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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  February 4, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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the fight for new hampshire, democrats fighting over labels. and the front runner being accused of cheating the blame game - talks to end the conflict in syria collapse. >> a sexual assault case against bill cosby advancing after a judge says no deal to imunit identify. >> preserving history, honour for some that died more than a century ago welcome to "your world this
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morning," i'm stephanie sy. i'm del walters, democrats running for prison, they will be holding their final debate ahead of the primary. tensions were high between the two. even though they didn't share the stage, as david shuster reports. they clashed over who could carry the label of progressive. >> reporter: six days before the first in the nation, new hampshire primary, bernie sanders and hillary clinton appeared in succession, each taking questions and speaking for an hour. >> i think it will be close in new hampshire. >> reporter: sanders addressed vulnerabilities and that he was too idealistic to respond to the congress, and pointed to work on health care. >> i compromised significantly with people like john mccain and republicans in the house to pass what was regarded as the most significant piece of veterans
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package passed in many years. >> reporter: he says he will not back down from plans to raise the minimum age and rein in wall street. >> how do we get these things through. what this campaign is about is not just erecting a president, but creating a political revolution where many have not been involved in the political process, stand up, demanding a government that represents all of us, not just wealthy campaign contributors. >> when asked about hillary clinton, sanders was matter of facts. >> polls suggest clinton is trailling sanders in new hampshire by double digits, and in her hour. she opened fire starting with the affordable care act. >> i don't agree that we should start over, we should throw our country into app contentious
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debate. >> he argued many debate are not grounded in reality. >> good ideas are important. you have to translate them into actions. i have a lot of experience doing that. i think i can deliver positive change for young people. >> as for her own ideas, clinton said she supports expanding health care coverage and lowering college education costs and insisted that she would be tough on wall street. >> no bank is too big to fail, no executive to powerful to gaol. >> anderson cooper asked about her speeches to the wall street bank. >> did you have to be paid $675,000. >> i don't know, that's what they offered. ever yit secretary of state i know has done that. >> once they are not running for an office. >> to be honest, i wasn't committed to running, i didn't know whether i would. >> you didn't think you would run for president?
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>> i didn't. >> clinton and sanders expect a long fight for the democratic nomination. it will be a short time until voters see them at the venue again. they'll appear face to face in new hampshire for the dehli debate. >> and the republicans are campaigning. donald trump expecting to sue over the results in iowa. in a series of tweets, ted cruz committing fraud. a new election should take place. cruz responding calling them a trumper tantrum. carly fiorina, the only woman, not needing the criteria. she did better in iowa. there is no under-card debate this time. carly fiorina wants the republican national committee to take over and set the rules. the man that won iowa in
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2012 suspended his campaign after a poor showing. rick santorum got less than 1% supporters he says it's not his year and throws support behind marco rubio, who came in third. senator rand paul withdrew after a fifth placed showing in iowa and plans to focus on returning for the senate in kansas city international, and has not endorsed rivals. >> a third of voters are up for grabs and polls show they are undecided. republican candidates are on a sprint to get face to face with as many voters as possible. erica pitzi is on the campaign trail. >> it's game time. we have six days to go. >> reporter: on the campaign trail, republicans criss-cross new hampshire to well the next republican in chief. hoping to ride the momentum.
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senator marco rubio is slated to do 100 event. this is his 77. his campaign says it raised $2 million since the iowa caucus, dubbing it marco mantu m. i think it's positive. i love that he's concerned about leaving an amazing country. not everyone is convinced. polls suggest one-third of voters are undecided. like small business owner. >> when i listen to marco rubio, what strikes me is that he is bashing the other party. and i heard it from other candidates as well. and it takes them down a notch for me. i really don't want to hear that. >> voters backed into event to hear from the zachary core. he is neck and neck with rwanda, standing next to a running
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national debt. kassig insisting he'll get the debt down and cut taxes. with the poll numbers not high, he admits new hampshire is his last gasp. >> if i could smoke here, what does that mean... >> that's why this couple came all the way from tennessee to help with the campaign. >> we knock on on 180 doors. those home and answering have been considering or committed. >> fresh off his win in iowa. >> everyone said that trump had it won. it was over, done, there was nothing you could do. >> senator ted cruz seemed to draw the loudest cheers on wednesday, despite running well behind donald trump, in most polls here. >> i need to go learn about him. >> reporter: this 19-year-old college student is not the only one undecided. some folks have not picked a party yet. >> democrats are saying good
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things, republicans are saying good things. i wish there was a way to incorporate all good ideas. >> wikipedia founder said he'll turn himself in if a european panel says he should. holing up inside the ecuadoran embassy, trying to avoid extrastayings to sweden, where he's wanted for a sex crime. julian assange claims it's a rouge so the u.s. can extradite him and martin pleading the fifth in front of congress, he's been subpoenaed to go before the house oversight committee to talk about drug prices. they raise the price by 5,000%. the sexual assault case is moving forward. a pennsylvania judge turning down the request to drop the
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charges because of an earlier deal cosby cut are prosecutors. we go outside the courthouse to john. a last-minute bombshell witness may have influenced the judge's decision. tell us more. >> well, you know, this is a peculiar pre-trial hearing. the judge has not followed his own rules, things have changes, and if lasted longer than expected. at the last second of the 11th hour, the prosecution put up a witness. she is andrea's civil lawyer. he is the center of the case accusing bill cos by of molesting her. they pushed back. everything that bruce caster, the district attorney at the center of this case, and a revered lawyer had though stay on the stand. she said she never heard of any
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non-prosecution deal between bruce caster and the comedian more than 10 years ago, and only found out when the press release was issued, that is about 10 years ago almost exactly. and devastatingly she said that she and her colleagues felt what was going on was that bruce caster was trying to appeal to the fans of bill hux table, the character played, because he a the da was running for office again. in the end the motion was denied by the judge, and sided with the evidence put forward. but we heard overnight that the cosby team intend to appeal. >> yet it goes forward based on the judge's decision. what do we expect in the next step. when is that to begin? >> it goes forward for the timebeing, we have to see how the appeal goes, the next date was march the 8th.
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the prosecution won this round, it doesn't mean he'll win the case. they have to convince a jury of men and women that charges are true beyond a reasonable doubt. that may be more difficult. >> john terrett, thank you florida's government declared an emergency in four counties after nine cases of zika virus were confirmed. all patients contracted the virus. the declaration allows florida to spray. the mosquito that carries zika. officials looking at the damage left behind. in the housing area. the tornado taking down trees and buildings. no one was hurt. dozens had to be relocated to temporary housing. >> the storm that brought the
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storms to the south may pose problems for the east coast. let's bring in the meteorologist. >> what we were watching was on the ground 10 minutes. if you can imagine that. here is the front. i'm bringing it back to where it was yesterday. i put this into motion. orange is wind damage. you can see a couple of things, one in south carolina, one was half a mile on the ground and did damage as well. this front will continue to cause very slight risk for thunder storms, that has diminished every day. definitely areas that you can see of heavier rain. once you get to the midatlearntic and north, most of -- mid-atlantic and north, most is off the coast. if you get a northern portion of this, it's a south-east look at the rain. we'll have a low pressure area developing.
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as it lifts northward, even though the front has passed through, more would come in tomorrow. boston, as the big city, had the most at one to three inches, new york, filled and into tomorrow, there could be a mix of rain. and finally getting the system out of here. this was the same one that caused the blizzards. >> little flakes we can handle. >> the i.r.s. hopes to have computer systems back up and running. taxpayer repairer tools stopped working, including the system used for e-filed returns. the i.r.s. blames a hardware failure. the agency doesn't anticipate major disruption they have never lost my return yet. coming up, searching for answers. >> i want everybody who is responsible for this fiasco to be held accountable. i'm not protecting anyone.
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>> members of congress display out rage over the water crisis in flint. we talk to a residence over whether she got the answers she was looking for. >> and one of the richest nations in central asia struggling to make ends meet. >> from rural midwest to war-torn mideast. she went for the money and found a greater calling...
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this morning there are more calls for answers in the water crisis in flint. some michigan officials were grilled before a congressional hearing. the governor and former manager were not there it's leading to outrage on both sides of the political sil. >> reporter: outside the u.s. capital, prayers. >> that you minimise the damage down to our children inside a hearing room
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outrage. >> i want everybody who is responsible for this fiasco to be held accountable. i'm not protecting anyone, that is not our job. we are the last line of defense. if we don't do it, nobody is going to want to do it. >> members of congress are looking for answers, who made the decision causing flint's water to be contaminated by dangerous levels of lead. local residents watched, wanting answers. >> they are struggling. they came all the way from flint. and mr chairman, they are americans like you and your children. >> reporter: the hearing was notable for who was gnat there - the former manager, darnell early. >> we are calling on the u.s. marshals to hunt him down and give him that subpoena.
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early's lawyer said is subpoena arrived on tuesday and did not give him enough to attend. >> what is disappointing is one. people most culpable will not take responsibility for it. >> republicans pointed a finger at the federal government. blaming the environmental protection agency. >> the e.p.a. failed in its responsibility. >> developments say it was reckless decisions at the state level, and they want to hear from the republican governor, rick schneider. >> we can't get the government of michigan to give responses for actions affecting 9,000 children. >> reporter: democrats are critical of michigan republicans for instituting an emergency management law, done in the name of money, cutting the council
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out of meeting. >> this is the consequence of putting ideology ahead of human being and their needs and welfare. the difference in political philosophy matters. political choices have consequences and flint is the moment dramatic. >> reporter: hours of test moan may as to who is responsible and what should be done for the people of flint michigan deborah hayes is the executive director of my brothers keeper and joins us via skype. she was with us yesterday. did you walk away from watching the hearings neiling that things would get better, worse or stay the same? >> i walked away from listening to the hearing, thinking things are getting better, because we are on the national stage, and on my point of view i don't
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think they are giving the governor or emergency manager any room to run. >> i want to play the sound bite we heard. this is marylands congresswoman, putting out that the marylands governor was not there, take a listen. >> i want to be clear. i don't care whether it's e.p.a., whether it's local or state. i want everybody who is responsible for this fiasco to be held accountable. i'm not protecting anyone. that is not our job. be your best line of defense. if we don't do it. no one will do it. you heard the chairman of the committee saying he believes marshal should go out early,
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reported by the governor. want the governor himself, should they send marshal to pick up rick schneider. >> absolutely first. he should be the first to testify. he is the leader. he should be accountable for every citizen. >> do you believe this will be a hearing, or do you think they truly want to get to the bottom of what is going on in flynn have flint. >> it could be another private act. >> who, if anyone, do you trust to fix the problem in flint? to fix the problem in flint. i think it will have to start on the state level. i understand that we have a
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rainy day fund we could tap into to bring in equipment and start the infrastructure, it's a matter of the government making those submissions. we are getting money from the federal level, all over the country. i hope and pray that the governor is listening and will get the pipes fixed now. they pent a lot of time thinking about the process. do you think they are interested or simply want to score political points. >> i watched the cnn at the hear, i felt passion and. pathy, some of these people and
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congress could have relatives affected by this. i truly believe that it was sincere. >> let me ask you this then, bapd on what you saw and heard -- based on what you saw and heard, are you convinces that anyone will go to gaol? >> i hope so. i hope people that are responsible will go to gaol. this is a long-term effect on the young people. the future leaders. it's not their to us. it's not fair to any united states citizens to drink poisoned water. >> do you expect anyone will go to gaol? >> yes. >> deborah hayes joining us live. >> thank you very much and deborah's family is not the only one living with bad water. al jazeera's andy rosen visited a family in a hard-hit area.
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>> this family lives in a neighbourhood one of the hottest spots for lead contamination according to a study. it's the dreaded burgundy zone. >> thank god we've been doing what we have been doing for so long. >> she calls herself lucky, her kids defted low and the family gave up on flint water and switched to bottled water when symptoms showed up. >> i daughter's allergies blew up. a big eye, something itching, sneezing. we were frustrated. >> reporter: within the burgundy zone, the lead levels varied. when someone gets water tested for lead, it can take five weeks to get results. a lot of time to think about it. >> how do you begin to not use any water at all.
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when you - when all you do is turn the top and it comes out. it's tempting and taunting to go ahead. >> darnell brown is the executive director of a charity that works with mother. she is imploring clients to get the kids tested for led. she told them that high levels of led are in the the only problem. they are sending out teams to check for low levels of chlorine in homes. if it's too low, it's not keeping bacteria out of the water. the e.p.a. said that the treatment center they work doesn't have chlorine. >> you go back saying how many launches have i had and gone to the rest room, so it's like a play back. >> the bottom line for flint's residence, confusion is king. >> i can't. as mp as i need to know, i can't
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take a new piece of information. that mother is speaking to is a lack of trust they feel about anything that comes out. >> water you drink - you expect to be safe. >> straight ahead dash talks suspended. an offensive blamed for putting an end to negotiations to stop syria's civil war. >> you're not muslim or american, you're muslim and american. >> and president obama's pointed message during a visit to an american mosque.
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the two democratic candidate dates for president heading back to the stage tonight, heading off one last time before tuesday's new hampshire primary. last night they took part in a town hall meeting clashing over policy choices including health care reform and clinton's ties to wall treat. wick key leaders jagian assong may turn himself over to police. he is inside the ecuadorian
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embassy. he'll abide by whatever the u.n. panel decide. a health emergency in effect in four counties in florida over the zika virus. they will aggressively spray against the mosquito witness even though it appears all patients contracted the virus outside of the u.s. >> the u.n. sponsored talks to end the war in syria are called off three days after they began. >> both sides blame each other for the collapse of the talks. let's go live to london at a major conference hoping to raise aid money for syria's humanitarian crisis. james, i want to get to that, but let's first start with why the u.n. decided to stop the talks. >> well, i was actually in geneva and flew there this morning as has the special envoy
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staffan de mistura. i spoke to him about an hour ago. he simply told me that he is here to brief ban ki-moon about the situation and it's clear that he didn't brief the u.n. secretary general before he made this announcement. he actually made this announcement after he met the syrian opposition and told quite firmly that they were going to pull out of his peace talks and he thought to try and preserve the peace talks, the best thing was not to let them pull out but try and get some sort of postponement. the reason for all this, well, it's very much the military escalation in recent days and russian bombardment. the opposition just felt the situation was untenable. they came for peace talks and they're colleagues on the ground in syria while they came to talk were being bombarded by russia, which is supposed to be one of the sponsors of the peace process. >> let's talk a bit more about that, because russian airstrikes were continuing, i understand as these talks exploratory talks
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were beginning. are they to blame for the talks being called off? >> i entirely think that is the position that the opposition would take, if you ask that question. they will say they are to blame, they will say the u.n., they have little trust in the u.n. they will say the u.s. is to blame. they are deeply unhappy that they have not heard a strong enough condemnation from the united states about russia's actions in this. they say it is shameful what russia has done to destroy this opportunity at peace. remember, the opposition, we're told by their allies, including the united states, get on that plane to geneva, we give you assurances if you come to geneva, you'll get something concrete which will allow your delegation to get support of the syrian people and get peace talks. what did they get? the exact opposite, a massive increase in military activity and massive bombardment by russia, which is at the
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beginning of this process, rush and the united states that created it and sponsored it. >> secretary of state john kerry just announced $600 million in u.s. aid. will this help slow down the mass exodus of refugees? >> well, the aim is to try and make life better for the syrians. we're almost at the five year mark in this war. the first one of these big donor conferences that was in kuwait in 2013, i covered that and i just looked back at my notes from the time they were asking for $1.2 billion then a couple of years into the war. they are now asking for a total of $8.9 billion and the sums reflect the scale of the humanitarian catastrophe that is syria. every single aid worker, every single human official will tell you yes, they need this money to
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help the people, but that's not going to stop the suffering, stopping the war has to stop the suffering and that's why the collapse of this latest peace effort i think is really so concerning to the united nations. >> covering the issue for us on all fronts, james bays, thank you. in iraq, people in if luge. >> are going hungry, trapped between isil and government forces there. the united nations is concerned there could be another humanitarian disaster in iraq, as well. imran kahn has more from baghdad. >> although it's not a humanitarian disaster yet, there is real concern that the situation in fallujah could escalate, it's certainly very desperate now. we've been speaking to people inside of the city. the markets are out of food, there's no fruits, no vegetables, no meat, they're saying that the medical supplies are running low. one mother told us there is no baby milk supplies within the city and she is struggling to
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feed her child. the governor of anbar province appealed to the u.s., saying there needs to be an air drop into the city of supplies, however, he is a lope voice. none of the aid agencies so far have commented on the situation yet. the iraqi security forces took the city of rimadi as they were doing and cut off a key supply line, which is the palestinian bridge and besieged the city of fallujah, no food or any other supplies are getting into i fallujah. now this is a common tactic. we've seen besieged cities before, they go in and take those cities from isil, however there is 5,000 families, 110,000 people trapped within the city itself. if supplies don't get in, it will become a humanitarian disaster. iraqis say this is part of the military campaign to go and take that city from isil. isil control that city. the only food stuff they have is
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stockpiles of wheat. their rations that out to the people of fallujah, but there isn't enough to go around. if something isn't done soon, that city will face a humanitarian disaster. >> isil has been in control of fallujah now for more than with it years. >> joining us is colonel steve warren joining us via skype from baghdad. thank you for your time. you may have just heard our correspondent saying there is going to be a humanitarian disaster in fallujah, which isil controls if supplies do not get in to the people there. how are you addressing this? >> we've spoken with the iraqi military every single day and in fact, the iraqi army is working to open humanitarian corridors into fallujah to help relieve this problem. unfortunately, isil, this enemy
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that we're fighting, daish, is not very cooperative and it's in fact this enemy who is starving out these people. >> do you know if air drops are being considered if the siege continues there? >> well, we have to think about air drops, right? when you drop supplies into an occupied city, you have to ask yourself who will get those splice and usually it's the people with the guns. >> last time that you were on with us, back in december, iraqi forces had retaken the government center in rimadi, but isil is counterattacking and has been for weeks. this week alone, 13 iraqi soldiers have been killed. how concerned are you about iraqi forces ability to control rimadi. >> iraqi forces will be able to hold rimadi. these counter attacks have been effective across the board. there will be a suicide truck or sniper team or a two man team with an r.p.g., certainly nothing with the combat power that would be required to retake
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rimadi. >> let's talk about the other major battle in the offing. isil's stronghold in iraq is mosul. are the iraqis prepared to retake mosul as of today without ground assistance by the coalition? >> the iraqis are generating what we call the bottom pat appear that's going to be necessary to seize that city. it will take time. we've already trained 20,000 iraqi soldiers. we will have to train many thousand more before the iraqi military has built up enough capability to take that city. this enemy can be beaten but for it to be a victory that sticks, that victory has to come from indigenous forces. >> i want to spend time here talking about civilian casualties. officially how many have been caused since operation inherent resolve started? >> 21 civilians have likely been killed with an additional 17 we
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believe were wounded. >> air wars, an independent monitoring group says at least 862 and as many add 1,190 non-combatants have died in coalition strikes. they use social media allegations to investigate claims which the pentagon does not. whose numbers are more accurate? >> well, i think all numbers have to be looked at inside of a larger context. every allegation that we see, whether it's on social media, whether it comes from aid groups, whether it comes from the united nations or whether it bubbles up just from the civilian population, we examine that allegation carefully. if that allegation based on our examination seems credible, we'll launch a full blown investigation, which includes all of our intelligence resources, so-- >> do you believe only 21 deaths have occurred out of more than 8,000 airstrikes now? >> the 21 that we've been able
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to verify. there are several other open investigation eggs and as we complete them, we'll announce the deaths. understand that this campaign, we believe, really has been the most precise air campaign in the history of warfare. that doesn't mean civilians aren't endangered. they are, but we have done everything humanly possible to mitigate and reduce those human casualties. >> do you see another front opening up in libya right now with isil and do you see that u.s. forces may be needed there? >> ice ail has made it clear they have worldwide ambitions. they are moving into libya, we've seen that and you've seen us already strike ice as i am's leader in libya. >> right. >> we are focused here on iraq and syria, it remains to be seen how libya will develop. >> colonel, thank you for your time. >> thank you very much. president obama is calling for an end to what he is calling
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inexcusable political rhetoric against muslims. he made remarks wednesday in a visit to a u.s. mosque. he said the attacks in paris an san bernardino unfairly linking all muslims with terrorism and called out presidential candidates saying their anti muslim message has led to a surge in threats to muslims. >> there is no one single profile for terrorists. we can't deal solely through the prism of law enforcement. we have to build trust and mutual respect. that's how we'll keep our communities strong, our communities united. >> the pot called on americans to show americans protects all faith, muslim american groups have been asking president obama to visit a mosque for quite some time in the u.s. he visited mosques in other countries, but never inside the united states. the northwest is bracing for another round of storms, believe it or not. let's bring in nicole mitchell for more.
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>> we just haven't been getting a break in central and southern california which we'd like to shift a little of this rain southward. the drought situation for washington state has been eroded over the course of the winter. it what been beneficial for some areas. you can see a little gap and another one coming in right behind that and as we look to the long term, another behind that. the one system will continue to move across the country, light areas of snow moving into the midwest the next couple of days. as the next one moves in, that's going to bring the potential for heavy rain through the weekend. watch for the half foot totals to get to the foot mark. the higher elevations we have different advisories out here. the cascades for know six to eight inches not out of the question. portions of wyoming, it's still on going from the last snowstorm, still high winds, still through this morning, we could see ground blizzard
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conditions, just because the snow is still blowing around. >> and still not what they wanted to hear. >> no. shell oil is cutting 10,000 jobs after a drop in profits. the earnings tumbled 44% because of collapsing oil prices, but the energy giant is not the only one cutting back. oil rich kazakhstan is scrambling to survive the decline as well. we have more. >> protests like this one organized without official approval are against the law in kazakhstan, but these mortgage holders want to make themselves heard. the u.s. dollar linked repayments on their home loans have risen beyond their means and at the same time, the property market has collapsed in a contracting economy. >> let's say they got a mortgage of $200,000 to buy a small apartment. that today is worth just $50,000 and people are in such trouble
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that they cannot pay. >> they may be a small, if vocal minority, but there is a silent, so far, struggling majority, whose lives have also been impacted by a falling national currency. >> kazakhstan's capital was built with oil money. now the oil price collapse has harmed value in just six months, dramatically raising the cost of living. that's hurting employers to employees and clientele. >> the supplies and landlords are raising prices and the customers spend less. that's two problems we're having to deal with at the same time. >> public spending is being cut, and so, too, are jobs. at the president's palace, officials admit how serious the problem is. >> our budget has been cut 40%.
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we understand the difficulties our citizens are facing and we are taking every action to stabilize the situation. >> unless that happens, public unrest, still a rarity, might because more routine. most people living in the northeast see all those commercials saying job rich kazakhstan. honoring the dead. >> one man's mission to restore the cemetery where his ancestors are buried.
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>> there is a lot of controversy this morning over new guidelines involving pregnancy and drinking. >> the c.d.c. said women should not drink at all unless they're on birth control. critics say the guideline shames women. >> alcohol and pregnancy do not muscle. the medical community warned women against drinking alcohol while pregnant. new guidelines from the c.d.c. recommend 15-44-year-old woman not drink any alcohol unless they're on birth control. right now, we know that the fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is associated with even small amounts of alcohol consumption and pregnancy. >> the guidelines aim at curbing
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birth defects. most women won't know they are pregnant for the first month or so, when they might still be drinking. the risk is real, why take the chance? the announcement is generating criticism mainly for leaving men out of the equation. on facebook, brianna writes why isn't the c.d.c. recommend that men stop having sex with women if they aren't using birth control. >> yes, let's mandate women show birth control use with their i.d. when purchasing alcohol or being permitted to a bar. one said ban reproductive age women from buying deli meat and sushi restaurants. >> more than 3 million drink, are sexually active and at risk of exposing their baby to alcohol if they become pregnant. >> the number could range two to 5% of the u.s. population.
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critics don't challenge the health risks but rather the way the risk is communicated focusing only on women. >> it's not that easy for some women to get birth control, by the way, in this country. has the c.d.c. reacted to the criticism? >> no comment beyond the report they put out. they commented on general comments about alcohol son assumption and critics but no comment about the double standard of the mental. alcohol is a major problem in south korea, residents believed to drink more hard liquor than anyone else on the planet. that has health officials now sounding the alarm. >> on drunk patrol, the officer has been called to this coffee shop. patrons report someone in urgent need of help.
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they find her, heavily in tax indicated and passed out in the bathroom. the officers carry her to the patrol car. they'll take her to medic. up until now, korean men have been the heavy drinkers, but increasingly, women are joining their ranks. every night, south koreans consume a local alcohol made from rice. >> the number of calls we're getting involving drunks is overall increasing, but women make up most of our calls now. they are destroying themselves with liquor. it's heartbreaking. >> on any given evening on the streets of seoul, young women can be seen stumbling about,
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drunk out of their minds. the big part of the problem is the viability of liquor. it can be found 74/7 anywhere and the cost, only one dollar a bottle. >> 25 alcoholics have launched a class action lawsuit against liquor companies, accusing them of using celebrities to lure young women into drinking. >> people obviously look at these advertisements and see celebrities downing liquor. because they are so famous, naturally it encourages consumers to drink more. it leads to overdrinking. >> university students argue partying and binge drinking helps relieve stress. she studies 18 hours a day, and with youth suicide rates here the highest in the developed world, she said drinking is good for mental health.
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>> do you ever see a day when south koreans will drink less? >> absolutely not. [ laughter ] >> liquor is something that's naturally shared between friends and family. i think korean drinking culture is very uplifting. i don't think the day will ever come, nor should it. >> none deny alcohol's negative effects but argue women are simply joining in on an old korean practice one that provides the necessary escape despite the risks. testing underway on a cure for diabetes. johnson and johnson developed a system using stem cells that would implant them under the skin to turn to insulin production cells. researchers say this system worked in animals. an update on former jimmy
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carter's battle with cancer. a scan last week showed no sign of melanoma. in december, he said the cancer was gone with his brain. he credits the new immuno therapy drug. he is undergoing treatment. he is 91. >> one man on a mission in florida trying to save a cemetery and restore dignity to some of the african-americans who helped build this country. we have more. >> i'd like to introduce my family. >> benjamin franklin smith is proud of his family. at 70 years old, the retired pastor and vietnam vet has a new purpose. his passion lies in restoring the final resting place of his ancestors. >> that was a lot of trial and error trying to make it across. >> at least once a week, smith drives this dirt road to an
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abandoned cemetery. >> do you remember the first time you visited the cemetery here? >> i was roughly about maybe four or five years old. this was back in about 1950. all this was black folk, property, at one time. a lot of these folk were related to me. >> the cemetery was established as a place for the african-american community here to bury their loved once. >> they had wooden box, remember. back in the 1880's, they put them away in a wooden box, so, you know, the wood's gone. >> it is home to an unknown number of people, mothers, fathers, sons and daughters, and even veterans. decades of neglect left it in disrepair, markers lost and headstones toppled. >> i had a cut a path to try to locate my parents. once i located them, it was hard to get back to find them again. >> now with the help of
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volunteers, smith is changing that. >> right there? >> it looks good. >> using metal detectors, they are on a quest to identify graves and restore them. so far, they found more than 125, thanks in part to volunteer paige, a girl scout who felt compelled to help when she heard of the mission. >> it's history, and it's people have come before us and i don't think you should forget that. it's important that we kind of just make it nice again, because i think that you should respect older, living or dead. >> each pink flag represents where they believe they found potential remains. the goal is to replace these flag witness a permanent marker. they are painstakingly mending this once forgoing hallow ground, head stone by head stone. smith says it's work he said
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taking on because no one else has. >> my grandmother, mary smith. she took pride and i took that pride right on to try to show respect for them and take care of them, but before, it was just no action and i don't know why it was neglected and who can you blame? there's no one to look around and blame. >> al jazeera, florida. >> those cemeteries are in almost every state. you hope what he is doing catches on. >> finally bringing dignity to the dead. martin jelly heads to capitol hill. >> understanding the epidemic. >> it was terrifying. >> it's like navigating a minefield. >> go inside the new medical breakthrough. >> you had quite a reaction there. >> that's crazy. >> i really feel my life changing. >> the freedom is unbelievable.
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>> techknow's team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> ...can affect and surpise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow, where technology meets humanity... >> only on al jazeera america.
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>> a state of emergency, florida governor taking action over the zika virus as cases spread in the u. a new hampshire throwdown, hillary clinton and bernie sanders trade accusations as donald trump accuses ted cruz of cheating in iowa. a pennsylvania judge ruling against bill cosby over sexual assault charges. picking up the piece, residents try to clean up after
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tornadoes tear through two southern states. good morning, welcome to your world this morning. i'm del walters. i'm stephanie sy. this morning a state of emergency in effect in parts of florida as new cases of the zika virus pop up in the u.s. >> nine have been diagnosed with the virus in four counties in florida alone and doctors believe those cases were contracted abroad. >> that brings the total number of case in the u.s. to 48 across 12 states and washington, d.c. florida governor rick scott wants his state to be prepared and stop the spread. >> miami has long been known as the gateway to the americas and borne out by the international airport. 40,000 passengers arrive from or
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go to latin america and the caribbean. it makes florida vulnerable. some of florida said most senior politicians voids their concerns that miami international airport may not be able to cope with the virus. getting back to basics may help the most. >> almost all experts expect locally transmitted cases at some point in the united states. >> the university of miami has been studying infectious diseases for years. there is nothing new in how communities can adapt and respond to the zika virus. florida has programs in place to battle the mosquito that spreads dengue fever, chicken begun i can't and the zika virus. he says improving positions globally and accurately diagnosing those who fall. >> to me, getting back to the
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basics, diagnostic, basic science on what is transmitting, trying to get a perfect diagnose and every patient in the world. >> it's business at usual, officials here have no plans to implement any special measures to combat the zika virus, but say it's people who will make the biggest difference. >> we are appealing to the public, the homeowners to do their job. they are called to play a major role right now in preventing the disease getting established in our county by eliminating every single accumulation of water around a home. >> as yet, there are no federal guidelines in response to a potential outbreak in florida. that may change as the weather gets warmer. education programs and the public's role will be crucial. >> health officials in brazil identified two cases of the zika
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virus transmitted through blood transfusions. they were both reported in sao paulo state and contracted early last year. the american red cross is asking potential blood donors who have traveled to affect countries to wait 28 days before donating. >> we are several days from the crucial new hampshire primary, the democrats running for president facing off for the final debate. tensions were high last night when hillary clinton and bernie sanders taking to the stage in that town hall. al jazeera's david shuster reports. >> just six days before the first in the nation new hampshire primary, bernie sanders and hillary clinton appeared in succession at this dairy town hall with each speaking for an hour and taking questions. >> i think this is going to be a very close election here. >> sanders addressed perceptions he is too idealistic to compromise with congress. he pointed to work on veteran's health care. >> i compromised significantly
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with john mccain and republicans in the house to pass what is rewarded as the most significant piece of veterans legislation passed in many, many years. >> sanders insisted he will not back down from his plans to raise the minimum wage, pass universal health care and rein in wall street. >> how do we get these things through? what this campaign is about is not just electing a president, it is creating a political revolution where millions of people, many of whom have not been involved in the political process stand up and demand a government which represents all of us, not just wealthy campaign contributors. >> when asked about hillary clinton, sanders was matter of fact. >> you can't go and say you're a moderate on one day and be a progressive on the other day. >> he suggested clinton is trailing sander in double digits and in her hour, she opened fire, starting with the affordable care act.
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>> i don't agree with senator sanders that we should start over, that we should throw our country into a contentious national debate about health kerrigan. >> clinton argued many of his plans are not grounded in political reality. >> good ideas on paper are important, but you've got to be able to translate them into action to get results for people. i have a lot of experience doing that. i think i can deliver positive change for young people. >> as for her own ideas, clinton said she supports expanding health care coverage and lowering college education costs and insisted that she would be tough on wall street. >> no bank is too big to fail, no executive too powerful to jail. >> anderson cooper then asked about her speeches to wall street banks. >> did you have to be paid $675,000? >> well, i don't know, that's what they offered. you know, every secretary of
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state that i know has done that. >> once they're in office, nos running for office. >> to be honest, i wasn't committed to running. i didn't know whether i would or not. >> you didn't think you were going to run for president? >> i didn't. >> clinton and sanders both expect a long fight for the democratic nomination, but it will only be a short time until voters see them at the same venue again. thursday night, they will appear face-to-face in new hampshire for a presidential debate. david shuster, al jazeera. the republicans are campaigning again today, donald trump threatening to sue over the results in iowa. in a series of tweets, trump saying ted cruz committed fraud to win and either new elections should take place or cruz results nullified. those tweets come days after trump congratulated cruz on his win in iowa. >> i'm just honored, really honored and i want to congratulate ted and all of the incredible candidates.
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>> cruz responding on twitter calling trump's new allegationles a trumper tantrum. the only woman in the republican race demands a spot on saturday's debate stage. carly fiorina didn't the criteria to make the debate stage. there is this time no undercard debate. fear arena said she wants the national committee to take over and set the rules. >> suspending his campaign after a poor showing, rick santorum got less than 1% report. in a tweet, the pennsylvania senator said it was just not his year. he is throwing support behind senator marco rubio who came in third in iowa and senator rand paul has also withdrawn from the race after a fifth place showing in iowa. he plan foss focus on running for reelection for the senate in kentucky. paul has not endorsed any of his rivals yet. the sexual assault case against bill cosby is moving
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forward, a pennsylvania judge ruling not to drop the charges. john for let is live in pennsylvania. john, what exactly led to the judge's decision in this case? >> good morning, dell, stephanie, we think a bombshell testimony to the prosecution put on at the 11th hour, right at the end of this two day hearing from dolores triani's torn. what was guard about her testimony was that she basically pushed back at everything bruce caster, the much revered, then district attorney here had said on the stand the day before. she said for example, that she had absolutely no idea that there was an agreement between bruce caster and bill cosby not to prosecute the comedian, she only found about it from a press
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release put out by bruce caster's office about 11 years ago now and she said on the stand that she and her colleagues felt that the real reason bruce caster was not prosecuting bill cosby all those years ago was because he, bruce caster, was running for office again and didn't want to alienate the fans of dr. cliff huxtable, the character played by bill cosby in that famous t.v. show. in the end, the judge decided that he preferred the testimony and the arguments put forward by the prosecution, the motion to have this case dismissed completely was denied, and so it goes forward, but overnight, we've heard from the cosby team they intend to appeal. >> what's next? when can we expect the next preliminary hearing in this case. >> marsh eight. there's going to be a meeting here. there will be another pretrial hearing on different topics from the ones that we've just lived through for this past 48 hours.
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march eight, everyone will be back to see what happens next. of course the appeal will have to take its course and then i think it's worth pointing out that the prosecution may well have won this first round, but now are going to have to go forward and present their evidence to a jury of 12 men and women, and they are going to have to prove to that jury beyond reasonable doubt that the allegations against bill cosby are true, and that may be a lot more difficult, a lot more difficult to convince a jury that it might have been over these last two days to convince a judge. >> john terrett live in pennsylvania this morning, thank you very much. officials in georgia are assessing the damage left behind by a tornado that touched down in the middle of housing at fort stuart near savannah. it damaged vehicles and buildings, took down trees. no one was hurt. dozens had to be relocated to
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temporary housing. >> that same system bringing bad weather to south carolina and georgia, where is it moving now? >> less potent in the last couple days. this brings us back in time about 24 hours to where things were then and each dot you see is a severe weather report. most reports are from the wind damage. you see a couple of reds, the video we just showed was on the ground an estimated 10 minutes, causing all that damage. the other one in south carolina was estimated to be on the ground covering about half a mile, a little over that, so definitely some people waking up and doing cleanup from that or be it from the high winds. the front now, today, much more likely that this would just be rain, can't rule out an isolated wind event but the severe weather yesterday was less than the day before. this has covered a lot of rain. this is what happens over the next couple days.
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this has kind of cleared the coastline, area of low pressure is going to develop on this and bring it back toward the coastline. if you're out in the east coast today, the northeast, mid atlantic maybe getting a mist. tomorrow, boston, one to three-inches of snow not out of the question. philadelphia, or new york, not quite as close to where the system would be could get a slight dusting or a couple of flakes going by. that would also be mixed in with rain because of the temperature with that watch for that. final clearing out a little bit more just in time for the weekend. speaking of temperatures, pretty mild today up and down the east coast in the 50's, but already by tomorrow, this gets colder and that means overnight is when it could support a little of that snow mixinging. >> nicole mitchell, thank you. >> in flint michigan, one day after officials went before a congressional committee. >> they were asked tough questions about the crisis. the governor and city's former manager were not there. >> outside the u.s. capital,
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prayers. >> operating that you minimize the damage that was done to our children. >> inside a hearing room, outrage. >> i want everybody who was responsible for this fiasco to be held accountable. i'm not protecting anybody, because that's not our job. we are the last line of defense and if we don't do it, nobody's going to do it. >> members of congress are looking for answers, who made the decision that caused flint's water to be contaminated by dangerous levels of lead? local residents watched, also hoping for answers. >> they are struggling. they've come all the way here from flip. i don't know how they got here. mr. chairman, they are also americans, just like you, and just like your children. >> the hearing was notable for who was not there, the former emergency manager of flint, darnell early, who was appointed by michigan's republican
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governor. >> we're calling on the u.s. marshals to hunt him down and give him that subpoena. >> early's lawyer said a subpoena arrived late tuesday and didn't give him enough time to attend. >> what's disappointing is that one of the people who is probably most culpable for the situation won't take responsibility for it, and i think he needs to appear here. >> republicans also pointed the finger at the federal government, blaming the environmental protect agency. >> the e.p.a. has failed in its responsibility. >> but democrats say it was reckless decisions at the state level that led to the crisis, and they want to hear from republican michigan governor rick snyder. >> we can't get the governor of michigan at this hearing to give responses for actions that are going to affect 9,000 children. >> democrats are also critical of michigan republicans for
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instituting an emergency manager law. it was done in the name of saving money and cut the city council out of decisions. >> this is the consequence of putting ideology ahead of human beings, and their needs and their welfare. the difference in political philosophy matters. political choices have consequences and flint is the most dramatic in our generation. >> hours of testimony and debate, congress is no closer to resolving who is responsible for what should be done for the people of flint, michigan, libby casey, al jazeera, washington. earlier on your world this morning, i talked to deborah hayes, the executive director of my brother's keeper in flint. she says she would like to see the governor and former emergency manager both forced to testify. >> unless the governor is there, they are not going to get to the bottom of it, and it appears that it could be another
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partisan act. >> let me ask you this. who if anyone do you trust to fix the problem in flint? >> to fix the problem in flint, i think it's going to have to start on the state level. i understand that we have a rainy day fund that we could tap into right now to bring some equipment in to start the infrastructure. it's just a matter of the governor making those decisions. we're getting money from the federal level, the local level all over the country, money is coming in. i hope and pray that the governor is listening and will open up the rainy day fund and get these pipes fixed now. i hope the people that are responsible will go to jail. this is a long term effect on our young people who are our future leaders and that's not fair. it's not fair to us. it's not fair to any united states citizens to be drinking
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poisoned water. i walked away from listening to the hearing, thinking that things are getting better, because we're on the national stage. on my point of view, i don't think that they're giving the governor or emergency manager or anyone who is responsible any room to run. >> she is confident that someone is going to wind up going to jail because of the water contamination problem in flint. the i.r.s. hopes to have its computer systems back up and running today. some tools stopped working on monday, including the system used to accept he filed returns. the i.r.s. blames a computer hardware failure. the agency is making repairs and doesn't anticipate major disruptionles. >> when we come back, the u.n. delays the syrian peace talks trying to keep them alive. >> the claim that the assad government is using the peace talks to shield a major
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offensive. younger voters don't seem to be throwing their support behind the woman who can become the first female president.
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talks for peace in syria were halted because the whole process was going to collapse from groups pulling out. the best option was to announce a pause, a delay for three weeks. this was the announcement made by the u.n. special envoy. >> there is more work to be done, not only by us, we have did you our part but by the stakeholders who have been been tell us, the countries, go and start this initiative. staffan de mistura speaking in geneva. i can tell you that he, like me, in fact, has made his way in the last couple of hours from geneva
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to here in london. i saw him as he arrived here. he told me that he was going straight away to brief the u.n. secretary general, ban ki-moon to give him his candid and frank assessment of the situation. i can also tell you that i've been speaking to another u.n. insider, who is involved with the staffan de mistura team and this insider told me that they felt the situation was very difficult now. it's going to be very hard to put this process back together. yes, they've announced delay, but they fear that the russian bombardment and the syrian military advance will continue. if that happens, it's going to be very hard to explain to the opposition block that they should come back to the negotiating table, because they feel that they were given assurances and they have been misled. >> we can hear the protestors behind you, but tell us more about this u.s. pledge for $600 million in aid to syria. how is that going to help the country and especially the
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refugees we keep seeing? >> the aim is to get a huge amount of money for the situation in syria, you just look at the figures, and compare them with previous years, and you can tell how bad things are getting in syria. it's becoming a humanitarian catastrophe. we're nearly five years into the civil war, dell apartment first one of these big donor conferences was two years in. that was in kuwait. i was covering that. i looked back at my notes. they were asking for $1.2 billion. that seemed like a huge sum of money and major problem. now they are asking for $8.9 billion, showing you how the problem has got even worse and spilled over from syria not just into the neighboring countries but all the way to where i am now in europe because of all these refugees. every single humanitarian you speak to says you need this
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money to help the people but we're not going to stop the problem until we stop the war. that is why the united nations is so worried about the collapse of these peace talks. hundreds of thousands of syrian refugees are in jordan, the country is struggling to help the people it has already taken in. >> these two men are studying to become pharmacists. at syrian refugees when they graduate, they won't be allowed to work. muhammed lives with his sister and children. in syria, he studied chemical engineering. after arriving in jordan, he learned how to repair cell phones, but he's not allowed to do that, either. >> i got the certificate but couldn't find work because when you go to a shop, first they say syrians are fore bidden from
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working. >> it's so hard to survive here that one by one, almost all of his friends have left. they spend a lot of time just walking around the streets, window shopping for things they can't buy. ahmed still has a bullet in his shoulder after being shot in syria. he worked in a sweet shop for a while, but was put in jail for working illegally. >> the infrastructure are overwhelmed by so many refugees. it says if the west wants it to continue to take in more syrians, including thousands stranded at the border, it has to do more to help. not just the refugees, but poor jordanians. >> those working earn much less than the minimum wage for
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jordanians, but with cuts in aid for refugees, more are working illegally. he stands on the sidewalk eight hours a day selling used stuffed toys. two weeks ago, municipal authorities came and took all the toys away. he had to pay to get them back. jordanians are also struggling to all the way a living here. he works 14 hours a day on that on a good day, he makes $10. >> i leave the house at 7:00 a.m. and finish at 9:00 p.m. i've reached the house at 10:00 or 11:00. sometimes i have dinner, sometimes i sleep without eating because i'm tired. >> there are close ties between syrians and jordanians. here the strain is beginning to show. al jazeera, jordan. >> jordan's king abdul has saying they need the money badly. >> that they are at the boiling point, he said. we'll talk about the
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resilience of isil. >> losses on the ground tell a different story. a former drug c.e.o. who raised the prices of one drug 5000% is set to go before congress.
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>> from rural midwest to war-torn mideast. she went for the money and found a greater calling...
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welcome back the your world this morning, 8:30 eastern time. a health emergency in effect in four florida counties over the zika virus, officials confirm nine cases reported in the state. the declaration allows florida to begin aggressively spraying against mosquitoes even though it appears all the patients in florida contracted the virus outside of the united states. >> this morning, the sexual assault case against bill cosby is moving forward. a pennsylvania judge turned down a defense request to drop the charges because of a deal cosby cut with prosecutors. dozens in georgia waking up in temporary housing after a tornado touched down on a base near savannah, taking down trees and damaging buildings. no one was hurt. the united nations little is concerned that there could be another humanitarian disaster in iraq. people in fallujah are going
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hungry. they are trapped in the fight between isil and government forces there. we have more from baghdad. >> although it's not a humanitarian disaster yet, there is real concern that the situation in fallujah could escalate. it's certainly very desperate. we've been speaking to people inside the city. they've told us that the markets are out of food, new fruits, vegetables or meat. they say the medical supplies are running very low. one mother told us that there is no baby milk supplies within the city and she is struggling to feed her child. the governor are anbar province appealed to the u.s., saying there needs to be an air drop into that city of supplies. however, he is a lone voice. none of the aid agency says so far commented on the situation yet. the iraqi security forces took the city of rimadi as they were doing that cut off a key supply line, which was the palestinian bridge. they besieged the city of fallujah, no food or any other supplies are getting into
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fallujah. this is a common tactic. we've seen in the iraqi security forces in besieged cities they go in and take those cities from isil. there are 110,000 people trapped within the city itself. supplies don't get in, it will become a human disaster and something will need to be done. the iraqis are very aware of this but also say that this is part of the military campaign tog and take that city from isil. isil controlled that city. the only food stuff they have is the stockpiles of wheat. they are rationing that wheat out to the people of fallujah, however we're being told that there isn't enough to go around and if something isn't done soon that that city will face a humanitarian disaster. >> that is imran kahn in baghdad. isil has been in control of fallujah now for more than two jeers. >> this morning we are getting a new sense of the size of isil. the intelligence community estimates the group now that between 20,000 and 25,000
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fighters, roughly the same as what the group was believed to have had before the u.s. led campaign began. the numbers suggest the group has been able to replenish its ranks. an estimated 25,000 isil members have been killed in coalition air likes. colonel steve warren is the spokesman for operation inherent resolve fighting isil with the national coalition. >> the iraqi army is working to open humanitarian corridors into fallujah to help relieve this problem. unfortunately, isil, this enemy that we're fighting, daish, is not cooperative and starving out these people. >> do you know if air drops are being considered if the siege continues? >> when you drop supplies into an occupied city, you have to ask yourself who will get those supplies and usually it's the people with the guns. >> last time you were on with
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us, back in december, iraqi forces had retaken the government center in rimadi, but isil is counterattacking, has been for weeks and this week, 13 iraqi soldiers have been killed. how concerned are you about iraqi soldiers' ability to hold rimadi? >> they will be able to hold ramadi. these counter attacks have been ineffective across the board. it will be a suicide truck or sniper team or a two man team with an r.p.g., certainly nothing with the combat power that would be required to retake rimadi. >> let's talk about the other major battle in the offing, isil stronghold in iraq is mosul. are the iraqis prepared to retake mosul as of today without ground assistance by the coalition? >> the iraqis are generating what we call the combat power necessary to seize that city. it will take time. we've already trained about
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20,000 iraqi soldiers. we will have to train many thousand more before the iraqi military has built up enough capability to seize that city, but we believe the iraqis can do it. it's important to know this enemy can be beaten, but for it to be a victory that sticks, that victory has to come from indigenous forces. >> the u.n.'s deputy special representative to rack said they have received two unverified reports of people who died from hunger, a child and a woman. the sources in the city reported two deaths from a lack of in license to treat diabetes. the national prayer breakfast in washington, d.c. is underway. that is speaker paul ryan at the podium. president obama will be giving remarks at the top of the hour. this is the 64th year of the prayer breakfast that brings together members of congress, evangelical christians as well as the white house. president obama calling for an end to what he is calling
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inexcusable rhetoric against muslims. he made those remarks during a visit to a mosque. he said attacks in paris and san bernardino unfairly links all muslims with terrorism. he called out presidential candidates saying anti muslim messages have led to a surge of threats against american muslims. >> there is no single one profile of terrorists. we can't secure ties our entire relationship with muslim americans. we can't deal with you solely through the prism of law enforcement. we have to build trust and respect. that's how we'll keep our communities strong and our communities united. >> the president calling on all americans to show that the united states respects all fates. martin shkreli is one subject of scorn. >> matter cell has been told by
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his lawyer to stop talking, something he had no problem doing last fall. >> these patients deserve a drug company that is turning a profit, fair profit and also developing a drug that is better for them. >> the former c.e.o. defend's himself after raising the price of a drug to $750 a pill. people suffering aids, malaria and cancer depend on the medication to fight a parasitic infection. hillary clinton tweeted price gouging like this in the specialty drug market i guess outrageous. he did not relent until last fall when he was arrested on federal security's fraud charges. he is accused of running a ponzi scheme and bilking investors out
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of $11 million. that led him to step down and in recent months, he feuded with a member of the clan over shkreli's over he beship of the only copy of one of the group's albums. his lawyers caution that had no one should expect much during his capitol hill visit today due to the pending criminal case. >> on the advice of counsel, mrs fifth amendment privilege against self incrimination and not answers questions. >> australia is one of three called to testify today. there are sure to be tough questions. it sounds like we aren't going to hear a lot of answers necessarily. how much does that medication sell for today? >> would you believe it still sells for $750 in a range, despite shkreli's promise before he left to lower the price.
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he then backtracked and said they would offer discounts to hospitals and not actually change the price. the committee has evidence that more than a few patients have been slapped with copays for the drug as high as $16,000. >> this has come up on the campaign trail, as well. on that note, the new hampshire primary five days away, hillary clinton and bernie sanders will debate tonight for the last time before the voters decide. last night they had a town hall meeting and traded jabs over policy differences like clinton's ties to wall street. clinton received the support of more than 170 prominent african-american women who say that they will campaign for her. jay newton small is a correspondent for time magazine, also the author of broad influence how women are changing the way america works. she joins us now from manchester, new hampshire, thanks for being with us. last night, one of the questions hillary clinton was asked
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involved a woman and her daughter, and the future for her daughter. take a listen. >> it is sometime the case that there are challenges and obstacles to young women's ambitions and i'm going to try to break the highest and hard evident glass ceiling. i hope it splinters completely. [ cheers and applause ] >> and i hope for your daughters it opens doors that might not be open right now. >> that of course, the secretary bricking back that image from campaign 2008 in which she talked about shattering that glass ceiling. listen to this. >> although we weren't able to shatter that highest, hard evident glass ceiling this time, thanks to you, it's got about 18 million cracks in it.
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the light is shining through like never before, filling us all with the hope and the sure knowledge that the past wil will--path will be a little easier next time. >> there seems to be a mute understand response to the fact that if elected, she would be the first female president in the history of the united states. why is that so muted this time? >> i don't think it's muted at all, actually. it's just interesting there's so much more emphasis on the campaign of her, the historic nature of her campaign than there was in 2008. in 2008, she really ran as a man, you could argue, very tough, she campaigned with generals and even tried to show she could be a commander in chief and deemphasized the fact that she would be the first female president. this time around, she's actually i would argue running as the first woman to run as a woman for president where she talks at every stop about breaking the glass ceiling, about equal pay, about child care and all these issues that are very central to
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women, very neighborhoodly appealing to the female vote. perhaps it's muted in the sense that everyone's kind of used to it by now, we've heard it so much for the last almost year now, but she really does emphasize it enormously on the campaign trail. >> she is also getting pushback. take a listen to this. >> nothing gets me angrier than when somebody implies i'm votele for hillary clinton simply because she's a woman. it's like we have estrogen that that causes us to go to the nearest vagina and vote for them. >> there was a poll in iowa that women 29 and younger voted for bernie sanders by a margin of 6-1. this was a poll that was conducted by the associated press. why the gap in generations? why do older women say this is a a great move for america and
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younger women say not so. >> they saw her break a lot of glass ceilings. it wasn't until she wore pants at first lady that it became normal for women to wear pants to work. women less than 30 years ago couldn't even wear pants to work. the millennial generation was the first born assuming the quality of women. they have no question in their mind that there will be a woman, a female president during their lifetime so there isn't that same sense of you are genesis. they don't look at the hillary as the first and last shot to have a female at president. they look at her as one option. this isn't about just electing the first woman, it's about electing the most qualified person and she happens to be a woman. >> germany has angela merkel, great britain maggie thatcher.
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before that, do you think that this might be the year that we see that glass ceiling shatter and if so, how will it differ? what would be different for women if there is a female president? >> well, i asked hillary clinton that for my book and asked her would you govern differently as a woman compared to a man and she said absolutely. she is the sum of her life experiences and they all involve being a woman, so she would obviously bring a very different perspective to the table than man and bring different priorities. she would focus on issues she thinks are important to women and also to men in terms of things like equal pay, child care, and really prioritizing bringing more women into the workforce as at the international monetary fund. she will be very different. will this be the year she is elect? looks like she'll lose in new
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hampshire against bernie sanders but odds are good she will win the nomination and depending who the republican side nominates, we'll see. >> president obama was asked if he would govern differently as the first african-american and was criticized throughout his first term as not doing enough to level the playing field between african-americans and majority americans. do you think in a sense if hillary clinton if elected president might be fenced in by the fact that so many people will be watching touses if she is pursuing a feminist agenda? >> first of all, she actually already has a record of doing -- empowering women throughout her entire life. this has been a priority since she was first lady, in the senate, in the state department. her focus was women and girls. she has already done that in office. secondly, it's an economic imperative. a as i write in the book, the baby boomer generation is retiring and by the year 2030,
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we'll be short workers in america. the only way to solve the gap is to bring in more immigration, which is hard to imagine with this congress or bring women up to full employment. that's something the next president, whom ever he or she is will have to deal with. >> because i'm an author i will pitch your book again, broad influence, how women are changing the way america works. buy it now. thank you very much. >> thanks so much, dell. an historic deal to open trade across the pacific. >>ing a are erupts as 12 nations sign the agreement. the backlash over the transpacific partnership.
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protests in new zealand's largest city, police in auckland clashed with thousands of demonstrators over the t.p.p. hundreds of people ran in front of traffic add intersections and attempted to block roads. others tried to break into the convention center where the deal was being signed. it is considered the biggest trade deal in history, 12 nations are issue it including the u.s., canada, japan, new dealt and mexico. the deal is designed to free trade and investment between the countries, but as al jazeera wane hey reports, many contend the deal only helps big businesses. >> after years of negotiations, the transpacific partnership is one step towards becoming a reality. new zealand is one of the
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drivers of this 12 nation deal and hosting the signing ceremony in auckland. >> i am personally delighted to be here today to mash the signing of this most important agreement. what brings us together is a shared belief that opening and integrating markets through trade and investment will enhance the prosperity of our peoples. >> outside, protestors were met by a large police presence. protestors say it undermines the so farty of member nations. they are not happy many of the details remain secret for six years. they believe it hands too much power to big business. >> it's really important that we build solidarity and strength. many, many new zealanders are opposed to the deal not only because of what it does economically but because of the
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political sovereignty that's been sold out from under us. >> many of the numbers are conservative, with new zealand forecasting the pact will increase their gross domestic product by 0.9% by 2030. the signing has been described as a technical step in the process. it certainly is not the end. each country now has two years to ratify the t.p.p. and in that time, protestors say they'll continue to oppose the deal with that ratty occasion may be the most differ in the united states where there is political opposition to it in the middle of a presidential election campaign. the trade representatives who signed say the deal is solid and are cast all 12 members will remain in the pact. wane hey, al jazeera, auckland. the white house has advocated for the transpacific partnership saying it has clear economic benefits. president obama wants congress to formalize the treaty before
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july. most in congress will be heading home after that to campaign for reelection and many say the deal may not be considered until the lame duck session at the end of the year. shell oil cutting 10,000 jobs after a sharp profit drop, fourth quarter earnings plunging 44% because of the collapsing price of oil. company leaders are now refocusing the company to deal with an era of lower oil prices. more could happen if the prices are low. more air bag problems for honda, recalling more than 2 million vehicles all equipped with takata airbags. that includes acura models. honda said it is just a precaution. government guidelines over alcohol called an overreach. an unclaimed california lot toe ticket worth millions expires today, unless a court steps in.
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of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >> ...can affect and surpise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> let's do it. >> techknow, where technology meets humanity... >> only on al jazeera america.
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a lot of guidelines over pregnancy and drinking. >> the c.d.c. says women should not drink unless on birth control. critics say the guidelines shames women. >> alcohol and pregnancy do not muscle.
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the medical community warned women against drinking alcohol while pregnant. new guidelines from the c.d.c. recommend 15-44-year-old woman not drink any alcohol unless they're on birth control. >> right now, we know that the fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is associated with even small amounts of alcohol consumption and pregnancy. >> the guidelines aim at curbing health defects in developing babies when most women don't know they are pregnant. most women won't know they are pregnant for the first month or so, when they might still be drinking. the risk is real, why take the chance? the announcement is generating criticism mainly for leaving men out of the equation. on facebook, brianna writes why isn't the c.d.c. recommend that men stop having sex with women if they aren't using birth control. >> yes, let's mandate women show birth control use with their i.d. when purchasing alcohol or being permitted to a bar. one said ban reproductive age women from buying deli meat and sushi restaurants.
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>> more than 3 million drink, are sexually active and not using birth control and at risk of exposing their baby to alcohol if they become pregnant. >> the number could range two to 5% of the u.s. population. critics don't challenge the health risks but rather the way the risk is communicated particularly because birth control is not readily available to many women. >> is the c.d.c. responding? >> they have commented on some specific questions about alcohol consumption and pregnancy, but nothing yet about remarks that there's double standard in the message, perhaps. >> thank you very much. it is now up to a judge to decide if an unclaimed $62 million jackpot in california will get paid out. a los angeles man filed legal papers just hours before the deadline to claim it. brandy miller said he's the
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rifle winner and lottery officials destroyed the evidence. the deadline is 5:00 p.m. today. >> that old saying, the customer's always right that? elon musk canceled and order for a tesla x car placed by a venture capitalist. he complained publicly about a bad experience at a recent event. he said he wasn't able to test drive the vehicle. musk said he wasn't comfortable having him own the car. it costs $130,000 and it is two years behind its scheduled delivery date. that's it for us here in new york. i'm del walters. i'm stephanie sy. your world morning is back tomorrow morning beginning at 730 eastern. the candidates have just a few days later to convince the
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voters in the nation's first primary. for more, go to aljazeera.com. syrian talks suspended, the war rages and andar urgent plea for aid. i'm in doha with the world news. also head, italy demands an investigation into the disappearance of a student who disappeared in cairo last month. protests bring athens to a standstill as thousands of workers strike against government. security is tightened for the

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