some data emerged on tuesday and retail spending even though lower than expected still grew by double digits and the automotive industry is expected to grow. >> it's lower than gdp growth but the industry as a whole is doing all right because consumers are willing to up grade their cars and they are higher with better cars coming on the market so the whole market is developing pretty fast. >> the government is already under taking structural reforms slowly changing from a centrally planned economy to a market-driven one. that will take time. for now china and the countries that depend on chinese demand for exports will have to put up with slower chinese growth. florence lee, al jazeera, beijing. we are getting a new sense today of how many civilians have died in iraq, many of them from atrocities committed by i.s.i.l. and alleged abuses by the government backed forces there,
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u.n. calling the number staggering and say between january of 2014 and october of 2015 nearly 19,000 civilians were killed, more than 36,000 people were injured. they say during that same time period more than three million people were displaced and the taliban this morning being blamed for this bomb blast in pakistan that left at least 11 people there dead and officials saying it took place in peshawar on a road that lead to afghanistan and a police and a child are dead and another 17 others wounded. learning mow about what happened to the ten u.s. sailors detained by iran last week. the pentagon says the sailors held at gunpoint and even exchanged verbal jabs with the iranians and sim cards confiscated and no indication the sailors were miss truted during 15-hour ordeal. $32 billion richer and assets unfrozen now sanctions
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lifted over the program and the head of the central bank saying the money will be used to import goods after years of crippling economic sanctions and at the same time five americans were also freed in that prisoner swap and as al jazeera lisa stark tells us the americans are now telling their stories. >> reporter: jason's white smile said it all free after 544 days in an iranian prison. the washington post journalist, his wife, mother and brother together at the u.s. military's land stool medical facility in germany. doctors evaluating his health and those of two other freed americans, former marine amirror held for four years, seen here in germany with his family and congressman. and christian pastor aiadd and his wife touted his release on twitter. he and the others were let go more than a year of secret negotiations. and he told the washington post
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he was feeling good physically. his brother has been a tireless advocate for his release. >> he was held nearly in solitary confinement and one person in the room with him so it's really going to be a process not just to get back to spending time with people. >> reporter: a fourth iranian american opted to stay in iran and a fifth student matthew was released separately on saturday. >> he is looking forward to coming home and having some serious hamburgers and things like that. >> reporter: on monday the head of the energy agency who will monitor the nuclear agreement with iran met with the president rouhanni and benjamin netanyahu who has been sharply critical of the deal says his government will keep a close watch on iran's compliance. the u.s. too is keeping close watch. even as the obama administration this weekend lifted sanctions relating to the nuclear deal it imposed new sanctions on
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companies and individuals involved with iran's ballistic missile program. on the presidential campaign trail republicans applauded with release of the americans but blasted mr. obama for cutting a deal that included dropping charges against some iranian americans for violating sanctions against iran. >> and you look at this new iran deal which took forever to get done, you look at how bad it is and how one sided it is. >> reporter: the families of those released those say they are just happy to have their loved ones free as alli put it congress told the president to use everything at his disposal to bring the americans home. lisa stark, al jazeera, washington. in iraq finding missing americans and taken hostage in the apartment section of baghdad and witnesses say gunmen in military uniforms carried out the kidnapping in broad daylight
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barely 100 yards from a police station and no one claimed responsibility for abductions and a search in hawaii for 12 missing marines and coast guard teams off the coast say they found life rafts but still no sign of marines, all 12 disappeared last thursday when two helicopters on a training mission crashed and it's known for choppy waters and high waves and rescuers say it's still possible they may be found alive. donald trump back on the road campaigning in iowa today after trying to appeal to evangelicals on monday and giving the complication at the virginia christian college founded by late jerry falwell and said two corinthians instead of once and cursed talking about christianity. >> we are going to protect christianity and if you look at what is going on throughout the world and look at syria if you
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are question and look at the different places and it's under siege, i'm a protestant, i'm very proud of it, presbyterian to be exact but i'm very proud of it, very very proud of it and we have to protect because bad things are happening. >> reporter: once leading we van gell van -- evangelical but after a three-hour debate with pilot and amusing insults they are not banning donald trump from coming in the country altogether but dana lewis says it doesn't mean they agree with his rhetoric or politics. >> reporter: couldn't agree on whether to ban donald trump from the united kingdom but united in condemning rhetoric and one by one they thrashed him. >> i heard of a number of cases where people have been excluded ford insightment and hatred and
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not one for stupidity and not sure we should be starting now. >> reporter: muslim mp says he should be ban like an extremist and not treated differently because he is privileged and rich, the uk banned 80 individuals for inciting violence and trump they say has insighted muslims, mexicans and women. >> this is a man extremely high profile involved in the american show biz industry and for years and years a man who is interviewing for the most important job in the world. his words are not comical. his words are not funny. his words are poison . >> reporter: ban by 570,000 people the largest ever to spark debate in parliament anger drawn by suggestions there are no go zones in the uk where police fear muslim areas. >> i would be delighted if he could show us where the so called no go areas the police are in this country, i've never been able to find one and
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perhaps it would be interesting to have a chat about why in america there are more people killed by shotguns everyday than are killed every year in this country. >> reporter: trump threatened to pull out a billion pledge to expand the golf resort in scotland where the petition got its start and the author suzanne kellie said his treatment of the environment here and called his bullying of neighbors all contributed to her anger which reached a boiling point over his comments concerning immigrants in america. >> either if i win or lose points have been made and discussionings have been had and people are thinking about the implications of this man's world. it is a huge difference between free speech and hate speech. >> reporter: dana lewis, al jazeera, scotland. should be a dry day in much of california after scenes like this on monday. heavy rain leading to landslides, they washed out roads and overflowed creeks and here in the northeast it is another day of fringed
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temperatures, so cold doctors warning of frost bite if you venture outside and the sun will be shining across much of the region temperatures will barely get above freezing and frost bite can set in within minutes. those bitterly cold temperatures not going away any time soon and the question is how long? >> slow moderation through the rest of the week but where the coldest air has been spreading. now it is still in the north ernl parts of the northwest in places like minnesota and while they are edging up a little bit and colder than the rest of the country these temperatures on the east coast are starting to go down and even though it's different in different places and with more wind in the northeast this is probably the most bitter morning in terms of all those warnings about frost bite and looking at some wind chills below zero and toronto and new york feels above zero but just barely and in the course of the day temperatures in the 20s and slowly start going up in the 30s, minnesota
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getting above 0 is better than yesterday in a lot of cases so some slow moderation and we are also watching in the eastern half of the country is snow moving through the midsection that will creep its way to the east and also that lake effect snow we have been monitoring will wind down through the day because the winds will e bait and the winds will continue and don't see it in the season because if they are frozen they cannot pick up moisture and no frozen lakes because of earlier and places we see the clipper snow 1-4" and want to give a heads up we do have something that will develop friday and calup the coast, a potential snowstorm and we will talk more about that as the certainty gets more likely but it definitely looks like snow friday and saturday for the east coast. >> nicole thank you. changing the rules on the job. >> we will talk about the company whose prayer policy is forcing some workers there to choose between their jobs and their religion, also. scientists say humans could
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become extinct just like the dinosaurs if a potential astroid were to hit earth and they are planning a major operation that could save us all. i'm in new york, that story coming up. ♪
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in just a few hours the governor of michigan will deliver his state of the state address and no doubt the water emergency in flint, michigan is expected to dominate the speech. >> more and more residents calling on the governor rick snyder to resign as he sends troops to hand out bottled water and the water became contaminated after his appointed city manager changed the water sources to save money and the
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state says they are providing the testing it provides to 100,000 residents and we go to kirk, an investigative reporter at the american civil liberties union and helped uncover the crisis in flint and is live from detroit and thanks for being with us and do we have a handle yet on how bad this crisis is? >> well, i think in some ways the worst part of it is over, number one is that people know about it now, the biggest danger of lead in pipes is not the lead itself but not being aware of it so certainly now people are very, very aware of the problem, they are either filtering their water or getting bottled water so in that sense people are being protected in a way they were not being protected, say, five months ago when this story first broke and the state continued to insist that the
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water was safe. >> which brings us, i was going to say. >> in that regard the worst is over. >> why we get to this point now, the protesters say they want the governor to resign. hillary clinton going one step further saying what is happening in flint is racist, take a listen. >> if the kids in a rich suburb of detroit had been drinking contaminated water and being bathed in it there would have been action. >> reporter: is she right, did the governor ignore the crisis and was race a factor and is that why so many people are angry right now versus five months ago when the crisis first cropped up? >> well, i think it goes a step further. this never would have happened in the rich white suburb. this happened because flint was a financially stressed city that was taken over by the state. democracy was eliminated in flint. the local elected officials had no real authority. all of the authority was in the hands of a single appointed
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emergency manager who was put in place by the governor. so it just never would have happened there but i think and then that is compounded by the fact that there were no checks and balances. you had the governor's appointed emergency manager making this decision or maybe even the governor's office, the governor still won't say if they were involved in the decision or not and then you have the governor's department of environmental quality that is supposed to be there over seeing things to make sure they are done correctly and they were complicit in the cover up. >> so let me ask the question this way and put it starkly, in your opinion, is what is happening in flint, michigan a crime? >> yes. people were poisoned and knew there was a problem and records
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were falsified so i think i should not get ahead of myself. i think what we need is adequate investigation to determine with certainty if there were crimes and then if there were they should be prosecuted. but we need to have investigations. there is a federal investigation right now. the state attorney general's office is investigating. i think the legislature should be holding hearings and putting people under oath and asking them questions because a lot of untrue things have been said throughout the course of this and people need to be put under oath and it should be done publically and they need to answer those questions and if they lie again then they will suffer the consequences of perjury. >> joining us live from detroit today, kurt, thank you very much. >> thank you. for the second time this month a plant in the midwest is facing anger from some muslim workers and have to decide whether to change the way they pray or lose their jobs. and as al jazeera's john henry smith tells us the company says it's about money, not religion.
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>> reporter: each day in between assembling snow blowers and lawnmowers in wisconsin 53 muslims would stop twice each shift to pray. but on january 14th the manufacturing said while employees will still be allowed to use prayer rooms in the plant they will only be allowed to use them during two company scheduled ten-minute breaks. >> i have been 35 years in america and never heard of a company that is not allowing to pray the employees to pray five minutes, that is absolutely discrimination on its face. >> reporter: muslim employees at the company say designating a set time for their prayer does work for them because under religious rules the time changes everyday. >> if someone tells you you pray on your break and the break time is not the prayer time it would be impossible to pray. >> reporter: companies ceo dan
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arens said he heard complaints from non-muslim workers that muslims at the plant were getting special treatment and also says allowing the extra two breaks per shift would mean shutting down production for those breaks which could cost the company a million dollars each year. the company says 43 of the 53 muslim employees said they don't plan on returning to work unless he reverses course and the employees say they were essentially fired. >> so they say if you don't pay the break time they give us this paper and then to just leave. >> no one was terminated. we were showing them what their options might be in the event that they voluntarily chose no, ma'am to come back to work. >> reporter: he says the policy limiting breaks really isn't new. it has been on the books for over 25 years. it just has not been enforced but it will be starting next week. >> so john what is the law, what does the legal authority say about this? >> del there is title seven of the civil rights act and it's
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unlawful to discriminate in the workplace because of religion and they must accommodate religious observances unless it causes undue hardship and says that is exactly what is happening here and ceo says having to shut down production and lose one million a year with prayer shifts is simply too much for the company to bear. >> john henry smith thank you. when we come back we will talk about getting a handle on an illness putting babies sick. >> what to know since the first known case has been diagnosed in the u.s. j you might want to call this oscar outrage and the growing protest has hollywood stars saying they are not going to go and say the show will go on without them. ♪
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>> farm workers striking in mexico.
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>> all that tension is about what's happening right now. >> you can work very hard and you will remain poor. >> what's the cost of harvesting america's food? >> do you see how it would be hard to get by on their salary? >> yeah. >> today, they will be arrested. >> they're firing canisters of gas at us. >> emmy award-winning investigative series. >> we have to get out of here. welcome back to your world this morning, 7:30 eastern time. more national guard troops are heading to flint michigan today where the bacteria and lead are contaminating the city's drinking water. the governor is expected to talk about the crisis later today and there is growing pressure on him, governor rick snyder, to resign. more uncertainty over china's economic future, the country says economic growth fell to 6.9% last quarter, the
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lowest rate in 25 years. shanghai stocks were up today but plunged in recent weeks to 13 month lows. >> a bomb blast killing 11 in pakistan. officials say it took place at a checkpoint in peshawar on a road leading to afghanistan. 17 others were wounded. the taliban is believed to be behind this blast. a warning about tracking overseas for pregnant women or women who plan to get pregnant. >> the zeke extra virus is leading to birth defects. >> mosquitoes are spreading the zika virus. mothers are holding their babies, born with smaller than normal heads, it leads to brain damage. >> in december, wet about 1,000
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cases, so six cases, now we've just heard last week it's been 3,000 reports. >> last week, the first known case in the u.s. was diagnosed in hawaii. the child's mother had traveled to brazil and disease experts predict infected mosquitoes could reach texas in three months. the brazilian health minister said this. >> the foreigner who comes to brazil is in the same situation, they should take all the necessary measures not to come in contact with the misskeet toe because it can bite and carry the zika virus. the problem is extremely serious. >> the brazilian army has been called in to combat the disease. the government announced it will direct funds to help develop a vaccine against the virus. >> one in five people who get
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the virus have symptoms including fever, rashes and pink eye and most recover with little complication, but it's the potential long-term effects on unborn babies that are causing the biggest concern especially for pregnant women. >> this summer, we've got the olympics in brazil. >> holt officials say they are taking enough measures that tourists will be ok. so far they vice president had consolations. >> we'll speak more about this about the founding dean of the national school of proppical medicine at baylor college. >> falling oil prices are making it hard for some nations to balance their budgets, including the kurdish reege of northern iraq, which is fighting a war. we have this story from erbil. >> the economy provides job and
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revenue. the reege exports over half a million barrels of oil a day but it's problems with the central government in baghdad hurt its economy. the government hasn't paid salaries for over four months. it owes billions of dollars to oil fund and financial institutions and stopped more than 600 public projects, including schools, hospitals and roads. in addition to helping the 2 million displaced persons in the area, it needs money to fight isil. >> the biggest problem faced is the low oil prices and that's wreaked havoc on budgets. even if everything was working great, even if the deal was in place last year, both sides will be having troubles with paying the bills. >> the kurdish region's economy is almost exclusively dependent on the energy sector. besides oil, there is gas. the k.r.g. estimates that it has nearly 3% of the world's goose reserves, but given the nature of the conflict around its
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borders, many politics see it as more of a challenge than an opportunity. >> infrastructure to export gas is still being built. the kurdish region's gas pipeline is scheduled to come into operation in 2017. its plan to transport natural gas from kurdistan to turkey and then to the international market. there is corruption on top of the regional issues. >> yes, it's true that we have a problem of corruption. we don't have national institutions. many politicians are oil dealers and they own companies that import, transport and export oil. >> the kurdish regional golf transports oil to turkey where it's sold by marketing companies to other countries. with the low price of oil and conflict nearby, the region struggles to continue to provide for its people. falling oil prices are hurting some country's economies, they are great for
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drivers in the u.s., especially at one michigan station. a price war pushed this station to drop its price to 47 cents per gallon. aaa said the national average for a gallon of regular gas is $1.88. a former u.s. military base in afghanistan has found a new purpose. it is now a much needed drug rehab center. drugs are cheap and there are millions of addicts in the world's largest poppy producing country. we have more from kabul. >> it was the biggest u.s. military camp in kabul, now the largest treatment center for drug addicts in afghanistan. most of these men are homeless. scarred by long years of addiction, they receive three meals a day, new training suits and a haircut. 600 men are now living here. many praise the treatment center, but some complain about the quality of food, and lack of proper medical services. outside, the addicts get fresh
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air every day and the chance to exercise, keeping fit and busy is important for their recovery. they are not allowed to leave, visitors come twice a week. the government plans to host 10,000 patients every year. government leaders have yet to approve a budget of approximately $4 million a year. this is one step on a long road. doctors here say the program starts with the 45 days detoxification and rehabilitation process. >> they will do physical activity and we will learn them, teach them physical -- for example they will learn carpentry, they will learn painting and now it's six months, a long period of time, so after that, we teach them the career. of course the government had decided to just send them to other ministries for the jobs. >> afghanistan is the world's
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biggest producer of opium. last year, it produced 3,300 tons. opium poppies are turned into heroin which is sold worldwide. illegal drugs in afghanistan are cheap and veil. in kabul, these men remain vulnerable. unemployment is high and addicts can easily return to old habits. the number of addict in afghanistan is alarming. the minister of counter narcotics says there are about 2.4 million adult drug users. the other problem is there are only 123 treatment centers across the country. >> in this center, a moment of joy for the addict, temporarily forgetting their battle which they could win or lose. al jazeera, kabul. the university of cincinnati reaching a settlement with a family of a man who was shot and killed by campus police officer, the university saying it will pay the family more than $4.8 million. they also say they are going to
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provide undergraduate education for his 12 children. the officer fatally shooting the man in july in a traffic stop following an alleged missing license plate. the officer faces murder charges. a new jersey school district making changes to its curriculum in an effort to alleviate stress and demand on children overburdened with homework and activities. >> ask these gifted middle schoolers how they spend their afternoons, and for the most part, it's all work and no play. >> we are really stressed, a lot of kids are very overwhelmed. >> all four of you every day after school, you're studying, doing homer work until you go to bed. >> pretty much. >> how stressed are you every day? >>ery stressed. >> recently i've been often stressed. >> sometimes stressed. >> often stressed.
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>> i feel afraid to go tell an adult that maybe we need to slow down, i need to take a step back. >> it's part of growing up, hating homework, freaking out about tests, dealing with stress but at west win door regional school district, parents we spoke with say what their kids faced was too much. >> how stressed do you think your kids are? >> i hear my son saying so many times i can't handle it. >> average students tend to struggle throughout their time here. >> there are people throwing up, and being very upset about the task and stressed out about it. >> what is the area you really want to focus on. >> the district is proud of its reputation for having highly driven kids. last year, 86% of the graduating class went on to attend four year universities. to many, on the surface, things looked great, but deep down, the superintendent was worried. last year, 120 students were recommended for mental health
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evaluations. two thirds of students are stressed all the time. >> we hear of sleep deprivation issues, students with suicidal ideations, and cutting, literally cutting, not cutting class. >> suicide clusters of students have been seen. >> that is no way to live. >> imposing bold, controversy changes to lighten the load was unheard of, like no homework nights or no mid terms or finals. even the elementary music program, every student can now participate, no matter their skill or talent. >> we're very confident that the education they receive will prepare them very well for life outside our district. >> i thought it was a good idea, because there's more to life than getting good grades and
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doing homework and studying for tests and stuff. >> the district faced backlash, the biggest concern, the changes would water down that quality education. >> my parents thought it was a bad idea, and usually no homework nights, my parents say ok, so you have no homework, so now you can spend more time practicing pie an know and ve ola. >> a lot of people are concerned you're did you remembering down the schools. >> i think that's non-productive. we believe over time the families will become to real estate the new plan met the needs of their children and serve more children well. >> for parents like karen, something had to change. >> you can't sustain study only. you'll never repeat your childhood. >> a bigger teaching moment perhaps for many here that not all of life's lessons are found in the classroom. jonathan betz, al jazeera, new jersey. more than two dozen people face charges after all but
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shutting down one of san francisco's busiest bridges. protestors blocked owl five westbound lanes on the bay bridge monday, among their demands, the firing of police officers and officials involved in recent shootings. traffic was backed up for miles. there are growing calls for a boy colt of the academy awards for the second straight year. there isn't a single actor of color mom nailed in any supporting or leading roles. it brought back the hash tag oscars so white. >> the oscars are just about a month away, but the buzz isn't about who's nominated, but who isn't. the frustration over the lack of diversity now leading to a full fledged boycott by some of the industry's biggest names, spike lee and jada pinkett-smith won't attend this year's ceremony. >> begging for acknowledgment or even asking diminishes dignity, and diminishes power and we are
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a dignified people and we are powerful, and let's not forget it. >> her husband, will smith, was passed over for his role in concussion. >> what are you doing here? >> along with'd dress he will ba in beast of no nation, spike lee blames the hollywood studio system saying the real battle is the executive offices where the gate keepers decide what gets made and what gets jetsoned. his film chi rack was also passed over. the oscars controversy reflects a wider pressure. >> the fact that the motion picture industry, like so many other institutions is very slow toe change, not a very diverse
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institution. you have a situation where essentially white males are dominating the industry. >> the president of the academy also expressed frustration over the lack of diversity, promising to take action to alter the makeup of the group's membership. >> we are working inside the academy in order to make sure we have inclusion and especially in the area of membership. >> that may not be enough come oscar night when a lot of potential viewers will boycott watching the show. >> the last time an of a american won for a leading role as actor was 2006, forest whitaker. many believe chris rock who is hosting will have the last laugh. monster's ball and training day, 2001. halle barry and denzel
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washington. let's bring in nicole mitchell. >> unlike the east coast with the brutally cold temperatures, temperatures have been milder on the west coast, at or above average. a lot of this is rain versus snow. this is the latest round as i put that into motion. you can see the heaviest rain now coming in. another area behind this, this has been our trend, the last one moving interior bringing snow to the midwest today. as we get to this most recent system, a lot of this will be rain especially valleys where we had a lot of runoff, two or three inches possible and of course if you're really in a runoff area we can have more landslide mudslide concern. the higher elevations you have to get for the coldest air. most parts of the seer i can't likely to get the most with this particular round. once this one comes through, we get a little break tomorrow, hit and miss and then another round coming right back in as we get
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into the day on thursday, so staying in that very active pattern as we head through the rest of the week. across the country, i mentioned that one system pulling out, that's bringing more of a lighter snow to areas of the midwest, a lot of people moving one to four inches as this moves along. definitely nuisance snow. we have the colder air, a lot of temperatures will be finally above zero in places like minnesota, but the coldest stuff has spread a little more east wards. as i mentioned, that milder air westward, 60's along the better than coast. that might be the vacation spot but for the rain. >> you like it cold. is this cold enough now? >> i like it cold, but i want the snowual with it. we haven't gotten the snow yet to go play in. i'm with you. i'm with you. it's now been three weeks since a group of protestors took over a wildlife center in oregon. this morning, they're sometime at that center, demanding the
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land be turned over to local ranchers and loggers. as al jazeera's allen schauffler reports, it's shedding light on a logging industry that's been lagging for decades. >> hardy county was once a thriving timber area, in the 1970's had the highest per capita industry in oregon. environmental groups and government regulation brought it almost to a halt. doug is the control technician at lewis and clark machine, a company that makes its money buying and selling milling equipment. >> there's so much resistance to logging anymore, and watch the movies, you know, have you ever seen a good logger? my kids watch movies, people that log are terrible, they dry the land, they kill everything. >> he's frustrated with the way federal lands are managed,
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saying current practices are bad for the timber industry and everyone. >> they're overgrown with brush and when they have a fire, used to be they could put a fire out in 10, 15,000 acres maybe if it was bad. now 100,000 acres almost normal. >> he's frustrated with the tactics of environmentalists. >> it's always their way or the highway. with them, there's no win for anybody but them. >> just up the road in grant county, they may have a different answer. environmentalists and loggers come together, trying to find ways to meet the forest's needs. we'll introduce you to the people behind the blue mountain forest partners and look at how they work to face local management and revive the loggers past. avoiding an asteroid
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apocalypse. ♪ remembering a musical great, eagles cofounder, glenn fry.
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♪ this morning, music fans around the world are remembering eagles company founder glenn frey, the 67-year-old dying after complications from surgery. the eagles went on to become one of the most successful rock bands in history. the band was inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame in 1998. brad paysly tweeting: sheryl crow tweeting: space x says ice build up may have caused sunday's botched landing of its falcon nine rocket. the rocket was descending on to an ocean barge when a leg
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buckled and the rocket exploded. space xc.e.o. elon musk said the root cause could have been ice that built up from the heavy fog at liftoff. that was the fourth failed test for that rocket. there's a new effort underway to protect the earth from asteroids. it's a real life armageddon trying to push an asteroid off course before disaster strikes. >> russia, february, 2000 2000 children, an os destroyed cuts the sky, terrifies residents and reminds the rest of us that eventually one with our name on it could be coming our way. with that in mind, these two scientists from nasa and the european space agency are putting their considerable brains together, their humble mission to save the planet from a potential catastrophic dead
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hit that could wipe us out. it has its sights on not one, but two asteroids, a larger one and a smaller one, a moon. neither is expected to hit earth, but they'll be used as target practice. nasa's craft aims to crash into the moon and like a giant game of cosmic snooker push it in another direction. >> an asteroid is almost the size of a mountain, and we hit it with a spacecraft, we only make a tiny change in the velocity but over time that's the differently of hitting the earth and not hitting the earth. >> a separate spacecraft will collect the data building the know how to recreate the mission for real. it would cause the same amount of energy or damage of dozens of atomic bombs if it hit the earth. currently, scientists don't see
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any such asteroids heading our way for another couple centuries. what's the russia to knock it off path? >> we want the capability to do this because we know these things are out there, but to find all the things that are potential threats is a very big goal, but now this particular mission is to go the next step, which is something very, very important, which is what are you going to do about it if something's actually got your name on it. >> for now, the project is still in the theoretical phases with approval for the launch still waiting to get the green light to prevent us from going the route of the dinosaurs. if you're a morning person you're in luck. you'll be able to see the planet mercury before the sunrises. that means all five planets will be visible for the first time in a dock cade. you can already see venus,
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saturn, mars and jupiter. travel warnings because of a dangerous illness. now the gulf coast may be at risk from the spread of the zika virus. norway clapping down on asylum seekers taking an unusual route into their country. we are back in two minutes. we will see you then. >> on hard earned, inspiring new beginnings... >> these workers got the fight in them, they just don't know it. >> facing up to old demons... >> i am really, really nervous... >> lives hanging in the balance... >> it's make or break... i got past the class... >> hard earned pride... hard earned respect... hard earned future... a real look at the
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american dream hard earned only on al jazeera america
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economic shack waves again, china recording its slowest growth in 25 years, the worldwide impact. anger and defiance in flint. the governor set to talk about the water crisis again today as more residents demand he lose his job. three americans reflecting on their freedom after spending more than a year behind bars in an iranian jail. i won't be watching. >> boycotting the oscars, the big names sitting out the awards
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in protest. good morning, welcome to your world this morning. i'm del walters. i am erica pitzi. stocks in this country are pointing up despite the word that china's economy is slowing, falling 6.9% in the last quarter. >> worries that worldwide growth will slow, but asian stocks closing up in toke i can't, and hong kong. it seems those markets are coming to grips with the fact that the chinese economy is cooling. >> these figures very much in line with expectations and bring the g.d.p. rate for last year to 6.9%, which is still around the 7% tarts that had been set by the authorities. it means that it is the slowest growth rate since 1990, but then
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many believe this is a rate that is more sustainable. there is always a balancing act in the chinese economy, having enough growth to support the fundamental changes that are taking place, the winding down of large state-run industries, moving workers from that sector into the private sector. also supporting the influx of workers from the countryside coming in search of work being pulled out of poverty. in fundamentally changing the economy, they have tools in their economic and fiscal tool box, the interest rate, while rates around the world are practically zero, in china, it's around 4%. they do have room for maneuver, as people expect and possibly economic stimulus, but there's no doubting that the slowing of the economy impacts the rest of the world. you just have to look at what commodity prices are and the oil price to realize that's taking
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place. that's rob mcbride reporting from beijing. experts hold it economic sector can boost the outcome. >> china relied on low manufacturing costs to make goods sold worldwide. more than 20 years of record breaking growth propelled china from communism to consumerism. now the chinese economy is stalling, and the slowdown is hurting many other economies worldwide. commodity exporters have relied on china as a buyer for arrears are now also struggling. analysts say a slow down is inevitable, given how much the chinese economy that grown in recent years. they say high speed growth is unsustainable and a reset needed. china is indeed in a moment of momentum, transferring from old to new. traditional industries are big in size, while these emerging
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industries are smaller. even though they are growing fast, emerging industries can't make up for traditional industries slowdown, so the overall economy is facing downward pressure. >> slower negotiate is expected to be the new normal for china. already analysts predict the economy to cool further this year, and even government measures, such as increasing spending and interest rates aren't expected to help much. >> chinese leaders encourage everyone to spend more, hoping to shift from export dependence to a more sustainable consumer driver model. encouraging data emerged. retail spending grew double digits. the auto industry is forecast to grow. >> auto sales growth is lower than g.d.p. growth, but consumers are willing to upgrade
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their cars. the whole market is developing pretty fast. >> the government is undertaking structural reforms, slowly changing from a centrally planned economy to a market driven one. that will take time. for now, china is a country that dependency on chinese demand for exports will have to put up with slower chinese growth. al jazeera, beijing. >> today, the man at the center of the flit water crisis, michigan governor rick snyder delivers his annual state of the state address, and the water mess is expected to dominate the speech as more people call for him to step down. we are live in flint this morning. good morning to you, andy. we are hearing more soldiers from the national guard are coming to flint. what is their role? >> last week, the national guard, red cross, michigan state police all doled out over 26,000
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cases of water just last week. in fact, in a pew minutes here at city hall, another convoy of trucks will start rolling out. they have to do this every single day. >> the red cross is in full fledged crisis mode, going block by block, knocking on doors, seeing who needs bottled water and just about everyone does. >> thank you again. >> the mood here is just as bitterly cold as the weather. >> i'm not sure what to make of i have the and i'm pretty sure i can't say on t.v. what i really think of it, but we're afraid. we're very afraid. we don't know what damage has been done to us. >> governor rick snyder apologized again for the crisis but in a series of tweets, the governor also took aim at some of the presidential candidates, accusing them of politicizing the crisis. he point out remarks clinton made on sunday. >> i said it was outrageous that
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the governor hadn't react and within two hours, he had. >> we don't know what to do, the governor has given us this and that and whatever else, but it'u know, we're still hurting and we still need a lot more help. >> as people scrambled monday to get cases of water from the national guard, they are still feeling the effects. >> you will start having problems. >> the national guard set up in fire stations around the city can't even keep track of the number of cases of wore it's doled out. >> i was very surprised at the amount of bottled water that's on the ground, the amount of filters, how fast they're getting here, and, you know, how fast they're going out. drew marsh is a flint resident, so moved by the crisis, he just joined the volunteers on monday. >> some of them just don't know where to go. some don't even watch the news.
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>> the residents wonder how long this will go on. >> it's terrible. we live in america. >> one of the short term goals here is to at least get every household in the city of flint one water filter so that at least one spigot in their house will be pouring out clean water. >> we know residents are calling for the governor to resign. why are they blaming him? >> well, because he's the one who pushed through the emergency management law which gave him the power to appoint a city manager in all these financially troubled cities in michigan and it was that city manager here in flint that changed the water supply in 2014 that led to this mess. there is no word yet on when this mess will be fixed, so this misery goes on fortress dents. >> all right, andy, thank you. earlier on your world this morning, we talked to the investigative reporter at the
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aclu, curt guyett. he said there is a cover up in flint and said it has to be investigated at the highest levels. >> this would have never happened in the rich white suburb. this happened because flint was a financially stressed city that was taken over by the state. democracy was eliminated in flint. the local elected officials had no real authority. all of the authority was in the hands of a single appointed emergency manager who was put in place by the governor, so it just never would have happened there. i think -- and then, that's compounded by the fact that there were no checks and balances. you had the governor's appointed emergency manager making that decision or maybe even the governor's office. the governor won't say if they were involved in the decision or not and then you have the governor's department of environmental quality that's supposed to be overseeing things to make sure they're done
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correctly and they were complicit in the coverup. >> in your opinion, is what is happening in flint michigan a crime? yes. people were poisoned, and the state knew that there was a problem and that they denied that there was a problem when they knew there was one. so, records were falsified. i think -- i should not get ahead of myself. i think that what we need is adequate investigation to determine with certainty if there were crimes, and then if there were, they should be prosecuted. >> curt saying there's already a federal probe but also says the legislature should be holding hearings and then putting people underoath. in iraq, an operation is underway to find three missing americans opinion the u.s. contractors were taken hostage in an amount. gunman in military uniforms
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carried out the kidnapping in broad daylight just 100 yards from am police station. at this point, no group has claimed responsibility for the abductions. a new u.n. report calls the violence suffered by civilians in iraq staggering. that includes atrocities commit by isil as well as alleged abuses of government backed forces between january 2014 and october 2015. the u.n. says nearly 19,000 civilians were killed, and more than 36,000 people injured over that same period more than 3 million people were displaced. no claim of responsibility for a bomb blast in pakistan. officials say it has the malmarks of the taliban. 11 died when the bomb went off on the outskirts of peshawar on a road leading to afghanistan. the dead including police and one child. >> the pentagon has new details about the detention of 10 u.s.
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sailors by iran last week, all were held at gunpoint and even trading words with iranians before they were released. officials also saying the sim cards from two sat phones were taken. no indication that the sailors were mistreated during their 15 hour ordeal. >> iran's sanctions have been lifted over iran's nuclear program. money will be used to import goods after years of crippling sanctions. at the same time, five americans were also freed in that prisoner swap. those americans are telling their stories. >> gastreas's wide smile said i.
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>> christian pastor >> he was held in nearly solitary confinement, one person in the room with him. it's going to be a process to get back to spending time with people. a fourth opted to stay in iran and a fifth released separately on saturday. >> he's looking forward to coming home and having some serious ham burgers and things like that. >> the head of the international atomic energy agency who will monitor the nuke agreement with iran melt with president
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rouhani. israel president benjamin netanyahu said his government will keep a close watch on iran's compliance. >> the u.s. is keeping close watch. even as the bam map administration this weekend lifted sanctions relating to the nuclear deal, it imposed new sanctions on companies and individuals involved with iran's ballistic missile program. >> on the presidential campaign trail, republicans applauded the release of the americans, but blasted mr. obama for cutting a deal that included dropping charges against some iranian americans for violating sanctions against iran. >> you look at this new iran deal which took forever to get done, you look at how bad it is and how one sided it is. >> the families of those released say they are just happy to have their loved ones free. congress told the president to
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use everything at his disposal to bring the americans home. lisa stark, al jazeera, washington. another search is underway near hawaii for 12 missing marines. coast guard teams found life rafts but no sign of the marines. all 12 disappeared when a train mission helicopter crashed. that area is known for hoppy waters and high waves. rescuers say it's still possible they might find the crew alive. it should be dry in must have of california after scenes like this on monday, heavy rain leading to landslides. they washed out roads and overflowed creeks. >> here in the northeast, it's another day of fright temperatures, so cold doctors warn of frostbite if you venture outside. even though the sun will be shining across much of the region, temperatures will barely get above freezing and frostbite by the way can set in within minutes. >> the weather word in one word here in the northeast, nicole
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mitchell, brr. >> it's really the eastern half of the country seeing temperatures at or below normal, a lot of below normal, but a lot of the western portion of the country not faring too badly. you can see temperatures, like minus six in minneapolis, a little less of a wind chill in that portion of the country but now the wind cranked up. the temperatures are in the teens and single digits for a lot of the northeast, but with the wind, almost everywhere is seeing at times temperatures dip below zero. that's what makes it so brutal on the skin and makes you get frostbite, wind chill even faster than you typically would. temperatures for the rest of the day up and down the coastline, 20's as far south as atlanta, only making it into the 30's, make 40 degrees today. finally, the midwest starts to warm and by warm, i mean we're making it above zero at least versus some of those temperatures yesterday. across the region, that same
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wind has been cranking up lake effect and one system from the west coast is pulling across the midwest. that's going to bring you go areas of snow. specific to the lake effect, the winds will shift later today that it will wind that down into the afternoon hours, so that will be improvements, also some drier air coming in. we don't always see the lake effect this late in the season, because sometimes the lakes start to freeze over and that minimizes moisture. this has been such a mild winter up until now and a couple little cold snaps that those lakes are still unfrozen, lots of moisture to pick up as that wind moves across it. the system moving through the midwest, not a lot of snow, one to four inches versus a major snowstorm. typical for january, but definitely a problem. speaking of major snowstorms, we're watching something developing on friday that could crawl up the east coast. it's cold enough for snow. dependency on how close to the coastline it is, but there are
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chance for major snow friday and saturday. >> they are all right buying milk and shovels in washington, d.c. changing the rules on the job. >> a company whose policy is forcing choices between their jobs and religion. pushing back on the academy. actors are skipping the oscars and not just because of this year's nominations.
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more than two dozen people face charges after nearly shut down one of san francisco's
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busiest bridges. protestors blocked all lines monday. among their demands, the firing of police officers and officials involved in recent shootings. traffic was backed up for miles. there are growing calls for an all out boy colt of the academy awards for the second straight year, there isn't a single actor of color nominated in any of the lead or supporting roles, and that has brought back last year's has she to go oscars so white. >> the nominees are. >> the as correspond are just about a month away, but the buzz isn't about who's nominated but who isn't. the frustration over the lack of differsty leading to a boycott. >> begging for acknowledgment or even asking diminishes dignity and diminishes power and we are
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a dignified people and we are powerful and let's not forget it. her husband will smith was passed over for his role in concussion. what are you doing here? >> along with beast of no nation and creed's michael b. jordan. the real battle is in the executive offices where the gate keepers decide what gets made and what gets jetsoned. his film chiraq was also passed over. the straight out of compton did get one nomination for its all white writing team even though the film growinged $200 million at the box office. the controversy reflects a wider problem. >> the fact that the motion picture city like son that other institutions is very clowe to
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change, not a very diverse institution. you have a situation where essentially white males are dominating the industry. >> and the president of the academy also expressed frustration over the lack of diversity. >> we are working inside the academy to make sure we have inclusion especially in the area of membership. >> that may not be enough come oscar night when viewers say they'll boycott watching the show. >> the last time an african-american won for a lead acting role was 2006. forest whitaker when he played the king in the last king of scotland. chris rock will have the last laugh. i have seen most of these films and what really stands out is not necessarily a racial factor, that is a factor, but also the fact that there's a generational
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factor. when you see straight out of compton that is something that appealed to younger audiences but was a very good film. creed is a better rocky. >> samuel jackson was passed up as well in quentin tarantino's -- looks like the academy has some work to do for sure. for the second time this month, a plant in the midwest is facing anger from some muslim workers. they have to decide whether to change the way they pray or lose their jobs. >> the company says it's not about money, it's about religion. >> each day in between assembling snow blowers and lawn mowers at a plant in wisconsin, 53 muslim employees would stop twice each shift to pray. on january 14 be a the company said while employees will still be allowed to use prayer rooms in the plant, they will only be allowed to use them during two
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company scheduled 10 minute breaks. >> i have been 35 years in america, i've never heard a company that is not allowing its employees to pray five minutes. it is absolutely discrimination. >> muslim employees at the company say designating a set time for their prayer doesn't work for them since under religious rules, the time changes every day. >> if someone tells you you pray on your break and the break is not the prayer time, it will be impossible to pray. >> company v.e.o. said that he heard complaints from non-muslim workers that muslims in the plant were getting special treatment. he also says allowing the extra two breaks per shift would mean shutting down production for those breaks which could cost the company a million dollars each year. the company says 43 of the 53 muslim employees said they don't plan on returning to work unless the company reverses course. the employees say they were
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essentially fired. >> they say if you don't pray the prayer time, they give us this paper and then just to leave. >> no one was terminated. we were showing them what their options might be in the event they voluntarily chose not to come to work. >> fight 17 it's illegal to disfrom him nate in the workplace because of reledgen. they must comply unless it causes the company undo hardship. the company says this policy change is no change at all, the policies been in place 25 years, just hasn't been enforced. the c.e.o. said giving more breaks is the definition of an undo hardship since that is exactly what losing $1 million a year to allow prayer breaks. >> it will be fascinating to see if the people on the religious right will champion this cause.
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>> very fascinating. >> thank you very much. china's worst growth in a quarter currently has world markets on edge. >> how beijing's problems could ripple through brazil to bangladesh. the first case in the u.s., the dangers of the zika virus and how it could get worse once the weather gets warmer.
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welcome back, it's 8:30 eastern, taking a look at today's top stories. more national guard heading to flint michigan today where bacteria and lead contaminated the drinking water supply. the governor is expected to speak about the crisis later today. there is growing pressure on rick snyder to resign. a bomb blast killed at least 11 in pakistan. it took place on the outskirts of peshawar on the road leading to having a. seven others were wounded. the taliban is believed to be behind the explosion. more uncertainty over china's economic future. economic growth fell 6.9% last quarter, the lowest rate in 25 years. shanghai stocks were up today.
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they have plunged in recent weeks to 13 month lows. that is expected to drive down economic growth. advanced economies like here in the u.s. will continue to push the markets, but there could be risks from china and other emerging countries. we have a report from london. >> we are talking about the entire economy and when you look at the imf projections, there are grounds for encouragement in some areas, piss six for others. it's a more nuanced picture. on the mismissistic side, the imf predict the global economy will grow in 2016 but it is 2% less than they predicted back in october, so they are trimming their estimate. they believe that the rate of growth in china will carry on slowing down in 2016, 2017, and this will have enormous global
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consequences. they predict also, i should say a very break picture in latin america. they see the brazilian economy contracts by 3.5% this year. they see problems for big oil exporters, countries like angola and nigeria in sub saharan africa but elsewhere are more optimistic. here in the developed world, they see a modest recovery continuing, countries like britain and spain caught up in the euro zone crisis, their economy that grown two-point line%, so it is a mixed picture. there is this morning a controversy brew i go between russia and norway at the border. norwegian officials plan to send back syrian refugees who are taking advantage of a loophole to cross into the country. the refugees make the long journey into russia, then travel
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by train north to a russian city and from there bike it across the norwegian border. it's all illegal. norway does not refugees by crossing over in a border or car, but bicycles are permitted. norway is trying to close that loophole. we have the details. >> cold, frightened and now hungry, norway's government doesn't want these refugees and plans to send them back crossed border to russia. >> why russia? i need an answer. >> russia doesn't want them either. the kremlin says they can cross the russian border but can't stay. the refugees don't want to be there, either. >> no money, nowhere to go. they don't speak russian. once we cross the border, nobody will help us. >> the asylum seekers many fleeing war have been camped in northeastern norway.
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frustrated and angry, they've started a hunger strike. >> everybody here, including the kids, nobody is eating. >> norway has been getting tougher on refugees. thirty pakistanis hoping to claim asylum were deported in november. they traveled to what's become known as the nordic route. norway said it would send back refugees entering by riding bikes. the refugees said the hunger strike is a desperate attempt to stay in one place. >> to the extent that there is a hunger strike, this will be assessed against the return of people, but this hunger strike is nothing that gives reason to halt it's return. >> the number of deportees is likely to increase. al jazeera. a warning today about traveling overseas for pregnant women or women who plan to get pregnant. >> the zika virus leads to birth
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defects and has now been found in the u.s. >> american women planning to get pregnant are being told to talk with their doctors before traveling to latin america and the care bean where mosquitoes are spreading the zika virus. in this brazilian hospital, distraught mothers are holding their babies. born with smaller than normal heads, it is a condition that leads to brain damage. >> in december, we had about 1,000 cases, now we've just heard last week it's been 3,000 reports. >> last week, the first known case in the u.s. was diagnosed in hawaii. the child's mother had traveled to brazil apartment virus was spreading so fast disease experts predict infected mosquitoes could reach texas within three months. the c.d.c. recommend all travelers to at least 14 latin american countries wear long sleeves and avoid mosquito bites. the health minister agrees.
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the foreigner who comes to brazil and intends to get pregnant or is pregnant is in the same situation. they should take necessary measures not to come in contact with the mosquito because it can bite and carry the zika virus. all the precautions may not be enough because the problem is extremely serious. >> the brazilian army has been called in to combat the disease carrying mosquitoes and the government announced it will fund studies for vaccines to the virus. >> the director of the texas children's hospital center for vaccine development and founding dean of the national school of tropical medicine at baylor college of medicine joins us from houston. thank you for joining us this morning, doctor. >> good morning. thanks for having me on. >> we know that zika has been around for decades but since most of the pop lanes is not immune, how concerned should web about the spread of this virus? >> we know it's spreading
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rapidly, so this is a virus that came from asia from africa through asia and ultimately to brazil in 2014, and over the course of a year and a half, it's spread to at least 14 countries and now it's in two caribbean countries, haiti and martinique and also in puerto rico. it may be that zika has spread across the caribbean. it's a fast moving disease and that is the way these infections work and we'll have to see how quickly it's going to expand. >> you mentioned the gulf coast. why is that area particularly vulnerable? >> there's several reasons. a big one is because of the warm tropical or sub tropical climate. also that we have two mosquito species capable of transmitting zika virus on the gulf coast,
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certainly in texas going across to florida, and then you have a third factor that not many people talk about but which i think is very important and that is poverty, especially extreme poverty. we have a lot of poor people on the gulf coast and when you drive through poor areas of the gulf, which you see are as clap dated housing, people without window screens or holes in their screens without air conditioning, more exposed to mosquito bites. you see garbage piled up in these poor communities. there's environmental degradation that allows mosquitoes to breed. you see discarded tires on the side of the road. it looks like the world health movies you show to medical students, but it's right here in america. >> researchers are working on a vaccine, but how realistic is it to pinpoint something that works quickly before this spreads like wildfire? >> well, the good news about zika virus is so far, we only
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know about one what we call strain of the virus as opposed to dengue fever which was more problem take because there were fore different strains and you had to make a vaccine against all four at the same time. this one is more straightforward. vaccines are not as quick as small molecule drugs in terms of making interconveniences for purposes of making a vaccine, but, you know, if you have the right target, and the science works, you can sometimes move in 18 months or two years. it may be too lately for brazil but depending how quickly this spreads, it may still be finding a use for the caribbean and the gulf coast. >> the c.d.c. issued a travel alert for pregnant women planning to visit the 14 countries here. you can see on this map exposed to zika, but is there something the c.d.c. can do to prevent the spread of this virus, telling
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people maybe not to go to the olympics? >> the olympics are still a few months away. i this i this is such an evolving fast-moving story that it may be premature to talk about not going to the olympics. i think the more worrisome and timely question now is what to do about travel to the caribbean. if we think that the virus is going to be all over the caribbean by the spring, should that advisory extend to the caribbean and some very difficult issue to address, because this has huge economic implications for the caribbean, especially places like puerto rico, which is already real from its economic dead, so these are not trivial issues to address and it takes a lot of things to consider. >> all right, thank you so much. turning now to presidential politics, donald trump back in iowa today trying to build more support. it comes a day after every
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visited with the evangelicals in virginia, giving the convocation monday where he referred to a book of the bible as two corinthians. he also cursed twice in his speech while taking up what he said were threats against christianity. >> we are going to protect christianity and if you look what's going on throughout the world, you look at syria where if you're christian, they're chopping off heads. you look at the different places, and christianity, it's under siege. i'm a protestant, i'm very proud of it, presbyterian to be exact, but i'm proud of it, very very proud of it and we've got to protect because bad things are happening. >> trump was once leading with conservative evangelical voters but that has slipped in favor of ted cruz. it is especially true in iowa which holds its caucuses in less than two weeks. it looks like for now donald trump is still going to be allow would into the u.k.
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the british parliament held a three hour debate filled with polite and sometimes amusing insults but in the end decided not to ban him. al jazeera's dana lewis reports. >> british parliament couldn't agree on whether to ban donald trump from the united kingdom but seemed united in condemning his rhetoric. one by one, they thrashed him. >> i've heard of a number of cases where people have been mistreated for incitement, hatred, i've never heard of one called stupidity. i'm not sure that we should be starting now. >> several muslim m.p.'s said trump should be banned like any extremist, not treated differently because he's privileged and rich. the u.k. has banned 80 individuals for inciting violence. trump they say that incited muslims, mexicans and women. >> he is involved in the american show business industry for years and years, a man who is interviewing for the most important job in the world, his
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words are not comical. his words are newt funny. his words are poisonous. >> the petition to ban was signed by more than 570,000 people, the large evident ever to spark a debate in parliament. anger partially driven by trump's suggestions there are no-go zones in the u.k. where police fear muslim areas. >> i would be delighted if he could show us where the so-called no-go areas for police are in this country. i've never been able to find them. perhaps why in america, there are more people killed by shotguns every day than are killed every year in this country. >> trump threatened to pull out of a billion dollars pledge to expand hills golf resort in scotland where the petition got its start. petition author american suzanne kelly said trump's treatment of the environment here and bullying of his neighbors contribute to anger which reached a boiling point over
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comments about immigrants in america. >> even if i win or lose, important discussions have been had and people are thinking about the implications of this man employee there's a different between free speech and hate speech. it's been three weeks since protestors took over a wildlife center in oregon. they are demanding the land be returned to local ranchers and loggers. it is shedding light on an industry, a logging industry that has been lagging for decades. >> northerny county was once a thriving timber air in that in the 70's, it had the highest per capita in come in or gone with that government regulations and environmentalists brought logging almost to a halt, driving the timber industry and jobs out of the county. doug used to work in the now closed mill in hines. he's now the control technician at lewis and clark machine, a company that makes its money buying and selling milling
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equipment. >> there's so much resistance to, you know, to logging anymore and watching movies, you know, have you ever seen a good logger? when kids watch the movies, people logging are terrible, they destroy the land, kill everything. >> he's frustrated with the way federal lands are managed, saying current practices are bad for everyone. >> they're overgrown with brush and when they have a fire used to be they could put a fire outer in 10, 15,000 acres maybe if it was bad. now 100,000 acres almost the normal. >> he's frustrated with the tactics of environmentalists. >> it's always their way or the highway. with them, there's no win for anybody but them. >> up the road in grant county, they may have a different answer. environmentalists and loggers come together trying to find ways to meet the forest needs. tonight we'll introduce you to the people behind the brew mountain forest partners and
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look at how they are working to shape national forest management locally and possibly revive the area's logging past. allen schauffler, al jazeera in the national forest. at the root of a wider problem. >> new claims that israeli settlement are the cause of unrest in the occupied territories. stopping danger from above, a new plan to blast asteroids out of the sky.
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the west coast is bracing for another round of heavy rain today. let's bring in nicole mitchell. >> we've had these two systems moving through. this has more moisture. putting this in motion, that continues to move in. we have one that's moved out into the midwest and will bring some snow but today's round is going to bring widespread two or three-inches not out of the question. we're warming up on the west coast. we will have to be concerned about snow in higher elevation and really, you have to get fairly high to do that. northern parts of the sierra, that could be the highest amount six to eight inches and we have winter weather advisories through the rest of the region. we get a little break tomorrow. you can kind of see that, the next one behind it is poised, so starting to see that moisture thursday and into friday. as i mentioned, the last systems already starting to move to the
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midsection of the country, so as this moves allege, that is going to be bringing one to four inches of snow into places south of the great lakes through the day today and tomorrow once it starts to pull out of the midwest a little more. some active weather now but i do want to kind of jump ahead through the next couple days. this gets us to friday. we have another round of rain continuing through this region. we are closely watching an area developing in the south. now we are colder in the eastern half of the country. unlike last weekend where the system was mostly rain because of temperatures, this looks like it will pull off the coast, wrap, intensify, have some strong winds with it and be snow. it depends where that is in the coastline as to how much snow, but something being watched closely for friday and saturday. >> because you both wanted snow, take a look at this. this is a dramatic look at an
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avalanche set off in purpose in switzerland. local officials do it each time it snows to start larger avalanches that could hurt and kill people. the road is quickly cleared away and the crews get ready for the next one. the advocacy group human rights watch said israeli companies are supporting illegal government policies against palestinians. al jazeera's stephanie decker has more. >> an israeli company quarrying stone in the occupied west bank. the owner, his palestinian workers and the businessman buying stone all said the issue is too complicated. the owner said he pays his workers well. they have social benefits and they have a lot of palestinian buyers. they all seem to agree, however told us that israeli companies get preferential treatment in
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israeli controlled areas obtaining licenses more quickly. >> quarries are used as one example of how settlement businesses benefit from policies that discriminate against palestinians. the report comes at a time of seemingly growing international pressure on israel. >> the european union is labeling products from israeli settlements, the eu wants to extinguish between israel and occupied territory. israel is having diplomatic spats a the u.s. and brazil and the situation is tense. the israeli denies international pressure on israel is growing. >> when we look, the horizon is bright and we see very good relations with many countries. this is a way it will keep on being. i think there is a negative spin inspired probably by the bureaucracy and it does not correspond to the truth. >> this man disagrees. he resigned from the israeli
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government because he didn't agree with the policies. >> the name of the game is benefit, israel claimed to be adhering to a peace process to the two-state solution, to the creation of the state of palestinian alongside israel. people believed israel, and we're prepared to leave any form of pressure aside, not anymore. we are seeing the pressure coming in. >> the report is the latest criticism from various international bodies. their patience with the israeli government over its settlement policies appears to be running out. al jazeera in the occupied west bank. when we come back, we remember the life of a musical giant. ♪ >> the legacy of eagles cofounder and guitarist glenn frey. plus. >> activities say humans could
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become extinct like the dinosaurs if an asteroid hits earth. they plan a major operation that could save us all. that story, coming up.
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♪ music fans are remembering eagles cofounder glenn frey. he died from complications after surgery. he started the legendary band and had a successful solo
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career, penning numerous hit songs. he and the rest of the eagles were inducted into the hall of fame 1998. there's a new effort underway to protect the earth from asteroids. trying a push an asteroid off course before disaster strikes. >> in russia, february 2013, an asteroid cuts the sky, terrifies residents and reminds us that eventually one with our name on it could be coming our way. with that in mind, these two scientists from nasa and the european space agency are putting their considerable brains together. their humble mission, to save the planet from a potentially catastrophic direct hit that could wipe us out.
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it has its sight the on two os studies, a larger one and a smaller asteroid moon. neither is expected to hit earth, but will be used at target practice. nasas craft aims to crash into the moon and like a giant game of cosmic snooker push it another direction. >> an asteroid is a very large, almost the size of a mountain and we hit it with a spacecraft, we only make a tiny change in the velocity but that's the difference between hitting the earth and not hitting the earth over time. >> a second spacecraft will collect the data to replicate the mission when it's needed for real. striking the earth would cause the same energy and damage as dozens of atomic bombs. scientists currently don't see any asteroids heading our way for another couple centuries, so what's the rush?
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>> we want to have the capability to do this as soon as possible because we know these things are out there, but to find all the things that are potential threats is a very big goal, but now this particular mission is to go the next step, which is something very, very important, which is what are going to do about it if something's actually got your name on it. >> for now, the project is still in the theoretical phaseles, with approval for the launch still waiting to get the green light to prevent us from going a route of the dinosaurs. al jazeera, new york. that's it for us here in new york. i'm del walters. i'm erica pitzi. tomorrow we look at the state of the auto industry as president obama travels to the detroit auto show. have a great day. we leave you with a little bit more from glenn frey. ♪
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the u.n. raises the a large saying the level of violence in iraq has been staggering. also ahead, libya's rival political factions announce the formation of a long awaited unity government. chinese stocks rise despite official physician suggesting the slowest economic growth in 25 years. boycotting the oscars, u.s. filmmaker spike lee won't attend what he calls a lily white award

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