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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  February 15, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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♪ the politics of the nation's highest court democrats and republicans on battle on replacing scalia. russian air strike suspected of killing several people at a doctors without borders facility. building a united front against china. >> and the nominations for best white actress go to. >> reporter: and blackout britain recognizes the best in film with a lack of diversity. ♪
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welcome to your world this morning i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm del walters and flags flying half state in washington in honor of scalia. >> preparations underway for his funeral and his body is back in virginia after his death in texas and sparked a partisan battle on who may take his place on the supreme court and vowing to block the nomination and vibing vikara begins the coverage. >> reporter: took america and congress by surprise the death of justice scalia after being on the bench since 1996 appointed by ronald regan and hot button of the cultural war the battles fought for decades now handled by the supreme court that this has already become such a volatile issue and consider the
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docket for the balance of the supreme court term, cases involving affirmative action, involving abortion, involving po's executive actions on immigration and whether or not they are going to be legal. these are vital issues not only to americans in general but in an election year to the base of both parties both conservatives and liberals we are talking about voters, we are talking about donors and talking about the type of grass roots advocates who go door to door and get out the vote and after the news broke have been insisting ever since that president obama withhold nomination and not send nomination to the senate and thinks the next president who they hope is a republican will have the privilege of doing that and rubio is a senator and republican presidential candidate and here is what he has to say. >> the senate is not moving forward on it until after the election and mcconnell said that and i agree with that. >> reporter: president obama
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made it clear he is going to go forward with the nomination and likely won't come this week when they are in recess and attends southeast asia nations in california and he willful fill his constitutional responsibility to nominate someone to the supreme court and whether or not the senate run by republicans and mitch mcconnell who also said he thinks the president should wait, whether they take that up is another matter altogether and on the democratic side for all of the same reasons that republicans say the president should wait democrats say the president should move forward and bernie sanders running for president on the democratic side has this view. >> it is beyond my comprehensive and it just speaks to the unbelievable level and unprecedented level of republic obstructionism from obama from day one. >> reporter: so there is a great deal of speculation about who could be dominated, who the president might choose, whether he will go the moderate route
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and try to pull in confirmation despite the wishes of conservatives and those running for president or will he go the left route and nominate a liberal to try to antagonize republicans to demonstrate they are obstructionists and fire up the democratic base in an election year. >> that is mike in washington, his colleagues scalia's colleagues reacting to his death and john roberts saying he was an extraordinary person and juryist and admired and treasured by his colleagues, his passing is a great loss to the country, the court he loved so loyally and justice ginsburg and scalia opposites and sharing a long friendship and frequently attended the opera together and saying to the end of the opera scalia and ginsburg and singing a duet, we are different, we are one, it's my great fortune to have known him as a working
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colleague and treasured friend. >> leaves the court without a man they consider a leader of the right and erica has that part of the story. >> reporter: for three decades he was one of the most out spoken and controversial of the court known for opinions and scathing descents and most recently voted with the minority opposing the landmark decision guarantying the right to same sex marriage and in his opinion he wrote the supreme court ruling was at odds not only with the constitution but the principles on which our nation was built and also made headlines in decent from the decision up holding president obama either care law saying we should call this scotus care referring to the united states born in trenton, new jersey who came through ellis island he attended public grade school and catholic high school in new york city and 1953 he enrolled in
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georgetown university in washington d.c., after graduation he went on to study at harvard law school and tagged as a future supreme court justice before ronald regan appointed him in 1986 and on the court he is championed and loved on the right and increasingly villified by the right and bush versus gore and handed the 2000 election to george w. bush and unapologetic for the role in the case telling critics it was the right thing to do, as a popular speaker for conservative causes in 2008 he agrees to be profiled by 60 minutes. justice scalia is a polarizing figure who invites protesters and picketers, there have not been many supreme court justices who become this much of a lightning rod. i'm surprised at how many people really, really hate you. these are some things we have been told, he is evil, he is an
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neandrathal and drag us back to 1789, they are threatened by what you represent and what you believe in. >> these are people that don't understand what my interpretative philosophy is. >> reporter: however scalia was not always that predictable. in 1989 he pleased liberals voting to up hold free speech when he supported the majority in a case called texas versus johnson and found a man named gregory lee johnson had the right to burn the american flag during the republican national convention. the death of justice scalia could affect several high profile cases and scheduled to hear abortion case challenging a texas law to cut the clinics from about 42 to more than ten and decision over affirmative action to allow students in the university of texas, the second time the court heard arguments if it is a violation of the equal protection clause in the constitution and another case involved the obama executive
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action on immigration, it is scheduled for arguments in april. the justices if they are deadlocked in any of the cases they have two choices to accept the lower court decision or set the case aside for reargument once a nine justice is confirmed and in the next hour we will have more about his legacy and the political fight to replace him. russia is reiterating this morning it will not stop air strikes around aleppo despite the latest truce plan one day after obama and putin pledged to step up cooperation over syria and today 23 killed in two separate air strikes and rockets targeted hospitals and schools in idlib providence south of the turkish border and al jazeera zaina is on the other side of the border in turkey with the detai details. >> reporter: a hospital which was supported by doctors without borders has been targeted, hit and destroyed. doctors without borders confirming, saying that they are calling this really as a deliberate attack, they are
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condemning it and they say eight of their staff are missing. the syrian observatory for human rights reported that nine people were killed in that strike. there was another attack in the northern border town of aziz in the providence of aleppo. we understand from turkish security officials is that nine ground to ground missiles targeted a number of locations in aziz and they spoke about a school, a hospital, as well as other locations. we still do not know if that hospital was actually functioning or whether or not these buildings were home to the displaced. so far at least 14 people killed, scores of injured. what we understand is that 35 people have been brought into turkey to receive treatment, ten of them children. now turkey harsh words really to the ypg today and already promised to continue shelling their positions and prime minister saying we will not allow aziz to fall and really what happened this morning the
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attack in aziz was a message that there is no red line but turkey saying it won't allow it to fall and saying really promising a harsh response. but russia answering turkey back and saying we are not happy with what we are concerned about is turkey's aggressive behavior in syria so undoubtedly the relationship between turkey and russia deteriorating further and the fight and battle for the northern corridor continues but i can tell you the ypg and kurdish militia is on the advance a few kilometers from aziz. >> on the turkish-syrian border, political and military battles continue at the expense of civilians in syria and al jazeera victoria reports now on the communities under siege and how groups are desperately trying to reach them. >> reporter: convoy from the world food program prepares to leave turkey for syria. it is carrying desperately needed aid for syrians escaping from the fighting in aleppo
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providence. >> we are unloading the trucks with food with the basic items such as wheat, flour, oil, rice, lentil and also we are unloading ing rations. >> reporter: they deliver to syria but once they gained ground in aleppo providence the number of refugees increased and the need for aid is more urgent. >> talking about tens of thousands of people who are moving towards turkish border looking for safety. and they are sending hundreds of trucks to syrian site every month. >> reporter: the u.n. says nearly half a million peer in syria are living in areas surrounded by either government or rebel forces. in the area of damascus after 45,000 people are cutoff from aid since government forces stepped up their offensive, in the found of madaya to the east
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of the capitol they are using starvation as weapon of war and some got through but hundreds need to be moved for medical help and 200,000 people are living under i.s.i.l. imposed siege where food and water are running out. in the rebel held stronghold of duma a medical convoy has arrived in the syria the red crescent says it has medicine and milk for children. last week world leaders meeting in munich pledged humanitarian assistance for those trapped in besieged areas but it's not known whether any of it has been delivered, victoria with al jazeera. in a few minutes we will hear from activist on the ground in syria using a social media to show the world what is happening to civilians in syria. southeast asia leaders heading to california today and going there for this year's summit to focus on trade encountering any threat from china, north korea and i.s.i.l.
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and we have more on the importance of u.s. relations with the region. >> reporter: this is what rebalancing looks like, president obama standing shoulder to shoulder last november with leaders from ozion. >> and now the afghan way. >> reporter: the association of southeast asia nation and a club and region dominated by china and where washington is determined to remain a major player. >> it's absolutely critical to promoting security, prosperity and human dignity around the world. >> reporter: the first standalone meeting in the united states with southeast asia leaders this week's summit in southern california will formally bring the relationship to a strategic partnership and routed in concerns over china's economic health and growing military might. >> we have successfully concluded the tran pacific
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partnership. >> reporter: four are part of the trans pacific partnership, the largest trade pack in history that if ratified will bind asia closer to the united states. four countries also lay claim to parts of the south china sea which china has marked out as its sovereign territory, expansive claim they tried to cement by building islands. >> we will fly, sail and operate wherever international law permits. >> reporter: which washington has in turned challenged by sailing u.s. war ships within 12 nautical miles of the features. the obama administration says it's not anti-china but rather the combination of the seven year effort to reorient u.s. foreign policy to asia, a pivot whose success will ultimately be measured how much influence washington continues to wield in
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beijing backyard. patricia with al jazeera. north korean leader praising the people behind the rocket launch and called it a telling blow to enemies an ordered scientists to get more ready, the rocket with the satellite on board is in orbit and sanctions against them after the launch and resent nuclear tests. now to presidential politics a familiar face will be on the campaign trail for his brother today, george w. bush will headline a rally for jeb bush in south carolina, the former president won that state's primary both times and won the white house and had to defend his brother at saturday's debate and donald trump criticized him saying the attacks happened on his launch and in the run up to the war. accident the government to expand medicaid coverage for some people exposed to flint's
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contaminated water and expanded care for pregnant women and under 21 years old and they need coverage for testing and treatment, for 18 months the city used the lead contaminated flint water for drinking water. cold hearts and valentine's day was so cold and broke records in the northeast and an icy scene in philadelphia and all of the water used to battle the flames turned to ice by sunday and even more cars there as you can see encased entirely. >> the risk for the east coast is an ice storm and more on that. >> the ground hog is not looking so smart now as we head into this week we are finally warming up just in time to watch another storm out there, this is one that is developing and you can see the snow with it and as we zoom closer in the southern edge anywhere from northern parts of california, south carolina up through the northeast could have ice and sleet mixed in so i'm
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most concerned about that, fortunately anything we get with milder temperatures won't stick around too long but definitely going to be a problem over the next couple of days and will spread its way northward and watch by this by the end of the day in 24 hours and the territory this will cover and as it gets going there is a corridor and some of the worst of this could be eastern virginia up there pennsylvania with areas that could get a quarter inch of ice and because of the temperatures heavier snow and sleet so watch for potential power outages and also the type of snow that could be heavy if you have to shovel it so take it easy on yourself and it continues to the northeast, some of this switches over by tomorrow because of the mild temperatures to plain rain so depending where you are is what you are going to see with all of this. the areas we have in the bright brighter pink is the winter warning and the snow is 2-3" but ice mixed in with all of that is the bigger problem getting in the northeast.
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the biggest snow area is because the lake effect system will kind of turn on only of those places could get over a foot in the next two days but the rest of the region still that winter weather concern, snow in some cases switching to rain by tomorrow but it is definitely going to be a mess. >> ground hog on line says let it go, nicole. thanks. >> never trust that guy. yeah. >> straight ahead a proposed truce could be falling apart before it even takes effect. >> we are talking to an activist on the ground in syria about the chances for peace there. and blessing the curse and pope francis travels to one of mexico's poorest and dangerous cities. ♪ >> the closest i got was sitting in my truck, gun in hand. >> who will save america's heroes? >> i wish he'd been able to talk to somebody. >> "faultlines". >> what do we want? >> al jazeera america's hard-hitting... >> today the will be arrested. >> ground-breaking... >> they're firing canisters of
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a former israeli prime minister
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has now become the first israeli leader to go to prison and starting his 19 month sentence for bribery charges related back to the time he was mayor of jerusalem and says he is innocent and they will say he will serve a sentence in prison in a special wing as a quote protected person. a stern warning for a foreign policy in seer syria. >> john mccain told the diplomates not to trust moscow and said putin used the conflict to his own advantage. >> mr. putin is not interested in being our partner and wants to shore up the assad regime and russia as a major power in the middle east and wants to exacerbate the refugee crisis and use it as a weapon. >> reporter: mccain also predicted that the latest pause in fighting in syria brokered by secretary of state john carry is likely to fail. the town of syria garnered
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recognition for having banners with the chance on war in syria with staunch messages and cartoons posted daily on social media and ferris is a syrian activist who joins me via skype from syria and what has been going on in your town and four months ago you wrote a piece of russian air strikes striking your town and has that continued and what is life for you and your family? >> they are continuing what they started since the three or four months and they keep shelling and air striking the whole area of the countryside and they are claiming they are targeting the i.s.i.s. or al-nusra or terrorism group and i.s.i.s. is
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like 100 kilometers away from here but they keep targeting the school and hospitals and everywhere. today two hours ago they targeted a hospital, belongs to very close to kilometers and right now you can hear like war planes in the sky now. and that is the situation now. people are so scared and most of people are fleeing to the borders to the turkish borders and to europe. >> you have among the posters that your group has created many of them are critical of not just russia and iran who have backed the assad government but of the u.s. who in this cartoon we are showing is adding sand to an hour glass, in other words, buying russia time, what do you think that the americans should be doing?
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>> since the beginning we started to talk, just talking, they kept talking since the first day of the revolution. in the beginning they said that assad lost his dignity and assad most go and they kept talking, not doing anything. they never acted what this is. and mr. obama didn't act like american president that is all. he just say assad must go but he did nothing. >> do you think that u.s. troops should go into syria and remove assad? do you think that would solve the problem of your country? >> like from the start air strikes against assad to protect civilians, that is what we wished from the beginning.
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we are civilians. we are people. assad says the people since the first day of the revolution and america kept claiming that but we see nothing that proves what america says from the beginning. >> what do you think is the best case scenario for syria is it where the different opposition factions can get together or do you think your country may break apart? >> they are fighting civilians and fighting against assad and terrorism so if we can step down assad then we can with the terrorism groups it will be easy and the only reason with the two groups they are fighting somehow assad but when we can get assad
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from syria they have no reason to stay in syria, we will fight them like now, we are fighting them while fighting against assad we are fighting against terrorism. we need time to rebuild syria but we will start, it will be the beginning of rebuilding syria when we step down assad. it's the only way we can rebuild syria. >> thank you so much for joining us on al jazeera. we wish you and your family the best. thank you. >> thank you, thank you so much. and when we come back a partisan fight to fill that vacancy on the supreme court justice scalia and fall out on the campaign trail. treating addiction that they believe could help save lives. ♪
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>> mdma helps with the therapeutic connection. >> exclusive access to the... >> our fears are dancing between us. >> techknows team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >>...can affect and surprise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> awesome. >> techknow, where technology meets humanity. >> only on al jazeera america. welcome back for your world this morning, the death of supreme court justice scalia is leading to contentious debate over who will replace him. >> republicans promising to black the nomination who it may be and the candidates who hope to be the next president are chiming in as well and al jazeera has more. >> i plan to fulfill my
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constitutional responsibilities to nominate a successor in due time. >> reporter: a simple announcement that has ignited a fire storm of controversy, even before the supreme court officially confirmed that justice scalia had died republican presidential candidate ted cruz put out a statement saying the next president, not obama should be the one who replaces scalia and an hour later mitch mcconnell made a similar statement and saturday night it was the only issue the candidates agreed on. >> i think it's up to mitch mcconnell and everybody else to stop it calling delay, delay. >> reporter: they took to the air waves to continue pressing the case against mr. obama. >> especially in the last year and 11 months we don't have a lame duck president make a highest decision on the land. >> a lame duck he has been a lame duck since reelected in 2012, are you saying no
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president can appoint somebody to the supreme court in their second term? >> well, i'm not saying it's illegal. he most certainly has the power to nominate someone and they said mitch mcconnell was clear and not moving forward with a nominee until after the election. [switching captioners] >> does in a mean your going to filibuster anyone the president nominates? >> absolutely. >> bernie sanders also appearing on the sunday talk shows saying the democrats cannot allow the supreme court vacancy to go unfilled with so many important cases to be decided. >> i think the iris taking the situation to the american people and i think fair minded americans, no matter their political point of view will say this is be a as you should, this
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is obstructionism. >> it is certain to become a major election issue for both democrats and republicans. >> people will incorrectly pick the next judge of the supreme court. it's pretty interesting. colleen nelson is the white house correspondent at wall street journal, joining us from washington this morning. thank you for your time. the battle lines have been drawn on this. president obama saying he will choose a nominee for the supreme court to replace justice scalia but what home run the chances that any mom know, moderate or liberal can get past the senate at this point. >> the chance don't appear greet. the question is who will obama nominate and we don't have an answer to that. he could go one of a couple different directions. he could choose to nominate
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someone more motte red, someone who has been confirmed by a wide margin in the senate in the last few years, a few names floated are the names of appeals court judges who were approved unanimously by the senate in the last couple years. it would be tougher to say when they voted for him previously they are not willing to consider. would perhaps president obama put forth the mere i am knowledge of scalia and say this is what the court should look like in the future. that's the first question mark. then it will be up to the senate to decide are they going to fill buster, are they going to refuse to hold hearings at all and the white house in that scenario hopes that eventually there will be public pressure on the senate to act and that republican senators who are up for election this year could face backlash in their home state for not taking any action. >> of course, you've heard
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sanders call cruz and others obstructionists, but we heard that before after the government shutdown. that doesn't seem to have hurt ted cruz in the polls. when it comes to the nomination, how high are the stakes as it pertains to the 2016 election. will it be a referendum on who the americans want to see as their next supreme court justice? >> well, this is an epic political battle. this is absolutely going to take over a lot of the debate in the presidential election. we're going to be talking about what voters would like to see in a supreme court justice, which is kind of a strange dynamic. supreme court justice are not generally a political issue, and they're also the purview of the president. this sets up a bizarre dynamic. you don't have a scenario in the past where a president has not nominated someone or where a vacancy hasd for more than a
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year, which is how long this would stretch out if obama doesn't get a pneumo true. this his unchartered territory. >> the words lame duck president have been used, but bam mace not a lame duck president until an election has been held. you hear about the popularity of political outsiders when it comes to congress, now when it comes to the white house. what about the supreme court, could that be the last bastion and could it be time for an outsider on the supreme court? >> that's an interesting question. it goes to what message president obama wants to send, and in terms of getting someone through, if the goal is to force the senate to act, he's not likely to go for an outsider. he's more likely to go for someone put forward a name that senators have voted on before. he could also opt to nominate a
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senator, to force the senate to vote on one of their colleagues. if the goal is to put pressure on the senate to act, it's less likely that he would go outside of the establishment and choose a surprise candidate. >> when it comes to sort of the constitutional. at stake here, is there any clarity this morning on who has the better case, whether it be the republicans saying that this is a presidential year and therefore a nominee should not be pos thed by the president or is the president in standing here? >> it's rare that you have a vacationancy on the supreme court during the eighth year of a presidency. it's rare to have a supreme court justice die while still on the bench. if you look back at the last couple times this has happened in terms of a president in his eighth year, you don't have any
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scenario where a president just left a seat sit vacant. it would be unprecedented for president obama to not put forward a nominee and of course he says he will put forward a nominee. if you look back the last two times a president put forth a nominee his last year in office, you have president reagan nominating justice kennedy with only 13 months to go. he was confirmed in the last year of reagan's tonnure. lyndon johnson put forward someone in his last year and that person was filibustered and withdrawn. >> very different times when kennedy was unanimously approved by the senate. thank you for that context this morning. >> thank you. pope francis holding a mass today in a place once considered to be mexico's least slick state. on sunday, giving a mass in a poor mexican city suburb, 250,000 people turned out to hear the pope and criticize the
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rampant corruption and inequality in that country. we have more on the pope's plans today. >> father perez looks more like a freedom fighter than a priest. he is one of the clergy in chapas who say their place is outside the church with the desperate and forgotten. >> now pope francis is visiting chapas and the in killing must population that live in poverty and the priest rebelling against a conservative catholic hierarchy and local politicians who act more as feudal lords.
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>> corruption is impoverished the population and generated violence. because we're exposing this, they want to kill me and put a price on my life. first it was 100,000 pesos and now a million. >> he doesn't leave the church now without his volunteer bodyguards, but conflict with the authorities is nothing new here. in 1994, an army of in killing thus farmers rose up, rejecting the state and creating their own autonomous area. the government responded, pouring in troops and money to pacify indigenous communities, but human rights groups say they are rarely consulted before it's spent. a good example of these houses. authorities built thousands for indigenous people but they lack service was and the land for crops to keep animals, so no one moved in. >> megaprojects exploit the
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state's natural resources. >> the government is working with the sector that wants to open areas for extraction for control, not for the poor. in that way, the pope's visit comes to give hope to those below and to say to those above don't always win. >> that's a message that priests like marcel low have been preaching for years. now they have the top man on their side. john hohman, al jazeera, chapas. authorities in australia seized $1 billion of meth called the biggest seizure r. the drug was found inside a shipment of clothing from hong kong and in art supplies in a storage in sydney. four hong kong residents have been arrested. a growing number of americans are struggling with drug addiction. president obama's latest budget proposal calls for $1 billion to treat them. >> for those hooked on heroin,
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it can be hard to find help. >> at 30 years old, vanessa is out of the 3 million americans fighting an opioid addiction. she is 18 months clean and living a normal productive life that no too long ago seemed completely out of reach. >> i never thought i would give it that much time to get clean. i didn't think it was possible. >> she began abuse be pain killers prescribed for her lupus and graduated to heroin. according to a johns hopkins university study, 80% of addicts are not getting treatment. vanessa got lucky. two years ago, she was ordered to rehab after facing jail time for drug charges.
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the center cost $24,000 a year. the center has been run for decades. >> most folks that come to us have a severe addiction disorder and prefers failed attempts at treatment. >> motor addicts don't have insurance, so turn to publicly funded centers like integrity house. the facility like many across the country doesn't have enough funds to deal with a growing national opioid epidemic so wait lists many addicts looking for treatment. >> 150. that's about the number of people on the wait list for treatment at integrity house on any given day. they are waiting on average eight to 10 weeks which can mean a matter of life or death. in that time, hundreds of americans will dry of a drug overdose. >> the alarming numbers inspired local and federal initiatives but fall short of what many hard hit states like new jersey, and vermont need to save lives. last year, president obama's budget request sought
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$1.2 billion to expand medication assisted treatment for opioid addiction. >> the expansion of medication treatment is very important. it's also important that medication alone will not help an individual transform their lives, and sustain their recoveries. >> many will need long term in-patient treatment, the kind of treatment that saved vanessa's life. >> it's a family community lifestyle here. >> vanessa is still receiving outpatient therapy. she lives in state subsidized apartments with other addicts far along in their treatment. she has a job now. >> good for her and brave of her to tell her story. you mentioned how hard it is to get into treatment centers. how was hav vanessa able to do ? >> new jersey had expanded its drug program to get treatment as opposed to throwing in jail where they are likely to return. integrity house donated half
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beds for patients so they are not waiting so long. hawaii declaring a state of emergency over mosquito bornylses. the govern wants more money to fight zika and dengue fever. there have been 250 cases of dengue fever but no cases of fever. the mosquito that carries dengue fever carries zika. let's bring in nicole mitchell for changes in the weather. >> it's weather whiplash over the next days. temperatures into the northeast yesterday starting in single digits, even below zero and then the wind chill much, much worse, already into the 30's today and way back into the midwest, as well. most of these temperatures running above freezing. then look at the day tomorrow, especially for the east coast, temperatures shooting into the 50's. sunday morning versus tuesday
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afternoon, just within a couple days, some temperatures have shot up 50 or 60 degrees by the time we get to tomorrow. that will feel good. the rest of the country, the western half has already been a little bit more on the mild side but that next system is bringing in rounds of snow and then as it gets warmer, rain. it's really not until the end of the week, somewhere like boston, average of 39 that we get into that middle ground and get closer to typical february weather. in the meantime, anything from ice all the way to the southern parts of the appalachian northward, snow with it. some of that transitions to rain as we get warmer. the west coast staying pretty active, as well, especially the state of washington for the next couple of days because of the rain coming in, we could see flood concerns. it's not until wednesday and the next system we get moisture farther southward, maybe into california this time. more than a billion people
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around the world live without access to electricity, 300 million of them living in rural india. the country's prime minister hopes to change that with solar power. we have more from a northern indian town. >> for less than 5 cents a night, this teenager is providing light to a village that can be days without any power. his name means moonlight. he is using sun light to power lanterns. she says her small enterprise has helped her family financially. >> earlier, we couldn't even afford chairs but i bought them now from the money i earned from these land earns. i also bought a t.v. and many other things. >> there's an energy revolution happening right across india, rooftop solar panels are part of the government strategy to bring cheap and clean energy to the masses. she has been selling solar
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gadgets for the past five years. this man has seen tuesday change. >> earlier, just a handful of people would come to me. then people started noticing how they could change their lives. in some villages, half of the households use solar. >> india is a natural candidate for solar energy. 300 million people are not connected to the electricity grid. here at the village level, people are taking charge of their energy needs but solar is going commercial, too. >> sun alpha is a startup that sees big potential in solar leasing. it installs panels on commercial buildings and provides supply under a long term contract. >> we provide the solar power to them at a rate that is cheaper than what they pay to the grid. so far without having to pay anything up front, they start generating income from the rooftop space. >> as night falls, many line up
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outside the door to pick up their lanterns. here, just a few hours of light could mean finishing homework or passing an exam, or getting grand dad to tell you a bedtime story. >> they have a similar program to that in africa where they are doing the same thing with a cooking lamp. >> real potential for innovation in those places. a missouri school district that's turning itself around. >> all thanks to the superintendent, what she is doing to go from worst to first.
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al jazeera america. it was once a fail school district, jennings, missouri borders ferguson, serving 3,000 students in a low income predominantly black university. thanks to one superintendent, the system is experiencing a turnaround. >> you see that crossing guard, the one who drove four hours to get here?
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she has single handedly transformed one of the worst performing school district in missouri. >> awesome, awesome, see you later. >> just try keeping pace with tiffany, the superintendent in jennings, missouri. she never seems to stop moving through every school in the district. >> here's kindergarten, good morning. >> when she roared into town four years ago, the school district was without accreditation, $2 million in a budget hole and seemingly without hope in this mostly black, poor suburb. >> this work is about serving children well and serving people well. this work is about transforming communities in ways that people thought weren't possible. >> and transform she did. anderson helped establish a food panary in the district, a student homeless shelter, a foundation that deals out clothes, shoes, food and school supplies, both low tech and high tech on a continuous base. she's established access to a
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doctor in the schools, and reestablished music and fine arts in the district. >> from birth all the way through college, we make sure we are there with our families. >> grant money and donations are in, test scores up, graduation rates up. the district is accredited again and the system system is black in the back. >> she is you dream, you make it work. >> when she's not shaking up an entire school district, she pops into classes to substitute teach or handing out food at the food pantry or helping students with their most basic need at all, just getting to class. her story has a built of a bitter sweet end be and that's coming up tonight. >> somehow, i think it has to do withholding on to somebody that good. >> i look forward to seeing that complete story tonight. the bafta awards handed out in london on sunday.
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>> this year's ceremony was marked with claims of racism. we have more. >> the behalf mistake goes to the revenant. >> that was hardly a surprise. yes, this was an incredibly tough year to call the winners, even the critics found it hard to commit to predictions, but this film stood one of the best chance of the lot. five awards, including best film, best actor for leonardo dicaprio and second time lucky for him. it wasn't to be her night, cate blanchett missed out on best actress. this is her in carol, nine nomination this movie had but in the end, best actress went to brie larson, an up and coming star for this, room, a tale of a
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woman and her child held captive in a shed. it is not an easy watch but her performance has been astounding critics. the clue is in the name, british, but the nature of the film industry, you will see from all over the world. these are widely seen as an indication of what is going to happen in hollywood. you'll see the same faces and hear the same names. you'll also hear about the same controversies, as well. case in point this year, the lack of diversity. this protest had been embraced by bafta which allowed demonstrators on the red carpet to hand out flyers. bafta said it is going to increase the diversity of its members, an issue the oscars are also facing. >> kate winslet for steve jobs.
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best supporting actor was for bridge of spies, which meant nothing for idris elba. he has missed out on that for this, beasts are no nation and no members of him at the oscars, either. he has become one of the faces of this campaign with his i am impassioned pleas for film to be open to everyone. >> the nominations for best white actress go to. >> the question is, how long will that really take? al jazeera president baftas in london. >> a high schooler in utah making sure to cover all the bases on value len tines day. he gave every girl at the
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school, all 834 a carnation to celebrate. he said it took a year and a half to buy the flowers. he said i don't think anything can compare to seeing every girl in your life holding a flower as they walk through the halls. for on the death of antonin scalia and filling his position on the supreme court. new clues in a decades old murder case involving three civil rights workers. steph and i are back in two minutes with more. stay tuned, we will see you then.
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>> shaping the future of the supreme court, the political battle now to replace a antonin scalia. the blame placed on russia. >> president obama welcoming asian leaders to california as the u.s. views for more power that in region. the push for a long term plan to battle opioid addiction.
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good morning, welcome to your world this morning p.m. i'm del walters. >> i'm steph eye. a political battle over the dote of justice scalia. >> president obama say he will name his successor. many say that should be left up to the next president. we have the story. >> i plan to fulfill my conservative responsibility to say nominate a successor in due time. >> a simple announcement that has ignite a firestorm of controversy, even before the supreme court officially confirmed that justice scalia died, republican presidential candidate ted cruz put out a statement saying president obama should not name a replacement for justice scalia.
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saturday night, it was the only issue the candidates agree on. >> i think it's up to mitc mitch mcconnell and everybody else to stop it, it's called delay delay delay. >> there's been a precedent that in the last year especially the last 11 months you do not have a lame duck president make an appointment to the highest court on the land -- in the land. >> president obama has basically been a lame duck since elected in 2012. are you saying that no president can appoint someone to the supreme court in their second term? >> well, he most certainly has the power to nominate someone. the senate has said and mitch mcconnell was very clear, we are not moving forward until after this election. >> even when the republican presidents were reminded that justice kennedy was mom nailed with only 13 months left in the president's term, there was this reaction. >> does that mean that you're
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going to filibuster anyone, anyone that president obama nominates? >> absolutely. >> democratic presidential candidate bernie sanders saying the democrats cannot allow the supreme court vacancy go unfilled. >> i think the issue is taking the situation to the american people and i think fair minded americans, no matter their political point of view will say this is absurd, this is obstructionism. >> in the republicans succeed in delaying the process, the replacement is certain to become a major election issue for both democrats and republicans. >> people will in a very unusual way indirectly sort of pick the next just of the supreme court. it's pretty interesting. >> al jazeera. our senior washington correspond mike viqueira giants us now, scalia's death affecting
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several cases pending before the supreme court. what happens to those cases? >> well, they would revert back to the lower court decisions and only apply to those circuits around the country. there are federal court benches around the country but only apply to the circuit served. these are volatile issues, issues incredibly important to the political bases of bolt parties. if you look at the supreme court docket, there are cases involving abortion, affirmative action, union deuce, immigration and president's executive orders there. a lot of this would accrue to the benefit have conservatives, because the lower courts have held up the president's order that would law those who are the parents of u.s. citizens who are themselves not here legally to stay in this country, so a lot of vital issues before the court this year and are evidently going to be before the public before the pops next november.
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>> we have talked about isil, about the economy, now justice scalia's death underscoring the unusual important of the 2016 election. what will a democratic or republican victory mean for the supreme court? >> lets stipulate every presidential election is important, but it illustrates to the offering voter what's at stake here. that perhaps is not a bad thing to get people more involved and aware of what is going on and what is at stake. there is absolutely no way that the president was going to side step his responsibility and frankly a political opportunity to illustrate themes that some of the democrats have put forward, number one, republicans have been obstructionists. not compromised. the president can put forward a moderate candidate, someone confirmed for a lower court judge ship. some have been confirmed unanimously and hold that up when republicans like ted cruz as he said tries to filibuster, o. hire someone known to be on
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the left side and fire up his political base, republicans for their part, this is an issue near and dear to them particularly on many of these hot button social issues. you're right, absolutely, a great deem at stake here in november in the presidential election. >> what is the likelihood that any nominee, moderate, liberal, conservative gets past the republican field in the senate at this point? >> i think the only possibility really is if the president goes the moderate route, nominates someone seen as a moderate who has been confirmed by the senate before for the d.c. court of balls which is seen as a stepping stone for the supreme court and that way puts pressure on senators who are from swing states like pennsylvania and rob portman in ohio to vote along with him for confirmation. that's really the only hope that a confirmation volt is going to go forward and the president would sub seed. other than that, i think we are looking at a four to four court,
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a split court with only eight members add least for the short term into this time next year. >> mike viqueira for us in washington, d.c., mike, as always, thank you very much. to syria, 23 have been killed in airstrikes in idlib and azaz. nine of them were at a doctors without borders hospital. it was called a deliberate attack. zeina hodor is in turkey with the details from the border. >> in idlib, a hospital supported by doctors without borders has been targeted, hit and destroyed. doctors without borders confirming, saying that they're calling this really a deliberate attack. they're condemning it. they say eight of their staff are missing. the syrian observatory for human rights report that had nine people were killed in that strike. there was another attack in the northern border town of azaz in
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aleppo. we understand from turkish security officials that nine ground to ground missiles targeted a number of locations in azaz. they spoke about a school, hospital as well as other locations. we still do not know if that hospital was functioning or these buildings were home to the displaced. so far, at least 14 people killed, scores are injured. we understand that 35 people have been brought into turkey to receive treatment. ten of them are children. turkey, harsh words really to the y.p.g. today. they have already promised to continue selling their positions. the prime minister saying that we will not allow azaz to fall. really what happened this morning, the attack in azaz was a message that there is no red line, but turkey saying it won't allow it to fall, promises a harsh response, but russia answering turkey back and saying we are not happy.
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what we are concerned about is turkeys aggressive behavior in syria, undoubtedly the relationship between turkey and russia deteriorating further and the battle for the northern corridor continues. i can tell you that the y.p.g., the kurdish militia is on the advance and just a few kilometers from azaz. an israeli raid in ramallah left 25 palestinians injured. israeli soldiers entered the camp looking for a suspect. they say dozens of young palestinians hit them with stones. the soldiers responded with bullets. israeli forces killed five palestinians in four separate incidents in the west bank over the weekend. bolt sides blamed the other for inciting the recent violence. new data showing imports and exports in china plunging, surprising analysts who predicted only a slight slowdown, imports falling 14
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years, exports down 11%. all raising fears how china can continue to support any global growth. we have more from beijing. >> chinas imports and exports have been falling for 12 months, providing another indicator about the confused state of the world's second largest economy. even though i am importants are down, exports are down, china still made a trade surplus in january of more than $62 billion, so china, inc. is still making money. one of the reasons why imports are down is that china is no longer buying things like iron ore and coper, these key commodities in quite the way that it once did. this week, all eyes are going to be on china's current, the yuwan. china wants to control the direction of its currency.
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a fuller picture on the state of china's economy will probably come next month when we get figures relatedding to retail sales, in vestment. gorge w. bush will be in south carolina trying to win over voters for jeb bush. he won that state both times he won the white house. the younger bush had to defend the president at the debate. donald trump attacked george w. saying the 9/11 attacks happened on george's watch and he lied leading up to the gulf war. michigan expanding medicaid covering for flint residents exposed to water. they need more covering for testing and treatment. for 18 months, the city has used
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the lead contaminated flint river for drinking water. >> valentine's day was so cold, it probation records. a huge fire saturday, half dozen buildings, all of that water used to battle the flames turned to ice by sunday morning, even cars were encased. >> a storm system is sending a wintery mix to the eastern third of the country. let's bring in nicole mitchell. i was looking at temperatures. >> as things get warmer, it switches more to rain. we had that cold air hopefully warm hearts over the weekend. that was the only thing warm for
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>> where you see the pinks are chances for places getting that ice and sleet mixing and behind that, or actually ahead of that in. some cases, the snow, because it would switch to the rain as temperatures drop, an increase over the next couple days. that means what snow will be out there if you're trying to shovel it will be heavy. i would personally wait until it warmed up and melted. that's usually my tactic. by wednesday, a lot of this clears out. the brighter pinks, that eastern corridor of the virginias into pennsylvania, that could be some of the heaviest ice amounts that could be enough to snap trees. then, because of the wind flow with this, the great lakes, we are going to see lake effect turn on for the next couple days, as well. some of those locations, if you
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get under a heavy band, you could be looking at over a foot of snow. that you may not wait for the temperatures to rise. a lot of cases, if you wait a day, you'llette out of the shoveling. >> a lot of restaurants were almost empty because it was so cold valentines' day. >> really? because i wouldn't have wanted to cook. >> nicole, thank you very much. strengthening the u.s. role in asia. >> the president's chance to show strength in a reason where china is usually the dominant player. pope francis celebrates mass with a quarter million people in mexico. his message in one of that countries most violent areas.
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>> it is absolutely critical to promoting prosperity around the world. the first meeting in the united states with southeast asian leaders, the summit will
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elevate the relationship to a strategic partnership, a symbolic upgrade. >> we have concluded the transpacific partnership initiative. >> four nations are part of the partnership, the largest trade pact in history that bill bind asia closer to the united states if ratified. four countries lay claim to parts of the china sea which china marked out as part of its sovereign territory, an expansive claim beijing tried to cement by building islands. >> we will fly, and operate wherever international law permits. >> which washington has challenged by sailing u.s. war ships within 12 nautical miles
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of the artificial features. >> the obama administration said this summit is not anti china but a combination of the efforts to reorient foreign policy toward asia, a pivot whose success will be measured by how much influence washington continues to wield in beijing's back yard. gordon chang writes about sign in a. you say this is about symbolism? >> yes, the united states could have held this summit anywhere but chose the sunny lands resort, rancho mirage, california, in 2013, we had the short sleeved summit with president xi and they hoped to have understandings going forward. in that setting, it didn't work. what the obama administration is
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doing is saying china, if you don't want to be part of the international community, we would love to talk to the 10 members of asian. it's our fourth largest trading partner and we'll be happy to trade with them rather than you. >> the chinese economy is not doing well and that is putting it politely. does the united have more muscle to flex this time? >> absolutely. chinese imports and exports collapsed in january. that continues a disastrous 2015, where trade for china dropped 8.0% instead of growing by their target of 6.0. we're going to see pretty bad numbers come out of china. i think now people are starting to understand that the united states and the rest of the international community have so much leverage when it comes to dealing with china, because china is no longer the 21
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century owner. >> how much of an eye is going to be on all of these nations, because there is so much anti asian rhetoric out of the political process. one candidate saying we're going to go after china, bad deals, china's going to do this, do that. how much has that changed the landscape for these talks? >> everyone is going to focus on the american led free trade deal, 12 nations, the united states and 11 others around the pacific rim. you have donald trump, the front runner in the republican primary plus both democratic candidate dates have come out against t.p.p. of course when they gone, it's going to be a different story, because trade is very important for the united states and -- >> do the partners know this is politics and once they become president will recognize how trade is so important. >> most people recognize what happens during american campaigns.
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there is the special concern because you do have the two outsiders, one republican, one democratic leading their fields. it might be a little different this time. i think that's what people around the world are concerned about. >> china is building those islands in the south china sea area and it is really exerting its influence. do those other nations that are participating want the u.s. as a trading partner or as somebody that can stand up to the chinese bully? >> both. although those countries have proximity, they are different. you have cambodia, laos and burma very much in chinese orbit, coming out and making statements about the china sea. the rest is around the south china sea, hoping very much a tt the united states exerts
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leadership. i don't expect asean to make a statement, but the bulk of the group does support freedom of navigation. >> what can the president hope to achieve at the summit? >> i think this is symbolism, saying to china we don't need you as much and saying to the american public, you need trade, it's good for the economic security of the united states, plus also geopolitical matters, therefore, i think this is directed to the u.s. public saying look, we have to maintain the consensus on trade, because this is what made america great, we can't turn our back on the rest of the world. that's going to be the message i think to the american public. >> thank you for being with us. >> thank you. pope francis is holding mass in a place considered mexico's least catholic state. the hope i go trying to boost the faith in the indigenous state. the pope celebrated mass near
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mexico city. during the outdoor ceremony, the pope said there can be no dialogue with the devil. adam rainy was there among the sea of faithful. >> hundred was thousands of people came out to celebrate mass with pope francis and sunday in this community on the edge of mexico city. many sleeping here, camping out in freezing temperatures say they didn't care because they wanted to share his message of peace and love. he spoke of creating a mexico of opportunity, a mexico that people don't need to emigrate to other countries to find work, where they don't need to fear being exploited or destroyed by dealers of death, worst in reference to drug gangs and cartels. this really resonates with the people we've been speaking to who come from these violent communities. >> i hope the pope through god's words can guide the mexican government especially in my home state of veracruz, which is totally corrupt and violent.
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>> whether we're neighbors, friends or relatives, violence affects us all. we are expecting the pope to bring hope to all mexicans with his message. >> by celebrating mass here, in this violent community, pope francis is standing in solidarity, people feel with them, because he's showing he understands the problems they are going through and he's going to continue to spread this message as he travels from the south of mexico all the way to the north, where he'll end his trip here on wednesday, and say a prayer for migrants, so many died who have tried to make it to the united states. >> adam rainy reporting from mexico city. the pope is halfway through his five day trip to mexico. trying to bring an end to the fighting in syria. fighters react to a proposed truce in the war. road blocks and getting cleaned, solving the nation's growing opioid addiction problem. m.
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>> what in god's name makes you think that you can handle stress, anxiety, depression... post-traumatic stress? >> the closest i got was sitting in my truck, gun in hand. >> who will save america's heroes? >> i wish he'd been able to talk to somebody. >> "faultlines". >> what do we want? >> al jazeera america's hard-hitting... >> today the will be arrested. >> ground-breaking... >> they're firing canisters of gas at us. >> emmy award-winning, investigative series. welcome back to your world this morning. time to look at today's top stories. the battle over who replaces justice scalia heath up in washington this morning. republicans will refuse to act
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on any supreme court nomination that the president offers. the white house saying it will select a nominee within weeks. north korea leader kim jong-un says he called the launch a telling blow to enemies. he ordered scientists to prepare a for more launches. the rocket with the satellite onboard is now in orbit. congress approved more sanctions after that launch. doctors without borders calling an air strike that hit a hospital in syria a deliberate attack. it hit a children's hospital and a school, killing at least 14 civilians. while there is no confirmation who carried out those strikes, russia today is saying it's not going to stop bombing what it calls terrorists in syria. that's despite a discussion between president obama and president putin tin on sunday. they view to step up cooperation trying to end syria's civil war. president obama asking putin to stop bombing moderate rebels.
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a truce is set to gibb later this week. a prominent american senator issues a stern warning over russian actions in issue i can't as a munich supreme court conference was wrapping up. senator john mccain told diplomats not to trust moscow, saying he was using it to his own advantage. >> mr. putin is not interested in being our partner. he wants oh reestablish russia as a major power in the middle east and exacerbate the refugee crisis and use it as a weapon. >> mccain also predicted that the latest pause in fighting in syria is likely to fail. during that same conference, israel's defendant minister called for splitting syria along sectarian lines. israel's military that stayed out of the fray in hopes of keeping its border with syria secure but that does not mean the israelis are staying
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neutral. we have more from the border in the golan heights. >> israeli military medics treating a syrian fighter. they have brought him to the hospital in northern israeli for emergency surgery. around 2,000 syrians have been treated in israeli medical facilities since fighting began four years ago, it's part of an israeli policy to provide medical assistance to armed groups that battle against arch rival hezbollah and other iranian backed fighters that are typically loyal to president bashar al assad. this doctor is one of the main surgeons here. a palestinian israeli, he speaks fluent arabic and has treated hundred was syrian fighters. >> what they are, who they belong to, it has become something usual. >> he takes us to a ward under armed group by israeli soldiers. this is where anti assad syrian fighters recover from their
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injuries. this 22-year-old is part of the free syrian army. he lost his leg in a russian air strike two months ago and has been receiving treatment at the hospital to save his other leg ever since. an internationally brokered deal he says won't work unless assad is forced to step down. >> i will continue to fight. personally, i will go back to fighting because my family suffered a lot under the assad regime. he is a criminal. >> although israel is not one of the 17 member countries of the syria support group which signed a cessation of hostilities agreement, al jazeera is told that it closely monitored the munich talks. >> it clearly has an interest in the has sits there and the potential of a ceasefire. one of its key concerns is the growing influence of iran, particularly in areas close to the border witness syria that it
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occupies. >> israel captured the golan heights from syria in 1967 and annexed it in 1981, a move not recognized under international law. syria's war has periodically spilled over into the occupied territory but israel has made great efforts not to be drown into the conflict. until the violence ends, syrian fighters fighting against groups loyal to assad will continue to be brought to israeli hospitals for treatment. the american band whose concert was attacked in paris last year going back. eagles of death metal going tock to tour gotten and tomorrow will be in paris at olympia hall. they were on stage when the music hall was attacked. 89 people were killed. they did go back and perform with u2 in paris, but this will be their first solo concert
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since the attacks. authorities seized $1 billion worth of meth, the largest meth bust in the country's history. the drug was found hidden inside shipments of clothing from hong kong and art supplies at a storage in sydney. four hong kong residents were arrested. a growing number of americans are struggling with drug addiction. president obama's latest budget proposal calls for more than a billion dollars to help treat them. >> as hermela aregawi found out, those hooked an heroin find help hard to find. >> at 30 years old, vanessa is out of the 3 million americans fighting an opioid addiction. she is 18 months clean and living a normal productive life that no too long ago seemed completely out of reach. >> i never thought i would give it that much time to get clean. i never thought it was possible.
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>> she began abusing pain killers prescribed for her lupus and graduated to heroin. according to a johns hopkins university study, 80% of addicts are not getting treatment. vanessa got lucky. two years ago, she was ordered to rehab after facing jail time for drug charges. that was at integrity house in newark. the center cost $24,000 a year. the center has been run for decades. >> most folks that come to us have a severe addiction disorder and previous failed attempts at treatment. >> most addicts don't have insurance, so turn to publicly funded centers like integrity house. the facility like many across
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the country doesn't have enough funds to deal with a growing national opioid epidemic so wait lists many addicts looking for treatment. >> 150. that's about the number of people on the wait list for treatment at integrity house on any given day. they are waiting on average eight to 10 weeks, which can mean a matter of life or death. in that time, hundreds of americans will dry of a drug overdose. >> the alarming numbers inspired local and federal initiatives but they fall short of what many hard hit states like new jersey, and vermont need to save lives. last year, president obama's budget request sought $1.2 billion to expand medication assisted treatment for opioid addiction. >> the expansion of medication assisted treatment is very important. it's also important that medication alone will not help an individual transform their lives, and sustain their recoveries. >> many will need long term in-patient treatment, the kind of treatment that saved vanessa's life. >> it's like a family community lifestyle here. >> vanessa is still receiving
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outpatient therapy to keep her on track. she lives in state subsidized apartments with other addicts far along in their treatment. she has a job now. >> you wonder how tough it is to get into treatment centers. how did she get in? >> there was a bipartisan effort to get non-violent addicts treatment instead of jail. centers like integrity house designated half of their beds for people referred through the criminal justice system. hawaii has declared a state of emergency over mosquito borne ill insists to control outbreaks of zika and dengue fever. there have been 250 cases of dengue fever, but no case of zika, the mosquito that carry dengue fever carry zika. there is a federal investigation underway whether exposure on rubber turfs on
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fields cause cancer. it is focusing on the turf found at universities. many contain elevated levels of lead. three agencies including the c.d.c. are involved in that study. a winter storm hitting parts of the country will usher in warmer temperatures. let's bring in nicole mitchell for more. >> it's definitely a mixed emotions sort of thing. you don't want to deal with a winter storm, everybody is ready for cold temperatures to be gone. already temperatures back in the 30s and all the way through the midwest, we keep temperatures at or above freezing. that's really a contrast to yesterday morning, sunday morning, we had temperatures especially for pores of the northeast that were either in the single digits or below zero and that was without adding in the wind chill. by the time tomorrow, these temperatures in the 50's, that means from sunday morning to tuesday afternoon, just over 48 hours, some temperatures are
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going to vary over 60 degrees and you like it that they're warmer. it takes a couple of days. we have that storm system coming in. snow and switching to rain tomorrow with the warmer temperatures, it's not until the end of the week we get places back to more typical for february, more into the 30s. speaking of that area, that system, you can see this pulling through south of the great lakes and that will turn on lake effect snow, as well. this morning, richmond virginia, you can see a couple of flakes starting to come down around the region. we're definitely going to have that and switching over, ice is embedded in all of this. the other side of the country, wet weather into the northwest, as well. that will give us some flood concerns, but it's not until we get into wednesday, the next broader system hits here that could even bring needed rain to california. >> it will cause the snow to melt in any place where that weather comes. >> more than a billion people
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around the world, a billion live without access to electricity at all. 300 million of them are in rural parts of india. the country hopes to change that by bringing solar power to the region. we have more from the northern town. . >> for less than 5 cents a night, this teenager is providing light to a village that can be days without any power. his name means moonlight. he is using sun light to power lanterns. she says her small enterprise has helped her family financially. >> earlier, we couldn't even afford chairs but i bought them now from the money i earned from these lanterns. i also bought a t.v. and many other things. >> there's an energy revolution happening right across india,
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rooftop solar panels are part of the government strategy to bring cheap and clean energy to the masses. he has been selling solar gadgets for the past five years. he says he has seen attitudes change. >> earlier, just a handful of people would come to me. then people started noticing how they could change their lives. in some villages, half of the households use solar. >> india is a natural candidate for solar energy. 300 million people are not connected to the electricity grid. here at the village level, people are taking charge of their energy needs but solar is going commercial, too. >> sun alpha is a startup that sees big potential in solar leasing. it installs panels on commercial buildings and supply under a long term contract. >> we provide the solar power to them at a rate that is cheaper than what they pay to the grid. so far without having to pay anything up front, they start generating income from the
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rooftop space. >> as night falls, many line up outside the door to pick up their lanterns. here, just a few hours of light could mean finishing homework or passing an exam, or getting granddad to tell you a bedtime story. digging up clues in a cold case. >> the quest to jump cover the truth in a case tied to the civil rights movement.
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it's been more than 50 years since the civil rights movement began. many families of those killed are still looking for justice. >> there is murders still unsolved. some of trying to change that. >> if somebody kills me, someday kills me. i tend to thinking safe materials. if someone kills me, then it just means i'm going home sooner. >> investigative reporter jerry mitchell has risked his life traveling the back roads of the deep south, looking for a special breed of killer. >> where were the three civil rights workers killed? >> right here, along this ditch. >> men who murdered civil rights activists decades ago with immunity. >> pulled them out of the car and said are you that n. word
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lover. he said sir, i understand how you feel. pulled the trigger. >> james that iny and michael some warner were helping african-americans to vote when they were ambushed and killed in 1964. they weren't alone june the back rods of mississippi still hold many dark secrets. during the violent days of the civil rights movement, african-american families were often hesitant to report disappearances or murders to law enforcement authorities because they didn't trust them. jerry mitchum says they had good reason. >> in fact, the trio was delivered to a link mob by the county's deputy sheriff, cecil price. >> yeah, he was in the klan and so was the sheriff. >> it would take 41 years for a murder prosecution in the case after mitchell's digging led to a preacher named he had guard
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ray killing. >> were you nervous? >> no, we were in a public place. he wanted me to come to his house, but it was going to be 9:00 at night. >> new evidence led to conviction on three counts of manslaughter. mitchell grew up mostly unaware he says of the civil rights movement. >> i grew up in my insular kind of white south in east the accident. i just didn't get exposed to a lot of it. >> the movie, mississippi burning opened his eyes. >> i was scared to death, man. >> don't you call me man, boy. >> as did lurk about his own newspaper's past. >> when you learn the legacy of this paper, what did you think? >> i was horrified. >> decades earlier, the paper supported segregation and had
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ties to keep ties on activists like the murdered men. >> it was an organ of the state spy agency that was opposed to civil rights. >> absolutely. when i found that out, we got to write about ourselves. >> former governor says the commission was formed in 1956 to promote mississippi. >> it was to be a p.r. operation. >> but by the 1960's, it operated in the shadows. >> exactly how did that work? >> well, they would infiltrate the ranks of the schisms of the naacp. it was really an arm of white segregationists who were determined at all costs to prevent any sort of integration particularly in the schools. >> through a source, mitchell got his hands on 2300 pages of sealed sovereign commission files and fount that medgar evers had been a major target. the commission's agents, some
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african-american recorded evers movements, portraying the world war ii veteran as an enemy of the state. >> so he was coming back home from an naacp rally? >> he was. >> in june, 1963 he was shot and killed in the driveway of his home. his wife and children were inside. >> as he step forward, he got shot in the back and it went through that window, the corner of the window here, went through a wall, hilt the refrigerator, and landed on the counter. >> his accused murderer byron beckwith was tried twice. both juries deadlocked. mitchell made a crucial discovery. >> at the same time the state of mississippi was prosecuting beckwith for killing medgar evers, this sovereignty commission was secretly asking the defense trying to get him acquitted. >> mitchum persuaded beckwith to give an interview. the chat was hate filled rhetoric.
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>> he walks me out to the car and says if you write negative things with white caucasian christians, god will punish you. if god does not punish you directly, several individuals will do it for him. >> witnesses came forward, saying beckwith bragged about the killing. >> back in those days, there were no white people speaking for us. he was one of the few whites and to this day, i love him as a brother and respect him as a reporter. >> in 1994, beckwith was convicted of third degree murder in evers death. mitchell helped in other cases to help secure a murder
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conviction against chance man bobby cherry. >> after talking to you, he was prosecuted. >> yeah, he was. >> did you ever think they'd get tipped off at a certain point? [ laughter ] >> mitchum is still on the hunt, working on a book titled race against time. >> why that title? >> because time's running out to be able to prosecute these cases. >> even if no suspects remain, says mitchell, telling the story is just as important, doing justice to history, no matter the risk. >> it's led to unexpected gift, which is living fearlessly. i began to, you know, live for something great are than me, i didn't, you know, i'm not that big a deal. >> al jazeera, jackson, mississippi. >> i went to alabama investigating the death of a
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person from new hampshire. the climate has not changed. >> even 50 years on, a lot wrong still being righted. >> when we come back, a bafta blackout. the nominations for best white actress go to -- oh. >> britain celebrates the best in film as some criticize the lack of diverse nominees.
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the bafta a wards last night, the highest awards in british film. >> the bafta goes to the revenant. >> that was hardly a surprise. yes, this was an incredibly tough year to call the winners, even the critics found it hard to commit to predictions. this film stood one of the best chance of the lot, five awards for the revenant, including three of the main ones, best film, best actor for leonardo dicaprio and best director. he lost out last year when birdman failed to take off here, second time lucky for him. it wasn't to be her night, cate blanchett missed out on best actress. this is her in carol. best actress went to.
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>> brie larson. >> an up and coming star for this, room, the tail of a woman and her child held captive for years in a shed. the baftas are british films, the clue is in the name. such is the international nature of the film industry, you will see from all over the world. these are widely seen as an indication of what's going to happen at the oscars in hollywood in two weeks time. you will see the same faces, hear the same names. you'll hear about the same controversies, as well. case in point this year, the lack of diversity. this protest had been embraced by bafta, which allowed demonstrators on to the red carpet to hand out flyers. bafta said it is going to increase the diversity of its members, an issue has the oscars
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are also facing. kate winslet for steve jobs. >> kate winslet walked off for best supporting actress. best supporting actor was mark rylen or bridge of spies. nothing for idris elba. he has missed out on that for this, beasts are no nation and no members of him at the oscars, either. he has become one of the faces of this campaign with his impassioned pleas for film to be open to everyone. >> the nominations for best white actress go to. >> the question is, how long will that really take? al jazeera at the baftas in london.
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>> singer songwriter natalie merchant has come out with a new version of her solo album, tiger lily called paradise is there. i talked to merchant about the themes in her work. >> i talked about race relations in that album, about rampant consumerism and corporate misconduct. of course i didn't say this is a song with corporate misconduct. i mean, it wasn't so overt, but those were the underlying themes. it's threaded through all my work, and i think tiger lily, a song like carnival, it's not political, but it definitely is taking a critical look at the way that we live. ♪ >> i have always wondered what
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carnival was about. >> about manhattan, walking through the streets of new york and just questioning. >> you can see my full interview that airs tonight at 6:00 eastern, 3:00 pacific on talk to al jazeera. spiderman fans should be tuning in toward new york, it is a chance to own a piece of history, amazing fantasy number 15 is the debut of the web slinger, the opener putting it up for auction. it is expected to fetch $400,000. the original price back in 1962, 16 cents. >> you remember when comics cost that much, right? >> i remember when they cost a dime. my neighbor has that by the way. i have to tell him to watch. >> your world this morning back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. we'll take a look at the state of emergency in hawaii over the mosquito borne illness, zika.
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hospitals and a school hit in two separate airstrikes in northern syria, more than 21 killed and dozens injured. turkey and russia in a war of words, as fighting escalates inside syria. you're watching al jazeera live from doha. also coming up, a ugandan opposition leader running for penalty is arrested while campaigning in the capitol. i'm in stoke home, sweden where aid workers and officials are struggle to figure out

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