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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  January 21, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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♪ markets in turmoil and foreign stocks tumble after triple digit losses will it continue today? a former oklahoma police officer convicted of sexual asults will be punished tad for the crimes. millions in the way of the major storm threatening to dump two feet of snow on the nation's capitol. buffalo bills choose a woman for a full-time coaching job. ♪ unvesters holding their breath
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as stocks had a bad morning across asia markets are wiped out over fears of china and declining oil prices and welcome to your world i'm stephanie. >> and i'm del walters, follows wednesday's day on wall street and doe down 250 and then it was down more than 500 at one time. >> analysts blame what is happening on oil. >> falling oil prices and no end in sight is what sparked another rocky day on wall street wednesday, oil and gas companies led the way as the doe dropped 3% the day before closing down 2%. the reason the price of crude oil falling below $27 a barrel, the lowest it has been since may 2003. >> we have an absolute glut of oil and in simple terms we have four times the supply and 1, 1 1/2, 2 times the demand and anybody can say that is not good. >> reporter: it's devastating
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for countries trying to produce oil and china's slowing economy has driven down demand for oil and saudi arabia floods the market with more and more crude with first to halt rival producers in the u.s. and now counter iranian oil that will flow due to lifting of sanctions because of the nuclear deal with the u.s. and five other nations and they may be able to take low prices for now but not true of oil producers like nigeria where the economy is being hurt by the oil. some nations start to die, we eat our way through some of these stockpiles and we have tankers that are sitting out in the ocean full of oil, waiting for someplace to put it. >> reporter: some blame it on commodity traders looking to make fast money and pointing to scotland saying basically sell everything and put it in safe investments and means while americans are thankful for oil and gas to fuel them this winter
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and it will be around a while until the price of oil bottoms out. >> a pick up and growth would be the kicker but do you know what that doesn't look to be happening soon hence the stock market is going down, the worst two weeks we had in history. >> reporter: john with al jazeera. in oklahoma city today a former police officer is expected to be sentenced for sexually assaulting women while on duty, daniel holtsclaw found guilty in december and jury recommended 263 years in prison and as al jazeera reports he has filed a last-minute request for a new trial. >> he should be locked up. >> reporter: in the neighborhood where former oklahoma city police officer daniel found his victims there is a sense of both anticipation and fear. >> he makes me feel uncomfortable. >> like i don't know who to trust. >> reporter: these are the blocks he patrolled in search of vulnerable african/american women with histories of drugs or prostitution to sexually assault. >> i think he is sick.
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i think he is an sociopath and a serial rapist. >> reporter: 13 came forward including a grandmother who he pulled over at this intersection then attacked in his squad car. another victim a 17-year-old girl raped on her mother's front porch, ultimately he was convicted of 18 sexual offenses. >> these attacks happened over the course of at least six months while this officer was on duty, how could that have happened under this department's nose? >> well, you know, it's a very difficult case and he is and anominally and not something you see all the time. in 20 years in law enforcement i've never seen that. >> reporter: the oklahoma city police department says it was clueless to hold the crimes until the allegations surfaced and then the department immediately stripped him of his badge put hill on leave and seven months later fired him. does this department accept any responsibility for what he was
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able to do while on duty? >> we are absolutely appalled and sorry that it occurred. once again if we can go back and change the past we would. this individual had nothing, no flags, no history that this had occurred. >> reporter: oklahoma city police say no new policies have resulted from this case, however the department has fast tracked a body camera program that was already in progress. those cameras will hit the street friday. though they are not required to run at all times and officers will still patrol alone. >> more has to be done. tighter monitoring, a no tolerance sexual assault police procedure has to be in effect. >> reporter: investigators say he may have had more victims who even today are too afraid to come forward and here on the streets where he hunted his prey the sight of a police car can still cause uneasy.
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heidi with al jazeera oklahoma city, oklahoma. the next trials in the death of freddie gray in baltimore could begin as early as next month, they had been put on hold as judges debated whether to force william porter to testify against three of his fellow officers, now a state judge has ruled porter will not have to. porter's trial ended in a mistrial last month, his retrial has been scheduled for june. political debate in washington over refugees hitting roadblocks and senate democrats stopping the bill to keep iraqi and syrians refugees from fleeing to this country and we have more from washington. >> reporter: supporters of the bill proposed after the paris attacks said it would help prevent americans from terrorist attacks and syrian and iraqi refugees are already vetted before they come to the united states but this would have made the process much more stringent and would have required for example the head of homeland security, the f.b.i. and national intelligence to sign off on each refugee, that each
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refugee was not a threat. here is one of the billed supporters senator bill. >> what this legislation is about is about national security people who are refugees whether they are adequately vetted by the appropriate authorities before they come to the united states and live in our communities, this is not about banning refugees, it simply is not. >> many democrats denounce the legislation saying republicans were declaring a war on refugees, and here is senator dick durban. >> our war is not with refugees but i.s.i.l. and terrorists and those who are using this country's freedoms to kill innocence people and for us to turn our back on these refugees is plainly wrong. the bill before us sounds so innocuous, a pause give me a break, read it. >> reporter: republicans needed 60 votes to advance this bill. it was a procedural vote even at the begin of the be bait they did not get it and democrats wanted to turn this into a slap
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at donald trump and we will advance the bill if you let us vote on an amendment to denounce trump for his call to ban muslims from coming into the united states. well the republicans were not going to go for that. immigration of course and security are very hot topic on the campaign trail and three republican candidates actually left their campaign to comcast a vote, rubio and cruz and rand paul, the democratic senator bernie sanders he stayed on the campaign trail, he was not at the senate today but of course we know how he would have voted, he would have voted against this refugee bill, back to you. >> lisa stark thank you very much of the four million syrian refugees in the world the u.s. taking in fewer than a thousand so far. detroit's public schools are back open today and about every school was closed on wednesday when the teachers had a mass sick out and asked the courts to intervene and it did and teachers say their pay is too low and the buildings are unsafe and al jazeera's diane has more.
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>> reporter: the doors were locked at the learning academy in detroit wednesday. as teachers from that school and 87 others called in sick so they could march outside the north american international auto show where president obama was visiting. this was the teacher's latest effort to draw attention to what they say are impossible working conditions in their debt-ridden school district. >> we have over crowded classes. we don't have enough teachers to offer all the classes that students need. >> they knew the conditions of the school and just didn't know we were going to tell over them. >> we are seeing damage from the roof. >> reporter: the american federation of teachers posted this video on youtube showing how rainwater damaged a ceiling and caused a floor in one school gym to warp, teachers in the video also complained about classrooms with too many kids and not enough supplies. >> i teach first grade and i
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don't have a reading book. >> reporter: detroit federation of teachers says money problems and a resolving door of district managers are why so many of its members are so frustrated. the school district is struggling under a more than $500 million definite caused by a drop in property tax revenue and cuts in state and federal aid that is why the district has struggled to maintain schools and keep teachers but the interim president says it's turning a blind eye to the problems in the schools. >> need to make education in the city of detroit priority one. >> they have not done that. >> they have not done that and has to be a priority and this is not happening to any other school district in the state of michigan. >> reporter: the michigan legislature is now considering a plan to create a second school district that would take control of the schools and pay down debt. in the state of the state speech tuesday night governor snyder
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said the legislature needs to act soon. >> detroit schools are in a crisis. the detroit schools are in need of a transformational change. >> reporter: the emergency manager of detroit public schools says it help doesn't come by april the district will be insolvent. >> we are talking about the lives of some 47,000 students, we are talking about families and communities and so these things are very critical to the long-term survivability of any city or any community so let's just say that we are at a point now where we believe it can be fixed but we need the legislature to do that. >> reporter: early couldn't say what would happen if the state fails to act. >> got to go. >> reporter: teachers fear it could mean even fewer teachers and a tougher learning environment for detroit's children, diane in detroit. we were scheduled to talk with the interim president of the teachers union who you saw in the piece and she cancelled because of the injunction filed against her with the district.
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staying in michigan we are getting a sense of the confusion at the start of the water crisis in flint, michigan governor rick snyder released hundreds of pages of e-mail and some show the top staff unsure of who is responsible for cleaning up the mess including this e-mail that said the real responsibility rests with the county, city and kwa, kwa is the local water authority. as al jazeera's andy reports flint's new mayor as a warning for other cities around the country, don't let this happen to you. >> reporter: increasing calls for rick snyder to resign but the mayor here is not lending a voice to the course and weaver is not a fan of the governor but doesn't say he should resign. >> trust was broken over a period of time and you don't regain trust within a matter of seconds because a statement was made and this is something he is going to have to work on for a long long time. >> reporter: weaver asked about what a lot of people in flint suspect that race and class played a role in the state's
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initial response to the crisis which even the governor called a failure. >> it's a minority and a poor community and our voices were not heard and that is part of this problem. >> reporter: the governor said tuesday during his state of the state address that his administration will make things right. >> there can be no excuse when michigan people turn on the tap they expect and deserve clean, safe water. >> reporter: president obama who met with weaver at the white house this week came to michigan on wednesday and talked about the crisis. >> it is a reminder of why you can't short change basic services that we provide to our people and that we together provide as a government to make sure that public health and safety is preserved. >> reporter: mayor weaver was at a conference in washington d.c. on wednesday, warning other mayors about the dangers of
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contaminated water. >> start monitoring what is going on with your water, the infrastructure and don't let this happen where you live. >> reporter: mayor weaver was just elected in november but a city manager appointed by governor snyder still has far more broad powers over the city than she does and it was a previous city manager also appointed by the governor who over saw the switch in the city's water supply that led to the dangerous drinking water, andy with al jazeera, flint, michigan. stay with us, in our next half hour we will speak to an environmental activist in michigan who is not satisfied with the governor or president obama's response to the crisis. millions on the east coast are bracing for the first winter storm and washington d.c. got light snowfall overnight causing a traffic mess but this is nothing compared to what the capitol is supposed to get, up to 30", the storm will move up the east coast over the weekend and multiple winter storm and blizzard warnings are in effect, that is just the beginning.
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>> we have seen this poor woman fall three times and it could cripple here and the east coast, it's nasty. >> that is a different system and if you think you got out of it you did not and watching things develop, this is what we are watching today a system pulling out of the rockies to the midsection of the country. yesterday's was in a lot of case some lighter snow. just a few inches but there was freezing precipitation and made it slick and definitely some traffic problems through the day yesterday and as we hone into it and put that into motion the east coast is getting mentioned a lot and i want to mention the south today is under a severe weather residence risk and not just the east coast and more on that in the next half hour but in terms of the snow this continues to develop through the day today into tomorrow eventually pulling off the coast and becoming a nor'easter and wrapping back around even more of that snow so already the snow for somewhere like d.c. will start falling through the day on
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friday but some of the heaviest stuff will be overnight on friday for the mid-atlantic and it shifts northward and the heavy snow through the day on saturday and because of where this will be we are going to see the heaviest snow through the pink and in some cases two feet of snow. the other problem of this is as i said a developing system becoming a nor'easter as it pulls off the coastline and look at the winds expand through saturday and intensify in some cases look at winds over 40 in new york and gusts over 50 miles per hour and because of snow and wind we have blizzards in effect for long island and d.c. area. >> nicole mitchell thank you. >> ash carter going to spend another day in france and talks to the military cadets there about the important role they will play in the fight to destroy i.s.i.l. >> our strikes are dismantling i.s.i.l.'s war sustaining
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finances targeting oil production, its industrial base. together we will continue these kinds of operations as part of the overall effort to degrade its financing. throughout iraq and syria we are contraining i.s.i.l.'s ability either to defend or attack. >> reporter: french president francois hollande says they will keep looking at this in the coming months. families burying nearly two dozen people who were attacked in pakistan and identified some of the gunmen and al jazeera kamal has more from charsadda. >> reporter: well, first of all as you can see it's still foggy here in charsadda and it's agricultural base that is shrou ed and has thick fog in the winter and this is after the attack for the pakistan military
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spokesman is that the attackers were using sims and in contact with a group inside afghanistan and quite a few details emerging but there is no doubt this was a security lapse because for the past week they had been warning across this particular province that an attack may happen and of course the perimeter that should have been better defended were not defended and the action by the security forces awarded a bigger crisis and we are told that another student has succumb to his wounds and takes the death toll to 21. >> that is kamal from pakistan, it was a little more than a year ago that a taliban linked group opened fire on school children in peshawar and 144 people killed were children. pointing fingers on the death of a russian spy. >> new information that vladimir putin probably approved the
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killing. arriving in america after weeks spent stranded a group of cubans finally make it to the u.s. ♪
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♪ president obama is back in washington this morning after visiting the detroit auto show. the president was there to taught the recovery in the auto industry and he told auto workers if it was not for the $85 billion government bailout general motors and chrysler would have gone out of business. >> i want people to remember how far we've come and i'm not running for office again. the reason i want to remind people is not because i'm on the ticket, it's because i want america to have confidence in
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where we can go. >> reporter: some activists are upset the president didn't make a side trip to flint to see the water crisis there firsthand. >> the president did talk about it briefly while he was in detroit and tapped assistant secretary of services to lead the government's response. >> all the people of flint's back as they work their way through this terrible tragedy, it is a reminder of why you can't short change basic services that we provide to our people and that we together provide as a government to make sure that the public health and safety is preserved. michigan's governor asking the president to reconsider his decision not to issue a federal dez aser declaration, right now it's only being labeled a federal emergency giving the
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action to $5 million in resources and she lives in detroit considered to be the most polluted in michigan and she is back with us this morning to talk about what she heard from the governor and the president and i want to ask you about the president first, he was in detroit and this is 70 miles away from flint but he didn't go, how do you feel about that? >> well, a little bit disappointed. i mean we were excited. we are always excited to welcome president obama to detroit, particularly to see the progress that has been made here, largely due in part to his policies. but flint is like a little sister to us. many of us have relatives there. i know i do. and the city is suffering so i think the consensus, at least with some of my friends is we would rather you go there and just try to let people know how much you care, give them that sense of things will be okay, i would prefer that actually. >> let me push back and you are
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being very pilot and let me ask the question if this had been president george w bush and some people say what is happening in flint is this governor's katrina do you think the people in your circumstances, your relatives would have had the same polite response or would they have been just down right angry? >> absolutely not. they would have been really angry and upset like why didn't you come here. i mean we are sitting here and, in fact, when i was on social media yesterday i saw that from quite a few of my friends. i mean, people were very upset saying why in the heck is he driving around detroit, you know, eating pizza and carrying on when the people there can't drink water. so i do think that because he is a black president and he is so adored that he sort of got a pass yesterday but the bottom line is even if he couldn't make it there i think it would have been wonderful and symbolic at least to bring a van load of
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people from flint, how about that, maybe they should have brought some people in to meet with him that morning in a private meeting that they tela cast and then say let him talk one on one, here are some of their stories. you have to make that connection. you have to let the people of flint know that the person who is in charge of everything is there and he does really have your back and let him say it to you face-to-face and not through a t.v. camera and i respect and admire mr. obama and everything he has done but i was kind of hoping that he would meet with the people yesterday. i want him to not come to detroit, i wanted him to hop on a van or motorcade. >> i'm sure you would have gone and picked him up if he needed it. >> we wanted him there. >> i want to ask you about the governor before we lose too much time there are calls the governor should resign but if that happens the lieutenant governor will take over, do you think that would make matters better or worse? >> it's a catastrophe and i think it's just a culture of
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failure there so we have at least i have no hope for any of them to do anything right at this point. i think we need outside intervention. i don't think our lieutenant governor can make this right. what ever happened and all the miss cues and now we have people sitting suffering and waking up, nightmare scenario like you can't drink your water, no, we need maybe someone from the federal government to come in and step in and oversee this entire process, to work with the people. i don't trust anyone in government there in lansing any more, none of it. >> i was going to say on this note before we run out of time as well there is talk about fixing infrastructure and wants to set aside $26 million to do so but have you heard anything about pipes going in everybody's homes and infrastructure means schools and businesses but not necessarily the people who have to drink the water. >> that would cost so much money
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and here is the bottom line the people can't drink the water today. how long would it even take to do something like that? what are people supposed to do for the months or years it might take to put a process like that in place? and then they have no property, zero property values, they can't move, i mean who is going to move into flint, who is going to be able to sell a house at this point so the whole infrastructure, this is a catastrophe of epic proportions so what are they going to do really? first of all though they need to make sure people can drink water. that is the most important thing, can you wake up in the morning and brush your teeth, your baby can you make formula so your baby can be healthy, can you not expose your children to these kind of chemicals and things and by the way the people might end up with kidney failure down the line. so many things wrong right there and talking about the huge infrastructure and pipes, fix the water, fix the water.
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>> thank you for joining us from detroit, we will probably be talking again. >> all right thank you. medical experts of course say there is no safe level of lead for children. >> not at all. >> still have not dealt with the short term problem there. straight ahead the republican frontrunner has a commanding lead in the crucial state of new hampshire. >> new numbers out show undecided voters are actually the ones who can change the whole picture. 2015 was the warmest year on record by a sizable amount. >> scientists sound the alarm as the earth continues to heat up.
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>> farm workers striking in mexico. >> all that tension is about what's happening right now. >> you can work very hard and you will remain poor.
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>> what's the cost of harvesting america's food? >> do you see how it would be hard to get by on their salary? >> yeah. >> today, they will be arrested. >> they're firing canisters of gas at us. >> emmy award-winning investigative series. >> we have to get out of here. welcome back about that taking a look at today's top stories, a former oklahoma city police officer is expected to be sentenced this morning for sexually assaulting women while on duty. he has filed a last minute request for a new trial. he was found guilty in december. the jury recommended 263 years in prison. senate democrats brocking the gill that the stop refugees from coming into the u.s. from syria. it would have required the white house to certify that no gyp
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coming refugees posed a security threat. modest early gains across asia and europe were wiped out at the close after the single worst day on the dow since 2014. there are growing fears a chinese recession will lead to a repeat of the 2008 global financial be crisis. patricia sobga joins us. we heard the chinese markets describes add bearish last week. are we seeing a bear market globally now? >> we are in london and japan. it's when the market falls 20% from its high. yes, we are in bear market territory in much of the globe. >> we are talking about china and about iran. iran pumping 500,000 more barrels of oil into the world oil spliff at a time it's oversaturated. are these concerns about iran justified? >> they appear to be justified in terms of the selloff that's
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precipitated that. what was very, very interesting is we've known about oversupply for a very long time. this is the latest of bad news in an oil market and a world that's been awash in cheap oil now for well over a year. the prospect now that now that iran has said that it's going to be pumping 500,000 more barrels a day, putting that into a market where you already have a serious supply overhang is just going to drive prices lower unless you see global demand pick up and that's unlikely when global growth is slowing. >> we are talking two forces. they are not separate, the oil prices and china. china's central bank poured another $90 billion to help prop up the economy. that tactic did not work two weeks ago. what left do they have in the tool box there in beijing? >> this is causing tremendous amount of nervousness in the market. the authorities in beijing keep trying to flow money at the
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problem through currency interventions to prop up the value of the ewe was not or share buy backs to lift the value of shares. it seems whatever they try, even if they get a temporary respite, it's just a pause and it continues to go down. it really appears it has the which of desperation about it and that is what is really well troubling to investors. they are asking what do beijing authorities know that we don't know, how bad is it really, is this going to be a harder landing than everybody banked on. >> patricia sobga live to talk to us about the money, thank you very much. day two of the economic forum, all eyes on the european central bank set to announce its interest rate decision later this hour. a british judge said president vladimir putin probably approved
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a plan to kill a former russian spy who had defected to the u.k. alexander vitenyenko was poisoned with plutonium in 2006. the judge is making some pretty big accusations. what does he believe was putin's exact role and what evidence does he cite? >> well here's the thing, this is not a smoking gun. this is circumstantial evidence. the key word the judge used when he described putin's role in all this is that it was probable. what he believes is that essentially as this was the report has found a murder, most probably ordered by the f.s.b.,
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russia's main security service, that therefore there is a high probability that it was sanctioned, at least from the very top, from vladimir putin himself. he also says that the means of murder, of highly radioactive, very, very rare poison suggests that this is only something a state could wield as a weapon, another built of evidence that he feels is pointing to the top of russia's leadership. as i said, this is a probable thing that the judge has accused the russian president of, not definite, not exact. >> there will be no repercussions internationally,
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but how did lit convenient co's wife react? >> she is pleased that it has finally been wrapped up. we can actually hear from the woman now. let's hear what she said. >> i am of course very pleased that the court has found my husband on his death bed accused mr. putin of murder has been proved true in the wish courts, a high court of independence and fairness. >> basically the two men accused of this murder are basically agents or people who have been operating in and around russia's
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security services for a number of years. one of them is now an m.p., a deputy in russia's parliament. now this basically means there is no chance these two men will be extra dated to face trial and the russian government has effectively said there is no chance these men will be prosecuted within russia, either. >> thank you. back in the u.s., so far much of the immigration debate here focused on people coming into the country covertly. there's a new report that shows that nearly half of the undocumented immigrants living in the u.s. got here on a temporary visa and stayed after it expired. john henry smith has more on what's being done. >> the u.s. may have a problem with foreigners overstaying their welcome. a new report says nearly a half million people remained in the country last year after their temporary visas expired.
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it found that's true for 40% of the estimated 11 mommy undocumented immigrants living in the u.s. >> this report articulates the foundation to build the biometric system upon. >> that system is now in place at j.f.k. airport, checking foreign nationals arriving under the vesica waiver program and randomly checks u.s. citizens to check faces against their passports, but losing track of a half mommy visa holders had officials responsible for border protection on the spot in front of a senate committee. >> you're in charge of doing an exit, visa exit system for the united states of america. >> homeland security officials drew harsh questioning for the democratic's inability to implement nationwide biometric screenings. >> it's been required for 20 years. it is not in place. >> d.h.s. had planned to develop options for a why yo het rick exit and report to congress rewarding benefits and costs in time for the fiscal year 2015
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budget cycle. d.h.s. did not meet that time frame. >> you've been trying to figure out where to put the equipment, is that right? >> it's a matter of incorporating into the departure process so we don't create gridlock? young does it take you to decide that? can you decide it next week. >> we can't compel space at the airports. >> a big problem is that unlike many other countries, u.s. airports don't mandate that all international flights take off from a specific designated space. >> you have a couple of thousand departure gates in the united states, so unless you want to restructure the airports and rebuild them to support this like other airports around the world have this, you have to look at a solution. you can multiply by over 2,000 to put in that time sensitive environment. >> deputy commissioner wagner told the senate subcommittee that the j.f.k. facial recognition rollout is part of a
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test plan to work out the kinks and technology. phase one saw the technology implement at washington's dulles airport. phase three will include one of california's land border crossings. >> but that will take time. a new poll this morning shows donald trump still leading in new hampshire three weeks before the primary. ted cruz's backing has climbed. he gets 14% support compared to trump's 34%. jeb bush and marco rubio are tied in third, but what could be the most important number, only 31% of new hampshire republicans say they have made up their mind. the race is closer in iowa with just 10 days to go until the caucus there. cruz and trump are neck and neck. trump hopes support from sarah palin will give him a boost. she was on the campaign trail for trump in oklahoma speaking at a christian college and rallying the crowd. >> there are some others who no instead of wanting to talk about
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the tough issues, they wear political correctness like a suicide vest. >> trump that half avoided whether he would ask palin to be his are not mate. he said he hasn't thought about a vice president yet and is focused on winning the primary. the first 200 out of nearly 8,000 cuban migrants are starting to arrive in the u.s. al jazeera's adam rainy made the journey with them and filed this report from miami. >> crossing from mexico into the united states, a brief celebration, then back on the road. from the state of texas, the u.s. highway stretches before them. each has their own destination, one here in texas, the others at different points in florida. soon, a checkpoint, cubans, unlike other migrants are immediately granted political asylum, so no hold up, no
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worries. they've got 36 more hours to go, a lot of time to take in new sights, especially since they've traveled so little in their lives. >> all of this is new to me. i'm surprised by everything, the roads, the cold weather, the shops, everything. they might seem like insignificant things, but they're all new to me. >> a cuban who came before them introduces to all that's offered even at u.s. gas stations. their first purchase, lottery tickets, a new land, a new culture, new things to buy. in the country less than a day, they are dreaming big. >> we are in transition and now we are in a place we want to be, happy and crazy to finally get where we are going. >> a trip they thought would last just a day goes on and on, the accident, louisiana, alabama, finally florida. it seems endless. >> we just pulled into miami and
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daisy's long trip is about to come to an end. she has traveled two and a half months, more than a half dozen countries and finally after two years is about to be reunited with her husband. >> a long time coming, and a counter all the more emotional because she had to leave her son behind and could only travel after her father recently died. >> i kept asking myself how much longer, how much longer. >> my batteries were almost drained waiting for the moment to come when she is here now. the long wait is finally over for this couple. thousands of other cubans though in central america are still waiting their turn. adam rainy, al jazeera, miami. the global vaccine alliance signed a deal with drug maker america to manufacture an experimental ebola vaccine, making 300 doses for use in clinical trials starting this may. the drug would also be made available for use in emergencies. sierra leone confirmed a
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second new case of ebola this week. the nation was deemed ebola free in november, but officials from the c.d.c. expected potential flare-ups. we have more from atlanta. >> over two years after it began, the ebola outbreak that took over 11,000 lives, the deadliest in recorded history appear to be over in west africa. >> you have to be very clear that although today is an important milestone, it's only a milestone. it is not the end of the ebola response in west africa. >> then last week, tests on a person who died in northern sierra leone proved positive for ebola. >> clearly a sense of disappointment, but also, there was -- i was encouraged to the case was identified from the response happened according to plan. >> dr. morgan from the c.d.c.
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arrived back in atlanta from sierra leone, saying investigators are focusing on the 150 people who came in contact with the woman who died and are working closely with government officials, doctors and border authorities there. the world health organization and c.d.c. warn has more flare-ups are expected. over 4,000 people have died from the ebola virus since the beginning of the outbreak in sierra leone. one of the biggest concerns is the lingering effects that many survivors are experiencing. >> it does appear at this point at least for male survivors, ebola virus can exist in the semen for quite a number of months. >> without a proven vaccine yet, many scientists and c.d.c. say rather than thinking of beginnings and the ends of outbreak there is a need for continuous surveillance for
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ebola in west africa. >> i feel relieved and concerned, also. i would be afraid for the future, because the system remains weak. >> the c.d.c. said small clusters of the virus are inevitable and expected but outbreaks are unpreventable in south africa. back to the weather now. we've been talking about that major nor'easter, but gulf coast i guess getting slammed already. >> the east coast is getting a lot of the attention because that will be the core of the wind and snow especially come this weekend, but this system is already causing problems. it's this bundle that's been pulling out of the rockies, not that oh snow that moved southwest of the great lakes yesterday. as this continue to say develop, not only snow, but areas of rain and thunderstorm are kirking up today. in terms of the snow side of this already, we had winter
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storm warnings from kansas all the way toward thallations and then the east coast, even into oklahoma this morning, some freezing fog areas. there's definitely slick spots with all of this. i've seen know reports as far north as south dakota and far south as arkansas already. you can see the heaviest stuff, five to six inches to get some of that and we're not used to driving in that or dealing with it in this area. on the southern side, showers and thunderstorms start to go ping up. i'm especially concerned through the course of the day right along the gulf coast, mississippi, louisiana, we could have tornadoes. i wouldn't be surprised to see that along with wind and hail. we have to watch all that, as well and a new system pushing on to the northwest could be heavy rain between today and tomorrow. some places could get up to a half foot of rain, so we have a lot to watch besides the big snowstorm. >> a very active weather day across the country.
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there is new evidence that climate change is real. government scientists finding that 2015 was the warmest year on record. al jazeera's jacob ward has more on the extreme weather expected if the planet continues to get warmer. >> millions of acres of forest land burned to a crisp, rain so severe bridges and roads were washed away. billions of dollars in damage. these are just a few of the effect of strange and severe weather in the u.s. and around the world last year. 2015 was the warmest year on record by a sizeable amount. >> 2015 set a terrible new standard for the planet, shatters records, warmer than 2014 which had been the hottest year on record. >> if you go back to 1880, you notice that 15 of the 16 warmest have all occurred since 2000.
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this tells you something's happening. it tells you the climate is warming and this is due to the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. >> the united states was hit especially hard. according to nooa, it was at the third wettest year since record keeping began. hotter temperatures are causing havoc around the world. last year, the first hurricane made landfall in yemen. there was a heatwave that saw temperatures above 48 degrees celsius or 118 degrees fahrenheit. hong kong so you its hottest on record. >> using ice core data, at
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certain times it was colder and at other times, it was not as warm, but we are at one of the warmest periods for the past one or 2 million years right now. >> el niño may be partly to blame for balmy temperature it is in december. the weather pattern is moving heat from the oceans into the air. >> it definitely affect weather patterns globally through more extreme weather events, as the atmosphere warms, the atmosphere can hold more water vapor. this is why we are seeing a greater frequency of heavier rains and snowfalls. >> the question now is whether 2016 will break records again. jacob ward, al jazeera, san francisco. straight ahead, a football first. >> buffalo bills are making history with its newest coach. take a look. going beyond pluto, the stunning new discovery in space.
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los angeles seems to be fueling in love with its new nfl
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team. the rams have collected more than 45,000 season ticket deposits in two days. the refundable deposits entitle fans to a spot in a virtual waiting line to purchase tickets. the rams returned to l.a. after spending 25 years in st. louis. >> i was a kid when the rams which last in l.a. >> so was i. >> not so. catherine smith will be a special teams quality control coach in the nhl, the first woman to get a full time coaching job with an nfl team. she served at administrative assistant to rex ryan. ryan applauded the hiring saying she has proven she's ready for the next step, so i'm proud and excited for her for this next opportunity. new models and computer simulations afocal tech suggest there is a previously unknown planet lurking behind pluto.
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scientists haven't seen it yet, can't confirm it exists. they believe little about the size of neptune and or bits the sun every 15,000 years. it was explained to us by the planet hadn't been previously detected. >> it's made out of hydrogen and helium, lighter than anything on earth. size wise, it might be only twice the diameter of earth, so it's actually pretty small. this thing probably evolved if it exists, much closer into the sun and then gently spiraled out over the four and a half billion year lifetime of the solar system. not surprising that it hasn't been seen so far. >> researchers neat an infrared telescope to detect the planet. it could be years if we know for certain if planet nine exists.
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the next saga in the star wars saga has been delayed. it was originally schedule would to open in may of 2017. disney saying it won't open until december of 2017. no reason for the delay. that spinoff is due out in december of this year. the politics of faith, trying to win over the evangelicals in the republican race but are the canned daylights being hypocritical about their own values. europe has weeks to solve its refugee crisis or clamp down on its borders. we are back in two minutes. we'll see you then. >> i lived that character. >> go one on one with america's movers and shakers. >> we will be able to see change. >> gripping... inspiring... entertaining. no topic off limits. >> 'cause i'm like, "dad, there are hookers in this house". >> exclusive conversations you
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won't find anywhere else. >> these are very vivid, human stories. >> if you have an agenda with people, you sometimes don't see the truth. >> "talk to al jazeera". monday, 6:00 eastern. only on al jazeera america.
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a global slide, the price of oil plummets and stocks follow suit. there is worry of a worldwide disaster. i think he was sick, a sociopath. i think he's a serial rapist. >> a former oklahoma city police officer set to be sentenced for saul women while on duty. heading to court, detroit's public schools file suit against teachers after days of sickouts keep classrooms closed. poisoned by the state, british investigators blame
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russia for killing a former spy and say vladimir putin probably gave the go ahead. welcome. stocks here in the u.s. seem poised for another rough ride today as the on going fears over the falling price of oil and fall stock price in china, the central bank leaving interest rates unchanged. it was another bad day for stocks in asia. in japan, hong kong, mainland china and south korea, patricia sobga joins us now. how much are the declining oil prices contributing to this global market turmoil? >> this has been a major major
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drag, a huge drag, but it's nothing new. we have known for over a year that there is an oversupply of oil. we have known opec has been keeping the taps open fill tilt and continues to pump more oil into that glutted market. really, the problem now is that there seems to be no relief in sight, because iran is now going to be pumping an additional 500,000-barrels of oil a day. that's their plan, already into this market. there's no real compelling evidence that we're suddenly going to see an increase in demand, an increase in demand for oil would raise the price but with the global economy slowing, that's unlikely. the only way to get oil prices up is to cut output and that's unlike lie. you'd have a get saudi arabia and iran to agree and they are bitter rivals. you'd have to get no one opec producers like russia onboard, as well. >> you get whiplash watching the
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markets. are bargain hunters out there? are we seeing the bottom of the market? >> i'm not going to call where the market's going to go today. yesterday was a good sign. it hit the bottom and clearly you saw investors who saw a buying opportunity who moved in. that means what we call the dreaded c. word, company pitlation, wall street's word for panic. >> what about the b. word? because we heard china's market described as bearish, seeing other global markets in bear market territory, the u.s. has so far avoided that, but how long can that last. >> the u.s. is in correction territory, but not bear market. bear market is 20% below our highs. there are some in bear market, so definitely around the globe market are experiencing where the b. word absolutely applies.
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>> what about the e.c.b. word, the european central bank? >> they will keep rates unchanged. you saw a little pop on that, maybe because investors are seeing that there is not panic. they are going to be watching closely the statement and words to get an idea of where things might head in march. >> we don't panic because we have you to talk to. patty, thank you very much. a former oklahoma city police officer is due in court in a few hours. he was found guilty of sexually assaulting women while on duty. his lawyers filed a last minute request for a new trial. al jazeera's heidi zhou castro is live in oklahoma city. good morning. is there any possibility that he could be granted a new hearing? >> we may find out about that before today's sentencing hearing. this motion for a new trial rests on a facebook post made by
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a police detective after he was found guilty, according to the court documents, the detective wrote there had been additional accusers come forward that police had determined to be "liars." the defense in its motion claims that the oklahoma city police department while investigating one of its own had led victims into their version of events to confirm their suspicion of guilty. his sentencing is scheduled for today. a jury recommended he serve 263 years in prison. meanwhile, the community he was found guilty of terrorizing i is still reeling. >> i should be locked up. >> in a neighborhood where former city police officers found his victims, there's a sense of both anticipation and fear. >> he makes me feel uncomfortable. >> don't know who to trust. >> he patrolled in search of vulnerable african-american women with history of drugs or
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prostitution to sexually assault. >> i think he's sick. i think he's a sociopath, a serial rapist. >> 13 accusers came forward, including a grandmother who he pulled over at this intersection, then attacked in his squad car. a 17-year-old girl was raped on her mother's front porch. he was convicted of 18 sexual offenses. >> these attacks happened over the course of at least six months while this officer was on duty. how could that have happened under this department's nose? >> it's not something that you see all the time. in 20 years of law enforcement i've never seen that. >> it was clueless to halt the crimes until the allegations surfaced. then the department stripped him of his badge, put him on leave and 17 months later fired him.
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>> does this department accept any responsibility for what he was able to do while on duty? >> we're absolutely appalled and sorry that it occurred. once again, if we could go back and change the past, we would. this individual had nothing, no flags in his file, no history that this had occurred. >> oklahoma city police say no new policies resulted from the case, however the department has fast tracked a code camera program that was already in progress. those cameras hit the street friday, though they are not required to run at all times and officers will still patrol alone. >> more has to be done. tighter monitoring, a no tolerance sexual assault police procedure has to be in effect. >> investigators say he may have had more victim who even today are too afraid to come forward. here on the streets, where the officer hunted his prey, the sight of a police car still
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causes unease. >> the oklahoma city police department has supervisors who oversee the streets, four to seven officers at a time. that has not changed since holtzclaw. >> how is the police department working to bring confidence back to the city especially to the women of that city. >> sure, the department says it has done a very thorough investigation of holtzclaw. most victims who testified against him were discovered by police, it wasn't the victims going to police. however, there was a community meeting last night at which tense questions were still thrown at this police chief and it's going to take a lot of work to regain community trust. >> heidi zhou castro reporting from oklahoma city this morning, thank you. >> we're getting a better sense of the confusion at the start of the flint water crisis. michigan governor rick snyder
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releasing emails, some of them showing his top staff were unsure about who was responsible for cleaning up the mess in the first place, including this one that said the real responsibility rests with the county and k.w.a. the president was promising support for flint but didn't go to flint. >> all the people of flint as they work their way through this terrible tragedy. it is a reminder of why you captain short change basic services that we provide to our people and that we together provide as a government to make sure that public health and safety is preserved. >> the president tapped an assistant secretary of health and human services to lead the government's response in flint but many are upset that the president didn't make that side
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trip to see the water crisis firsthand, just 70 miles away. earlier on your world this morning i asked environmental activist emma lodge ridge about that decision. >> the consensus among my friends is we'd rather you go there and just let people know how much you care, give them that sense that things will be ok. i would have prefer that had, actually. >> you're being very polite, but let me ask the question this way. if this had been president george w. bush and some are saying what is happening in speed limit is this governor's katrina, do you think people in your circumstances, your relatives would have had the same poll light response or been just down right angry. >> absolutely not. they would have been really angry and upset, like why didn't you come here? we're sitting here and in fact, when i was on social media yesterday, i saw that from quite a few of my friends. people were very upset, saying
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why in the heck is he driving around detroit, you know, eating pizza and carrying on when the people there can't drink water? i do think that because he is a black president and he's so adored that he sort of got a pass yesterday, but the bottom line is even if he couldn't make it there, i think it would have been wonderful and symbolic to bring a van load of people from flint, brought people in to meet with him that morning in a private meeting that they tell cast and let him talk occupy within own. you have to make the connection, let the people of flint know that the person whos in charge of everything is there and he does really have your back and let him say it to you face-to-face and not through a t.v. camera. >> the flint residents have been
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complaining about foul odor, headaches and rashes. they still can't drink the water from the top. detroit public schools are open a day after teachers staged a mass sickout forcing most schools to close. the district is using its facebook page to keep parents and students informed. a judge was asked to force them back into the classroom. we have more on the reasons behind the teachers' actions. >> the doors were locked at roberto clemente learning academy in detroit wednesday as teachers from that school and 87 others called in sick so they could march outside the international auto show where president obama was visiting. this was the teachers' latest effort to draw attention to what they say are impossible working conditions in their debt-ridden school district. >> we have overcrowded classes, don't have enough teachers that offer all the classes students need. >> they knew the conditions of
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the school. they just didn't know we were going to tell on them. >> we're seeing damage from the roof. >> the american federation of teachers posted this video on you tube showing how rain water damage add ceiling and caused a floor in one school gymnasium to warp. teachers in the video complained about classrooms with too many kids and not enough supplies. >> i teach first grade, and i don't have reading bookings. >> the detroit federation of teachers say money problems and a resolving door of emergency managers are why so many members are so frustrated. >> the school district is struggling over a $500 million deficit caused by a drop in property tax revenue and cuts in state and federal aid. that's wipe the district has struggled to maintain schools and keep teachers, but the interim penalty of the detroit federation of teachers say the district is turning a blind eye to the problems in its schools. >> they need to make education
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in the city of detroit priority one. >> they haven't done that? >> no, it has to be a priority. this is not happening to any other school district in the state of michigan. >> the legislature is considering a plan to create a second school district that would take control of the schools and pay down debt. in his state of the state speech tuesday night, governor rick snyder said the legislature needs to act soon. >> detroit schools are in a crisis. the detroit schools are in need of a transformational change. >> the emergency manager of detroit public schools said if help doesn't come by april, the district will be insolvent. >> we are talking the lives of students and families and communities. these things are very critical to the long term survivability of any city or any community, so let's just say that we're at a point now where we believe it can be fixed, but we need the legislature to do that. >> darnell early couldn't say
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what might happen if the state fails to act. the teachers fear it could mean even fewer teachers and even tougher learning environment for detroit said children. let's talk about the weather. millions up and down the east coast bracing for that major winter storm, washington, d.c. getting light snowfall overnight cause this, a traffic nightmare. nothing compared to what nation's capital is supposed to get, looking at 30 inches of snow. the storm is going to move up the east coast over the weekend, a number of storms and blizzard warnings out already in effect. let's bring in nicole mitchell. >> the 30 inches is possible in isolated spots, widespread a foot and a half up to two feet. this is a system now, this has caused problems in the west, now pulling out into the central united states. mississippi have both a chance for tornadoes today and snow.
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so this his causing a lot of problems. i'll talk more about that coming up. you can see some of this developing through the course of today. tomorrow as this lifts towards the coastline, eventually pulling off the coast, developing into a nor'easter and continuing to intensify, the east coast is getting much attention because this is really where the brunt of the storm is going to be. wrap around winds, cold winds, high winds, 50 to 60 miles an hour not out of the question plus all of that snow, it's the mid atlantic that gets the most. the places in the brighter purplion are the places it could get a foot and a half or more and some isolated spots over tww york, it's probably more eight to 12 inches. by the time we get to boston, maybe only three or four. we have the wind coming in as i mentioned as all of this develops. you put that into motion, we go from relatively lighter winds
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now. the core, the closer you get to the coastline, the more impressive winds are. someone was asking me about flying out saturday, saturday for a lot of the coast is going to be the worst day. you'll have the snow all right blowing around or getting the new areas of snow. trying to get anywhere is going to be really really problematic through saturday, because of those factors. also because of those factors, not only do we see widespread winter storm advisories, watches, warnings, but have the brighter greens out there, places like long island and parts of new jersey and d.c. baltimore, that entire area under blizzard watches. what you need for a blizzard is that combination of the snow coming down heavy and the high winds visibility really reduced. >> the silver lining really is that it's happening on the end of the week and not on a monday morning. >> it's not going to shut down our big cities. >> the models seem to agree on this one, right? >> yeah, this is going to be a
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heavy storm. >> a hilt ordered at the highest levels. >> a british judge saying if vladimir putin may have approved the killing of a russian dissident. >> new technology at the airports, concern that changes are not keeping pace with security needs.
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defense secretary tear ash carter is spending another day in france. he talked to french military cadets about the role they'll play in the fight to destroy isil. >> our strikes are dismantling is as i will finances, targeting its oil production, its industrial base. together, we will continue these
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operations as part of the overall effort to degrade its financing. throughout iraq and syria, we are significantly constraining isil's ability either to defend or attack. >> french president today saying airstrikes against isil will accelerate in the coming months. russian president vladimir putin is implicated this morning in the poisoning death of a former spy. alexander have itian co defected to britain. moscow refuses to extradite the two accused of poisoning him. big accusations from this british judge today. what is it the judge believed putin did and what there been any reaction from the kremlin
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>> it is probable it must have had the green light given to it by vladimir putin himself. the report is that the method of murder, balloon yum 210, a highly specialized rare radioactive substance suggest this had state involvement. it's not the kind of material that your average street tough, street hitman would be able to get their hands on.
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as to reaction so far, there has been reaction from other sources, the ministry of for the purpose affairs but not the premier so far. >> what was litvinenko's widow's reaction to the finding? >> she has been campaigning for this inquiry for a number of years ever since the murder in 2006. she's pretty happy that it has actually happened now, and has broadly supported her own accusations. she would like there to be various sanctions left against the russian government and for agents inside the u.k. to be kicked out. let's listen to what she said earlier today. >> i'm of course very pleased that the words my husband spoke on his death bed when he accused
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mr. putin of his murder have been proved through an english court with standards of independence and fairness. >> now to what happens next particularly rewarding the two men accused of the murder, one is actually a deputy inside the russian parliament now, so will they face trial in the u.k. or russia? russia says they are not going to be extra dated, there is no chance of prosecution of them inside russia, either, so not going to happen. >> not the accountability his widow was looking for. thank you. the top u.s. general saying russian airstrikes in syria are helping keep bashar al assad in power. joint chiefs chair general joseph dunford saying airstrikes have given the assad forces more stability, giving him a stronger hand during peace talks next week. pakistan is holding a
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national day of mourning after a university attack. there were two dozen victims in northwest pakistan. the military has identified some of the gunmen. we have more. >> if you ask the common citizens of this country whether they feel safe or not, they will tell you a big no. that is primarily because the security is always provided to the politicians and country's leadership. the people of this country are vulnerable, the education institutions of vulnerable and despite claims from the government that they have been able to enforce strict water tight security, you can see the evidence that the attackers were able to figure out this soft target. >> every day being a parent, i am worried and concerned about my own kids, when they are going to school and i'm always looking toward my phone when there will be a call, god forbid, bad news
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from the school. >> little virtually impossible to be able to give security to the level that is required. the big problem also emanates from the fact that the taliban, pakistan fighters are now finding sanction in afghanistan from where they can operate with impunity. they have logistic and economic support and above all also have local support within this province and across the country where they have facilitators. pakistan intelligence agencies and the military spokesman is saying that they had credible information. they were able to monitor the telephone calls of these attackers and they were all traced to afghanistan. >> reporting from pakistan. it was little more than a year ago that a taliban link opened fire on school children in peshawar. 150 people were killed there, 144 of them children. when we come back, europe at
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a crossroads. >> leaders forced to consider closing their once open borders. we're going to talk about faith on the campaign trail, donald trump's strategy to win votes from evangelical, is it hypocritical.
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welcome back to your world this morning. time to take a look at today's top stories. worldwide, the stocks in the middle of another bad day. modest gains across asia and europe early on were wiped out at the close. futures here in the u.s. are mixed after the single worst day on the dow since 2015. a former oklahoma city police officer will go sentenced today for sexually assaulting women while on duty. he filed a last minute request for new trial. the jury recommended 263 years in prison. michigan governor asking president obama to declare a major disaster in flint, freeing up $100 million in aid instead of the $5 million that is being given to the city right now.
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the president going to detroit yesterday, but didn't go to flint, where the water is still undrinkable. the refugee crisis has become the focus of the annual world economic forum in davos today. there is a call for an overhaul of e.u.'s policies. we are live in davos. this is an economic forum. has refugees and that issue become a priority there? >> i wouldn't go so far as to say a priority, but it's very much on the agenda. hate to be, it's an economic issue. you look at what's happening in europe at the moment and the pressure that it's putting on so many different countries and of course the refugees and migrants themselves and it is simply an economic issue. there is so much discussed here at the world economic forum that goes beyond economic. there's a massive cue for a talk about jobs at the moment. we have been talking about
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refugees, heard from politicians talks about it. the o. of the amnesty international who was very eloquent and put it into perspective for us about how big the problem is and why countries all over the world need to act. have a listen. >> it's a crisis of historic proportions. we've never seen anything like this and i think there is a conscious of this reality, 16 million plus displaced in the world over 20 million refugees. if you don't ask this question, without human rights, you're not going to are prosperity or peace. there's no, you know, serious business leader who doesn't understand this, but the reason we come to davos is to remind people of the human rights obligation and the risk to businesses and societies if they don't ask these basic questions. >> they all have the same
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message that they need to get in here and talk to the people. this is a huge networking event. they've got to get some face time with people and make sure that the issues of refugees stays high on the agenda when everyone else is talking about oil and economic throwdown. >> i understand on the dutch policies, what do the butch p.m.'s say about refugees and what other activities focus are happening at davos today? >> this is what we've been hearing from politicians, the dutch prime minister. he said we've got six to eight weeks to get this under control and when he talking about this thing, he means the schengen zone, and dublin agreement, the instrument which means people have to seek asylum in the country they arrive in, so of course all of that pressure goes on southern europe. we've got to get these things sorted. why six to eight weeks? because it's cold right now, very cold, i'm glad i'm inside
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at the moment. it will start getting warmer in six to eight weeks time and it will all start again, the volume will increase and they have to find a way to deal with it before that in flux goes on. i've spoken to the swedish prime minister. he talked about they were very open, wanted people to come in, they were being as generous as they could. they had to close the borders because the country couldn't cope and so many political pressures on leadership. refugees, we're talking about it today. it's a lot of talk but as the dutch prime minister said, the clock is ticking six oh to eight weeks before the influx starts again. >> thank you. refugees a hot topic in washington. senate democrats stopping the bill that would have kept iraqis and syrians from persecution out of this country. lisa stark has more. >> supporters of the bill which
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was proposed after the paris attacks said it would help prevent americans from terrorist attacks. now syrian and iraqi reef gees are already vetted before they come to the united states, but this would have made that process much more stringent. it would have required for example the head of homeland security, the f.b.i. and national intelligence to sign off on each refugee, that each refugee was not a threat. here's one of the bill supporters. >> what this legislation is about, though, is about national security, people who are refugees, whether they're adequately vetted by the appropriate authorities before they come to the united states and live. this is not about banning refugees. it simply is not. >> many democrats deannounced the legislation, saying republicans were declaring a war on refugees. here's senator dick durbin. >> our war is not with syrian refugees, but with isil and terrorists and those using this
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countries freedoms to kill in sent people. to turn the back on these refugees is so wrong. the bill sounds innocuous, a pause, give me a break. read it! >> i it was a procedural vote to begin debate. they did not get it. democrats wanted to turn this into a slop on donald trump. they said we'll vote to advance the bill if you would vote on an amendment to denounce trump. the republicans were not going to go for that. immigration and security a very hot topic on the campaign trail, and three republican candidates actually left their campaigning to come cast a vote. marco rubio, ted cruz, and rand paul. the democratic senator bernie sanders stayed on the campaign trail. he was not at the senate today. of course we know how he would have voted. he would have voted against this refugee bill.
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back to you. >> lisa tells us of the 4 million syrian refugees in the word taken in so far, the u.s. taking in fewer than 1,000 so far. the political debate, much migration here has focused on the people coming in covertly. >> nearly half the undocumented immigrants got here on a temporary visa and stayed after those visas expired. we have more on what's being done. >> the u.s. may have a problem with foreigners overstaying their welcome. a new report from the department of homeland security says nearly half a million people remained in the country last year after their temporary visas expired.
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>> this report articulates the foundation to build the biometric system upon. >> that system is now in place at j.f.k. airport, checking foreign nationals arriving under the visa waiver program and randomly checks u.s. citizens to check faces against their passports, but losing track of a half mommy visa holders had officials responsible for border protection on the spot in front of a senate committee. >> you're in charge of doing an exit, visa exit system for the united states of america. >> homeland security officials drew harsh questioning for the department inability to implement nationwide biometric screenings. >> it's been required for 20 years. it is not in place. >> d.h.s. had planned to develop options for a biometric exit and report to congress regarding benefits and costs in time for the fiscal year 2015 budget cycle. d.h.s. did not meet that time frame. >> you've been trying to figure out where to put the equipment, is that right? >> it's a matter of incorporating into the departure process so we don't create gridlock. >> how long does it take you to decide that?
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can you decide it next week? >> we can't compel space at the airports. >> a big problem is that unlike many other countries, u.s. airports don't mandate that all international flights take off from a specific designated space. >> you have a couple of thousand departure gates in the united states, so unless you want to restructure the airports and rebuild them to support this like other airports around the world have this, you have to look at a solution. you can multiply by over 2,000 to put in that time sensitive environment. >> most immigrants do come to the u.s. legally. the number of so-called visa overstays is about 1% of the 45 million people who came to this country last year. >> back to the facial recognition thing, has the government tried it anywhere else beside j.f.k. airport? >> they have. customs and border tried the technology at dulles airport
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last year. they say later this year, did you mean less will get tested again as will a land border crossing in california, so slowly but surely. 10 days to go until the iowa caucuses, donald trump and ted cruz are neck and neck. trump hopes support from sarah palin will give him a boost. she was on the campaign trail for trump in oklahoma, speck at a christian college and rallying the crowd. >> there are some others who no in steady of wanting to talk about the tough issues, they wear political correctness like a suicide vest. >> trump that avoided answering whether he would ask palin to be his running mate, saying he hasn't thought about a vice president yet. there's a new poll that shows donald trump leading in new hampshire three weeks before the primary there. senator ted cruz is up eight points but trails trump by a
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wide margin, only 31% of new hampshire voters have made up their minds on who they will vote for. >> i was looking on line, in the bible, i was a staining stranger and you invited me in, i need clothes and you clothed me. yesterday you have a republican front runner who says ban all muslims coming into the u.s. even though most of fleeing persian accusation. >> yeah, the bible exhorts is to welcome our neighbor and ask who is our neighbor, it ends up being anybody in need. that's what the scriptures encourage us to do. for those who of believers and contributions, our challenge is to love everybody, to hate nobody, to help people who need help, and to consider those who
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need help as our neighbors. >> when we talk about courting this evangelical vote, the bible saying judge not lest you be judge, but donald trump has been married three times, sarah palin is a grandmother of two out of wedlock children, her son recently arrested on domestic violence charges, and yet they're the darlings of evangelicals. a lot of people say that is hypocritical. >> certainly the american electorate has become much more understanding in the last maybe 50 years of candidates running for the presidency. there was a time 50 years ago when it would have been unthinkable for a candidate to be running for the presidency and to have been divorced once even. ronald reagan was divorced and that ended up not being a problem. he ended up winning the presidency in 1980. for the most part, american voters have been very, very for giving that canned gates running for the presidency. you have donald trump who in
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this case has been married three times, sarah palin of course has two out of wedlock children. i think for a lot of the voters, the issue becomes what the bible says with regards to judgment, and there's a line that says judge not that you be not judged. christians are encouraged not to judge other people too marshy so they themselves aren't judged too marshy. i think for a lot of evangelical voters, they're looking at not who they are going to elect to be their next pastor, but their next president. they're not being too terribly hard on them. >> there are critics of those critics who say that the tea party is just a fancy name for people who are race i have the who want to ban muslims and hispanics and hate the president just because he is an african-american. are they right or are they wrong? >> our country has a distance to travel and the republican party, the party that i'm a part of has a distance to travel to make sure that nobody believed that about us. of course there are people in
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both parties who may harbor racist thoughts and who may have thought patterns that aren't consistent with what the mainstream parties believe, but we've got a lot of work to do to help people really love each other and to understand each other and to celebrate the fact that we are diverse, that we do come from different ethnic backgrounds and religious backgrounds and yet we can still be americans and love each other. for those who are incoming, the same is true, because all of us come from someplace else. this is a country full of immigrants. the idea is to continue to be welcoming to people who come from other place and love them as we love each other. >> i want to get your reaction to these two sound bites because of the language on the campaign trail. >> two corinthians, right, 317 that's the whole ballgame. where the spirit of the lord is,
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there is liberty and here there is liberty college, but it is so true. when you think, and that's really -- is that the one? is that the one you like? i think that's the one you like. >> take a listen to this one. >> how refreshing, he is perfectly positioned to let you make america great again. are you ready for that, iowa? no more pussy footing around. >> i want a general where we knock the hell out of him. >> if any christian pastor used that lounge r. language from the pulpit on sunday, how long would it take for the decons to pull them aside and do you think the christian evangelical vote is being taken advantage of or pandered to? >> candidates say what they need to be elected, you're liable to
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hear anything coming from candidates at this juncture because the race is so fluid and we're a couple weeks away from iowa caulk uses and of course new hampshire and south carolina. i think evangelical voters are very, very smart. they can only vote from the folks that are actually listed as candidates, so they've got to choose from among those folks who would best be the person to carry them forward. you are going to hear folks saying things to win the vote of evangelical voters, but i think voters are smart people. they are for giving people. they are not too terribly judge mental but are looking for a commander-in-chief going forward. it's going to be interesting. del, it's not over. a lot of as you said, voters have not made up their minds, so the race is very fluid. >> thank you very much. severe weather is hitting the midwest and south today. >> the snow and rain is falling
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on cities up and down the east coast, most of them bracing for major snow. it was a late start to winter after the hottest year on record. the lasting effects of climate change.
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there are blizzard watches across parts of the east coast this morning, but this is not the only one in the path of the storms. let's bring in a very busy meteorologist, nicole mitchell. >> we've had a lot going on this week and the system we are
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watching now. it's the system pulling out of the rockies, you can see this into the midwest. this is causing problems today for the midwest, the south and another system off on the west coast. in addition to all the snow that we've been talking about through the east coast and some places could get over two feet, significant, even winter storm warning as far south at mississippi. you talk mississippi, if it's four, five, six inches, that is a significant snowfall. south of that, that's the northern part of the state, the southern part could have tornadoes today. we have snow reports from south dakota into arkansas with this system. some places, you're more used to that snow, but it gets farther south and we are not. the severe side of this especially along the gulf coast, louisiana through about alabama, watch that very closely. it does include a risk for tornadoes through today. this is just a very potent system. then on the other side of the
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country, another system now pushing on to the west coast, already seeing rain especially into washington state. between today and tomorrow, this spreads from northern california with three or four inches of rain to washington, could get a half foot of rape between the next couple days, higher elevations, that is snow, so a lot going on. as this system continues to develop, that is all the snow cranks up more for the coastline, you'll start to see it tomorrow, but really the whipped and snow and saturday is going to be really, really difficult. >> rent rules of movies. new evidence on climate change. government scientists found 2015 was the warmest year on record. al jazeera has more on the impact. >> millions of acres of forest land burned to a crisp. rain so severe bridges and roads were washed away. billions of dollars in damage. these are just a few of the effect of strange and severe
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weather in the u.s. and around the world last year. >> the 2015 was the warmest year on record by a sizeable amount. >> 2015 set a terrible new standard for the planet. shattering records. warmer, even than 2014, which had been the hottest year on record. >> if you look at the as follows temperature record, which goes back to 1880, you notice that 15 of the 16 warmest years have all occurred since 2000. this tells you something's happening. it tells you that climate is warming and this is due to the accumulation of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. >> the united states was hit especially hard. according to nooa, 2015 was the country's second warm evident year and its third wettest year since record keeping began. hotter temperatures are causinging havoc around the
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world. last year, the first hurricane storm made landfall in yemen in recorded history. india lost 2,000 people dead in a heatwave between may and june that saw temperatures above 48 degrees celsius or 118 degrees fahrenheit. there was no relief in hong kong. it saw its hottest june to august period on record. >> it's not natural when you go back and study the pale yo climate of the earth usingation core data. at certain times it was colder and other times not as warm, bull we are at one of the warm evident periods for the past one or 2 million years right now. >> el niño may be partly to blame for balmy temperatures in december. the weather pattern moving heat from the oceans into the air. >> it definitely affects weather patterns globally through more extreme weather events. as the atmosphere warms, it can hold more water vapor.
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this is why we are seeing heavier rains and snowfalls. >> the question now is whether 2016 will break records again. jacob word, al jazeera, san francisco. hidden in plain sight. >> scientists think they have found a gnomon net, but they are just not sure. lending a hand, a tennis champ stopping his match to help out. rare diseases. >> as scientists we'd be fighting a losing battle against mosquitos. >> they'd kill one person every 12 seconds. >> just like that, i might have genetically modified a mosquito. >> it's like a video game with genes. >> this is what innovation looks like. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow, where technology meets humanity. only on al jazeera america.
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scientists say there may be a ninth planet in our solar system, suggesting there was a once unknown planet behind pluto. they can't see it and canned confirm it exists but believe it orbits the sun every tin thousand years. space reporter explaining why it hasn't been detected so far. >> it isn't that large. it's made out of hydrogen and helium. size wise, it might only be twice the diameter of earth, so actually is pretty small. also, the way that we think planet's revolve this probably evolved much close closer into n and spiraled out. >> research hers needed and
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infrared telescope to detect the planet. it could take years before we know if it exists. the buffalo bills hired a woman as a full time coach, a quality control coach, she issues the first woman to get a full time coaching job with an nfl team. she served as the administrative assistant to head coach rex ryan. she spent 12 years with the jets. ryan applauded the hiring saying she that proven that she is ready for the next step so i am excited and proud for her. los angeles is falling in love with its new nfl team. the rams collected more than 45,000 season ticket deposits in two days. they entitle fans to a spot in a virtual waiting line to purchase up to eight season tickets appease. the rams returned to l.a. later this year after spending 21 years in st. louis. the australian open showing it doesn't just showcase the better tennis players, but
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sportsmanship at its best. >> a match was posed to help a ball girl who was hit in the face. she was getting a little teary. >> he wrapped his arms around her and they walked off arm-in-arm. that ball girl is expected to be ok. >> it's so nice so his something like that when we talk about poor ports manship, you forget these are heroes and they do the right thing. >> and ball girls are people, too. a lot of people thought it was the heat, but annual 80 degrees, the face that she got hit in the face with the ball was the reason she had the problems. your world this morning is back tomorrow at 7:00 a.m. eastern. we'll take a look at the state of japan's nuclear plant. it has been five years since a tsunami led to a twin disaster there. >> another rough days overseas
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in the markets, u.s. markets preparing for the same. we'll see you back here tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. have a great day. a british judge says vladimir putin probably approved the murder in london of alexander litvinenko. you're watching al jazeera live from our headquarters in doha. also coming up, a rebel commander stands trial, accused of war crimes in uganda. anger rises in tunisia over a shortage of jobs pitting protestors against police. pregnant woman are treated in chairs in hospitals as the health crisis worsens in brazil.

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