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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  January 22, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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♪ states of emergency, tens of millions along the east coast bracing for a major nor'easter already causing problems down south. epa in flint and forces out a top official. north korea and american student arrested accused of committing a hostile act against the state. and nearly two dozen people dead as al-shabab fighters attack a popular restaurant in somalia. ♪ the eastern sea board is bracing today for a blizzard that could
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dump two feet of snow in areas and the men answering storm system caused apossible tornado in mississippi with significant damage to homes and power line answer s and welcome to your world and i'm stephanie sy. >> and i'm del walters and they are getting ready and shopping for essentials to get through the storm and five days and the district of columbia already declaring a state of emergency, so far this morning take a look at this more than 2000 flights up and down the east coast already cancelled. >> we are seeing the everything line up for a major storm system affecting the eastern third of the country and affecting at least 50 million people with heavy snow and cold temperatures and very strong winds which are dangerous situations. >> reporter: robert ray is live in char let, north carolina where ice is a big fear, robert have you seen any of that ice yet? >> i have nothing. hey, del good morning for you
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from charlotte, north carolina. you can see the streets here are starting to fill up with some snow. ice is expected up to one inch throughout the day, that is the big issue. but as of right now i mean this city is quite prepared. they have shut down the schools already and vehicles are moving through the roads downtown charlotte and bus services are still running here fortunately. the snow is coming down. you can't quite see it at this point but it's slushy and not horrible right now but remember this is supposed to last all day long into saturday and even the big nfl playoff game on sunday, they put a complete tarp over the field and they decided they have cancelled the pep rally that was later today in preparation for it but people are okay, they are hunkering down here and this is just the beginning, this started just a few hours here ago, del. >> okay, robert ray live for us in charlotte, thank you robert.
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there are a lot of problems as the storm starts to hit places, we are already see that conditions are getting worse and it will continue into this weekend and let's bring in metrologist nicole mitchell on what to expect nicole. >> a potent storm system already causing problems as it moved really all the way from the west coast and had days of rain and snow because of this system. here is where it is right now. we were just talking to robert in charlotte and while he said he wasn't quite seeing it yet i looked at the airport report there and already reporting some freezing rain so there is a dividing line. a lot of this right now is rain but even yesterday somewhere like mississippi where we had the possible tornado and i think it was, i looked at some of the damage issues anomaly get in there and confirm it and you have the tornadoic and severe activity in the south of the state and snow in the northern part of the state and really unprecedented in terms of all the things we have going on. as this continues to move its way across and we will have a
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dividing line again today where we have risk of severe weather and not as strong as yesterday and less of tornado threat, i would say the primary risk today is wind and we will watch for that in places like florida and on the north inside of this you can see all the different watches and warnings but that kind of cuts especially the carolinas a half inch of ice or even more is possible in some cases and that is enough to break down trees. now as we get a little further to the north this is pretty much straight up snow after you get mostly past the carolinas because of the temperatures. so as we look at some of those temperatures like washington d.c. the high right around 31 so that is under the freezing mark, new york the same thing. for the day tomorrow. so straight up snow for a lot of places up the coastline as this continues to move and here is how this moves so pulling up through the day today already by the time we get into the day tomorrow this starts to clear out a little bit more for us and/or the day tomorrow is the heaviest day and the wind and the snow and then by the time we
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get into sunday you can see this clears out pretty quickly so some big improvement but one really messy day especially tomorrow for a lot of the coastline. as we continue on i'll have more on that forecast coming up, but some of those snow totals two feet around dc, not out of the question and winds could gust over 50 miles per hour. >> they had a terrible problem with 1" the other day. >> this is going to be a mess. . flint, michigan the federal government says it's going to step in to help with the city water crisis there, epa issuing emergency order taking over the testing of the waters. on thursday the regular director of epa resigned following allegation the agency did not do enough to fix the problems and president obama says he is going to give michigan $80 million to help repair the infrastructure in flint and al jazeera is live in flint for us right now, andy the house committee saying it wants to hold a hearing on the crisis next month and now washington as we just mentioned
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is getting involved, is that what the people of flint want? >> well yes and no, del. a lot of the folks here are just so worn out from having their lives fundamentally altered crisis and they do want accountability and governor snyder has been called to testify especially reading the e-mails and 2014 when they changed flint's water source from detroit system to the not so pristine flint river a press release sent to governor rick snyder acknowledges the public's concern. even with a proven tract record with perfectly good water for flint there still remains uncertainty about the quality of the water. to reassure the residents of flint the release further states that an expert verifies the water being put out meets all drinking water standards and flint water is safe to drink but
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soon after the switch residents began complaining about the smelly brown water coming out of their taps. in october 2014 in a brief to the governor the michigan department of environmental quality blames the weather for the water troubles. warm weather conditions are not only more conducive to bacterial growth and degrade the water disinfectant residuals and then the blame game begins after children test positive for lead, september 2015 governor chief of staff mush moore saying i can't figure out why the state is responsibility, the real responsibility is with the city, the county and local kwa the local water authority and aids that state firms it could be a political football but since the issue here is the health of citizens and children we are taking a proactive approach. in october of 2015 governor snyder requests daily updateses on the flint water crisis after
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news of filters being distributed and should have come internally with more detail he says, i had press questions last night. only october 18, 2015 director of the state's department of environmental quality acknowledges water testing should have been done from the beginning, our staff believed they were constrained by two consecutive six-month tests, i believe now we made a mistake. one of the last e-mails dated december 29, 2015 from independent task force created by the governor suggests where the blame really lies. we believe the primary responsibility for what happened in flint rests with the michigan department of environmental quality. in his state of the state address on tuesday night 20 months after the water crisis in flint began governor snyder apologizes. >> to you, the people of flint, i say tonight as i have before i'm sorry and i will fix it. >> reporter: well, that $80 million that president obama has now approved to come to flint to
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fix this water crisis is far more than the $5 million he originally called for and it will arrive here they say next week. del. >> andy the epa calling the city's response to the crisis an adequate more finger pointing but does their intervention come too late? >> you know, we just don't know, del really because at this point these kids and these people were drinking this water up words of a year that had higher lead levels so we don't know the affects down the road and folks say it's too late and looking ahead we don't know how long it will take to fix this and some people say up to 15 years to fix this whole problem which means really again another fundamental change that could go on for years for these people. >> and testing even longer than that, andy live in flint, michigan and andy thank you very much and reminder join us tonight for our special report crisis in flint, a water emergency it airs a 7:30 eastern and 4:30 p.m. pacific.
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detained a college student for committing what it calls a hostile act and otto fredic was in north korea for a trip in new year's and detained in pyongyang on the second and he is a student at the university of virginia and two other western citizens are believes to be detained in north korea. 20 dead after attack in somalia and happened at a popular beach front restaurant in mogadishu and mary ann has the latest. >> reporter: daylight in mogadishu reveals the full horror of the attack as the grim task of identifying the dead begins. al-shabab fighters are responsible for the carnage at a popular beach front restaurant. >> intending to go out but heard explosion and gunfire and when i looked back i saw a shooter firing at everybody and i locked myself in a room until we were
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evacuated peacefully by the security forces. >> reporter: awaiting ceremony and a graduation dinner were underway when armed fighters rammed a car packed with explosives into the restaurant. they then stormed the building, shooting at customers. a well-planned attack from an organization which the authorities in somalia and kenya had thought to be struggling and on the defensivdefensive. >> security services even in the west seem to really under state the threat of groups such as al-shabab. they have been very good at planning operations even outside somalia. >> reporter: last friday fighters from the group protect an african union base in southwest somalia and al-shabab said people were killed but they have not confirmed the figure. in april last year al-show bob fighters killed 147 people on an attack at the university college in kenya and in september 2013
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fighters from the group stormed the west gate shopping mall in nairobi killing 67 people. somalia has been devastated by decades of civil unrest. four years ago somalia's government pushed al-shabab out with the help of african union soldiers but attacks like this sow somalia government and supporters still have much more work to do, mary ann with al jazeera. atlanta area police officer is expected to be arrested today for killing an unarmed black man last year, on thursday the grand jury indicted robert olson on aggravated assault and felony murder and shooting and killing 27 anthony hill after responding to a call about a naked man who was behaving er radically and he was airforce vet and family says he struggled with mental health problems. daniel holts claw is
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beginning the first day of 263 year prison term and sentenced for sexually assaulting women in poor communities on duty and heidi joe castro was in the courtroom. >> reporter: showed no emotion as the judge read his sentence but there was a murmur from the audience parked with their victims and supporters followed by tears of joy and relief. >> we stopped the serial rapist with a badge when everybody else had doubts. thank you. >> reporter: former oklahoma police officer daniel holts claw will spend the rest of his life in prison for sexually assaulting eight women all african/american and from a low-income neighborhood where he patrolled. >> i would like to say thank god for those who do believe us and no matter how powerful he was and how vulnerable and hell less we were he had no power to do what was done to us. >> reporter: the attacks happened during a six-month period in 2013 and 2016 while he was on duty.
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a jury convicted him on 18 charges last month. jamie liggins was the last victim and he assaulted the 58-year-old grandmother and daycare worker in the back of his squad car. >> whatever happened to you, no matter who it is tell it, don't let them get away with it, it's not right and it's wrong, a police officer with a badge without a knife is wrong, that is wrong. >> reporter: his previous victims had histories of drug abuse or prostitutions, the state says the officer targeted them believing no one would take the women's word over his. but she had no criminal history and she reported the attack breaking the case. >> a lot of people are calling you a hero, do you feel that way? >> actually i don't but they say i am. i am not a hero and did what i had to do. >> reporter: trying to make amembereds by firing him and investigating the case. >> we are with the community and have proven this. this is a terrible case.
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there is no way of changing that. there is no way of changing what happened to these victims. we can't go back and change the past. >> reporter: those who live in the area he once terrorized are not satisfied and calling for meaningful reform and dispatching officers in teams and overhauling the supervision system that allowed him to slip through have been unanswered. do you feel safe now in that neighborhood? >> safer, not completely and i know he is off the street but to me there may be more because of what happened to me i don't trust any of them right about now. >> reporter: you say today with 100% certainty there are no other officers committing these crimes on your force? >> we have no reason to believe that there are and in there is ever an allegation, if there is ever a case we need to investigate we will do so. >> reporter: with his 263 year sentence he will never again patrol these streets but in these alleys and corners the shadows cast by his crimes still
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loom, heidi in oklahoma city. leader of the armed group occupying a oklahoma refuge is now speaking with the f.b.i. and bundy talked with an f.b.i. anything yapter by phone thursday, he plans to have more conversations today and bundy says he went to the f.b.i. staging area at the municipal airport for a face-to-face meeting but f.b.i. declined the meeting and they occupied the refuge from the second and they called for federal action to end the take over. >> costing the state $100,000 a week. will lgbt rights in louisiana. >> the new governor there promising to protect gay workers in the state and why the protections are just not needed. heading home freed from captivity in iran finally on the last leg of a long journey.
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this morning the washington post reporter recently freed from an iranian prison is heading back to the u.s. >> jason is finishing his medical examinations at the u.s. military hospital in germany, in a statement he said he is feeling fine after spending almost 18 months inside an iran yanukovych jail and freed over the weekend all part of the prisoner swap. another prisoner iran released last week is waking up in michigan this morning, u.s. marine amir-hekmati returned for the first time in four years and was accused of being a spy in 2012 and hekmati said he was glad to be back in flint. >> i love this city, i love the people and happy to be home. it has been a very long road, very long journey, i'm standing here healthy, tall and with my head held high. >> reporter: officials say while he was in prison hekmati
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spent long time in solitary confinement and sleep deprivation and said his military training helped him survive those conditions. myanmar president freeing political prisoners there and dozens are said to be released and happening days before the chi party is set to form its government and we report from bangkok. >> reporter: very difficult to confirm exactly who has been released or indeed how many numbers of political prisoners have been freed or will be freed later on friday but it seems that around 30 have been freed already. the reason it's difficult to confirm is simply communication released out from several different prisons right around the country and it takes some time for ngos to monitor exactly who has been released but the latest we are hearing is around 30 political prisoners have been released and they are among a group of about 100 in total prisoners who have been free
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given amnesty today by the government of myanmar. february first the new parliament will convene and most of those seats in parliament will be filled by the party of chi the national league for democracy that won last year's election comfortably and former generals who ran the country as a military dictatorship for 50 years will now move aside so clearly they want to leave some sort of positive legacy by releasing these political prisoners that they at least helped put this country on the path to some sort of democracy but it has to be remembered that even though we are seeing around 30 political prisoners released today there are still reports of several hundred remaining behind bars so clearly there is still a long way to go. >> and that is wayne reporting from bangkok and u.s. calling on the outgoing government there to release those political prisoners, asian stocks ending on a high note and index posting more than 1% gains and japan
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storing 6% on the heels of thursday's market by the stocks and doe closing up 116 points and now they are up more than 1% and thursday's rise in oil prices is getting the credit and oil prices almost $30 a barrel. >> still very low and despite thursday's doubts analysts expect oil will remain cheap nor the foreseeable future because there is a glut in supply and john explains where all the oil is coming from. [bell ringing] doe closed up 115 points after a wild ride the day before as in previous days since the new oil talk dominated and it was $30 and the biggest relief in three moves but crude has not found the floor and the problem is the world is a wash with oil. china a key commodity consumer is going through a slow down in its industrial sector and needs
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far less oil than anticipated. add to that the lack luster recovery at home and u.s. needs less despite the lowest prices at the pumps in a decade and then there is saudi arabia, riyadh is playing a game of double jeopardy, first up they want to damage the chances of the new high tech u.s. oil producers making america the biggest oil producer in the world now and second many analysts believe they want to damage iran's chances of turning a fast buck once their oil starts flowing again now that international sanctions are lifted following the resent nuclear arms deal. >> we will not exceed to other members of opec and particularly iran and iraq and opened up the spikets for the rivals in the gulf to produce oil. >> reporter: can keep it up a couple of years but not true of nigeria for example and west africa which is keen to have an
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extraordinary meeting of the cartel in an effort to cut production and so boost prices. meanwhile it's that time of year again when the biggest names in u.s. business tell us how well they did in the last three months of last year and fourth quarter earning season could play a big part in driving oil prices and stock prices in the short term, long-term it's still anybody's guess. john with al jazeera. a chess tournament in mekko will go on today despite saudi arabia saying the game is against islam and the grant mufti with a religious decree and said it's to gambling and the work of the devil and it's unclear whether the government will try to stop the people there from playing. the country's most prominent conservative news magazine blasting donald trump. >> a special issue and why the review says the gop frontrunner is a menace to conservativism. >> reporter: women are told to put off getting pregnant for two years because of the zika virus.
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a snowstorm making its way to the east coast and you can see it coming down in ashville, north carolina and there are winter storm warnings there and nicole mitchell is back with what to expect, next.
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>> farm workers striking in mexico. >> all that tension is about what's happening right now. >> you can work very hard and you will remain poor. >> what's the cost of harvesting america's food? >> do you see how it would be hard to get by on their salary? >> yeah. >> today, they will be arrested. >> they're firing canisters of gas at us. >> emmy award-winning investigative series. >> we have to get out of here. ♪ welcome back to your world this morning and time to look at the top stories at least 20 people are dead this morning after gunmen attacked the beach front restaurant in somalia and al-shabab claiming
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responsibility for eight hours and the people behind it were killed or captures. >> epa stepping in to help handle the water crisis in flint and they issued an emergency order taking over the testing of the water supply and the agency's regional director resigned and president obama will give michigan $80 million in federal aid and considerably more than $5 million that was originally pledged. >> effects of major storm being felt on the east coast more than 2300 flights cancelled so far so if you are planning on flying out today call ahead and check in. many states including the district of columbia right now under a state of emergency, at least 50 million people in this storm's path, the nation's capitol appears right smack dab in the middle of it all and i will bring in nicole mitchell and in north carolina they are seeing traffic jams because of ice and road closer and seeing snowfall there. >> ice and freezing rains in the
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carolinas and in the core of that and ice is hard for anyone but if you are especially not used to driving in that it gets more troublesome. on the southern end, has not been confirmed but a tornado from yesterday evening in mississippi so a severe component of all of this and you can see kind of the dividing line about tennessee through the carolinas where we go from rain to snow although some of this arkansas, northern parts of mississippi have got some of that snow as well so it's goingly to be a really treacherous day and this is portions of north carolina. we have been seeing that combination of freezing precipitation and snow so this is a live look at ashville. it's kind of coming down lightly and then if we go to charlotte, this is another place that could be in the core of some freezing precipitation as well. now parts of the carolinas looks like they are about to test out the shot there, parts of the carol carolyn -- carolina could go
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full inch of freezing precipitation and this is about power lines and worried of the east cost for tomorrow and washington d.c. the lighter snow starts probably into this afternoon and maybe a little this morning and it really picks up in the evening hours. [switching captioners] >> with the high winds, it's go going to be really thigh clear this off. in the d.c. area, you could get the two feet, farther north, closer to new york, six to 10. farther north than that, boston two or three. the mid atlantic gets the heavy stuff but high winds creates whiteout conditions. that's what i'm concerned about in terms of bringing town power lines. we could have some significant
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power outages both because of the ice and high winds. you can see that as i put that into motion, some winds could be gusting in the 40-50-mile per hour range. that's why we have those blizzard concerns up because of all the snow combined with the wind making a whiteout. >> is there a chance this storm could push further east? >> it's a coastal system. you could have variations. the models have been pretty consistently so that's usually a good sign. there could be a couple inches of variation, but this is definitely going to be a big snowstorm. >> and the milk and bread have already been sold out. thank you very much. we are 10 days from the iowa caucuses. >> on the democratic side, a new poll giving bernie sanders an 8 point lead in iowa, clinton holding the lead for several months but not now. several polls show sanders with a huge lead over hillary clinton in new hampshire. >> there's a lot to like about
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some of his ideas but in theory isn't enough. a president has to deliver in reality. >> if we do well in both of those states, i think my friends we are looking at one of the great political upsets in the modern history of the united states of america. >> on the republican side, a cnn poll keeps trump in the lead over senator ted cruz in iowa, cruz in third, trump holds a larger margin over both in new hampshire. the political director and anchor at nh1 joining us this morning from new hampshire. paul, good morning, thank you so much for being with us. a lot of buzz this morning about the conservative magazine, the national review's special issue devoted to donald trump, calling him a menace to conservativism and politicallyun moored
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opportunityist. >> you've seen conservatives say donald trump is not the real conservative in the race and that is what ted cruz has been saying for weeks, that donald trump is not a real conservative, he's changed his positions several times. donald trump responding saying they're a failing organization, their circulation is starting to die off. trump began belittling those who attack him, but it is a good question and right now you are seeing a fight between donald trump and at the time cruz here in new hampshire and iowa and around the nation for the real conservative voters, cruz saying donald trump has changed his mind, he's a chameleon and not a real conservative. it's crunch time now. you're seeing rhetoric size on the democratic and republican side because people are about to vote. >> specifically they point out his changing positions on gun control and on abortion, but also slam him on his immigration
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plan. yesterday, the buzz was around conservative stalwarts like bob dole saying trump is a better standard bearer for the party than ted cruz. are we seeing what politico termed a circling firing squad now in the gop? >> yeah, there have been a couple of story lines this week, one was the establishment has welcomed donald trump and they think trump would be led hurtful to the party than ted cruz. ted cruz is a u.s. senator. none of the other senators have endorsed ted cruz. he became to the senate in 2013 and he was a fire bomber, not there to make friends. you're hearing from conservatives in d.c. like the national review that donald trump is going to be detrimental to the party. it is bizarre what is going on. this is the presidential cycle where we're taking the rules and
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throwing them out the window on the republican side and something we're starting to see on the d side with bernie sanders, with a large lead depending on the polls and edging hillary clinton in iowa. you play that sound from hillary clinton, she is starting to turn up the heat on bernie sanders in what was a pretty friendly race until three weeks ago. >> you talk about the democrats and that poll showing sanders with a huge lead over clinton in new hampshire. it seems most of the polls are showing that he's leading in new hampshire. let's listen to what hillary said yesterday in iowa. >> in theory, there's a lot to like about some of his ideas, but in theory isn't enough. a president has to deliver in reality. >> as you mentioned, paul, her attacks against sanders, particularly his plan on health care had been relatively strong. yesterday, it almost seemed to me like she was trying a new
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tack, basically saying look, i don't disagree with bernie, but getting what he wants is not realistic. is that a new tactic? >> that's something they've been doing for two weeks now, turning up the temperature on those attacks, saying he has a lot of ideas, how is he going to pay for them, will he get them implemented. hillary about a week ago really rapping herself around the obama administration, around obamacare, saying she's going to be a defender of obamacare and continue the policies of this president. that may not be working though, stephanie right now with democratic voters. we've been talking about this for a while. republican voters, republican primary voters are angry, frustrate. they want anything but a typical politician. we're seeing that on the democratic side, as well right here in new hampshire and elsewhere and that is why certain sand is doing so well. >> back to the gop race in new hampshire. two and a half weeks from your
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primary. how is the race looking for those other four gop candidates, rubio, christie, kasich and bush, could one emerge as a viable alternative to trump and cruz? >> that's been the big story line for quite some time, that who is the establishment candidate going to be, who is going to rise up. the four gentlemen you mentioned are spending time in new hampshire, we love that, campaigning the town halls and countering the center right vote. new hampshire seems to be a battle more second place right now on the republican side. donald trump is very far ahead. plus ted cruz, who is starting to pay more attention, battle for second and third. there is going to be three, maybe four ticket out of new hampshire. one thing about voters, they traditionally make up their minds late. we still have two weeks to go. voters say i want to go to a few
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more events. >> are they watching what happens in iowa? could that impact them? >> it will definitely impact here in new hampshire a little bit, momentum always matters. if you win in iowa, it doesn't hurt, could make a difference here, but new hampshire voters are proud of the fact that they are ahead and want to talk to the candidates, not just once, but two or three times. >> i can't imagine what it's like there with all the political ads running. thank you, good to see you. >> thank you. louisiana new governor democratic already making waves in his first few weeks in office, john bell edwards pushing an initiative to protect gay people from discrimination in the workplace. not everyone thinks that law is necessary. >> it is still legal in most parts of louisiana to fire someone because of sexual orientation. only a few communities in the
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state have northern discrimination policies. >> people should not lose their livelihoods because of who they love or who they are. we have to treat people fairly. >> he promised a issue an executive order to protect state workers and government contractors who are gay, lesbian or transgender from discrimination. >> unfortunately discrimination does occur. having non-discrimination laws for race sex or religion means you have a mechanism to complain and resolve the issue. >> a similar law had been enforce but for the past eight years, governor bobby jindal decided not to have the protection, call it unnecessary. the louisiana family forum agree. >> it's difficult to protect against or guard against discrimination that you cannot legally define. >> many opposed to the plan argue there's no proof discrimination against lgbt people has been an issue in
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louisiana and say added protections could lead to a flood of lawsuits. >> if you are fired because you are incompetent or dishonest or chronically tardy and now you identify with one of these new specially protected categories provides immunity, or at least the alleged charge of immunity. you can't fire me, i'm protected. >> the governor hasn't said exactly when he will sign the order and while his action would shield 60,000 state employees, it would not apply to private businesses. advocates hope louisiana will do what 28 other states have done and adopt non-discrimination law that is apply to all companies. the obama administration is tightening rules on who visit the u.s., 30 countries don't need a visa but those who have been to iran, iraq or sudan must apply for permission, new rules
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since the paris attacks. the t.s.a. has received a record number of guns from baggage in 2015, firing 2700 fire arms last year, up 20% from 2014, more than 80% of those guns loaded. most were seized in dallas and atlanta. in davos, the global financial elite is talking about how to defeat isil. financier george soar rose said by fear monger be, donald trump helps isil recruits. secretary of state john kerry focused on the global issues that spur terrorism. >> corruption is a radicalize er, because it destroys faith and legitimate authority, occupies up a vacuum, which allows the predators to move in, and no one knows that better than the violent extremist groups who regularly use corruption as a recruitment tool
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with that corruption is an opportunity destroyer. >> defense secretary ash carter is in davos today. the pentagon tweeted this picture showing carter meeting with iraqi prime minister al abadi discussing isil strategy. women are asked to hold off getting pregnant for two years as the zika virus spreads in brazil. they hope to get time to understand how the virus affects the women and unborn children. we have this report. >> in this clinic in control colombia, future mothers anxiously wait for their doctor's visit. some were sick with the zika virus. the researchers believe it causes genital detects in some babies. >> i saw it on television in the news and people told me about it. i'm very worried. what if my child is malformed,
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can you imagine bringing him to life like that? it's scary. >> thousands of babies have been born in brazil with small heads and brain damage, their mothers were infected by zika. the virus that affected more than 13,000 people in colombia since october, making it the second worst hit count rip in the region. it could affect as many as 700,000 more in coming months. they warn women to avoid getting pregnant. >> they should consider postponing frying nance for six or eight months. we are saying it this way because it's a good way to communicate the risk involved. there can be serious consequences. >> up to this point, there haven't been any confirmed cases of micro receive lee in newborn babies related to zika. health officials say it's only to question of time zika can be
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spread by the same mosquitoes that care dengue fever. they breed in small amounts of still water. she is eight months pregnant. she said unlike many friends, she hasn't been in effect. she's been careful to rid her home of still water and uses repellant and mosquito nets at night. >> the problem is there's a lot of women poorly informed and not taking any precautions. that's how viruses spread. now the government is telling people not to get pregnant and it's not going to work. >> the government is promising to start a health campaign to convince people to change hear habits, but with no cure tort virus, mean fear the disease could turn into an epidemic. al jazeera. >> it's the poor areas in a lot of these communities in brazil most affected because there's so
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much standing water. >> and they're calling for more ultra sounds but in the poor us community that is not something they can afford. >> they are taking extraordinary measures there. commercial drones are about to get closer to the action. a production company said the f.a.a. has given the ok to fly drones hundreds of feet closer to people than once allowed. skiers have recorded runs. the drones are asked to stay 50. the international ski federation banned camera drones after one narrowly missed hitting a skier. >> just in case you get snowed in, a trip to the superbowl on the line some weekend. it's peyton manning and tom brady back at it again. the patriots travel to denver to play the broncos. panthers hosting the panthers. the winner will be playing for the lombardi tree deon february 7. stock up on those snacks. >> like anyone needed an excuse
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to stay in and watch that game. >> i wanted to know if my wife was listening. showing off at sun dance. >> hoping to be the next big thing. the eco friendly fashion, sending a message on the cat walks of hong kong.
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>> al jazeera america brings you independent reporting without spin. >> not everybody is asking the questions you're asking me today. >> we give you more perspectives >> the separatists took control a few days ago. >> and a global view. >> now everybody in this country can hear them. >> getting the story first-hand. >> they have travelled for weeks, sometimes months. >> what's your message then? >> we need help now. >> you're watching al jazeera america. >> the fashion elite of mosing up in hong kong for an unsure fashion show that promotes environmentally friendly designs including recycled clothes.
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rob mcbride you has the story. >> in a world where strange is often good, it is one of the stranger fashion shows. it seems to make absolute sense. collections from designers all use recycled fabrics from bed sheets dumped by hotels to labels discarded by factories in china. >> i saw a lot of ways from the taylor after they cut and show and i found at that time, i'm thinking maybe i can use them. >> making yesterday's fashions fashionable again has never been more important. one year in vogue, the next season out of the it, the fashion industry is made for waste not just in the techs tiles of the dump but in the huge amount of chemicals and water used in their production. aiming to thank change that, this ngo takes designers on a
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journey to discover the possibilities of recycling. on this trip, a visit to one of the growing warehouses handling clothes from hong kong and china. >> lot of them are really good quality. the ones we pick out are virtually knew. >> back at the fashion week exhibition, the winner of the award from previous years now have their own labels. >> we educate these designers. i see their passion and creative di and the massive impact they have, because they are proving that you can recycle waste and put it back into fashion. >> soon the class of 2016 will join them, hoping to make environmentally friendly become the fashion. al jazeera, hong kong. in hollywood, the motion picture academy in damage control after another actor decided to boycott the oscars. will smith now joining his wife
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saying the racial gap is part of a wider problem. >> the academy reflects the industry, reflects hollywood and the industry reflects america. there is a regressive slide toward separatism, towards racial and religious disharmony and that's not the hollywood that i want to leave behind. >> this is the second year in a row that all 20 oscar nominees in the main acting categories are white. an center title and culture critic saying the issue starts at the top. >> how do you expect an outcome to be different if those voting are predominantly white. the interesting thing about how the academy is comprised, you have to be invited to become a member and then two current members have to ratify your invitation and then if you make
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it to the final round, the board of governors has to ratify that invitation. that's how it works. there are only white men in the room and only inviting people they know and they have to be ratified by another two in the room, guess what the demographic is going to look like. >> the controversy over the oscars threatens to overshadow the sun dance festival. many of the industry's biggest names are gathering now. robert redford said this last night: al jazeera's rob reynolds is in park city utah with more on the films there. >> the rocky mountain air here is full of expectation. independent filmmakers from 37 countries are showing off their artistic creations to an
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estimated 45,000 eager cinema fans and prospective film studio buyers. >> it's a bucket item list for me. i always wanted to come. >> people are told they know this is where the best content in the world for film is. >> 120 featured films will be screened at sun dance this year, called for more than 4,000 positions. robert let ford is on narrative. >> to me, the story is the most important thing and story telling is what it should be about. >> starring rebecca hall, this is a dark drama about a female journalist trying to break into the world of news. the israeli produced arabic language film sand storm tells the story of a bedouin family and its struggle to recognize its beliefs with contemporary sexual relationships.
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birth of a nation, directed by and starring nate parker takes its name from d.w. griffith, the blatantly racist epic but tells the story. in the documentary division, there's buzz about new town, taking on the wrenching debate over gun violence, focusing on grieving families that lost chirp in the sandy hook school massacre in 2012. legendary german filmmaker is back with lo and behold, off beat look at the digitized interconnected world humanitarian has made and which is remaking humanity. >> in 2015, the festival's grand prize winner, me and earl and the dying girl failed to win big audiences when it was released
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in theaters. >> that just shows there's a big difference between the bubble of the sun dance film festival and what mainstream audiences are going to be interested in. >> you can be sure many of the filmmakers walking here hope their labor of love will be the next little miss sunshine, whiplash or blare witch project. al jazeera, park city, utah. ahead, travel delays and cancellations, that huge winter storm brings snow, ice and could shut down parts of the east coast. >> the sexual assault crimes that go unreported because the attackers are police. we are back in two minutes with more of your world this morning. >> from the time i was 3 years old, music was what i loved above all else. >> grammy winning artist moby talks about his work outside the studio. >> what led me to animal rights activism, is every animal wants to avoid pain and avoid suffering. >> and the future of the music industry. >> maybe i shouldn't admit this but i don't really buy music
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anymore.
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looking at the window on the way, the whole country is in the path of a storm. >> bringing rain, snow and ice. stepping up and aside. the e.p.a. outs the top official in flint michigan. an american student detained in north korea, the charges he faces and why he was there in the first place.
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nearly five years after the fukushima disaster, japan's nuclear plants are not safe enough. good morning, welcome to your world this morning. i'm del walters. i'm stephanie sy. that big storm threatens the east coast has begun to take aim. north carolina is seeing freezing rain and ice now. >> that storm is headed north, 50 million people in its path, many states already declaring states of emergency. >> many residents are emptying shelves to get the essentials they need for a weekend indoors. right now, more than half of the flights out of the two largest airports in north carolina, charlotte and raleigh durham have been canceled, all told, more than 2300 flights have been canceled so far nationwide, 132 others have been delayed. >> robert ray live right now in
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charlotte, north carolina, the ice there, you can see on the streets, a major concern. robert, what exactly is the weather doing now? >> yep, good morning, guys. in fact, you know, last hour, we had some light snow coming down, now it's a mix of freezing rain and snow, and that's the major issue. that's what people are concerned about here. in the south, the temperature's going to hover around 31, 32 degrees, right at the freezing mark and the problem is when that occurs, you see more of an ice issue. you can see its, you know, starting to pile up a little bit here. it's a beautiful scene here in charlotte, the beautiful church, nice snow, of course, things looking very pretty, but this is going to last all through the weekend and once you get a quarter inch, maybe a full inch of ice on the roads, this will cripple the entire area. the west of here in the mountains, they are expecting a foot or more of snow, but people
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are out and about, shoveling, the buses still running, schools are closed, universities are closed, but, you know, people here hunkering down, just trying to get through the weekend, but this happens. at least once a year in the south, perhaps not to this degree, as we know, and the real problems are going to be north where you guys are at. >> robert, i'm assuming that you are standing in the street, you are not being run over, that is a good sign. it seems to indicate that people there were told to stay home as you mentioned. what else has charlotte done to get ready? >> yeah, exactly. i mean, most people are going to take off today work here. again, like i said, the south gets us about once a year. they are not used to this, so businesses, schools, they're used to saying ok, everybody just stay home, don't come into work, don't go into school, but you can see, there are some people walking around, the buses are going, somebody is honking
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as usual during a live shot. it's winter, it's expected, but not so much here with the ice. that again, the big problem, del, that cripples the area. this is a very hilly region of the country and people can't get around when there is ice on the roads. >> robert, thank you very much. >> as he said, as bad as it is in charlotte, conditions are set to get worst in other parts of the east coast. let's bring in nicole mitchell for more on what to expect. >> a lot of people are asking what, when, where, as we continue, we have the core of the ice. that will continue today possibly into earlier tomorrow in the carolinas. south of this, most of this is going to stay rain because of the temperatures, the carolinas, you're close enough to the warm air that you've got a warm air aloft allowing the rain. d.c. through the atmosphere, it's above freezing, that means it will be freezing
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precipitation down, snow, straight up snow. it's not here yet to the core of where it's going to be the worst of it which really is kind of interior of d.c. and virginia, west virginia area we could see isolated amounts over two feet. that will start and really pick up into this evening. dependency where you are. we had severe weather with all of this yesterday. that risk has shifted, so we had over 60 reports, mostly wind and hail, but one that looked like a tornado in mississippi, as well, the tornado risk goes down but the wind he is special lip in pores of florida, watch for that on the warm side, the stormy side. i mentioned temperatures, anywhere from really probably richmond northward, we are going to see straight up snow, not the ice mixing in, because the temperatures will stay cool enough. the southern end, all the different winter weather advisories, atlanta is likely to
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stay rain, sleet mixed in, but not that huge ice sheet we saw a couple of years ago. the areas highlighted in red, long island through the d.c. area are blizzard warnings. the combination of snow and even more importantly, the wind coming will create the conditions that could be whiteouts. in d.c., that already started this afternoon. i don't think we'll see that this afternoon because the wind won't be there to support it, but through tomorrow, i would definitely say maybe not a full blizzard, you need three hours that have whiteout but definitely whiteout from time to time up toward new york. >> this storm has already claimed two lives and millions of dollars will be lost because people can't go to work. >> and power with that wind and ice, a lot of people can be without power. >> very serious storm, thank you very much. north korea has detained a college student for what they
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call a whose style act. he was detained in pyongyang on january 2. two others are believed to be detained in north korea. we have more from seoul. >> this news came through on the north korean state media saying they had detained a u.s. citizen, a student for a supposed hostile act against the state. also, this media report saying that that act was cool rated and manipulated by the united states government. the name of this man, otto frederik wambia. seoul confirming that it has seen the media reports, deferring other questions to the state department in washington. there has been some corroboration from young pioneer tours which says this young man was on one of its tours and
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detained on january 2. they say that they are acting closely with the swedish embassy in pyongyang which looks after interests in north korea and the u.s. state department trying to get this man released. he's not certainly the first u.s. citizen to be detained in north korea. in 2014, three u.s. citizens were released. there have been instances of missionary activity. one tourist who left behind a bible in a hotel, these things have gotten people into trouble in the past. also last year, there was a south korean student with a u.s. green card who was studying in the u.s. detained after crossing illegally into north korean territory from china. he was kept six months before handled back over to south korean authorities here. this isn't the first of its type but is a new development, a new u.s. citizen reportedly detained inside north korea.
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>> the state department has declined to comment. the city of flint has until today to comply with that e.p.a. order concerning its water crisis, the agency saying it is going to take over the testing and the regional director has now resigned. we are live in flint. andy, the e.p.a. calling the city response to the crisis inadequate. is it too little too late? >> the residence think so. they say when does my life get back to normal and the e.p.a. criticizing flint. the regional director of the e.p.a. in charge of flint resigned yesterday as did the director of the michigan department of environmental quality, bolt agencies criticized for not saking seriously enough the complaints of citizens here back in the summer of 2014 when the problems started showing up, and michigan's governor rick snyder has been called to testify before congress about this.
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del. >> a lot of people upset at the obama administration because the president skipped going to flint when he was in detroit just 70 miles away. now the white house saying it is going to send $80 million in federal aid to michigan, how is that money going to be used? >> that will be specifically to help fix the water infrastructure here. when president obama made that announcement that he'd be giving up that ate million dollars for this, he said that the flint water crisis was inexcusable. >> last month's bipartisan budget agreement we secured additional funding to help cities like yourself build water infrastructure and we'll have that funding available next week, including more than $80 million for the state of michigan. our children should not have to be worried about the water that they're drinking in america. >> that $80 million will be available, actually next week, del, very quickly. >> here's the bottom line.
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what is the quality of the water in flint right now, can you drink it? >> you can't. it's still bad. you can't drink it and it could be some estimates 15 years before the whole system is fixed. governor snyder did say this morning that they actually have started testing the corrosiveness of the lead pipes and the water here back in december. he said the wheels of turning, but this could be a year's long process. >> we began covering this story in 2014. andy, thank you very much. we're going to have much more on that crisis in flint tonight. we're going to have an aljazeera america special report. tune in tonight at 7:30 eastern time. >> also in michigan, lawmakers are pushing nor new legislation to clamp down on work stoppages, making it easier to punish the teachers taking part in strikes, that move coming after week of sickouts by teachers over crumbling buildings and lack of funding for the schools. former oklahoma city police officer daniel holtzclaw is
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beginning the first day of his 263 year prison term. he was sentenced for sexually assaulting women in poor communities while on duty. al jazeera's heidi zhou castro was in the courtroom. >> daniel holds claw showed no emotion as the judge read his sentence but there is was a murmur from the audience packed with victim and supporters, followed by tears of joy and relief. >> we stopped the serial racist with a badge when everybody else had doubts. >> former oklahoma city police officer daniel holtzclaw will spend the rest of his life in prison for sexually assaulting at least eight women, all african american and from a low income neighborhood where holtzclaw patrolled. >> i'd likes to thank god for those who do believe us and no matter how powerful he was and how vulnerable and helpless we were, he had no power to do what was done to us. >> the attack happened during a
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six month period in 2013 and 2014 while he was on adult. he was convict on 18 charges last month. jami liggins was the last victim. he assaulted the 58-year-old grandmother and day care worker in the back of his squad car. >> whatever happened to you, no matter who it is, tell it. wrong is wrong. police officer with a badge, a gun or not, wrong is wrong. he got what he deserved. >> holtzclaw's previous victims had histories of drug abuse and prostitution. he targeted them believing no one would take their word. she had no criminal history, she reported the attack, breaking the case. >> a lot of people are calling you a hero. do you feel that way? >> i don't feel like i am. i just did what i had to do. >> the oklahoma city police department has tried to make amends through firing hots claw and aggressively investigating the case.
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>> we are very much committed to this community and i believe we have proven that. this is a terrible case. there's no way of changing that, of changing what happened to these victims. we can't go back and change the past. >> those who live in the area holtzclaw once terrorized are not satisfied. they are calling for dispatching officers and teams and overhauling the supervision system that allowed holtzclaw to slip through. they have been unanswered. >> beautiful safe in your neighborhood? >> safer, but to me, there might be more like him because of what happened to me, i don't trust any of them now. >> can you say with 100% certainty that there are no other officers committing these crimes? >> we have no reason to believe that there are. if there's ever an allegation or case we need to investigate, we will do so. >> holtzclaw will never again patrol these streets but in these alleys and corners, the
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shadows cast by his crimes still loom. >> the case has been described as anomaly, but that doesn't seem to be the case. one investigation uncovered 1,000 officers involved in sexual assault cases but perhaps many others are unreported. we are going to look at what departments across the country are doing bit. this morning, jason rezaian heading back to the u.s. the tehran bureau chief for the washington post said he's feeling well after spending almost 18 months inside an iranian jail. he was freed over the weekend in that prisoner swap. >> another prisoner released last week by tehran waking up at home in michigan this morning. amir heck mattie returned.
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i am standing hear healthy and tall with my head held high. >> officials say while in prison, heck mati spent long times in solitary confinement. he said his military training helped him survive. >> you wonder how long it will take them to mentally recover from that ordeal. >> coming up, a siege at a beach front resort. >> al jazeera launches an attack in somalia. experts say this is a sign of what might come. the nuclear risk in japan, five years after the disaster in fukushima, inspectors say nuke plants are still not safe.
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>> somali officials say at least 20 are dead after an attack in mogadishu that happened at a popular beach front restaurant. we have the latest. >> daylight reveals the full horror of the attack as the grim task of identifying the dead begins. al shabab fighters say they are responsible for the carnage at a popular beach front restaurant. >> i was intending to go out, but suddenly we heard an explosion and gunfire. i looked back and saw a fighter shooting at everybody. i locked myself inside a room until we were evacuated by the security forces. >> a wedding ceremony and graduation dinner were underway when armed fighters rammed a car packed with explosionives into the restaurant. they then stormed the building,
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shooting at customers. a well planned attack from an organization which the authorities in somalia and kenya had thought to be struggling and on the defensive. >> unfortunately security services even in the west seem to really understate the threat of groups such as al shabab. there's been very good at planning operations even outside somalia. >> last friday, fighters from the group attacked an of a 18 military base in southwest somalia. 100 kenyan soldiers were killed, but the kenyan government hasn't confirmed that figure. in april last year, al shabab attacked burris is a university in kenya and in september, 2013 fighters from the group stormed the west gate shopping mall in nairobi, killing 67 people. somalia has been devastated by decades of civil unrest.
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four years ago, somalia's government pushed al shabab out of major cities, including mogadishu with the help of african union soldiers. somali government and supporters still have much work to do. >> al shabab has shown different tactics in these latest attacks. some say it's a sign of changing strategy for the group. >> over the last years, since the intervention of kenya and amazon forces, al shabab has reluctantly let go have some of the territories exacting taxes from people, providing law and order and services, now are capable of doing what they are doing now. even in the past, largely an urban grill are a movement now are an insurgency and with that, they do not need a lot of capacity in order to cause this
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damage. they have now converted all their efforts, resourcesources d mansour into doing what they are doing now. >> weapons have been taken from african union peacekeepers. japan's nuclear safety has improved since fukushima in a disaster, but there's still a long way to go. >> i believe there were several problems in the process of inspections in the nuclear wreck laatory system in japan. it has a lot to do with the bad habit that once the utility passed the test they do not make effort to enhance the security. japan lacked in the awareness of putting extra efforts even if they are not told to do so by the regulators. >> the team said safety inspections and skills of its staff needs strength anyone. the fukushima reactor has never
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been completely cleaned up. this machine will remove highly radioactive rods. how important are these inspections and how off are they being done now that the world's attention is no longer on fukushima? >> this particular mission doesn't happen very often at all. as a matter of fact, the last one that was held in japan was back in 2017. it's what is known as a peer review, and this particular one looks specifically at the regulatory system, so honestly, they happen maybe once in a decade. it's really important to remember that the safety regime globally is completely voluntary, so this mission could
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make recommendation to say japan and japan might feel free to ignore them. >> there is a tendency to believe once the crisis itself is over, that everything is ok. they are cleaning up a major catastrophe there, this robot that toshiba is announcing won't be on line until 2017. how dangerous is fukushima today? >> well, so i think some of the radiation levels have gone down. i've been to fukushima a few times but obviously when you have a core, several cores that have melted, you know, it's an environmental nightmare for a long time. you know, when we think back to three-mile island, it took years before we were actually able to enter the reactor building, and that was nothing like fukushima. you know, you can expect decades and hundreds of billions of dollars to be spent in this.
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it's also important to remember that the nuke regulatory authority in japan does not, you know, it's a real mix of organizations that have responsibility for that site, so the n.r.a. that japan n.r.a. has a very kind of small role at fukushima. the utility tepco is doing the majority of the work. >> if tepco downgrades efforts at fukushima, is there a sense that the situation there could grow worse? >> well, you know, there is the possibility that tepco may not do, you know, there's a possibility that it may not do the best, fastest, most thorough job. remember, this site is now a complete loss.
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there are no reactors operating at that site anymore. they've all been shut down. this is also very different from say the three-mile island case, where we still have reactors operating there, so it's a complete lolls for tepco. on the other hand, everyone's paying attention all the time, so there are a lot of journalists there, the japanese parliament, the diet is watching very closely, the world is watching very closely, so i think that there are, you know, some of their ideas are better than others. we all i think need to keep a close eye on what's happening. >> before you go, the u.s. considered the gold standard but after fukushima are you confident that what we saw happen in japan and russia with chernobyl can't happen here? >> well, you know, it's a funny thing, the chernobyl accident
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was quite different. that's clearly the worst nuclear accident ever and that had somewhat to do with the design of the reactor. i won't get into technical details, but those kinds of reactors are no longer marketed and operating, but that reactor in japan, that was a u.s. design. it was a boiling water reactor, general electric reactor. it was a combination of a lot of things. obviously it was the earthquake and tsunami. a lot of people will look and say well, you know, how many times are we going to have an earthquake and tsunami together. that is not the point. the point is have we thought through all the possible combinations of disasters that could happen and, you know, our
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technology is only as good as humans are. we need to spend a lot of time and money, i think in making sure that our nuclear safety regulations, our power plants are safe and it's a constant struggle and a constant kind of visual lance that's required. >> thank you very much. >> still evacuation orders in place around a lot of the towns in fukushima. a global rebound to end the week. >> the markets looking up after a disastrous start to 2016, but china's economy still hanging over investors. sexual assault crimes that often go unreported because the attackers carry a badge.
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>> water is a human right! >> flint in a state of emergency. >> this can cause death... all kinds of health effects. >> we're already having trouble, but now what little i have has to completely go towards water. >> only on al jazeera america. this is a changing situation and it could be very, very dangerous. a weather warning in north carolina where officials are telling residents don't go out this morning as that winter weather is getting worse. this is north carolina, the governor activating the state of emergency and road crews already presalting the roads. they have the trucks that are ready to respond if things get even worse. >> a lot of times in these
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incidents in the carolinas they get trucks -- >> on loan -- >> they simply don't have those trucks on hand. welcome back to your word this morning. that huge winter storm is our top story. more than 2300 flights have been canceled and five states and district of columbia under a state of emergency. 50 million people are in the storm's path and the nation's capital appears to be in the bullseye. >> let's go to nicole mitchell. >> we were just looking at that video. i know you guys have been concerned that the woman had a contain. it was a walking stick, which is actually maybe not a bad idea to give yourself extra grip in all of this. that was coming out of the carolinas. in that area, we have a little warm air a loft. when you have the coder air in the surface and warmer ai air
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aloft, people ask where is it mixed. atlanta, this is mostly going to be rain. the carolinas, snow, but some places will have more of that freezing precipitation mixed in up toward a half inch or more. that's the dividing line, when branches start to break, power outages start because the lines are coming down. that's going to be a tricky situation here. possibly even the severe weather in the southern side, wind damage especially in southern pourings of florida. this afternoon, the light snow starts in d.c. and picks up tonight and through tomorrow. for new york, a little farther to the north, it starts overnight and picks up through the day tomorrow. here's some of the total, the core is near that d.c. area where we can see totals over tw. you get farther north, it's less, but a half foot to in some cases a foot is still significant snow and then the
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winds will be kicking up with this system, because it's a coastal system, getting more intense. delaware to long island, some places could have wind gusts over 50 miles an hour. that's going to blow that snow around. it's a couple days. this clears out quickly on sunday, but by the time we get there, there's going to be so much digging out in some places, we still might be a little slow starting out monday morning. >> government buildings are going to close at noon, at some point -- >> metro at 11:00 i think. >> if you have an elderly neighbor, someone snowed in with power outages, make sure everyone around is ok. >> the futures are trading higher. right now, dow futures are up.
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>> soaring about 6% in hong kong, jumps 3%, the shanghai composite finishing up about 1%. >> one reason for the turbulent start for global stocks in 2016 is china's economic throwdown. there is growing concern that the company's ballooning private sector debt could rattle markets even more. we have the details. >> like many middle class wage earners, he has borrowed money to buy a home and car. he said he and his wive are financially prudent. >> their loans are considered household debt and classified at
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non-state borrowing, which makes up a third of china's total debt. that's not the type of liability chinese policy makers are most concerned about. as china's debt gross faster than its economy, it is money loaned top state owned extra prizes and local government that could be a credit crisis in the making. >> during the global financial crisis of 2008, the chinese government pumped in lots of money to keep the economy going. local governments i should bonds and state owned businesses borrowed money from banks to finance both new and on going projects. developers kept believe, even though there weren't buyers. the result, ghost cities. factories kept producing and expanding, even as records are forming. the result, overcapacity. debt started to balloon. conservative estimates put it at twice the size of g.d.p. while some analysts say it could be as
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much as 280%. what makes china's debt problem different could also be a mitigating factor. >> nearly all of the debt is local, so it's debt essentially issued by a state enterprise or local government especially, and usually, the person who finance that had was a state owned bank, so especially what we are talking about is a ledger where the chinese government has money in one pocket on the left and the debt in the other on the right. >> that, he says gives the central government morley way managing the problem. the government in beijing has the ability to force state owned banks to take a loss on loans they made to local governments or public companies which are now struggling to make repayments. it will allow state opened enterprises to go bankrupt instead of bailing them out. unemployment could go up. as the days of easy credit appear to be over, the chinese
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government will have to go through a painful period of j. florence lee, al jazeera, beijing. china's economy being discussed at the world forum today. they are also toss the war in syria and refugees. secretary of state john kerry among those calling for action. >> i can't think of a time in my life, and i grew up in the shadow of world war ii, where i have seen so much atrocity. everyone here senses a call to action and in fact welcomes our shared duty to respond. >> kerry saying the world needs to fight global problems like climate change, corruption and inequality. those he says are responsible for the rise of isil. >> the leader of the armed group occupying an oregon wildlife refuge is talking with the f.b.i. they plan more confidences today. bundy went to the staging area
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for a face-to-face meeting, but the f.b.i. declined the meeting. bundy and his group have occupied the refuge since january 2. oregon called for federal action to end the takeover. >> atlanta area police officer expected to be arrested for killing an unarmed black man last year. the grand jury indicted the officer robert olsen on aggravated assault. he responded to a call about a neighborhood man behaving erratically. hill is an air force veteran. his family said he struggled with mental health problems. >> former oklahoma city police officer daniel moments claw is in prison today. he was sentenced to 263 years in jail. moments claw sexually assaulted 13 women in low income neighborhoods while on duty in oklahoma city, but his case is not the only one. it is raising concerns about
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other underreported crimes, including sexual assault committed by police. steven yoder is an investigative journalist who writes about sex crime policy and other criminal poles issues and joins us from albany new york. steven, thank you for your time. >> an a.p. investigation by the associated press uncovered about 1,000 officers who lost their badges during a six year period for rape, sodomy, and other sexual assault crimes. so holtzclaw's case is not anomaly as some have described it. >> no, it's not, stephanie, and in my own reporting, i found five cases in which women now have on going civil suits against new york city's police department for cases like this, cases of sexual coerce while officers are on duty. these are alleged, and three other cases in 2015 of sexual
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coercion. in one department, there are eight of these cased in additional to these newspaper investigations. >> as you report, sexual assault in general tend to be underreported, but when you're dealing with a police officer with a gun, how likely are victims to come forward and how often are police held to account, charged, progress cute or convicted? >> well, as in the hots claw case, many of these women are at risk of some type of prosecution they canning sex workers or they can be pulled over for tickets in which the charges are offered to be dropped in exchange for favors. these women don't have the money for lawyers and are not willing
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to pursue the case. when they were put on the stand, at one lawyer told me, you put one of these victims on the stand with a police officer and a jury usually is going to believe the officer. only a third of rapes generally are reported, so in these cases, it's probably far lower. >> there's a strand that you found in your reporting that the victims do tend to be those that are already at risk, are themselves being prosecuted for crimes, sometimes they are prostitutes, many times they are african-american women. >> in the holtsclaw case, the neighborhoods that this officer targeted were african-american, so that -- you know, we weren't able to look at, the reporting and the documentation on this is early, so right now, we're just getting a sense of the numbers and don't have a sense of the demographics of this. the sources i talked to say it's more likely to be women who are at risk in some way poor, and
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likely a minority, but we don't have numbers on that yet. >> do many police departments have a system set up for these kinds of complaints? >> no, and that's, you know, the federal government recognizes that women should not be targeted by those who are sworn to direct them. the federal government tasked the national police leadership organization in 2011 with coming up with guidelines for local democrats. those were issued. they are very -- those call for each democratic a zero tolerance policies on this. in my reporting, i called democrats and only three have policies like this. >> three! >> yes. another source found something similar in her research. it's likely very few police departments are taking the federal government's own guidelines seriously. >> thank you for your reporting on this and for joining us this
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morning. >> even as a journalist i was watching that interview and stunned at the numbers coming out. >> after the holds claw sentencing, i think it is something we will hear more and more about. there simply aren't a lot of statistics on the number of sexual assaults and harassment by police. when we come back, a new warning over a very dangerous virus. >> the countries now saying women should not get pregnant because of the zika virus. the imbalance threatening to drown one of the biggest cities in california.
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there is a warn over the zika virus, officials in colombia asking women to give up getting pregnant for the rest of this year, saying women should put off pregnancy until 2018 in that they hope they can delay it long enough to get a handle on the virus. >> in this clinic, future mothers anxiously wait for their during's visit. some were sick with the zika virus, which is believed to be causing genital defect in some babies. >> i saw it on television in the news and people told me about it.
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i'm very worried. what if my child is malformed, can you imagine bringing him to life like that? it's scary. >> thousands of babies have been born in brazil with small heads and brain damage, their mothers were infected by zika. the virus has infected more than 13,000 people in colombia since october, making it the second worst hit country in the region. it could affect as many as 700,000 more in coming months. they warn women to avoid getting pregnant. >> they should consider postponing pregnancy for six or eight months. we are saying it this way because it's a good way to communicate the risk involved. there can be serious consequences. >> up to this point, there haven't been any confirmed cases of microcephaly in newborn babies related to zika. health officials say it's only
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a question of time. >> zika can be spread by the same mosquitoes that care dengue fever. they breed in small amounts of still water. she is eight months pregnant. she said unlike many friends, she hasn't been infected. she's been careful to rid her home of still water and uses repellant and mosquito nets at night. >> the problem is there's a lot of women poorly informed and not taking any precautions. that's how viruses spread. now the government is telling people not to get pregnant and it's not going to work. >> the government is promising to start a health campaign to convince people to change habits, but with no cure tort virus, mean fear the disease could turn into an epidemic. al jazeera. >> women in this country being told by the c.d.c. to avoid
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travel to caribbean nations. a king tide is raising water levels a foot higher than normal. as jake ward explains, that threatens homes to the city's airport. >> this is san francisco's waterfront. this is a pier, one of many inundated today by sea water. we're in the middle of what's called a king tide, and basically you know how tides work, the sun and moon basically pull on our oceans. they yank on them by their gravitational pull. every so often, you get a spring tide when the sun and moon combine and their gravitational pull pulse hard on the ocean. right now we're in this king tide where we're especially close to the sun. it means the high tide is about a foot and a half higher than it typically is. you combine that with the effect of el niño, we're looking at another foot of rise.
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in a storm situation between three and four, maybe five feet of sea level rise. this isn't just some sort of novelty, just a threat to the tourist shoes here today. this is a glimpse of the future, the kind of sea level rise we're going to see on a regular basis by 2100. this doesn't also just affect san francisco, four out of 10 americans live in a coastal town according to fema, leaping the lives of maybe hundreds of millions are people are going to be affected, drinking water, infrastructure, the roads that they drive on, homes they live in, all of these things will be washed -- will be inundated by water as we see today. this is really an interesting opportunity for city managers to take a look of a day like today and understand how they are going to cope with years of that by the end of this century.
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>> city leaders are debating a tax on every piece of real estate sold to build protections against climate change. that fish you eat might not be available in the future. the world's fish stockpiles are in far worse shape than thought, overfishing blamed. 50% more fish had been caught than first realized. >> there's a climate aspect to that. clearly bleaching leads to fewer fish in the ocean. diversity on the big screen. >> the sun dance film festival shows creations from all over the world.
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the motion picture academy is in damage control, another actor will boycott the oscars, will smith saying: >> the academy reflects the industry. it's like hollywood and the industry reflects america. there is a regressive slide toward separatism, towards racial and religious disharmony and that's not the hollywood i want to leave behind. >> this is the second year in a row all nominees in major categories are white. how do you expect an outcome to
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be different when those voting are so predominantly white. the interesting thing about how the cod my is comprised, you have to be invited to become a member and two current members have to ratify your invitation and if you make it to the final round, the board of governors that a ratify that invitation. that's how it works. if there are only white men in the room and only inviting people they know and those same people have to be ratified by another two in the room, guess what the demographic is going to look like. sun dance is underway in park city utah and founder robert redford said he is proud of the diversity show cased at sun dance. the rocky mountain air in this town is full of expectations. independent filmmakers are showing off their artistic creations to an estimate 45,000
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eager cinema fans and prospective film buyers. >> it's a bucket item list for me. i always wanted to come. >> people are told they know this is where the best content in the world for film is. >> 120 featured films will be screened at sun dance this year, called for more than 4,000 positions. robert redford is on narrative. >> to me, the story is the most important thing and story telling is what it should be about. >> starring rebecca hall, this is a dark drama about a female journalist trying to break into the male dominated 1970 era world of news. the israeli produced arabic language film sand storm tells the story of a bedouin family and its struggle to recognize
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its beliefs with contemporary sexual relationships. birth of a nation, directed by and starring nate parker takes its name from d.w. griffith, the blatantly racist 1915 silent epic but tells the story led by african american folk hero. in the documentary division, there's buzz about new town, taking on the wrenching debate over gun violence, focusing on grieving families that lost chirp in the sandy hook school massacre in 2012. a legendary german filmmaker is back with lo and behold, off beat look at the digitized internet connected world humanity has made and which is remaking humanity. >> in 2015, the festival's grand prize winner, me and earl and the dying girl failed to win big audiences when it was released in theaters.
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>> that just shows there's a big difference between the bubble of the sun dance film festival and what mainstream audiences are going to be interested in. >> you can be sure many of the filmmakers walking here hope their labor of love will be the next little miss sunshine, whiplash or blair witch project. >> we are back monday morning beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time when we take a look at the latest on guantanamo. this is a live look in north korea, more than 2400 flights have been canceled nationwide and storm working its way north. have a great day and great weekend. >> and be safe.
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tunisia declares a nationwide curfew after days of protest against the government. you're watching al jazeera live from doha. also coming up, the eu looks at extending border controls. 22 killed in an attack in mogadishu. al shabab claims responsibility. inside tunisia prisons, many say the jails are a breeding ground for

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