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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  January 27, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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oregon arrests. wildlife center members in police custody. one dead donald trump pulls out of the iowa face-off. the reason he will not take part in the debate. >> there's no treatment for this virus. if you get infected we can't geoff you a drug to cure you. the zika virus confirmed in another state. now there are guidelines to keep people safe this morning the armed protesters occupying a wildlife
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center in oregon pledged that they will not back down. last night the leader was arrested and another member of the movement shot dead. welcome to "your world this morning." i'm stephanie sy. details of what happened are sketchy, we know that aimen bundy is among those arrested, and now in police custody. it comes a month after they took over the federal building. >> reporter: authorities in oregon released few of the details about a conversation that began with a traffic stop. fbi and state police stopped vehicles carrying some of the protesters, it ended with a shoot out. and several members arrested. including the leader, ammon bundy. his brother was shot and injured. the group's spokesman was dead. >> it's the ride of the individual we are looking at.
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>> finighan spoke for the group. he put up numerous videos and talked about the occupation earlier this month with our allen schauffler. >> this grievance is widespread throughout the west. this is not going away. the armed protesters seized wild lie emissions. >> those in the compound went online calling for reinforcement. >> we need the patriots to get hear. >> ammon bundy had been talking with the fbi, it's not clear where the notions stood. it's believed they were heading for a community forum. >> al jazeera's katherine barrett has been covering the stand off and joins us on the phone from seattle. do you have any details on what
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happened yesterday to lead to these arrests. and where does the occupation go from here. >> well, stephanie, where it goes from here remains on open question. obviously from what we understand the two main leaders of the movement have been removed, ammon bundy by arrest and lavoie finighan dead, the fbi has not confirmed his identity. it's been widely reported. it's far from clear whether the arrests and the death will discourage the remaining few who occupy mellor, or pardon their resolve to stay. they have put out a call for reinforcements, calling this an emergency. that's a call they made before, without a huge turn out. but obviously the turn of event towards violence could change that. oregon's governor kate brown released a statement calling for
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patience as officials continued pursuit of a peaceful resolution. oregon department of transportation says that 40 miles of road north of the refuge remains closed for at least one hour more this morning. the situation apparently still fluid. there are not a lot of roads in this area. if the feds and state police are continuing to limit people's movement, that will have an impacts on whether those still occupying it can come or go. again, the situation is best described as fluid at this hour. >> any idea - you said a few protesters remaining, do be know how many are at the wildlife center, and have you heard signs are moving to storm the center or moving closer in to the refuge than they were before? >> i have not heard nor seen
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that. again, this road closure though - obviously they stopped them on the road. if they maintain a road block and maintain other roadblocks, it will be hard for them to get out. short of going in and getting them out. this is an escalation in the federal response to block the roads. they enjoyed free movement over the last month of the occupation. it's just a little too early to say. again, we'll probably scr more news when day breaks al jazeera's katherine barrett with us from seattle. we expect more details in daylight presidential politics and a heated war of words between donald trump and megan fox of fox news. trump saying he will not participate in the presidential
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debate, the final forum before the iowa caucuses. it's debated by the fox nows and meghan kelly. he say cueses the network of toying with him and nose a bad deal when he sees it. >> i'm not doing the debate. we'll do something where we raise money for the wounded veterans. let's see how much money they make without me. >> when of coursed about comment concerning women, it was said: trump taking the heat for his decision to skip the debate from his rival ted cruz. the senator challenging trump to do a one on one debate with him any time before the caucuses on monday. no comment from the trump camp. the latest poll numbers giving trump the edge. 37% backed him in the a.b.c.
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washington survey. ted cruz is second, and marco rubio rounding out the top three with 11% of those polled. >> republican candidates are on the stump in iowa, trying to convince the undecideds to support them. michael shure has the story. >> reporter: texas senator ted cruz is making his final pitch to iowa was before the state caucuses on monday. on the republican side iowa has been a two-man race with the two jostling over the past week for key endorsements. the texas senator picked up support. there is not a candidate that is asking four your support, that reflects it any better, power fully nor consistently than the next president of the united states, senator ted cruz. >> backing up perry was the
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procruise super-pact add in iowa on tuesday. the ad slammed trump and tried to soften a backlash that cruz may have suffered. >> i mean, hey, i lived in new york city and manhattan, my viewses are different than if i lived in iowa. it also aimed at winning back evangelical support. >> when president trump banned the board. >> i'm pro-choice. >> for trump, crews strategy has the hallmarks of desperation. >> he is so nervous, such a mess, his polls have gone down like i have never seen polls go down. people realise you probably can't run for president, he was born in canada. >> any headway cruz hopes to make with evangelicals, especially with sarah palin's endorsement of trump may have been thwarted. trump picked up fall well
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junior, coming as a video from the christian broadcasting network emerged. revealing a meeting with iowa pastors. >> if donald wins iowa, he has a substantial lead in new hampshire, if he wins new lamp shire, there's a chance he could be unstoppable and be the nominee. >> as for the rest of the field. they quather in the hawkeye state one last time to make their case. with donald trump announcing he would not participate in the debate, it's looking like a 3-man show between crust, dr ben carr sen. jed bush, chris christie and john kasich have virtually pulled out of iowa to concentrate on the new hampshire caucuses. >> democrats have been busy in iowa, bernie sanders is getting off the trial and heading to the
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white house. the senator meeting with president obama in oval office. there's no formal agenda. on tuesday, sanders blocked the president's latest appointment to the f.d.a., before heading eest, sanders tried to rally support from voters. >> to my mind we will win here in matthew highmore, if the voter -- in iowa, if the voter tonne out is high. >> hillary clinton has been caughting voters in iowa, and holds the get out the vote there. >> the fbi arresting a man they believe was ready to carry out an attack. he was planning to kill dozens of people at a tem plel in milwaukee. he was arrested after buying machine guns from agents. he said he wanted the attack to be known to the world and ignite broader clashes. >> authorities upping the ante in the capture of three escaped prisoners.
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they broke out last friday for the central gaol in santa ana. the reward has been quadrupled. the men should be considered armed and dangerous. >> six police officers in cleveland should be fired. the chase in 2012 ended in a hail of bullets that killed a couple. one of the officers was criminally charge. he was litre acquitted. >> i promised the community at that thyme that i would find out. >> the public security director, former chief of police, vowed to get to the end of a police chase that ended in gun fire. killing both unamped occupants of this building. 137 shots were fired. 60-plus cars, went through three districts. >> on tuesday, the police department shared its findings,
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the details of an internal investigation into the actions of 13 police officers involved in the shooting. and announced the firing of six officers, including michael brilo, the only officer charged in the incident. he was acquitted of manslaughter last may. >> the acquittal lead toe demonstrations that for the most part were peaceful. >> the officer climbs up on the trunk. he was standing on the police vehicle and firing shots into the car. the officer fired into the vehicle. police recreated a shooting incident using trial testimony. officer j refuses due to the fun fire to retrieve the shotgun. >> reporter: another six officers were responded for their roam.
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>> it's not criminal. it doesn't rise to the level of firing anyone. the police union defend the the actions. >> we mired the guns. we have a right to defend ourselves. the police union vows to appeal the dismissal. >> new details in a fatal police footing. newly released tape shows tony laguer called police three times before coming to their department. he begged for help. a neighbour was killed. >> that shooting happened after christmas - it's the latest drawing attention to the chicago p.d. two other fatal shootings at the hands of one receiving little in the way of publicity, the officer in this case not
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charged. the parents of the victim sitting down to share their story. >> reporter: this is police dash cam video showing a chicago police officer shooting flint farmer dead in 2011. farmer was a suspect in a domestic disturbance. >> he walked by and puts three shots in the back of his hand and neck. >> reporter: was that guy armed, was farmer armed. >> he was armed. >> reporter: a former investigator with the city agreed with the family that this was a case of murder. davis's bosses at the in dependent police review authority overruled him. the state declined to prosecute saying even though the police officer made a mistake in thinking farmer was armed, actions were not criminal. he had shot and killed another unarmed man earlier in an unrelated case of mistaken identity. the officer said at the time he
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stopped the man because his car was wanted in a shooting. he was never charged and left the force. >> but the families have continued demonstrating justice for the victim. >> following the release of police video, a spotlight is being shoined. >> i've said it all along. other mothers, all they said, don't net them tell you nothing about your child. >> it hasn't come to a climax yet. it is a lot of relief knowing that something is starting to be done. >> the family of client farmer settled a case with the city for $4.1 million. the family of damian pynax sued for excessive force and lost. two attorneys withheld evidence in the case, ruled a judge.
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now the two attorneys are out, and police that were there at the time. and the head of the police unit who clashed with the investigator. >> it made me feel better that i got people to resign, is what i did. all the crooked people. i did that. >> whether the family moves ahead with a new trial or accepts a settlement as the family did, the attorney for the family says in this is no way for a city to operate. >> it doesn't do any good releasing videos of children being shot in the streets and the city paying people. >> reporter: we were told they were as wronged as the other family. but could face charges. and could now face a federal civil rights charge because after the mcdonald's video was released the city asked federal investigators to look into all the city's police-involved
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killings, as the families always wanted. >> black people don't have litters, we have children. you know. people that care about them, you know michigan governor rick schneider wants more federal help for the young in flint. the government asked washington to expands medicaidelagibility for those under the age of 21. that gives them care to deal with lead exposure from contaminated water. the government has not responded in ohio, the manager of a water treatment plan denies he falselied reports about high levels of led and copper in that city's water supplies. the state environmental protection agency said the operator fail to notify the government. and submitted misleading reports. children and pregnant women are
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advised to seek to bottled water the full extent of the damage from the storms last week - 48 were killed from new york to south carolina. in the in addition's capital, residents are getting back to work and school after being snowed in. some announced they'll ta closed gore the evidence of the week. >> the issue for the south-east is rain. >> when you said school closed the rest of the week, i could here all the kids. >> we had another system go through much lesser. kind of apples and oranges, this one, because of warmer airways rain up and down the coastline. a little now. behind that you can see in the morne tear another system coming in, a clipper. they were moving quickly and not dumping know. temperatures make a difference, we have behind that grant gotten colder air. if there was melting and refreezing, watch for the areas
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of black ice. near of the coastline where the front is going through, temperatures are in the '40s, it's been melting through the night. it's a differentiation from where we have rain and behind this, with the wind flow, lake enhancement snow. through the day as the clipper moves through we'll talk about areas one, two, three inches, up to 4. and then rain could have strong thunder storms, one to three, persistently for florida. said top set in some case, top five or one. they've been focus the on the snow diagnosing ge press. -- depression. and remembering abe bagota, and also for the inaccurate reports about his death.
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president obama joins the calls for a public response to fight the virus. the virus spreading across central and south america, doctors fear it is on its way to the u.s. over the last two years dozens in these states that you are seeing, and porta rico testing positive. it's getting more attention because of the link to birth defects. al jazeera with more on how officials are going to contain it. the interests for disease control and prevention confirm na residents of virginia and arkansas tested positive for the zika virus. both travelled outside the u.s. zika is a relativelile new virus, and it spread through
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mosquitos not person to person contact. it appeared in the americas, in 2014 and spread to other countries. the c.d.c. urged pregnant women or women who may become pregnant not to travel to the destinations. >> laboratory confirms they have a handful of cases. the huge increase of zika in the nearby brazil, and the rise of zika cases gives a lot of reason for concern, and now that the big task is to try to establish the link, the world health organization suspects there is a link between the virus in brazal and children born with small legs and brains. other countries that this outbreaks have not reported cases of microcephali. in brazil workers fume gated rio
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de janeiro, where the upcoming parades will be held, it's been fume gated. during the carnivale, there'll be crowds of people from different parts of world and brazil. which will have the virus get in and with the carriers around, you could have the start of the epidemic. >> puerto rico confirmed 18 cases in addition to one earlier, and the majority of the cases are in the south-east, and the victims are mostly elderly. united airlines and latin america's airlines say they'll wave cancellation for people that wants to travel to countries where the virus is present. as travellers come back to the u.s., there could be more cases. >> i think we'll probably have small, shall we sea splurges or clusters. beyond that, i'm confident that we will not have widespread zika
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virus. it's hard to spot, and one in five actually develop symptoms, like fever, rash and joint pain. >> no treatment for the virus. if you get infected we can't give you a drug to cure you. there's no vaccine. the trip is to stay away from infected mosquitos. it may be more difficult because health officials expect the virus to proceed to every county except canada and chile. >> health officials saying it will not spread there because the mosquito that transports zika will not stay there. stay with us, in the next hour we talk to a doctor about disaster planning from the zika virus. >> pregnant women should be screened for depression during and after pregnancy. new evidence suggests that cases of post part 'em depression often starts during pregnancy.
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others suggest maternal depression is more common than thought and could affect one in seven new mothers. depression is the leading cause of disease-related disability in women around the world. >> president obama's move to ban confinement for juve miles and what it means for the prince. >> and watching the doomsday clock, the countdown to global catastrophe - why it is still minutes away.
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>> every monday night. >> i lived that character. >> go one on one with america's movers and shakers. >> we will be able to see change. >> gripping... inspiring... entertaining. no topic off limits. >> 'cause i'm like, "dad, there are hookers in this house". >> exclusive conversations you
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won't find anywhere else. >> these are very vivid, human stories. >> if you have an agenda with people, you sometimes don't see the truth. >> "talk to al jazeera". monday, 6:00 eastern. only on al jazeera america. >> several others were arrested during a traffic stop another killed at an oregon wildlife ref stage standoff. >> the ref final happen occupied, demanding that the land be turned over to local ranchers. lawmakers until last night taking the action to push them out. we are joined by phone from kansas city, kansas. is this the way that the f.b.i.
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wanted this standoff to escalate or do you think it was a tactical mistake on their part? >> anytime you have a standoff like this, ultimately, you want it to end peacefully. my guess is they were waiting for them to make a move away from the refuge where they could get better opportunity to make the arrest without putting anyone in danger, including agents that might be going into that area, so they probably waited for this time to make -- to uses this opportunity. >> the tensions between the bundy family and law enforcement going back to cliven bundy has been brewing for quite some time. was it inevitable that sooner or later the f.b.i. had to move in? >> ultimately, the law of the land prevails and it's not a country of men, it's a country of laws. you can't just let somebody occupy federal property. if they have a beef with the federal government, it has to be worked out legally not by
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occupying land. there's no way the government is going to give in to any kind of demands based on occupation. this was an inevitable event to happen. the arrest would have to be made at some point or they would have to have left the property before the arrest. >> jeff, is this the beginning of the end of the standoff or just the beginning of the escalating tensions? do you see others for instance coming to oregon to join in the fight which could possibly lead to another waco, because they have issued that call for backup? >> yeah, i can see where some people may want to come to the defense of these individuals, given what we've read in the news stories and what they're beefs are. i don't see it escalating much further than maybe some people coming there. i don't see another waco, because i think ultimately people realize that there are other ways to work out their grievances attorney cause long
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term standoffs which don't accomplish anything except getting people arrested and putting a lot of people in danger. >> retired f.b.i. agent jeff lanza joining us, thank you for being with us. this week president obama announced his effort to reform america prisons, taking efforts to ban solitary confinement for some juveniles in federal jails. the change will only affect a handful of teenage inmates. >> president barack obama has made criminal justice reform a top priority for his final months in office. he is the only president to visit a federal jail and he is making changes for solitary confinement for juvenile offenders. writing an editorial, he said research suggests that solitary confinement has the potential to lead to devastating lasting
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psychological consequences, linked to withdrawal, an inability to interact with others and potential for violent behavior. he highlighted it in a speech last year. >> do we think it makes sense to lock so many people in tiny cells for months, sometimes for years at a time? that is not going to make us safer. >> roughly 10,000 inmates serve time in solitary confinement, all day alone with virtually no human contact. it's six months sings the president pushed the j justice department to study how solitary confinement were being used. there are 50 principles he wants to see used. until now, an inmate punished for a disciplinary offense could face a year in solitaire for the first infraction with that the longest term now will be 60 days.
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the president's actions will be studied but say on the face of it, they father justified. the white house is hoping what happens in federal prison will become a model for state prisons around the the country. >> glenn martin is the president of just leadership u.s.a., a criminal justice advocate who himself spent time in prison. thank you for your time. >> glad to be hear. >> the u.n. has said that solitary confinement beyond 15 days is comparable to torture. you hear about people in solitary losings their minds. is it also sort of linked with a return to crime when somebody's out? >> sure, i think for president obama, this is about his values. 95% of people who go to prison return home at some point, so folks are coming back to our communities. the question is how do we want people to come home. all the research and evidence tells us that solitary confinement create a situation where people come home more broken than they went into prison. he is trying to reverse that
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trend, also raising that particularly with young people the research said since the human brain develops up to the age of 24, there can be long term effect from these inhumane conditions. >> in fact, there are 10-12 states i believe that have already begun limiting cool tear confinement. should we be looking at the adult population, as well, because there's been research on the psychological impacts on adults. >> this is clearly part of a trend, states are starting to roll back the number of people in solitary confinement but also change the conditions that people face while they're in solitary confinement. it affects adults as much as young people. in prison they tend to uses solitary confinement as a way to control the prison population. you hit a tipping point where people come out more violent than they went into the situation. as you can imagine, being in one cell for 23 hours a day can
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create that sort of psychological effect. we have research to tell us we should be doing more of what works and less of what doesn't. >> you spent a couple of weeks in solitary confinement when you were doing time for armed robbery. what was that experience like and was it anymore damaging than other prison experiences you may of had? >> yeah, i served six years in prison. it's almost impossible to do more than a few months in prison before ending up in the box. just about everybody ends up in solitary confinement. it's used not sparingly, actually liberally in the prison context. i went to the box for looking at a correction officer the wrong way and stayed there a few weeks. you have no human contact. prison is all right limiting in terms of liberty but when you get to the point where 23 hours a day you're alone, you can imagine what that feels like. at first you're hearing voices, then wondering if it's your voice or something going on in your head. it's usually damaging. >> was it worse than other
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prison experiences you had. was there something that stood out for you? >> for me it was actually absolutely worse. when you think of the man in new york city who committed suicide arguably of spending two years in solitary confinement and this is the president getting out ahead of even local leaders. i mean, in new york city, you have mayor debellagio who has done next to nothing to respond to that particular death. the president is showing the political courage that hopefully other leaders will follow up with. >> thank you for joining us this morning. seattle police this morning investigating a deadly shooting at a homeless camp, two people shot and killed three wounded at the camp known os the jungle. police responded to shots fired and found five hurt. authorities say the victims lived at the camp and have reason to believe they might have been the targets. 18-year-old ethan couch
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dropping his people against being deported from mexico. couch and his mother fled the country to avoid being charged for probation. couch used the affluenza defense for a drunk driving accident that killed four people. there is criticism this morning over a new denmark law designed to make the country less attractive to refugees and asylum seekers. the law passed overwhelmingly on tuesday. it forces migrants to hand over valuables when they enter the country. it also delays family reunifications. danish officials argue the nation has done more than enough to help relieve europe's immigration crisis. denmark says the only way to stop the migrant crisis i guess to end syria's war. the main syrian opposition group is meeting deciding whether to attend peace talks scheduled to start friday in he geneva.
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another significant rebel group, the occurian kurdish p.y.g. was not invited. >> the united states believes strongly that china has a particular ability because which its special role and its connections to north korea an bat to be able to help us significantly to resolve this challenge. >> china is north carolina's main ally but condemned a nuclear test suggesting that china wouldn't support any sanctions against pyongyang. vietnam communist party reelecting its leader. he's he will keep the economy growing, that depends on china
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and the u.s. relations. >> following 2,000 years, the historical roots shared with its neighbors to the north run deep. the relationship with china has become increasingly unsteady the last few years. a tour guide in the capitol for 15 years, dedicated to confucius, the temple is a frequent stop for visitors. his company suffered a 75% fall in traffic because of the territorial dispute involving china, vietnam and other countries. >> the chinese people, it depends on the relationship between the government and you also know that in recently, the relation between china. >> as a result of the souring relationship, vietnam has been
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embracing the pivot to asia. the relationship with its former enemy has never been better. the u.s. transpacific trade agreement is in the final stages, removing tariffs to make trading easier and cheaper. vietnam, which is one of 12 nations in the pact is positioned to hugely benefit economically. the agreement could also loosen vietnamese ties with china. >> the economic relations between vietnam and china is overdependence, but we do hope that we have it in place and will have more and deeper relationship. >> the partnership can now include u.s. military equipment. the u.s. government lifted its bans on weapon sales to vietnam two years ago. >> vietnam is one of the fastest growing economies in the world.
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industries are looking to take off. >> for every 1 billion of u.s. export, will create about 100,000 jobs. exports from vietnam will exceed 40 billion by 2020. >> that's a million and a half more vietnamese employed in the textile and apparel industry alone. the younger generation hopes growth and good fortune in vietnam continue. dumping untreated assuming into the ocean is no longer a practice in most developed countries except just north of seattle in british colombia. we have the details of what's happening there. >> this is the clover point pumping station, one of two facilities where raw sewage from victoria's 200,000 or so people
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is treated. it comes in and pipes under the floor here around this is the current treatment system, the raw assuming hits these streams. everything that's bigger than about that that you can put in the toilet is filtered out. it gets dumped into these drop boxes and deposited in a landfill within the remains in mostly liquid form goes into the wet wells. we're down a level now and those wells are just on the other side of this wall. what's in those wells, that screened or filtered raw sewage comes into this room where the pumps are, two pumps at a time usually working, pushing all of that material into these four big tubes. they combine right about here and then go out of the pumping station in that big blue tube. we're talking about tens of millions of gallons of that screen liquefied raw sewage everyday coming through that pipe. it runs underground for a couple of hundred yards and straight
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out that way into the strait, the body of water separating canada from the state of washington. 200 feet down, it's dispersed into the waters of the straight. that system for dealing with sewage has been a source of controversy for decades and a new treatment plan will be a billion plus. we'll take a deeper look at the controversy and challenges tonight. al jazeera, victoria, british colombia. >> you can see the rain fouling where alan is, bringing more snow and rain to the northwest. >> as we head to the west coast, not the most pleasant forecast as we get out here. here's all that moisture coming in. you can see that this is going to be a broad area that will bring us rain starting into today, but going through the end of the week and then more behind that, so we could have another active period starting to set up in the west coast while things quiet down in the east coast.
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here's the initial rain coming in, it's especially into the day later today and into tomorrow where we get the heaviest banding. northern california, some erosion is threatens coastal homes. that's something we'll have to watch with the next storm coming in and just in general with the very active pattern we've had this season. to get could be anywhere from washington and northern california six to eight inches widespread, some heavier amounts more than that in some of the higher elevations, portions of cascade one to two feet not out of the question. a lot of this is rain because the west coast has stayed mild, 60's, 70's southward versus some of the cooler air on the opposite side of the country. speaking of temperatures, either with that front that's gone through the east coast, it only knocks the temperatures down a couple of degrees. the temperatures for this time
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of year have stayed relatively reasonable. >> nicole, thank you very much. >> say it ain't so, the thought that niagara falls could run dry. plans to replace two bridges poor pedestrians means the falls are going to be turned off for the first time since 1969, the water rerouted. the project will last a few years and it is a few years away. plans call for the falls to be closed from five to nine months. new york state is going to hold a public hearing on the issue today. we have a new sense today of how close the world is to cots free, the doomsday clock reports are released. they say we may not be far from the end of the world. >> it's been a year of breakthroughs, a global climate change agreement, the iran nuclear deal done. according to the bulletin of the atomic scientists, the people who set the doomsday clock, it's
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not enough to move their hands of time. they say the world is just three minutes from utter catastrophe. nothing's changed from last year in part because more nuclear weapons are being made. >> nuclear modernization programs continue, china, pakistan and north korea are increasing their nuclear arsenals and russia modernizing theirs, spending $350 billion. >> this clock has been getting attention for 69 years. the fear it spreads has only encouraged more countries to get nuclear weapons. >> major case in point is the war in iraq which began in 2003 mainly as an anti proliferation war, the danger was sadaam is going to get nuke weapons. the result i also 400,000 dead,
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far more than were killed at hiroshima and nagasaki combined. >> are you ready for a commander-in-chief? >> the doomsday clock scientists want people to push their politicians but annual that is unlikely in this very unusual year. >> it will be a long and somewhat put it this way, disillusioning year as we elect a new president. my hopes are that we will elect a president who is totally fitted for the job. >> it is an open question who will be the next one to hold the u.s. nuclear codes. they say the outcome will determine which way the clock moves next. al jazeera, washington. on to more immediate concerns, zoning in on dangerous driving. >> why uber is watching its
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drivers and what that means for your ride sharing experience.
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>> there are new details about the death of a former nfl player, officials say former giants safety had an advance form of c.t.e. when he overdozed on pain medication. he was just 27. c.t.e. is connected to head trauma and found in a number of former players. family members say he suffered with confusion and memory loss before he died. the nfl investigating a quarterback going into this year's superbowl, doing a comprehensive review into whether peyton manning used human growth hormone. last month an al jazeera investigation showing substances had been shipped to manning's home. he denied allegation of using h.d.h. the results of the review aren't expected to be known until just
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before the superbowl. this you tube video pokes fun at a make believe uber driver, but the ride sharing company's latest announcement is no joke. uber is now running a pilot program using gyro meters, measuring small movements on a driver's phone, trying to see if they are speeding and braking too fast. the company's chief security officer says if a rider complains that a driver traveled too fast, we can use that data. we hope to improve safety proactively. the company cites 10,000 deaths related to speeding in 2012 in the u.s. the measure could generate complaints from drivers themselves, worried over being tracked but uber has the right to monitor those working for the service. >> they're not going to hand out ticket and not take them to court and throw them in jail,
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but they can decide whether somebody who is providing a service under their name to their customers is adhering to the law. >> critics say the technology could be an added stress for drivers. >> it's yet another distraction where you have to think about how fast you're going and how hard you're braking when you should really be thinking about what's in front of you and keeping everyone safe. >> many transportation companies already track their employee movements including u.p.s. it's not clear if any of use g.p.s. to evaluate safety on the road. al jazeera. it looks like drones are the new american toy that. the f.a.a. saying 300,000 people registers their devicevices stag a month ago. the f.a.a. hopes the process
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will cut down on news as soon as in using fans. abe vigoda was a fixture for decades. he was on barney miller around leaves behind a legacy. >> he had a face for the ages, lovable an durable and instantly recognizable. for decades, he made looking old look easy. >> he wants to arrange a meeting. >> that's him at 50, playing the mobster tessio in the godfather. >> tom, can you get me off the hook for old time's sake? >> can't do it, sal. >> he said it was the best movie he ever made. >> you captain stoop over in this neighborhood. >> the brooklyn born son of jewish immigrants frock russia found his greatest fame with the
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t.v. sitcom barney miller. he played detective phil fish, a cranky cop full of an old man's aches and pains and one liners. >> come on, criminal person. >> a short lived sitcom followed. it was the stage where he began, from shakespeare to a revival of. a punk rock band is named after him. he poked fun at himself in this snickers commercial with betty white. i've always been content just to be working and making a modest living for my wife and child he
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once said. he did just that and much more. >> john siegenthaler, al jazeera. >> he once went on national television to say i'm not dead. >> he definitely had the last laugh. >> he did this time. ahead, shooting in the jungle, police looking for two suspect in what they say were targeted killings among the homeless in seattle. denmark places restrictions on arriving refugees. we are back in two minutes with more. stay with us. >> the homeless, it's not always who you think. >> the majority are families with children. >> a growing epidemic that impacts us all. >> i think it's the most helpless feeling i've ever experienced. >> but who's getting rich while some are just trying to survive? >> they want to make the city for people that can afford things. >> "faultlines". >> al jazeera america's
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hard-hitting... >> today the will be arrested. >> ground-breaking... >> they're firing canisters of gas at us. >> award-winning, investigative documentary series.
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walking for backup. men at the oregon wildlife center in our digging in when their leader and others were arrested. most likely, i won't be doing the debate. >> the republican front runner refuses to join the next debate. his anger over who will be asking the questions. new kurds, no deal, syria's opposition threatening to skip the peace talks. stopping the virus, president obama calls for action as zika is found in another u.s.
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state. good morning, i'm del walters. i'm stephanie sy. the leader of an armed group occupying a wildlife refuge is in police custody. >> he was arrested with six others. one member of the movement was killed in that shootout. >> those who remain at the wildlife center pledge not to back down. john r. john henry smith has details. >> authorities have released few details about the confrontation that began with a traffic stop tuesday afternoon. the f.b.i. and state police stopped vehicles carrying several of the protestors about 20 miles north of the wildlife center they've been occupying for almost a month. it ended with a shootout and several members of the movement arrest, including leader ammon
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did you understandy, his brother ryan was shot and injured. family members say another was shot dead. >> it's the right of the individual that we're looking at. >> he was a rancher who had taken on the role of speaking for the group. >> tell them to come and serve the warrant right here. >> he put up videos on his you tube page and talked about the occupation earlier this month with our correspondent. >> this is widespread. this is not going to go away. >> the armed protestors seeds it refuge an january 2, demanding federal lands be turned back to local ranchers. as news spread of the shooting and arrest, they called for reinforcements. >> we need all patriots to get here as soon as possible. ammon bundy has been talking with the f.b.i. it's believed the men were heading for about a community forum when they were arrested.
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john henry smith, eying. >> catherine has been covering the standoff since the beginning and joins us from seattle. catherine, are there sign that is authorities are now moving to storm the center or even moving closer in? >> well, they certainly are closer than they have been. these folks were allowed pretty free passage around the area for the past three weeks now but there remains 50 miles of roadway closed between the wildlife center and highway area to the north of bend. the situation is described as fluid, also described as a process of containment. perhaps that means not quite confrontation, and it remains an open question exactly what these who remain at the refuge will do with their two principle leaders taken out, one arrested, one apparently dead, though it has
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not been confirmed by the feds. del. >> do we know how many people are at the wildlife center now and what happens to them and whether that includes women, as well? >> it has in the past included some women. some people have been coming and going, but there were never reportedly many more than perhaps several dozen. they kept it pretty close to the vest as to exactly how many were there. they said for security reasons. obviously with eight arrests and one death, that reduced the number somewhat. there have been on line calls for reinforcements, but there's been no evidence that that has come. basically authorities are call for hem to peacefully withdraw from the reef final now and the oregon governor released a statement calling for patience as officials continue to pursue a swift and peaceful resolution. del. >> the oregon governor in fact pointing out this is costing the
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state $100,000 a week as they were on the ground and both the sheriff and a judge saying they wanted the protestors to leave. catherine, thank you for being with us. to presidential politics and the escalating feud between donald trump and megyn kelly of fox news. trump will skip tomorrow's presidential debate, the final before the iowa caucuses. it is being moderated by fox news and kelly part of that. trump accused the network of toying with him. >> i'm not doing the debate, i'll be doing something else in iowa. >> let's see how much money fox is going to make on the debate without me. >> trump and kelly sparred in a debate when she questioned trump about his comments against women. fox news chief roger ails defends kelly saying she is an excellent journalist and network stands behind her. she will absolutely be on the debate stage thursday night.
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ted cruz criticized him for sitting out the debate and texas senator is challenging trump to do a one-on-one debate with him before the caucuses. no comment from trump on that challenge. the latest poll numbers give trump the edge with voters nationwide. 37% of voters book anymore in the survey. ted cruz is 16 points behind. marco rubio rounds out the top three with 11%. all of the republican candidates are out on the stump in iowa trying to convince those all important last minute undecideds to support them. michael shure has that story. >> it's basic common sense, live within your means. >> ted cruz is making his final pitch before the state's caulk us cans monday. on the republican side, iowa has been a virtual two-man race between cruz and donald trump with the two jostling over the past week for key endorsements. tuesday, the texas senator picked up support from a favorite target of trump.
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>> there is not a candidate that is asking for your support that reflects it any better, anymore powerfully, nor anymore consistently than the next president of the united states, senator ted cruz. >> backing uppery were pro cruz super pac ads that day abused in iowa tuesday. the ads slam trump and try to soften backlash cruz suffered over his new york values remarks during the last debate. >> i mean hey, i lived in new york city, manhattan owl my life, so my views are a little different than if i lived in iowa. >> the ad seems aimed at winning back evangelical support. >> when president trump banned partial birth abortion. >> he is so nervous, such a mess, his polls have gone down
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like i've never seen polls gone down. people realize he probably can't even run for president, he was born in canada. >> any headway trump hopes to make especially about palin's support may have been thwarted. falwell support comes revealing a surprising admission by cruz with iowa pastors. >> if donald wins iowa, he right now has a substantial lead in new hampshire. if he went on top win new hampshire, he could be unstoppable and be our nominee. >> as for the rest of the crowded republican field, they gather in the hawk eye state one last time to make their case thursday. with donald trump announcing he would not participate in the debate, it's looking like trusses, dr. ben carson and
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florida senator marco rubio. jeb bush, chris christie and john kasich have virtually pulled out of iowa to concentrate on the new hampshire primary. michael shure, al jazeera, des moines, iowa. bernie sanders is getting off the campaign trail heading to the white house meeting with president obama in the oval office. there is no formal agenda for the meeting which was planned before the holidays. on tuesday, sanders blocked the president's latest appointment to the f.d.a. and before heading east tried to rally support from voters. >> to my mind, we will win here in iowa if the voter turnout is high. >> hillary clinton also courting voters in iowa. today she holds a get out the vote event. authorities in southern california increased the reward for the capture of three escaped prisoners. the three broke out last friday
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from the men's central jail in santa ana. the reward for their arrest is $200,000. sheriff's department officials say they are extremely dangerous. the fib arrested a milwaukee man they believe was ready to core out an attack saying the man was planning to kill dozens at a temple in milwaukee. he was arrested on monday after buying machine guns from undercover agents. the fish said he told informants he wanted his attack to be known the world over and ignite broader clashes. six police officers in cleveland now fired for their role in a police chase that ended back in 2012 in a hail of bullets that killed an unarmed couple. it led to a federal investigation. as al jazeera's richelle carey tells us, only one was charged and he was late acquitted. >> i promised the community at that time that i would find out. >> cleveland public security director, a former chief of police, michael mcgrath vowed he
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would get to the bottom of a november 2012 police chase that ended in a barrage of gunfire that killed timothy russell and melissa williams, bolt unarmed occupants of this vehicle. >> the 137 shots were fired involved 60 plus cars, went through three districts. >> on tuesday, the police department shared findings. the details of an internal investigation into the actions of 13 police officers involved in the shooting. he announced the firing of six officers, including michael brillo, the only officer criminally charged in the incident. he was acquitted of manslaughter last may. the acquittal led to demonstrations that were for the most part peaceful. >> officer c. climbs up on the trunk area. >> he was accused of standing on a police cruiser and firing 15 shots into the windshield of russell's car. >> officer c. fires into the suspect vehicle. >> as part of its in certainly
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investigation, police recreated the incident, uses trial testimony and forensic analysis. >> officer d asks officer j. to retrieve the shotgun. officer j. refuses due to the gunfire. >> another six officers have been suspended for their role in the pursuit and a 13t 13th officer, officer early. >> it does not rise to the level of firing anybody. >> the police union defended the actions, saying the officer's lives were threatened when russell refused to heed warning. >> they used the car as a deadly weapon. we have a right to defend ourselves and go home to our families. >> the cleveland police union is vowing to paul the dismissals. al jazeera. there has been a new lawsuit filed today demanding michigan and the city of flint replace all of the lead pipes in the city water systems. they are blamed for contaminating the water supply for 100,000 residents in flint.
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the suit vital the safe water drinking act and calls for water mains to be charged and changed for free. this morning, much of the nation's capital is finally getting back to normal after the winter storm left it all by paralyzed. some schools are closed and will be for the rest of the week. 48 people were killed as a result of the storm from new york all the way down to south carolina. the red cross said the storm led to a shortage of blood. severe weather forced them to cancel hundreds of blood drives across 20 states since the start of the month. the red cross is urging people to donate in coming days and weeks when they can. >> parts of the east coast getting ready for another round of winter weather.
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>> it has been in the 40s. these could be our highest temperatures today and nudging off by the afternoon as the front goes through behind this where we've already gotten that front going through, temperatures are in the 20's. the wind flow behind that in the colder air is enhancing lake effect snow. not really too troublesome but this northern system coming in could be widespread one to threp across the gate lakes into tomorrow. a couple operation little could see three or four with that. another one later in the week behind that is a system, the southern edge of this front is predominantly all rain. through florida is the heaviest amounts, one to three inches. the winter storms have been
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getting more of the attention, but florida we've got a number of places that could set top five wettest januaries this month because we have had some pretty persistent rain this month. the invitations are out. there seems to be a snag in the syrian peace talks. >> a major u.s. ally is standing in the way. >> denmark's new law to help pay for rising refugees. critics say it is a violation of human rights.
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there is controversy and disagreement two days before the proposed syrian peace talks over who gets to join. the kurdish pyg not invited.
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that group controls chunks of northern syria. >> other groups didn't want the p.y.d. there, saying the kurds haven't been fighting the assad regime. >> the turkish authorities have long let it be known that they are opposed to the y.p.g. being involved, the p.y.d. being involved in these talks in syria. however, on the ground in syria, the y.p.g. is the most effective fighting force. the u.s., the united states particularly has been working with them for a long time supplying them with small arms, supplying them with logistical assistance to fight isil. they were wanting some sort of representation at these talks. sergey lavrov has said we cannot achieve the results we want in syria if the p.y.d. is excluded.
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the russians have made their views clear. the leader of the p.y.d. has said we expected to be on the table, we expect to be invited. he hasn't received an have it yet and they represent a large section of syrian society. there are a lot of syrian kurds living in the country, and he says we should be represented around those tables and if we're not, then these geneva three talks could fail, he suspects like the geneva two talks held back in february, 2014 and failed because he says not every aspect of syrian society was represented around the table. >> bernard smith reporting. the u.n. has yet to reveal a full list of who will attended the talks. there is criticism over a law in denmark designed to make the country less attractive to refugees by seizing their valuables. human rights groups say that is a dangerous precedent.
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the lawmakers in copenhagen see it differently. >> the mood was subdued, the three hour debate polite. 81 votes to 27, politicians said police can seize valuables worth more than 1500 u.s. dollars from refugees. the cash will be used to help cover housing and food costs while they wait for their asylum claims to be heard. those behind the bill are determined that it is fair. >> the argument that denmark doesn't do its bit, we absolutely do our bit when it comes to refugees in europe. it's not a secret that when we stand here today, it is because we wish to take a smaller share. >> denmark took in a record 20,000 refugees last year and it's not the only country to make them pay for living expenses. switzerland takes valuables worth more than $985. parts of germany have a similar
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policy. critics and supporters of the bill say it has more to do with deterring refugees to cross the border. the united nations is concerned. >> the decision to give danish police the authority to search and confiscate values from asylum seekers sends damaging messages and runs the risk of fueling sentiments of fear rather than solidarity for people in need of protection. >> the danish politician say it is in line with danes themselves who have to sell assets of more than $1,500 to receive benefits. they may keep wedding an engagement rings, family portraits and meat also. they might have to hand over watches, computers and mobile phones, sometimes their only link to family and friends they
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may have left behind. al jazeera. >> the chair of refugees welcome denmark offer free legal counseling to the refugees. she joins us live from copenhagen. the vote wasn't even close, 81-27. what does that say to you about denmark and its attitude toward refugees? >> well, the whole of europe is part of a competition these days to appear least attractive to refugees, so this is just one step on the way and it seems like denmark is taking a lead right now to scare people away from coming to denmark, but it's quite ridiculous, because the refugees are arriving at europe's borders no matter what we do, so we're just pushing around people from one country to another. we have to face the problem and find a common solution in the
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whole of europe. >> also police can seize valuables worth more than 1500 u.s. dollars from the refugees including watches. why should police be able to seize their assets and do they have any legal recourse? june it's really ridiculous to have this. it's a completely symbolic part of the law this one and got so much attention in the international media, which is a bit sad, i think, because it's really not important to people. most people who arrive at denmark and ask for asylum have absolutely nothing of value, so it's not really going to make any difference for them. what will make a difference is that we have strengthened and restricted a lot of rules, which will really change their lives. the most important one is that a part of the syrian refugees will have to wait three years before they can even apply for family reunification. >> why is denmark so afraid? has anything happened that would
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cause people to fear these refugees? >> well, it's not only denmark, it's the whole north of europe and it has to do with our welfare system. i think that we have a tax based welfare system and we're very afraid that when people come here, they will have to be able to support themselves, because as long as they don't, there will be a huge expense to society, and it's also a very highly skilled labor market that we have, quite difficult to enter, so our experience is people from far away from europe have difficulty to enter the labor market and support themselves, which is actually more maybe a problem for us than for them. that's one of the reasons why people are so afraid of having too many at one time in a short time. >> on a practical note, do these people have no voice, they're fleeing persecution and going
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anywhere that they are wanted when they are not wanted. how do you protest without being seen as a malcontent? >> that's the ridiculous part about it, because on one hand, we recognize that these people are in danger and give them asylum if they enter or border and give them some kind of human rights, but at the same time, we try to scare them away to go to somewhere else. we think that these people are the problem of some other countries. i don't know why turkey and lebanon should be more burdened by refugees than syria than we should, but that's the opinion of the danish state. >> as part of the bill and this is the part i read that really seemed to be most trouble, families can be separated for as long as five years. is denmark rolling out the welcome mat or rolling it up and is the country saying you just aren't want here?
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>> well, we have to accept the people who actually enter the country not to break the conventions, but then we try to scare away their families to make the number smaller. when people hear that there is this risk of having to wait up to five years, three years in the law, but in practice, up to five years. then of course people will consider going to somewhere else where they can have access to get their family immediately, so it's part of the scare away campaign, you can say. it's not really because we want to separate families, but it's something that is very important for refugees to have their family with them, of course. it's a basic human thing to be with your family, so if we try to make restrictions on this access, then of course, many people will try to find another place to stay, so it is working,
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unfortunately. >> thank you very much. concerns over the unchecked spread of the zika virus. >> president obama calls for action as brazil is trying to contain the virus. we'll talk about who is at risk and how it's transmitted. a state of emergency over the homeless problem in seattle, killings raise fears over whether the city is doing enough.
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>> a critical first step on the road to the white house. >> you have to find common ground. >> i'm doing what's right for you. >> that's the kind of debate that we need to have. >> stay with al jazeera america for...
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>> it's going to be about getting people out to the caucus, which is not an easy thing to do. >> comprehensive coverage that's... >> the focus will be on south carolina tonight. welcome back. the leader of that armed group occupying a federal wildlife refuge in oregon is under arrest. police saying ammon bundy and several others were arrested during a traffic stop tuesday. another member was killed. the group has occupied the refuge since january 2, demanding the land be turned over to local ranchers. >> donald trump will not take part in tomorrow's debate. the forum is moderated by fox news with megyn kelly taking part. they spard when she questioned
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his comments about women. a milwaukee man accused of carrying out an attack. the f.b.i. sake the man was planning to killed dozen little at a temple. he was arrested after buying machine guns from undercover agents. also this morning, president obama joining the calls for a larger public health response to fight zika virus. he discussed fast tracking research for a vaccine, the virus transmitted by mosquitoes is spreading across central and saw the america. dozens in these states and puerto rico have tested positive for zika. it is getting more attention because of links to birth defects. officials here are trying to contain it. >> the c.d.c. confirmed that residents of virginia and arkansas tested positive for the zika virus. both had seriesly traveled outside the u.s. zika is a new virus spread nothing moss skeet bites.
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it first appeared in the americas in 2014 and spread to 20 countries. the c.d.c. urged pregnant women or women who may become pregnant not to travel to 24 destinations. it released guidelines on when to test newborns for the virus and when to do ultra sounds or pregnant women. >> laboratory confirms you only have a handful of cases but the huge increase of zika especially in northeastern brass still and the rise of zika cases gives a lot of reason for concern, and now that the big task is to try to establish the link here. >> the world health organization suspects there is a link between the virus in brazil and microcephaly, children born with be a normally small heads and brains, so far, the evidence is circumstance. other countries that have had outbreaks have not reported these cases. in brazil, workers fume gated
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rio de janeiro where the upcoming carnival parades will be held as part of an effort to contain the virus. >> during carnival, there will be people from the world and brazil which will help the virus get in and with the warriors flying around, you could have the start of an epidemic. >> 18 new cases of the virus were confirmed in addition to one known earlier, the majority of the cases are in the southeast of the island and the victims mostly elderly. united airlines and latin america's largest airlines will wave cancellation or flight change fees for people who want to change trips to countries where the zika view us is present. as more travelers come back to the u.s. with the virus, there could be more cases. >> i think we'll probably have small splurges or clusters, but beyond that, i'm really pretty confident that we will not have
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widespread zika view with us. >> it's hard to spot and just one in five infected develop symptoms. >> there is no treatment for this virus. if you get infected, we can't give you a drug to cure you and there's no vaccine yet, so the whole trick is to stay away from infected mosquitoes. >> which may become more difficult. health officials expect the virus to spread to every country in north and south america except canada and chile. >> health officials say it won't spread to canada and chile because a specific mosquito is not found there. let's bring in the director of global disaster response with harvard medical school. govern, thank you for being with us. i guess that is my first question. how does zika spread? it is not as i understand it a person to person transmission, so why are we seeing it crop up in places from asia to arkansas?
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>> good morning. with the zika virus, a mosquito, there are two types here in the u.s. we know can tran mitt the virus. the mass keith has to bite a person with active infection and then it has to go on and bite another person and transmits the infection that way. it has to bite a person with the infection, an active infection of the virus to transmit to another person who doesn't have the virus. that's how the transmission occurs. >> the c.d.c. is warning pregnant women not to travel to more than 20 countries. in south america, women are basically being told don't have a baby. what have you thought of the response by countries so far? >> this is really important when it comes to public health messages. when you develop a public health message, you have to think about what is the message i want to tell my family, what do i want to tell my wife and children. in this situation, we've seen
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the country like el salvador which has recommended just this week that women should not get pregnant for the next two years until 2018, but this is a country that doesn't have the means to do that, so while you can make a public health recommendation, you've got to look at the reality, calibrate your confidence and look at your limitations. birth control in a country like el salvador doesn't exist. what is the how, the how to make that recommendation happen. we've got to be very careful on what public health authorities actually too recommend. >> we have to be careful about putting fear and risk in perspective at this point. assuming one is not pregnant, what is the worse that can happen if they're bitten by a zika carrying mosquito? >> zika virus is a disease, when we started to see cases, we weren't too worried about it. this wasn't a big deal because in 80% of the people infected,
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they're not going to have symptoms. in those that have, they are very mild. you might get a bit of a five, a headache, you might have an eye infection. you could develop a rash, but these are mild symptoms that tend to go away after about a week or so. >> buff when we are talking about more than 3800 indicates of microcephaly, when babies are born with be a normally small heads in brazil since october, the previous year there were a couple hundred of those cases, that connection is being drawn. how tight is that link and why don't we know more about the link and whether it is conclusive? >> and this is really new, just happening right now. in 2014, it was around 150 case of a abnormal small heads in children in newborn children. what we are seeing now, though, that's up to 4,000 in just a few months in brazil. we've got this link between
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microcephaly increasing and the virus increasing. the infection is bound in the placentas of mothers. we need to collect more evidence and data, but we're pretty sure with the evidence we have now, there's a correlation between increased zika virus and increased micro receively, these small abnormal heads. these children will have developmental problems and could die. we have to think about family planning decisions that we need to make in southeastern states of the u.s. as we get to spring and summer and those mosquitoes, population starts to increase. we've got to use map to say critically show where high risk areas could be. >> we appreciate your expertise on this, thank you. health officials say women should be screened for
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depression during and after pregnancy. the died lines saying the new evidence suggests that cases of post partum depression often start during the pregnancy. other researchers suggest it is far more common than once thought and could affect one in seven mothers. depression i guess the leading cause of disease related disability in women around the world. police in seattle are trying to find those responsible for shooting at a homeless camp. two people were killed. as hermela aregawi reports, it is the latest trouble as the ski tries to deal with the growing problem. >> police say the victims of tuesday night's shooting lived at a camp known locally as the jungle. >> we do have at least two persons of interest. we believe this was a targeted incident. >> the shooting comes at a time when several cities including seattle, new york and washington, d.c. are grappling with homelessness. seattle's has risen sharply.
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king county saw a 21% increase in homeless population in 2014 over the year before. executives declared a state of emergency, pledging more than $7 million to address the crisis. >> we are involved in a homeless crisis, the like we have not seen since the great depression. the executive order was not a gimmick. it was an actual plea that seattle by ourselves cannot deal with this crisis. it was an actual plea to the state and federal government to assist us. >> the mayor has been criticized by the homeless and their allies for shutting down unauthorized camps without notice despite the lack of shelter beds. he said the lack of mental health care funding and a national heroin epidemic has aggravated the problem. >> for the past year, the mayor and business leaders in the city have been lobbying for an increase in mental health care funding. according to the national alliance on mental illness, washington state spends 40%
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below the national average. >> what is the city going to do next? >> the city hasn't had control of this area that includes this camp known as the jungle for two decades. in the next 48 hours, police and investigators will assess the area along the i-five in seattle and figuring out how to prevent something like this happening. >> it seems it has reached crisis levels in some parts of that city. thank you for joining us. >> there are new details in a fatal police shooting in chicago. newly released tapes showing a 19-year-old calling police three times before they came to his amount september 26. he begged for help, saying his life was being threatened in a fight with his father. police arrived and shot and killed him and a neighbor. police called the shooting an accident. that shooting right after christmas just the latest to draw attention to the chicago p.d. two other shootings at the hands of one officer receiving very little in the way of publicity, the officer not charged in either case.
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the parents of the victim sitting down with al jazeera to share their story. >> this is police dash cam video showing chicago police officer shooting flint farmer dead in 2011. he was a suspect in a domestic disturbance. >> he walks behind him, then puts the three kill shots in the back of his head and neck. >> was farmer armed? >> he was armed with a cell phone. >> lorendo davis, a former lead police investigator with the city agreed with farmer's family that this was a careless of murder. davis' bosses and the city's independent police review authority overruled him and the state's attorney declined to prosecute saying even though the officer made a mistake, his actions were not criminal. sierra had also shot and killed darius, another unarmed man six months earlier in an unrelated case of mistaken identity. the officer said at the time he stopped the man because his car
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was wanted in a shooting. sierra was never charged in either case and eventually left the force. >> no justice, no peace. >> the families of the two men have continued demanding justice for the victims, and now following november's release of the laquan mcdamaged police shooting video a new spotlight is being shined on these cases. >> it's like i told you so, you know, i've been saying it all along, they be lying. so these other mothers hear what they said, don't let nobody tell you nothing about your child. >> it hasn't come to a climax yet. it is a lot of relief knowing something is starting to be done. >> the family of farmer settled with the city for $1.4 million. the family of pinex sued for excessive force last year and lost. this month, a federal judge ruled that two attorneys with the city withheld evidence in that case, and ordered a new trial.
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now, those two city attorneys are out along with the police superintendent at the time, and the head of the city police investigative unit, who clashed with investigator lorenzo davis. >> it makes me feel better that i got people to resign is what i did, all these crooked people. i did that. >> whether the pinex family moves ahead or accept as settlement, the attorney for a family in another police involved shooting says this is no way for a city to operate. >> it doesn't do any good to keep releasing videos of teenagers getting shot and killed in the streets and the city of chicago just paying people. >> the attorney for former officer sierra tells us he was just as wronged by the city attorneys who withheld evidence as the minex family was. sierra could face criminal charges and a federal civil rights charge, because after the mcdonald video was reds, the city asked federal investigators to look into all of the city's
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police involved killings, just as the families always wanted. >> black people don't have litters. we have children. people that care about them, you know? >> al jazeera, chicago. this week, president obama announced his latest effort to reform america's prisons, taking executive action to ban solitary confinement for some juveniles in federal jails. he said the changes are essential because punishment can have long term psychological consequences. the guidelines include banning solitaire confinement for juveniles with low offenses, adult prisoners are locked up, 13 juvenile inmates were sent between 2014 and 2015 in the federal system. an inmate can currently face up to a year in solitaire. under the president's action, that is changing to a maximum of 60 days. criminal justice advocate glenn
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martin himself has spent time in prison. he told me that he hopes the president's guidelines can become a model most of state prisons around the country. >> the question of how do we want people to come home. all the research and evidence tells us solitary confinement creates a situation where people actually come home more broken than they might have been into prison. essentially he is trying to reverse the trend, recognizing that with young people, the human brain is developing up to the age of 24, there can be long lasting effect from these inhumane conditions. >> in fact, there are 10-12 states, i believe that have already begun limiting the use of solitary confinement. are we only talking about juveniles or should web looking at the adult prison population as well because there has also been research on the psychological impact on adults held in salutory. >> states are starting to roll back the number of people that are in solitary confinement and
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also change the conditions. it affects adults just as much as young people. in prison, they use solitary confinement to control the prison population. at a turn point, you hit a tipping point where people come out sometimes even more violent than they went into the situation, as you can imagine being in one cell 23 hours a day can create that sort of psychological effect. we have research to tell us we should be doing more of what works and less of that doesn't. >> the u.n. said solitary confinement beyond 15 days is considered torture. new probes among america's elite athletes. watching speed remotely, uber monitors its drivers because of customer complaints.
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newspaper details in the death of a former nfl player, sash had an add advanced form of c.t.e. when he overdozed on pain medication. he was 28 years old. c.t.e. has been found in numerous former nfl players. family members said he struggled with confusion and memory loss before he died. the nfl investigating a comprehensive review of weather broncos quarterback peyton manning used h.g.h. or human
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growth hormones. last month, an al jazeera investigation showed banned substances were shipped to his home. he denied ever using h.g.h. the results are not expect to be known before the superbowl. major league baseball asking for its hope in doping allegations raised by that same aljazeera america investigation. the league wants the anti doping agency to look into whether baseball players took h.g.h. the documentary quoted a former medical clinic employee saying he provided the banned services to former players. he now denies those statements. >> still a lot of fallout from that investigation. uber is testing to make sure drivers are safe on the road. critics say it may do more harm than good. >> this you tube video pokes fun, but the ride sharing company's latest announcement is no joke. uber is running a pilot program
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measuring small movements on a driver's phone, trying so his if drivers are speeding and braking too fast. the company's chief security officer says if a rider complains that a driver accelerated too fast and braked too hard, we can use that data. we hope to use technology to increase safety. 10,000 deaths related to speeding were recorded in the j in 2012. uber likely has the right to monitor those working for the service. >> they are not going to hand out tickets and they're not going to take them to court or throw them in jail. they can decide whether somebody who is providing a service under their name to their customers i also adhering total law. >> critics say the technology could be added stress for drivers. >> it's yet east distraction where you have to think about how fast you're going and how hard you're braking when you
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should really be thinking about what's in front of you and keeping everyone safe. >> many transportation track their employee movements including delivery firms like u.p.s. it's not clear if any of them use g.p.s. to evaluate safety on the road. hundreds of french taxi drivers are back on that the rods after taking a day off to protest apps like uber. >> we are more committed than ever. today taxi drivers have nothing to lose. as long as we are not seen by the government or heard, we will stay here as long as it takes. >> 2,000 drivers blocked roads in paris tuesday. one uber driver had his car kicked by protestors. france ban add low class service offered by uber, but the app is still widely available around the country. taxi drivers say business has shrunk 20-30%. >> getting ready for more winter
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weather. >> it's not the northeast. what's in store on the west coast.
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drones look like the new more than a toy. nearly 300,000 people registered drones since the agency started accepting applications. anyone who operated before that had to register before february 19 to keep flying them legally.
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the agency hopes the process will cut down on nuisance and all the drones can cause. the northwest is bracing for another round of wet weather. let's bring in nicole mitchell on what to expect. >> remember the drone causing problems in wildfire seasons. now we've had that reversal of fortune. a number of systems have hit this month and we end the month on a wet note in washington, oregon and california. here's initial moisture with that already coming in. it will be more intense later into the day. by friday, we could see with a couple different rounds coming in a widespread area from northern california northward that could see 60 to eight inches of rain, and obviously there's isolated spots that always get higher. it's been relatively warm out here. most of this is a rainstorm until you get a higher
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elevations. w. where it could be one to two. this is the warmer portion of the country where the temperatures have been just cold enough to support snow. new york today 43. that's more the morning temperature. by this afternoon in the upper 30's. there's slightly cooler air with the front here now. even today into tomorrow, not too many places to are really out of whack this time of year. the front is mostly rain automobile the east coast where you get the snow is back in a little cooler air behind that, some lake enhancement and another clipper into the midwest. >> nothing like last week. >> nothing like that. the american side of niagara falls could soon run dry, plans
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to replace two bridges mean the falls would be turned off for the first time since 1969. the falls would be closed for five to nine months. the project if approved is a few years away. new york state will hold a public issue today imagine diverting that much water. oprah saying she lost 26 pounds. she took a 10% stake in weight watchers and now sits on the company board. shares of weight watchers jumping 20% after she revealed her success. we are back tomorrow morning. we're going to look at status of space travel and the effect of private companies 30 years now after the challenger disaster. have a great day.
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syrian groups start arriving in switzerland ahead of friday talks. there are still divisions over the inclusion of a prominent kurdish faction. welcome. i'm live from our headquarters in doha. also coming up, local reports suggest the f.b.i. is sending reinforcements to the oregon wildlife refuge occupied by an

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