Skip to main content

tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  January 26, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

7:00 am
♪ making their final pitch democratic candidates for president face off with just six days until the iowa caucuses. gaining ground and syrian forces retake a strategic town ahead of a new round of diplomatic talks. market turmoil and investors panic in china driving stocks down 6% and impact it could have in the u.s. >> it can help you like calm down when you get angry. >> young yogis in practice kids learning to clear their minds of violence that is part of their everyday life. ♪
7:01 am
the final pitch before iowa democratic presidential hopefuls make their closing arguments before voters head to caucuses and welcome to your world this morning i'm stephanie. and i'm dell and bake on the campaign trail after making their case at a town hall meeting in des moines. >> bernie sanders sharpened attacks on hillary clinton and hillary clinton says she is the proven fighter and michael shore has more from iowa. >> reporter: in des moines at drake university the three remaining democratic candidates got their chance at final arguments, a chance to make their case to the voters of iowa and even beyond, it was a forum not a debate so it was a town hall style conversation anchored by chris and mcmcand martin o'malley and bernie sanders were on stage separately answering questions and talking with a moderator and what exists are
7:02 am
foreign policies and bernie sanders tried to answer those who may think his experience does not match those of hillary clinton. sanders says that you can look at just one part of his foreign policy experience, that is the vote against the iraq war to know enough about where he stands. >> i voted against the war in iraq and if you go to my website listen to the speech that i gave when i was in the house in 2002 saying, yeah, it's easy to get rid of a dictator like saddam hussein but there is a political vacuum and will be instability and gives me no pleasure to tell you much of what i feared, in fact, happened. hillary clinton voted for the war in iraq. >> reporter: hillary clinton for her part showed the difference between being a senator and how she would be a president saying that, in fact, war is not her first option, the first place she would like to go is diplomacy. >> it's imperative you do your
7:03 am
best every president and certainly i will to avoid military action it should be the last resort, not the first choice. to use diplomacy even if it is slow, boring, hard, to continue to persistent be patient to get results and that you also should use the enormous capabilities that we have to project our values around the world, our cultural values, our freedoms, our human rights and respect for the dignity of all people. >> reporter: then there is martin o'malley the former governor of maryland cited in a des moines endorsement of hillary clinton where they said he would be most suited for a cabinet position. o'malley says he is in the race to win. >> we need a candidate who can actually pull us together, who can heal these divisions and get things done, that is what i have done all my life. i'm not a divider and if i were i would not be able to accomplish what we accomplished in a very troubled city or state through a recession and that is what i believe the people of
7:04 am
iowa are looking for. >> reporter: these three democratic candidates get along and complement each other like the ads with bernie sanders america ad and it's a presidential race and facing off against each other and hillary clinton feeling bernie sanders in the poll numbers in iowa and this is a chance they all had to make the closing statement to the people of iowa. >> michael shore for us in iowa and stay with us coming up, in about 15 minutes we are going to be uk that talking more about the town hall meeting and what is at stake in iowa with political scientist kristina greer. we could find out later today who is invited over talks to end syria's war and will send out invitations schedule on friday and today i.s.i.l. claimed responsibility for a suicide bomb in homs that killed at least 20 people and the government says it retook a keytown in deraa providence with help of air strikes and sergei fedorov addressed russia's role
7:05 am
in syria this morning. >> translator: key direction of our efforts has been moving forward with the initiative of president vladimir putin the creation of a broad antiterrorist coalition. actions by russian airforces have substantially helped to turn around the situation in the country and help control the territory controlled by terrorist forces and we have a clear picture of what is acting and trying to use them in their ogetistic, one sided goals. >> increase in fighting could but because of up coming face and al jazeera james base editor explains. >> reporter: over nearly five years of warfare in syria whenever there has been the prospect of a diplomatic initiative we've seen an increase in the fighting on the ground. we saw it two years ago when last time there were talks here in geneva. and i think the reason you are seeing military initiatives right nowadays before talks are
7:06 am
about to start is because staffan de mistura the u.n. envoy who is going to deal with these talks, convene these talks has said one of the first things on the agenda is trying to get ceasefires in place in places in syria as well as humanitarian access. now i think that when the various parties and in case the syrian government hear that possibly a ceasefire is coming soon they clearly try and make some military gains before that ceasefire because they know that once there is a ceasefire the military situation will be frozen so i think what you're seeing on the ground right now in syria and in particular in the last few hours in deraa is linked to the fact that there is prospect of these talks at the end of the week starting here in geneva. >> james base reporting and also tells us russian foreign minister sergei fedorov rejected the suggestion russia tried to persuade assad to step down after negotiations.
7:07 am
alleged person of al-qaeda due in court he has been held in guantanamo bay since 2007 and accused of orchestrating suicide attacks and car bombing against u.s. and coalition force in afghanistan and pakistan in 2003, 2004, those attacks killing at least eight u.s. service members and a 50,000 reward is being offered as authorities are trying to find the three fugitives who escaped from a southern california prison and manhunt continues this morning for the three and they all broke out of the orange county central jail in sant-anna on friday. >> we need the public's help and need the public's assistance to look at the pictures and we know somebody out there knows something. >> reporter: escape led the sheriff department to look at video surveillance and equipment. solitary confinement for
7:08 am
juveniles and in the washington post the president says the practice is overused and cites research that says it can lead to devastating psychological consequences and it will be prohibited for low-level offenses and executive actions include expanding treatment for mentally ill prisoners and supreme court decided hundreds of inmates who were sentenced to life without parole as juveniles can now challenge their punishment. the high court voted to retroactively apply a 2012 ruling they found mandatory life sentences for juveles violates the constitution and al jazeera jonathan marton reports. >> reporter: more than 1,000 u.s. prisoners convicted of murder as juveniles have been serving mandatory life sentences without parole but a ruling on monday means the inmates will now have a chance to be released. >> all of these men and women, some of whom have been in prison for many, many decades now get an opportunity to make their case to a judge or to a parole
7:09 am
board for why it is that it's safe to send them home. >> reporter: in a 6-3 decision the high court determined the 2012 ruling giving all teens a chance to like at parole should be applied retroactively. >> this is a fundamentally a decision that justice is justice and kids are kids everywhere no matter what the accident of geography and of time. >> reporter: the case montgomery versus louisiana involved henry montgomery who spend half a century behind bars and in 1963 at 17 years old he killed a sriff deputy in baton rouge, louisiana and given mandatory life without payroll but 2012 says states cannot sentence someone under 18 to life without parole and factors like maturity and social development must be considered and the attorneys said it should apply to people sentenced before the 2012 ruling. >> it's very much about a level playing field, about ensuring
7:10 am
that rulings by the supreme court, the particular sentences are unconstitutional are indeed applied across the board. >> reporter: and his opinion justice anthony kennedy wrote prisoners like montgomery must be given opportunity to show their crime and not reflect corruption and if it did not the hope of years of life beyond prison walls must be restored and scalia descended and calling it astonishing and said the decision was for the states to make. many states have already been applying the juvenile law retroactively since 2012, 7 including louisiana have not. a long with henry montgomery about 300 louisiana inmates could now be eligible for parole. jonathan martin, al jazeera, new orleans. this morning the second day of testimony begins in the case of a new york city police officer who shot and killed an unarmed black man officer peter lang charged with manslaughter and happened in an unlit stairwell in 2014 and he said it was an accident but monday said
7:11 am
he quote wined about getting fired after the shooting, instead of giving cpr to girly and faces 15 years in prison. this morning two of the activists behind the under cover videos at planned parenthood are facing charges and it was an unexpected result of a grand jury's investigation into the health provider and al jazeera john henry smith has the story. >> reporter: these under cover videos launched a nationwide debate over planned parenthood and abortion appointments said they were the smoking gun they needed to prove the group was proving from abortion. >> hard to close your eyes and ignore this is a child that is being dismembered. >> reporter: the people that made and released the videos in 2015 said it was investigative journalism but monday a grand jury in houston said two of the people involved in making those videos committed a crime. >> trying to get planned parenthood to commit a crime and at the same time you are committing a crime yourself. >> reporter: that grand jury
7:12 am
indicted the 27-year-old founder of the center for medical progress david delidan as well as another center employee, both face felony charges they tampered with a government record. there are reports those charges are connected to the use of fake identification cards that look like driver's licenses and he is also charged with violating the state's prohibition on the purchase and sale of human organs. >> and the charges they could go to jail for this. >> reporter: grand jury convened at request of state lawmakers who wanted charges against planned parenthood and found no evidence planned parenthood ever tried to illegally profit from abortions and after the ruling planned parenthood released a statement saying the only people who engaged in wrongdoing are the criminals behind this fraud and he released a statement saying planned parenthood cannot deny the mission of leadership of
7:13 am
fetal organ sales captured on video for all the world to see. planned parenthood long insisted it does not sell tissue from aborted fetuses and any money talked about in the videos was maritally money intended to cover costs. officials say the two makers of those videos are now in talks with authorities to turn themselves in and their bond has been set as $10,000 each, fairly low. >> i guess the other question is has planned parent hood taken legal action against these two activists. >> actually stephanie earlier this month planned parenthood filed a suit against medical progress and people with the under cover videos and includes david and said they had a three-year campaign against parenthood using criminal means and the center for medical progress called the suit frivolous. >> and while the snow was
7:14 am
falling down the march was taking place as scheduled. thanks john. new calls food for today for protesters occupying a wildlife center to go home and the group met with local officials on monday and have no plans to leave but native american groups want to force the protesters out and fear some artifact also go missing, a local sheriff in the neighboring county said officials should give into some of the group's demands to end the occupation. >> offices in washington d.c. are still closed and costs that closed the capitol and think the storm could cost the region between 500 million and 3 billion with a b dollars. that includes lost business, similar storm back in 1996 cost nearly $5 billion in economic losses. damage is clearly visible also in new jersey where the high tides overwhelmed some of the communities along the shore but officials say that miles of protective dunes that were built after hurricane sandy saved a
7:15 am
lot of towns. >> believe it or not a front coming through and a rain maker for if east coast and we will look at that with nicole mitchell. >> talking about the cost imagine had this not happened on a saturday. >> right. >> when there were really almost two days of recovery before trying to get people back to work in a lot of cases. the next system nothing by comparison and rain maker for the most part is one difference but much weaker and not going to cause too many problems and you can see the snow side like the upper peninsula of michigan we could get 5-6", parts of wisconsin 3-4" but not really unusual snow for the month of january especially for this part of the country and enhancing across the great lakes. you can start to see the front pretty clearly as it picks up moisture and has more rain along it and that is what it will be for most people but as it continues later today into portions of the northeast and areas highlighted in pink and purple is where you can see a little ice mixing in and really
7:16 am
light and enough to coat and we have snow on the ground and watch for icy spots and back behind this closer to the lake where we see the wind advisories especially coming off of lake eerie watch for that to gust in 30 miles per hour range but could gust 30-50 miles per hour and not a lot of snow, some but a lot of places this will be rain instead and even through the next couple of days the front lingers through the south and in terms of the rain it's the south and southeast that gets the brunt of that and the forecast through the next couple of days and definitely this is kind of the only player and other than that we had the calm after the storm. >> but flooding is going to be a concern and nicole thank you very much diplomacy at the holy sea. >> pope francis meets with iran's president today as the vatican weighs in on politics in the middle east. i'm andrew near turkey's border with syria and reporting
7:17 am
on children living in poverty and the rainbow project that is giving them some hope. the only way to get better is to challenge yourself,
7:18 am
and that's what we're doing at xfinity. we are challenging ourselves to improve every aspect of your experience. and this includes our commitment to being on time. every time. that's why if we're ever late for an appointment, we'll credit your account $20. it's our promise to you. we're doing everything we can to give you the best experience possible. because we should fit into your life. not the other way around.
7:19 am
♪ well the democrats who want to be president pitting experience against judgment last night in their final pitch ahead of the iowa caucuses and in des moines bernie sanders and hillary clinton trying to draw on records and saying his war in iraq and clinton talking about her experience as a young activist and clinton lead over sanders is getting narrow and clinton 52% and sanders 38% and former governor of maryland martin o'malley just 2% very far behind the race in iowa even tighter with clinton and sanders now at a statistical dead heat
7:20 am
and professor of science and thanks for being with us and hillary clinton and bernie sanders neck and neck did either do anything to move the voters in a positive or negative direction based on what you saw? >> no, i don't think so. i think this is sort of their last week to make their case even though these were undecided the people who want hillary clinton are not going any where and staying with bernie so to introduce themselves to a lot of people but in many ways it's for the rest of the country and i think iowa is pretty much locked in. >> the first question that hillary clinton had to answer had to do with her character, take a listen. >> i've heard from quite a few people my age that they think you're dishonest. >> i'm totally happy to see young people involved in any way. i've been around a long time. people have thrown all kinds of things at me. and you know i can't keep up with it. i just keep going forward. they fall by the way side, they come up with these out landish
7:21 am
things and make charges and i keep going forward because there is nothing to it. they throw all this stuff at me and i'm still standing. >> reporter: she has had to answer this question in the past and she has had a tough time doing so, it boils down to how do you prove -- disprove a negative, how did she do last night? >> well with the clintons and come as a box set, this is what we consistently see. i mean there is no one on the planet with hillary clinton's phobe and there are pros and cons to that and has been around a long time and many things in her past that quite frankly concern a lot of people especially young people and she answered the question and always answered the question-and-answered the question about the e-mails and answered the question about the vote in iraq and about healthcare and her relationship with the republicans so i think part of the sub text of the question was why is it that you always seem to sort of be surrounded by people who don't
7:22 am
find you to be on the up and up. >> also this question that was asked of bernie sanders was fascinating and asked about his claims he is a democratic socialist and didn't have the word democratic in there. >> called you a socialist on occasions and you don't seem too troubled by that and sometimes embrace it and wondered if you could elaborate on that. >> sure. >> just to show us what the comfort level of your definition of it so it doesn't concern the rest of us citizens. >> what democratic socialism means is the economic rights, the rights to economic security should exist in the united states of america. it means to me that there is something wrong when we have millions of senior citizens today trying to get by on 11, 12000 a year social security. it means there is something wrong when the rich get richer and almost everyone else gets poor. >> reporter: is there such thing as a democratic socialist
7:23 am
and if he is a socialist can a socialist win in a general election? >> i don't think a socialist could win in a general election but it depends on who she going against and vast majority of americans are in the center so if we think about america as a distribution curve the chunk of people are in the middle. in a primary people run to the polls, when i say polls the left and right of the polls and so often times we find the most die hard democrats that may mirror somewhat of a socialist slant in a primary the extreme of the extreme. but bernie's analysis falls short in many ways because he doesn't tackle the issues that are of concern to people of color which is class is one thing but we have a long history of race in this country as well which he doesn't really seem to talk about. >> i want to get to a last issue and that was a muslim woman who was also a veteran who stood up and said my children are now afraid to go to school.
7:24 am
she wanted to know and asked secretary clinton what she thought about donald trump to ban muslim and did she give a forceful enough response and will that play well in the general election with a hockey position from the republican side on the right? >> people always have to move when it comes -- when they have to switch from primary rhetoric to general election and this was a problem with mitt romney and ran so far to the right by the time november came around he was trying to makeup ground and had to go against many of the things he said months prior. i think any democrat if they really want to sort of go with the new mantle of what the party should and could be as we go further in the 21st century it has to be more forceful and policy positions of what we will do in a public education system that is majority minority to protect young people dealing with race and racism we have never seen before. >> donald trump will it hurt him
7:25 am
in the general election regarding muslims? >> his party no. >> thank you and stef. dell donald trump is sitting out in iowa hosted by fox news and kellie won't be fair to him and last year they clashed about his past comments about women and ted cruz has the backing of a person who tried to win the white house rick perry and the former texas governor calls cruz a consistent conservative who can defeat the nominee and keep the military strong and perry himself ran for president in 2012 and again this year and he dropped out early from the race. jimmy carter clarifying earlier remarks that he is cancer free. >> what i said is they have not detected any cancer but sometimes the cancer spots including in my brain which is one millimeter which is a tiny little thing and so i'm still
7:26 am
taking treatments regularly and i'll continue that until the doctors tell me i don't have to any more. >> reporter: now you may recall that in december carter announced that an mri showed his cancer on his brain was gone. the former president said he is positive about treatment and his wife is the one who keeps his spirits high. iran president is at the vatican today, the latest stop on the european tour and meeting with pope francis and talking ties and drumming up business after lifting sanctions in the country and the first trip to europe by an iranian leader in almost two decades and people ask if this is the beginning and end of isolation for the islamic republic. straight ahead unfit for humans. >> i was certainly not bathed a newborn child or a young infant in this bad water. >> they can't drink it, can't bathe in it and why are
7:27 am
residents in flint being billed for their water usage and the fight to hold someone responsible for the contamination. a real life cliff hanger, el nino storm leaves dozens of homes on the brink.
7:28 am
7:29 am
>> "inside story" takes you beyond the headlines, beyond the quick cuts, beyond the soundbites. we're giving you a deeper dive into the stories that are making our world what it is. >> every monday night. >> i lived that character. >> go one on one with america's movers and shakers. >> we will be able to see change. >> gripping... inspiring... entertaining. no topic off limits. >> 'cause i'm like, "dad, there are hookers in this house". >> exclusive conversations you won't find anywhere else. >> these are very vivid, human stories. >> if you have an agenda with people, you sometimes don't see the truth. >> "talk to al jazeera". monday, 6:00 eastern. only on al jazeera america.
7:30 am
welcome back to your world this morning, now 7:30 eastern time. we are going to find out today who's being invited to those unsponsorred talks over ending the war in syria. negotiations were delayed until friday after diplomats couldn't agree who should attend. some of the rebel groups the u.n. calls terrorists and say shouldn't be invited. and anti abortion activist suggesting planned parenthood suggested fee fetal tissues were being sold after abortions. authorities increasing the reward to $50,000 as they try to find three men who escaped a southern california prison. the three broke out of the
7:31 am
orange county jail in santa ana friday. one of them facing murder charges. michigan officials issuing a subpoena for government emails related to the flint water crisis. >> it is one part of an investigation into how dangerous levels of lead got into the city water supply. children are still getting sick. as al jazeera's bisi onile-ere reports, many have rashes from the water and they're being tested for more serious side effects, too. >> the tragedy of flint is a tragedy of immense proportion. words can barely describe this tragedy. >> things went terribly wrong. those were the words of michigan attorney general bill shute. >> i would certainly not bathe a newborn child or a young infant in this bad water. and if you can't drink the bad water, you shouldn't pay for it. >> one week after launching an
7:32 am
investigation into possible wrongdoing, the state attorney general announced two high profile appointments to lead the probe. >> reputations are earned and todd and andy have excellent reputations. >> todd flood who had contributed to rick snyder's campaigns will serve as special counsel. retired chief andrew rena will determine what laws were broken. the attorney general calls the team a firewall as they defend the state against lawsuits brought by residents. >> this is an investigation i can assure you we're going to open up every door. we're going to ask the tough questions, the facts will lead us to the truth. you go in this with flo pro dispositions, no preconceptions. >> in 2014, the financially strapped city cut ties with the
7:33 am
nearby detroit water system and began pulling water from the flint river. chemicals added to clean the polluted river water were corrosive and caused flint's aging pipes to leech lead. elevated lead levels lead to stunted mental development and behavior problems in children we worry constantly about the kids. >> i know the governor has been under fire. who do you hold accountable? >> i think it starts with the city first. they're the ones that switched over. they knew that the pipes were bad. >> pipes that flint leaders say would cost the cash strapped city more than $1 billion to replace. the michigan national guard has spent weeks passing out bottles of water and filters with no end date in sight, as the city in crisis waits on a solution. bisi onile-ere, al jazeera, flint, michigan. >> this just in, walmart, coca-cola, necessarily and pepsi company pledged to supply flint
7:34 am
with water through the end of the year. curt is an investigative reporter at the aclu of michigan and helped uncover the water crisis in flint and joins us from detroit this morning. curt, thank you for your time. you uncovered court documents that revealed that back in 2012, local and state officials thought aboutng rejected it after consulting the state's environmental regulators. what does that prove to you that they thought about it, rejected it, but at some-month decided to use the water from the flint? >> i don't know that it proofs anything, because i don't have yet the documentation that shows what went into making that decision, but certainly, it raises yet more questions about what was going on, which really, this whole situation keeps getting more and more bizarre, as more and more becomes uncovered. but certainly, the questions
7:35 am
raised, how come the river which was decided to be the cheapest choice going forward witness they were looking at different options for the city's long term water supply, and it was determined that the flint river was the cheapest source, yet nonetheless, and you say city officials, but that's not really true. city officials have had no real power at all in flint since 2011, because they've been under the control of a state appointed emergency manager. >> right. >> so it was not city officials, iit was state officials both in terms of the emergency management team and the department of environmental quality that decided not to use the river for the long term, even though it was the cheapest option. >> as you say, in 2014, the city emergency manager who was appointed by the state, a man named darnell early, he said the city would save millions of dollars if it stopped buying detroit's water and got it from flint. do you know who signed off on
7:36 am
that decision? >> yeah. that was darnell early himself in a letter to the detroit department of water and sewerage. detroit wanted to keep selling flint water in the interim while this no pipeline was being built. darnell's letter is on the letter saying thanks but no thanks for your offer, detroit, we're going to use the river. >> do you know if darnell early had a risk assessment from environmental experts, did he know for example that there were risks that lead could leech into the pipes from the water? >> you know, i have not seen a risk assessment. i've filed trying to see if anything like that was done. i've looked at thousands of
7:37 am
documents in response to freedom of information act requests and i've never once seen the worth corrosive. either they did not dew their due diligence or didn't adhere to it. there was culpability in terms of negligence. people did not do their jobs. darnell early signed the letter but according to the former director of public works for the city of flint who has since resigned, according to him, the decision, the ultimate decision to use the river came out of the governor's office. >> you have that on camera. >> people around the answering that camera. >> you have mr. craft, former works director on camera saying that the governor's office in some way approved of the decision. whether or not the governor knew, have you gotten to the bottom of whether he was aware of any risks of lead
7:38 am
contamination? >> no. it certainly was not in the emails that he released, but he didn't release enough emails. he released 2015, 2014, we need to go back, really to 2013, and to 2012, when decisions rewarding use of the river, both long term in 2012 and it was put in motion really in 2013 to use it, so you know, there's a long period of time that the governor needs to produce more emails. it's also sort of mystifying in the emails released during 2014, 2015, there's no emails whatsoever about flint water. >> is there anything you have coming down the pipeline? clearly there is still a lot of questions. is there anything you have coming down the pipeline that
7:39 am
you can share with us this morning? >> no, not at the moment. i'm continuing to dig in to try to get an answer as to where the actual decision to use the river came from. i think that's a very important question. the governor in his state of the state speech really committed a lie of omission in his supposedly comprehensive time line trying to make it seem like that decision to use the river was forced on the state, and that's just not true, so there's a lot of questions that still need to be answered here. >> we'll continue to look for your reporting on that important issue affecting all the residents in flynn michigan, thanks for joining us. >> thanks for having me on. >> we're going to speak to the state senator coming up in our next our. officials in sea bring ohio say they could be the next flint, children and women
7:40 am
getting blood tested today after being advised not to drink the water. elevated of levels of lead were found last year and not reported. the shanghai plunging more than 6%. that is its lowest point now since december of 2014. exchanges in japan and hong kong also closing down more than 2%. oil and concerns about china still moving the markets in the red. >> the federal reserve is meeting today and it comes as many question whether the fed made a mistake when it hiked interest rates in december. patricia sobga joins us. what are the expectations for this upcoming meeting. >> stephanie and del, absolutely no one is expecting the federal reserve to raise interest rates wednesday. giving the beating the global markets and crude oil prices have taken, some wonder if the
7:41 am
fed blundered when it hiked interest rates for the first time in a decade. when you raise interest rates, it slows the economy by making the more expensive for consumers to buy things on credit and firms to take loans to expand businesses. it cellses the value of the dollar, making u.s. goods more expensive to buy abroad. when the fed hiked rates in december, it signaled at that time it could raise rates more times this year. china stock market and its currency have been pounded and the seeming inability of beijing to get a grip has affected other markets, including here in the u.s. as evidenced by this chart of the dow jones industrial average. you see that line down from the beginning of the year. stocks have been dragged down by plunging oil prices and fundamentals of global crude, and a failing cooperation to cut
7:42 am
back production points to more possible pain ahead. >> investors are jittery and that is putting it mildly. what do they want to hear from the fed. >> certainly the fed is going to issue a policy statement, scrutinizing the language. they are going to be waiting to see what the fed has to say about stock markets and oil. really what they're probably hoping to hear is something very doveish, that the fed may be willing to step in with more support. after the e.c.b. lest rates unchanged, mario signaled strongly that the e.c.b. might step up to the plate with more stimulus, basically more cheap money when they meet in march. >> this is why the fed wanted it to be a gradual increase from the beginning. there were these questions. we'll leave it there.
7:43 am
a michigan state judge failing to tell the teachers not to stage sickouts. an injunction had been asked for too keep the teachers in the classroom. the judge saying the district didn't have any proof that the head of the teachers union encouraged those absences. two former walt did i see any employees are suing the company claims it plotted to replace them with foreign workers. the tech workers were fired and replaced with workers from india. they came the firms that brought in the immigrants knew that the american workers would be replaced. disney saying it has rehired more than 100 workers who were laid off. a university of missouri assistant professor who drew national attention faces misdemeanor charges after trying to stop a student journalist from reporting on racially charged protests back in november. we have the story. >> you need to get out. you need to get out. >> no i don't. >> the professor was recorded in
7:44 am
this confrontation with a student journalist. >> click, who teaches communication at the school faces a misdemeanor assault charge. the student journalist was trying to conduct interviews as a protest about racially charged incidents on campus. on monday, the interim chancellor rebuffed demands to fire click, who is in the process of being considered for tenure. >> for those calling for hasty action, we have good strong processes in place and will follow them to their completion and logical outcome. >> she gave up her courtesy appointment in the journalism school. while there are calls for her to be fired, dozens of members of the faculty wrote a letter supporting her. in a statement, the videographer wrote i don't want anyone too assume that this problem goes away with that i urge the university to enact reasonable protections that ensure
7:45 am
journalists can gather news without being strong armed. a university task force is reviewing what happened, including her interaction with the student journalist. >> she plans to plead inning today but if she's found guilty, the prosecutor's office tells al jazeera the teacher would likely be find. there could be a sentence of 15 days in jail. >> i understand that the student journalist on the video was actually went on to receive an award of some type. >> that journalist use that at the end of the video will receive the first amendment defender award. it is given to somebody who takes a public stand for supporting press freedom and he'll be receiving that in march. >> he showed so much courage in defending his right to film when confronted by that teach every. he's got that down and clearly knows his rights, too. take a look at this video, residents in a northern
7:46 am
california town being forced to evacuate as their homes are inching ever closer to the sea. these amounts are just south of san francisco. the large chunks of dirty roding from the coastal bluffers below caused by the high surf and rains, city officials figure they could disappear in the next few days. using yoga moves to help kids de-stress. >> helping children deal with the violence in chicago. the top dog, the pooch went for a walk and wound up ahead of the pack. the only way to get better is to challenge yourself,
7:47 am
7:48 am
and that's what we're doing at xfinity. we are challenging ourselves to improve every aspect of your experience. and this includes our commitment to being on time. every time. that's why if we're ever late for an appointment, we'll credit your account $20. it's our promise to you. we're doing everything we can to give you the best experience possible. because we should fit into your life. not the other way around.
7:49 am
the latest artwork by the illusive street artist has been boarded up. the logo is from the musical movie, bub the young girl is surrounded by gas. the image contained a bar code linked to a video showing french
7:50 am
police releasing tear goes. google will dough note laptops to help refugees resettling in europe, a grant toward a german non-profit providing help for refugees. the war in syria robbing a lot of children of their education, but now there's a small group which volunteers in turkey trying to fill that void. al jazeera's andrew simmons has their story. >> they should be in school but instead are turning out to forage for anything that might make money, paper, cardboard or plastic that could be turned in is what they are looking for. in turkey, the u.n. estimates more than $160,000 syrian refugees are of school age but well beyond half don't go to school. here in the rundown backstreets,
7:51 am
there's a ray of light for these children. some warmth, and some hope in a dismal situation. it may be a small building but a group of volunteers with so much effort and so much enthusiasm are using just two rooms to try to start to educate 65 children with very little money indeed. >> this english teacher said most of their pupils are street kids or parents who can't afford the transportation money to get them to turkish schools. she said it's difficult to troy to help the children with behavioral and learning problems. >> we are trying to do our best. we are looking for information, trying to deal with them with love and with passion and to do our best. >> the children get a snack before leaving at mid-day.
7:52 am
it's the youngest of the pupil most receptive to the teachers. this girl says i love this school, and i come every day. it's called the rainbow center, no one here is paid to teach. there's no religious instruction and no reference to politics. >> the children who don't go to school because they have to work in the streets or wherever, they have lost their rights to a childhood and especially an education. it's all been taken by the war. >> a tragic mix of poverty and conflict have left the children in this way. the reason bay center doesn't pretend to be a school, more a temporary prop for these young lives. the children and their teachers can only dream of a permanent solution. andrew simmons, al jazeera, turkey. the world health organization says the number of obese and overweight children again under the age of five is
7:53 am
alarming. new figures show at least 41 million children fit into that category around the world. that is an increase of 10 million since 1990. the w.h.o. said the numbers are rising fastest in developing countries and it blames the marketing of unhealthy food and drinks as a major factor. in 2015, chicago recorded the most murders of any city in the u.s. it's a city where many families live in daily violence. for kids that can be traumatizing. one group is helping the kids deem with the stress based on yoga. >> in the suffocating violence on chicago's south side. >> inhale. >> it helps to breathe. >> hold it. exhale. >> once a week students in the tough englewood neighborhood practice yoga to help clear their minds of the gangs, guns and police to infiltrate their
7:54 am
lives. >> hey, get off the drive! >> how do we get into the warrior pose? >> it can help you like calm down and when you get angry. >> it helps cool you down and like helps cool your mind down. >> bend down when you look at me, you have your hand here. >> the two instructors are from the non-profit i grow chicago. they grew up in englewood and started teaching yoga at the school last fall. they say it's a great way to reduce conflict. >> it helps to not focus on the negativity. once you're into yoga, we say be mindful of your choices, you know, be mindful of your surroundings. >> this exercise is about self control. >> we cheer loud, we say happy
7:55 am
birthday loud, we clap loud, as duties, we know how to bring it back down. >> kids face constant challenges. on this day, two schools were on lockdown all morning because of a shooting just a couple of blocks away. >> child health researchers say children exposed to constant violence can show symptoms of post traumatic stress similar to combat veterans. rebecca levine says that makes it hard for them to develop coping skills. >> we have children who are exposed to the constant level of violence and fear and it's as if their fight or flight mechanism is always kicked in. >> the teachers think the yoga makes a difference at the school. she is using it in her classroom. >> before the test today, we implement breathing, had them
7:56 am
visualize what they would do if they have a difficult time with a problem, and how they can stop and calm themselves down. >> for these kids, a half hour of yoga is a welcome respite from the stress in their lives, a chance to just be kids. diane esterbrook, al jazeera, chicago. a lot of combat veterans actually do do yoga. a blood hound may no longer be called lazy. he wandered away on the morning of a race. he wound up following some of the fastest runners. the dog placed seventh overall, finishing just over an hour and a half, but he was first among dogs. how do you feel if you came in behind a dog. >> apparently he joined at mile 13, so he had a lot more energy than the runners from the first half of the marathon.
7:57 am
ahead in our next hour, accountability for the water crisis in flint. we speak with the michigan state senator who represents the city. the growing fears over the zika virus, women warned about the risk if they get pregnant. we are back in two minutes with more of your world this morning. >> stay with us. >> the homeless, it's not always who you think. >> the majority are families with children. >> a growing epidemic that impacts us all. >> i think it's the most helpless feeling i've ever experienced. >> but who's getting rich while some are just trying to survive? >> they want to make the city for people that can afford things. >> "faultlines". >> al jazeera america's hard-hitting... >> today the will be arrested. >> ground-breaking... >> they're firing canisters of gas at us. >> award-winning, investigative documentary series.
7:58 am
7:59 am
8:00 am
you have to have somebody who is a proven, proven fighter, somebody who has taken them on and won. >> fighting for iowa, hillary clinton and bernie sanders spar over specifics in hopes of winning the first votes of 2016. the president lays out new rules for underage prisoners and the supreme court calls this of their sentences unconstitutional. planned parenthood in the clear, accusers face felony
8:01 am
charges instead. the chinese market tumbles again as policy meeters meet to talk interest rates. we are less than a week from the iowa caucuses and the democrats who want to be president are pulling out all the stops to make their case to voters. >> hillary clinton and bernie sanders squaring off on their vision and experience at a town hall in des moines at a time the polls show both in a dead heat. we have more. >> it was a chance for iowa voters to pose questions direct lib to the democratic presidential candidates, including hillary clinton, no longer leading opinion polls in iowa, now struggling to overcome scandals of the past and win the support of young voters.
8:02 am
>> i've heard from quite a few people mage that they think you're dishonest, but i'd like to their from you why you feel the enthusiasm isn't there. >> there's nothing to it, they throw all this stuff at me and i'm still standing. >> clinton used the stage to echo statements she's made on the campaign trail, that as a former secretary of state she has the most foreign policy experience to be president. she took aim at the republican front runner donald trump for his statements against muslims. >> we need a coalition that includes muslim nations to defeat isis, and it's pretty hard to figure out how you're going to make a coalition with the very nations you need if you spend your time insulting their religion. >> bernie sanders acknowledged hillary clinton has foreign policy experience but highlighted her biggest mistakes. >> hillary clinton voted for the war in iraq. >> as an anti establishment
8:03 am
candidate who pledged to overcome income inequality, sanders reminded voters banks were deregulated when her husband, bill was president. >> i led against wall street deregulation. see where hillary clinton was on this issue. >> despite polling showing clinton and sanders leading the race to the democratic nomination in iowa, there's a third candidate martin o'malley saying he is the best man to overcome the tensions in the united states. >> yes, black lives matter. >> despite o'malley telling supporters to stand strong, his biggest challenge will be to prove he's still relevant in a presidential nomination contest that has become a two person race. >> you should have seen stephanie's face when i called
8:04 am
her hillary sanders. fro are pros and consist to hillary clinton presenting herself at someone with vast experience. >> she has been around a very long time, so there are many things in her past that concern a lot of people, especially young people, so she acknowledged the question, but she's always and the questions about the emails, the vote in iraq, health care, about her relationship with republicans. i think part of the subtext of the question was why is it that you always seem to sort of be surrounded by people who don't find you to be on the up and up. >> also if question was asked of bernie sanders was fascinating. he was asked about his claims that he is a democratic socialist. take a listen. >> some of your detractors have called you a socialist on occasion and you don't seem too troubled and sometimes embrace it. >> sure. >> i wonder if you can elaborate
8:05 am
on that just to show us your comfort level. >> what democratic socialism means to me is that economic rights, the right for economic security should exist in the united states of america. it means to me that there's something wrong when we have millions of senior citizens today trying to get by on $11,000, $12,000 a year social security. it means there's something wrong when the ridge get richer and almost everybody else gets poorer. >> first of all, is there really such thing as a democratic socialist and if he is a socialist, can a socialist win in a general election? >> i don't think a socialist can win in a general election but then again it depends who he's going against approximate the vast majority of americans are in the center. the chunk of people are in the middle. >> the latest poll showing clinton's lead nrowing
8:06 am
nationwide, 52%, sanders 38%. former maryland governor martin o'malley with just 2% of the vote. and alleged senior member of al-qaeda is scheduled to appear in a military court today, held at guantanamo bay since 2007. he is accused of orchestrating suicide attacks and car bombings against u.s. and coalition forces in afghanistan and pakistan in 2003 and 2004. the attacks killed eight u.s. service members. a $50,000 reward is offered as authority try to find three fugitives who escaped a southern california prison. the tree broke out of the orange county central men's jail in santa ana on friday. authorities are asking for help. >> we absolutely needle the public's help. we need the public's assistance to look at these picture. we know that somebody out there
8:07 am
knows something. >> the escape that led the sheriff's department to reassess focus on security. president obama banning solitary confinement for juveniles in the federal prison system. in today's washington post, the president said the pro is overused, citing research that it leads to devastating psychological consequences. the executive actions include expanding the treatment for mentally ill prisoners, as well. the president's decision coming on the same day the supreme court ruled that hundreds of inmates can now challenge their life sentences. all were juveniles at the time they were convicted. the justice ruled an earlier decision applies to their cases, as well. >> jonathan martin reports. >> more than 1,000 u.s. prisoners convicted of murder as juveniles have been serving mandatory life sentences without parole. a supreme court ruling monday ans inmates will now have a cans chance to be released. >> am of these men and women,
8:08 am
some of whom have been in prison for many many decades now get an opportunity to make their case to a judge or to a parole board for why it is that it's safe to send them home. >> in a 6-3 decision, the high court determined it's 2012 ruling giving all teenagers a chance at parole that are sentenced to life done retroactively. >> justice is justice and kids are kids everywhere, no matter what the accident of geography and time. >> the case montgomery versus lose involved henry montgomery, spent over half a century behind bars. at 17 years old, he killed a sheriff's deputy in baton rouge and given a mandatory sentence of life without parole. in 2012, the supreme court ruled states con no longer automatically sense someone under 18 to life beyond parole, factors like development and maturity must be consider road.
8:09 am
that must ply to people sentenced before the 2012 ruling. >> it's about ensuring rulings by the supreme court, the particular sentences are unconstitutional are indeed applied across the board. >> justice anthony ken dip wrote prisoners like montgomery must be given the opportunity to show their crime did not reflect irreparable corruption and if not, their hope for some life outside prison walls must be restored. anthony sale i can't dissented, saying this decision was for the states to make. many states have been applying the juvenile law retroactively since 2012. several have not. along with henry montgomery, inmates could now be eligible for parole. al jazeera, new orleans. this morning, two activists behind undercover videos behind plant parent hood face charges. it was the result of a grand
8:10 am
jury investigation into the health provider. john henry smith has the story. >> these wonder jump videos launched a nation wild debate over planned parenthood. an oh borings opponent they were a smoking gun proving the group profited from abortions. >> it's hard to ignore that this is a child being dismembered. >> the people that made and released the videos in 2015 said it was investigative journalism. a grand jury in houston said two involved in making those videos committed a trial. >> trying to get planned parenthood to commit a crime by committing a crime yourself. >> the 27-year-old founder of the cent for medical progress was indicted, as well as another employee. both face felony charges they tampered with a government record. there are reports those charges are connect the to the use of fake identification cards that
8:11 am
looked like driver's licenses. he is also charged with violating the state's prohibition on the purchase and sale of human organs. >> they'll have to go to court and defend these charges. they could go to jail for this. >> the grand jury had been convened at the request of state lawmakers who wanted charges against planned parenthood. jurors found no evidence that planned parenthood ever tried to illegally profit from oh boringses. after the ruling, planned parenthood released a statement saying the only people engaged in wrongdoing are the criminals behind this fraud. david released his own statement saying planned parenthood still cannot deny the admission from their leadership about fetal organ sales captured on video for all the word to see. planned parenthood insisted it does not sell tissue from aborted feet at uses. it said any money talked about in those videos was merely money intended to cover costs. >> officials say the two makers
8:12 am
of those videos are now in talks with authorities to turn themselves in, bond set at $10,000 each. >> really surprising development. texas is one of a few states that launched investigations. will the investigation continue? >> it will. texas gone greg abbot said the state will press on with investigation of planned parenthood. the state attorney general said the videos still show that he calls a additional reward of human life by that the abortion industry. >> thank you very much. this morning, a lot of government workers are still working from home, their offices in washington, d.c. still closed. that storm could cost the region anywhere between $500 million and $3 billion. it includes lost business. another storm back in 1996 cost nearly $5 billion in economic losses. damage also visible in new jersey where the high tides
8:13 am
overwhelmed the jersey shore. those miles of protective dunes that were built after hurricane sandy saved a lot of the coastal towns. another storm is already rolling in. let's bring in nicole mitchell for for on that. >> these are apples and oranges. this is nothing like the blizzard we saw over the course of the weekend. we have a system moving through the midwest and behind that we'll have another clipper, the front extending down from this, there is still warm air ahead. it's been reasonably comfortable for january the last couple of days and that's helped melt some of the snow from the blizzard. snow this morning going now from wisconsin a little bit more into michigan, northern parts of the state, especially we'll be watching that. we've got rain developing through the southern edge of all of this that we'll deal with through the next days. temperature-wise, a lot of this is going to be rain because even this morning, these aren't the highs for the days, these are the current temperatures, most
8:14 am
are above freezing. so as this starts to push into the northeast, i've only found a couple reports of ice and that's falling on ground that could be a little above freezing. i'm not saying don't be careful and watch for slick spots, but this could be worse if we have slightly colder air, the areas you see in pinks and purples, those are places we watch for possible freezing conditions, hit and miss. it only takes a little spot of that. next to the great lakes, higher winds. we could see those gusts in the 30, 40, even 50-mile per hour range through the course of the day. i mentioned that more of this is rain especially as we head farther south. you can really see that picking up the moisture as it moves along. the heaviest rain will be through portions of the southern united states today. as this moves through the northeast, even places like new york or d.c. cleaning out much more likely to be rain and this kind of lingers in the south, the frontal boundary for the next couple days. we could get some on and off probably not flooding rain in
8:15 am
this area, but definitely heavier stuff from time to time. the forecast tomorrow shows all of that area kind of laying up right through the southeast. back to you. >> nicole, thank you very much. we could find out later today who will be invited to talks to end the war in syria. the u.n. brokered negotiation scheduled for friday. there is been an uptick in fighting as the talks get closer. isil claims responsibility for the suicide bombings that left 20 people dead. the government saying it retook oh key town with the help of russian led airstrikes. today, the danish parliament will vote on a controversy proposal to curb the rights of asylum seekers and refugees. migrants will have to pay 1400 euros to enter the country. the government will confiscate their valuables. it delays family reunions to discourage new arrivals. the bill i guess expected to pass. the anger rising in flint over the water crisis. >> residents say the state left
8:16 am
them to fend for themselves. we'll talk to a state senator who lives in flint himself. back to business, iran's president visits the vatican hoping to rebuild its economy and standing in the world. the only way to get better is to challenge yourself,
8:17 am
and that's what we're doing at xfinity. we are challenging ourselves to improve every aspect of your experience. and this includes our commitment to being on time. every time. that's why if we're ever late for an appointment, we'll credit your account $20. it's our promise to you. we're doing everything we can to give you the best experience possible. because we should fit into your life. not the other way around.
8:18 am
there are new developments in the flint water crisis, the public schools will be provided with water. the state will lunch an investigation into how dangerous levels of lead got into the city's water supply. bisi onile-ere reports. >> the tragedy of flint is a
8:19 am
tragedy of immense proportion. words can barely describe this tragedy. >> things went terribly wrong. those were the words of michigan attorney general bill shute. >> i would certainly not bathe a newborn child or a young infant in this bad water. and if you can't drink the bad water, you shouldn't pay for it. >> one week after launching an investigation into possible wrongdoing, the state attorney general announced two high profile appointments to lead the probe. >> reputations are earned and todd and andy have excellent reputations. >> former prosecutor todd flood who had contributed to rick snyder's campaigns will serve as special counsel.
8:20 am
retired chief andrew rena will determine what if any laws were broken. the attorney general calls the team a firewall as they defend the state against lawsuits brought by flint residents. >> this is an investigation i can assure you we're going to open up every door. we're going to ask the tough questions, the facts will lead us to the truth. we go in this with no predispositions, no preconceptions. >> in 2014, the financially strapped city cut ties with the nearby detroit water system and began pulling water from the flint river. chemicals added to clean the polluted river water were corrosive and caused flint's aging pipes to leech lead. elevated lead levels lead to stunted mental development and behavior problems in children we worry constantly about the kids. >> i know the governor has been under fire. who do you hold accountable? >> i think it starts with the city first. they're the ones that switched over. they knew that the pipes were
8:21 am
bad. >> pipes that flint leaders say would cost the cash strapped city more than $1 billion to replace. the michigan national guard has spent weeks passing out bottles of water and filters with no end date in sight, as the city in crisis waits on a solution. bisi onile-ere, al jazeera, flint, michigan. >> the minority leader in the michigan state senate joins us. jim, thank you so much for your time. i understand that you actually live in flint and are therefore personally impacted by the water crisis. as a lawmaker and representative, were you aware when the city decided to make the switch and were you concerned then? >> yes, i'm also a father. i live in one of the zip codes that is the worst in the community. a lot of people were coming forward expressing concern, but when experts or supposed
8:22 am
experts, department of environmental quality continued over and over again to say the levels were safe even when they were finding out it wasn't, we find ourselves in the situation we are in. >> they told you the levels which safe? where do you place accountable. >> leadership is ownership. the governor has taken the lion's share of the blame. folks within his administration time and time again lied to individuals of my community, lied to members of the governor's staff. unfortunately, it's become aware that the top aids of the governor in july became aware and didn't tell anybody. the citizens of flint deserve better. >> governor snyder said during his state of the stateeach this. >> government failed you, federal, state and local leaders by breaking the trust you placed
8:23 am
in us. we need to make sure this never happens again in any michigan city. >> jim, is that sufficient of an apology to you from the governor? >> i think apologies are important. they would have been extremely important six months ago when they became aware. what we need now is action. the trust in my community, you talk to people in the community, it is gone. the only way to get it back is through action showing people that there's going to be step to say take care of the long term needs, whether infrastructure, whether health care needs especially of children. lead can lead to brain damage, cognitive problems, development issues and we've seen no action on those things. >> the governor has announced a series of actions. for example he is asking for a $28 million in extra funding. are you planning to support that supplemental funding? that would include a million dollars for nurses and health
8:24 am
professionals. it would include addressing some of the immediate needs in flint, according to the governor. >> yeah, i mean i definitely will be supporting it. i'm having a number of amendments when it comes to developmental services people need now and nutrition, which leads to helping get the lead out of the system. 85% of it goes to the various department that is failed us. "million dollars is for water and filters. we've gotten donations from people while the state waited for action. we've seen so many people donate across the country and world water and filters. we almost have too much of that right now. we need the developmental services that help the kids move from a negative to possibly coming out in a better way because we know what works, head start, great start, early on services, one-on-one services to help the kids with their developmental issues if they have any. that is what we need to focus on. there's good things in that
8:25 am
supplemental. i do think it's a step in the right direction. the citizens need real action. >> flinted water crisis really started with a fiscal crisis, didn't snit that has not only gone away, those economic problems, but now a reporter that we've had on the story, bisi onile-ere for a long time, she said the city needs a billion dollars to you. fix the corroded pipes. where is that money going to come from? >> one of the things i've asked for and is in the supplement also, we need a study in the infrastructure, corrosion control if placed back into the water can actually recoat the pipes and provide that protective layer. we have no idea whether the entire system needs to be replaced, just the service lines, some, we have no idea right now. that's one of the trouble things, why so many of us have asked for urgent action. the longer we delay to fix the problem, the more people will be affected by it. >> do you think you're going to see as a resident of flint and i
8:26 am
understand the area in which you live, there are a lot of people who have found lead in their water, do you believe people are going to leave flint, that there will be long term problems with property values? >> there already are, no question about it. there are issues i'm running across every single day from residents. i hope people don't leave. i don't think this is a death sentence for the community. this is a man-made disaster that happened through failures of state government. if services are provided and we take a long term view of this, this is a six year, 10 year, 15 year problem, if we have consistent action, and solutions, not just rhetoric, i think we can actually get this problem solved and the citizens of flint can be better off. obviously this never should have happened, but can have better health outcomes if we do it right. >> we wish you and your colleagues the best of luck in that endeavor to help with the recovery. thank you for your final this
8:27 am
morning. officials in see bring ohio see it could be the next flint, women and children getting their blood tested after being advised don't brink the water. elevated levels of lead app detected last year but were not reported. there is now a criminal investigation. market worries as stocks slide world wild. >> the criticism over the federal reserves roll in the crisis. the united nations demands access to syria. why it says it sees to spike in the number of child soldiers.
8:28 am
8:29 am
>> i'm off the coast of hawaii.
8:30 am
>> we are on the tipping point of an ecological disaster. >> this coral is not dead. >> techknow's team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> can affect and surprise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow - where technology meets humanity. welcome back to your world this morning. it is 8:30 eastern. taking a look at today's top stories, the democratic president candidacy are facing off for the final time ahead of the iowa caucuses. they took part in a town hall event in dough money, bernie sanders went after hillary clinton's past votes, including support for the iraq war. clinton defended her record. president obama banning solitairsolitary confinement fow level juvenile offenders in the juvenile offender prison. the president saying the
8:31 am
practice is over used. he cites research showing it leads to definitely stating psychological consequences. two activists face felony charges for their videos of planned parenthood. two were indicted. the jury cleared the health group of breaking allows over its handle of fetal tissues. u.s. stocks are higher this hour, oil is climbing. you never know what's going to happen on wall street these days. >> the shanghai plummeted. exchanges in japan closed down 2%, despite signs that oil producers may be closer to tackling the supply glut driving prices down. >> those market fluctuation sure to be discussed at the ted meeting today. we've got more weakness in the asian stocks but the dow seems to be trending higher today.
8:32 am
what continues to drag on the markets and why can't we get certainty among investors. >> we are getting a lot of volatility and that reflects the tremendous amount of uncertainty. will oil prices such 12 years lows last week go down to 20, which is what many analysts calling for. also the uncertainty over china. how weak is their economy. can beijing get a handle, because so far, they seem ununable to get a handle on both their plunging currency and stock crisis. >> the federal revere increased interest rates at their last meeting. could that be to blame for the volatility. >> it was a really huge deal. it's impossible to really say is this responsible for the volatility, because we're talking about sentiment. now, there are voices out there that are saying investors
8:33 am
feeling uncomfortable because they've lost that crutch of near zero interest rates. basically it was the first interest rate hike in a decade and pulled interest rates off the near zero level they've been at since 2008. some say this injected more nervousness into the market and this could be one of the reasons we're seeing all this volunteering tilt. one thing is for certain, it certainly helped contribute to the rise in the dollar. let's say the fed decides to lower interest rates again this time year or doesn't raise them more, the dollar is a safe haven, a port in the storm when people aren't sure what the future holds. >> china following the lead of the united states, the united states following the lead of china, will the global markets affect china. >> china is the stuart of the global economy, the u.s. is the
8:34 am
largest economy on the planet. they'll scrutinize the policy statement to see what the fed has to say about china, what the fed may say about oil price, they'll also be hoping cross be their fingers and hoping that the fed will give some sign that it's willing to maybe step in and ease things a little bit with some stimulus. that's what happened last week with the european central bank. they certainly sent that signal that they would be willing to step in in march. the u.n. is appealing for more aid to help millions of syrian children. humanitarian leaders described a dire situation in the country, saying children are starving and basic health care needs not met. this comes days ahead of peace talks in geneva. aid groups hope talks will allow them to finally get help to people who most need it. >> after five years now of access problems and people starving to death in
8:35 am
besiegement, i want us to use this momentum to get the international sponsors of the parties to tell in no uncertain terms total parties, give access to everybody now. so i don't foresee any negotiation on it. i foresee them granting this to us and us using this momentum. >> the u.n. said children are taking more active roles in fighting, manning checkpoints and taking part in suicide bombings. as andrew simmons tells us, others are simply being robbed of an education. >> they should be in school, but instead, they're turning out whatever the weather to forage for anything that might make them some money. paper, cardboard or plastic that could be turned in is what they are looking for.
8:36 am
they move on with empty bags. in turkey, the u.n. estimates more than 160,000 syrian refugees are of school age but well beyond half don't go to school. here in the rundown backstreets, there's a ray of light for these children. some warmth, and some hope in a dismal situation. it may be a small building but a group of volunteers with so much effort and so much enthusiasm are using just two rooms to try to start to educate 65 children with very little money indeed. >> this english teacher said most of their pupils are street kids or children of parents who can't afford the transportation money to get them to turkish schools. she said it's difficult to try to help the children with behavioral and learning problems. >> we are trying to do our best. we are looking for information, trying to deal with them with
8:37 am
love and with passion and to do our best. >> the children get a snack before leaving at mid-day. it's the youngest of the pupils who are most receptive to the teachers. this girl says i love this school, and i come every day. it's called the rainbow center, no one here is paid to teach. there's no religious instruction and no reference to politics. >> the children who don't go to school because they have to work in the streets or wherever, they have lost their rights to a childhood and especially an education. it's all been taken by the war. >> a tragic mix of poverty and conflict have left the children in this way. the rainbow center doesn't pretend to be a school, more a temporary prop for these young lives. the children and their teachers can only dream of a permanent solution. andrew simmons, al jazeera, turkey.
8:38 am
ran's president is going to be at the vatican today on his european tour, he's there trying to rebuild ties with the west and drum up business after the lifting of sanctions against his country. it is the first state visit to europe by an iranian leader in two decades. we are live in rome. jacki, a new amnesty international report highlighting iran's executions of minors. will those human rights be under the spotlight only trip? >> well, in general, no, because the emphasis is very much for italy's political leaders has been on the economy and trade. however, they will have been under the spotlight, we expect during the meeting that ended a short while ago between hassan
8:39 am
rouhani and the pope. he will be urged to use his influence and contact with the regime of bashar al assad in syria to try to help international efforts to get those syrian peace talks restarted. >> what does ili have to gain with working with iran? >> italy obviously is like many countries in europe, struggling economically. the economy's quite depressed. growth is sluggish. certainly what ran offers now are new opportunities to do business, investment, and of course if the italian firms getting contracts in iran, that can mean jobs for people in italy. we have seen a number of contracts signed, around $18 billion worth of contracts with italian companies, just one note of caution for those companies, sanctions could
8:40 am
potentially be reintroduced against iran if the nuclear deal is not being respected. that is something cross and business leaders have to bear in mind. >> those snap back provisions, thank you very much. >> one of the architects of the fight against the taliban is stepping down, saying he will retire this year. he's held the position since 1998. sharif has been an important partner to the u.s. in the fight. malaysia cleared the prime minister of corruption over a nearly $700 million gift from saudi arabia. the findings were released today. the prime minister did not commit a crime by accepting the money. he has been criticized for financial mismanagement in the past. a university of missouri assistant professor who drew national attention is due in court today. >> she faces misdemeanor charges after trying to stop a
8:41 am
journalism stand from reporting. we have the story. >> you need to get out. you need to get out. >> no i don't. >> the professor was recorded in this confrontation with a student journalist. >> click, who teaches communications at the school faces a misdemeanor assault charge. the student journalist was trying to conduct interviews at a protest about racially charged incidents on campus. on monday, the interim chancellor rebuffed demands to fire click, who is in the process of being considered for tenure. >> for those calling for hasty action, i say this, we have good strong processes in place and will follow them to their completion and logical outcome. >> click gave up her courtesy appointment in the journalism school.
8:42 am
while republican state lawmakers called for her to be fired, dozens of members of the faculty wrote a letter supporting her. in a statement, the videographer wrote i don't want anyone too assume that this problem goes away. i urge the university to enact reasonable protections that ensure journalists can gather news without being strong armed. a university task force is reviewing what happened, including her interaction with the student journalist. >> click plans to plead not guilty today but if she's found guilty, the prosecutor's office tells al jazeera the teacher would likely be find. there could be a sentence of 15 days in jail. >> is she still in class? >> no, are is working from home. asked if she would be fired before the school ton err pros, he said there is no chance of that. >> thank you very much. a driver in north carolina has been charged with killing a man who tried to rescue him during this weekend said snowstorm. a marvin jacob lee appeared in
8:43 am
court monday. lee's car spun out near charlotte and got stuck in the snow. lee got angry when the good samaritan approached and shot the man numerous times. police believe lee was drunk. the founder of hot yoga has been ordered to pay nearly a million dollars. a jury sided with the accuser against him, the crater of the yoga. the suit was brought by a lawyer who alleged that he sexually harassed her then fired her after she started investigating claims that he raped a yoga student. six other women have sued, alleging that he sexually assaulted or harassed them. he denies all claims. the cold snap bringing the nation to a standstill. a community on edge, some homes in california at risk of being swallowed up by that the ocean. ocean. the only way to get better is to challenge yourself,
8:44 am
8:45 am
and that's what we're doing at xfinity. we are challenging ourselves to improve every aspect of your experience. and this includes our commitment to being on time. every time. that's why if we're ever late for an appointment, we'll credit your account $20. it's our promise to you. we're doing everything we can to give you the best experience possible. because we should fit into your life. not the other way around.
8:46 am
a dangerous cold snap is sweeping east asia and is responsible for the death of at least 85 people in taiwan. al jazeera is in beijing with more. >> asia is freezing, plummeting temperatures and snowfall in japan is reducing traffic to a crawl. cancellation and delays mean public transport is in chaos. businesses grinding to a halt because staff struggle to get to work. >> i was supposed to board the 2:00 train, but i'm thinking of going home, since i don't know
8:47 am
when the trains will arrive. >> in taiwan, dozens of people, many trail and elderly have died. the sudden drop in temperature strains their hearts and lungs. many homes don't have central heating. in vietnam, farmers are helplessly watching their crops freeze and animals die. >> since i was born, i've never seen anything like this. this weather is badly affecting our society and my family's economy. >> the south korean island has had its heaviest snowfall in 30 years. airports were shut over the weekend, leaving many travelers stranded. >> staying in the airport is really exhausting. i really want to get out of the area. i've been at the airport 12 hours. >> hong kong experienced its coldest day in 60 years. in northern china, temperatures dropped below minus 40. >> the cold front is forecast to exit tuesday, allowing
8:48 am
temperatures to creep back up to normal. >> this will come as a relief to many, in particular to the millions of people who have been traveling home for the upcoming luna newer holiday. >> the latitude of taiwan is that like hawaii. they are not prepared for that kind of snow there. >> nicole mitchell, you just got back from thailand. >> that was in the 90's ait's amazing we're talking about that cold snap and this cold snap and people saying climate change is not happening. >> these storms fuel bigger events. while we are cold in the united states, that's one of the things i mentioned with this storm, a lot of times these big storms usher in these major cold snaps. this one didn't do this. this is more typical january weather, even above average. a lot of tees temperatures, the northeast above freezing, so we've been able to melt a little
8:49 am
bit overnight. i've only seen a couple below freezing. ice is a concern. there could be spots of ice with this next round of moisture, parts of new york and pennsylvania, but this could be much more widespread. we need to be probably here, thankful that we stayed a little bit on the mild side. we have the system moving through. it's rain through the southern edge, snow on the great likes side of this. watches for the freezing temperatures this morning. atlanta got snow, so we recovered nicely in terms of temperatures. watching the next system come in, a lot of this to the southern edge, rain, also a little bit of rain, mostly rain for the west coast, too, so we're very fortunate we didn't get one of those dips after this especially with people losing power. >> absolutely. >> and we haven't mentioned it this morning, but with del
8:50 am
needing to dig out. >> my neighbors still digging out. in northern virginia, it is worse than washington, d.c. most of the people who live there work in d.c. one town in california forced to evacuate. >> in the last week, probably seven, eight feet, at least. in the last 40 years, 100 feet. >> these amounts just south of san francisco, large chunks of dirty reading below caused by surf and powerful rains. city official fear those amounts will slide away within the next couple of days. taking drastic measures to keep a virus from spreading. >> taking action against the zika virus.
8:51 am
8:52 am
8:53 am
dire warnings from the world health officials about the zika virus, saying the outbreak will spread across all of north and south america. that virus linked to brain damage in babies. we have more from mexico city. >> the zika virus has spread to -- zika is spread by mosquitoes. brazilian authorities think it
8:54 am
causes micro receive lee. there is a growing number of cases and are taking the extraordinary step to advise women against getting pregnant. the u.s. authorities themselves have issued guidelines on travel to zika hot spots. >> we are quite concerned about the potential complications to the fetus of zika virus infection of pregnant women, so we are advising that pregnant women seriously consider postponing travel to these areas if possible. >> the world health organization that come out and said this is now affecting the zika virus, 21 countries and territories in the americas and think it is going to spread to every country in the region apart from canada and chile who don't have the type of
8:55 am
mosquito that brings the zika virus with them. >> mexico is fumigating public spaces and houses in the south to try to get ahead of the virus. >> we will not stop the virus. we haven't been able to stop dengue fever which is the same mosquito. use long sleeves, pants, and repellant. >> all this just months from the brazil olympics this summer, where a huge influx of visitors would also be vulnerable to the apparent threat of this virus. al jazeera, mexico city. world health officials call the rising numbers of obese and overweight children and exploding night near. new figures show 41 million children under five fit into that category aund the world. that is an increase of 10 million since 1990. the w.h.o. says the numbers are rising fastest in developing
8:56 am
countries and blames the marketing of unhealthy food and drinks as a major factor. in 2015, chicago rolled the most murders of any city in the u.s. it's a city where many families live amid daily violence and for kids that can be especially traumatizing. one group is using an ancient pro to help kids deal with the stress of that violence. we have a report from chicago. >> in the suffocating violence on chicago's south side, it helps to breathe. >> inhale, hold it, exhale. >> once a week, students in the school in chicago's tough englewood neighborhood practice yoga to help clear their minds of the gangs, guns and police to infiltrate their lives. >> hey, get off the drive! >> how do we get into the warrior pose? >> it can help you like calm down and when you get angry.
8:57 am
>> it helps cool you down and like helps cool your mind down. >> bend down when you look at me, you have your hand here. >> the two instructors are from the non-profit i grow chicago. they grew up in englewood and started teaching yoga at the school last fall. they say it's a great way to reduce conflict. >> it helps me not focus on the negativity. once you're into yoga, we say be mindful of your choices, you know, be mindful of your surroundings. >> this exercise is about self control. >> we cheer loud, we say happy birthday loud, we clap loud, as adults, we know how to bring it back down. >> kids face constant challenges. on this day, two schools were on
8:58 am
lockdown all morning because of a shooting just a couple of blocks away. >> child health researchers say children exposed to constant violence can show symptoms of post traumatic stress similar to combat veterans. rebecca levine says that makes it hard for them to develop coping skills. >> we have children who are exposed to the constant level of violence and fear and it's as if their fight or flight mechanism is always kicked in. >> the teachers think the yoga makes a difference at the school. she is using it in her classroom. >> before the test today, we implement breathing, had them visualize what they would do if they have a difficult time with a problem, and how they can stop and calm themselves down. >> for these kids, a half hour
8:59 am
of yoga is a welcome respite from the stress in their lives, a chance to just be kids. diane esterbrook, al jazeera, chicago. taped the day we learn if the world is moving closer to doomsday. scientists will announce whether we're ticking closer to midnight, representing the destruction of earth. key factors in moving the clock closer are nuclear weapons threats, climate change and new technology. the clack stands three minutes to midnight, the closer since its inception 60 years ago. as kids, this used to freak us out. >> that's it for us here in new york. >> your word this morning is back tomorrow morning beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. we're going to look at the. of juveniles behind bars. the president is banning solitary confinement for them in federal jails. >> for news anytime, go to
9:00 am
aljazeera.com. thanks for watching. syria is probably the most dangerous applies on earth now to be a child. >> an appeal for syria's most vulnerable humanitarian agencies warn an entire generation could be lost. welcome live from our headquarters in doha. also coming up, the syrian army retakes the key town, gaining leverage ahead of a new round of talks. stock market panic in china, investors sell their shares, causing the market to foul

36 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on