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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  February 16, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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♪ february fury, a massive storm system sweeps through the east bringing tornados, snow and ice. >> i came here for two reasons, one because i care deeply about jeb and two because i care deeply about our country. >> brotherly love in south carolina president bush stumping for jeb and will it help with the white house. reach a deal to hold off on pumping oil but it may not boost prices. ♪ and they are calling it grammy gold and honoring its own and paying tribute to some of rock's icons. ♪
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the eastern third of the country facing severe weather while ice falls on the northeast tornados hit the gulf coast leaving a trail of destruction and welcome to your world this morning i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm del walters and millions waking up to the storms on mondays to slick commutes in new york to even tornados. >> snow, sleet, strong winds and heavy rain and al jazeera's john henry smith has more. >> reporter: 1200 mile long winter storm stretching from the south to the northeast will head off shore today. right on the heels of a storm that brought record cold to the east coast over the weekend, the winter storm began the workweek with enough snow and wind to cause virginia and north carolina to declare states of emergency. some parts of virginia got nearly a foot of snow and the traffic problems that go with
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it, hundreds of accidents. >> i hit the inside rail of the bridge and spun around. the posted speed limit through her was 60 and i was doing 55. >> the roads look good but they are black ice and iced over. >> reporter: the massive pile up in indiana. >> when the weather is changing people need to reduce their speed and people just didn't do it today. >> reporter: the storm also brought tornados across four gulf states and twisters in mississippi and the florida panhandle destroyed a dozen homes and damaged a high school full of students and in louisiana the winds ripped apart businesses. >> i seen it like coming at me. it was scary. >> reporter: now comes a major warm up, that could mean flooding as the snow and ice melt. john henry smith, al jazeera. and it's not over, that massive system is causing major headaches this morning and let's bring in nicole mitchell on that good morning. >> the snow brought in 100 different reports of severe weather and a lot of that wind
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and tornadoic and 16 reports and you can see all that pinging through the gulf coast as that went through and then now into portions of florida so as we continue through the morning at least through 8:00 a.m. we are under a tornado watch, that means the potential is there but not imminent and that is when we would see a warning, a warning is more the imminent but to the north and flooding will be river flooding for today at least in the southern portion of all of this, as we get further north warmer temperatures have come ahead of this and some of the places that started off as ice or snow have transitioned now to areas of rain. and the problem is the ground was so cold over the course of the weekend pretty well frozen so the problem with that is when you get that rain on that frozen ground we do also have some flood concerns. look at this as you get to some of the central portions of the appalachians for example it's not going to be able to absorb all the rain because of the frozen ground and we have different winter weather
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advisories including the storm warnings closer to the lakes where we have the cold air already and it's going to be more snow than the transitional rain and these are places near the lakes where we could before everything is said and done get one or a couple isolated spots of two feet of that snow so here is how this continues through the day, starts to pull off a little later into the day and really clearing the extreme northeast, that is going to take all of today and there is a little disturbance behind that that could bring to places like the mid-atlantic, a little snow or rain and we get a nice dry break to the end of the week and temperatures the return to more normal for this time of year and finally it has been a rough week and we deserve the break. >> reminder when you walk outside a lot of ice. >> there is, frozen ground. >> nicole thanks. we are days away from the south carolina primary and this morning they are getting ready for prayer breakfasts and rally making the case to voters and donald trump leading in the polls and monday he targeted tud
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cruz and he is saying he will sue to determine if he is eligible to become president if he doesn't take down his antitrump attack aids and rubio saying attacks over same sex marriage, campaign tactics and more. >> when rubio and trump scream liar, liar, liar it makes you wonder how they will deal with putin and not sure if it's effective to scream liar, liar. to be honest putin and many enemies of the country are liars. >> reporter: they need strong support from south carolina to win the primary and a former president now back on the campaign trail trying to boost his brother's chances for winning the white house george w. bush and jeb sharing the stage for the first time during this race and randall pinkston reports. >> reporter: here at the coliseum in charleston, south carolina may prove to have been a turning point.
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former president george w. bush jokes he stayed out of eight after leaving the white house to work on a tree farm and work on a stump speech and it was good practice not for himself but his brother jeb and campaigning in columbia and an enthusiastic rally in north charleston. >> thank you for your hard work for jeb and thank you for what you are going to do which is to vote for him on saturday here in the great state of south carolina. >> reporter: polls suggest many south carolina republicans are turning their backs on jeb or donald trump which had criticism of both bush brothers. >> we do not need someone in the oval office who mirrors or inflames our anger and frustration. [cheers and applause] we need someone who can fix the problems, that caused our anger and frustration and that is jeb bush. [cheers and applause] i always said and will tell him why don't you use the name bush,
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you are bush, use the name bush. >> reporter: donald trump still leading the polls was also out campaigning, repeating his costic criticism of jeb bush saying his brother kept america safe before and after during 9-11. >> it came down in the reign of george bush, i mean it came down and during the ronald regan he mentioned the debate and we were not safe. >> i never thought in a debate we would talk about i'm peefing a republican two-term president. >> didn't speak his name but there was no doubt who was taking about. >> while he was building a reality show and i'm sure it was fantastic, i've never seen it george bush brought together a team to build the security apparatus that to this day is one of the reasons why we have not been attacked. >> reporter: a year ago jeb bush made a speech in chicago at
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telling to separate himself from his brother. >> but i'm my own man. >> reporter: some political analyst say jeb bush has not been able to gain voters on his own. >> it's clear that south carolina is really pivot on their side and jeb bush in the teens to single digits has to do something to breakout and no surprise if he is relying on his brother and mother in new hampshire to try to gin up support. >> reporter: his mother barbara bush did campaign for him in new hampshire, it didn't help. he is hoping for better luck from his brother in south carolina. south carolina voters have put two bushes in the white house, comsat the republican presidential primary will determine if they will help a third bush on his way. randall pinkston, north charleston, south carolina. on the democratic side bernie sanders has a busy morning beginning with a prayer breakfast and town hall at the university of carolina and he spoke to big crowds in michigan, nearly 10,000 turned out at a
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rally at eastern michigan university, before the event he met with several flint residents and called it one of the most difficult meetings he ever had and hillary clinton focusing energies in nevada ahead of saturday's caucuses and held two rallies there on monday and talked about her supreme court nominee in the wake of scalia's death. >> the other argument they make oh, my gosh it's an election year, the last time i looked the constitution did not have a parentheses the president nominees except in an election year, that is not the way our system works but more than that in 1988 the last year of president regan's presidency an election year, president reagan nominated justice kennedy and the senate acted. so their arguments are flimsy. >> including that regionen appointment over the last
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century there were six cases of new supreme court justices nominated and confirmed in an election year. stay with us in our next half hour we will speak to a law professor who covers the high court and the president's options and if he will choose a candidate no one is expecting. south carolina primaries are getting close and voters are being flooded with more and more campaign ads on t.v. each and every time they turn on their set, some residents saying they have never seen so many commercials before and al jazeera david shuster has the story. >> reporter: the candidates and super pacs spent $24 million in the state on television ads. that is three times as much as 2012. and independent media group says almost half the ads have come from one super pac that supports jeb bush. >> right to rise usa responsible for the content of this message. >> reporter: the latest spot features his brother george w. >> the first job of the president is to protect america,
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our next president must be preprayed to lead and i know jeb and good heart and strong backbone. >> reporter: antiestablishment republicans cruz and trump have been hammering each other with attack ads. >> insider who cannot be trusted. >> reporter: trump pulled that spot after deciding it was too negative. cruz is hitting trump with a humor video featuring children. >> i got the trump action figure. >> what does he do? >> he pretends to be a republican. [laughter] in the democratic race hillary clinton and bernie sanders are trying to appeal to african/americans who usually makeup over half of the south carolina democratic vote. >> something is just fundamentally broken, when african/americans are more likely to be arrested by police and sentenced to longer prison terms for doing the same thing
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that whites do. >> reporter: the donor of eric garner the unarmed african/american man after a new york officer put him in a choke hold recorded this ad for sanders. >> there is no other person that is speaking about this. people are dying. this is real. this is not t.v. we need a president that is going to talk about it. >> reporter: in the political ad world the most talk this year has been about two other ads both produced by the sanders campaign, the first an upbeat spot featuring the music of simon and garfunkle racked up three million hits on youtube. ♪ that ad has even been praised by jeb bush on msnbc morning joe. >> best ad i have seen and simon and garfunkle came back.
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>> reporter: the second ad goes viral features faces of his supporters. >> when we stand together and demand this country work for all of us rather than the few we will transform america and that is what this campaign is about, it's bringing people together. >> reporter: and in south carolina there are messages that are now impossible to miss. david shuster al jazeera. this morning russia denying claims that its war planes struck a doctors without bordered supported hospital in northern syria, the bombing on monday left at least seven people dead at that hospital. dozens more died in strikes that hit four other hospitals and two schools. the state department condemned the attacks and the united nations said they are a blatant violation of international law and al jazeera dana has more from turkey on the border with syria. >> reporter: the opposition increasingly losing ground in the northern aleppo countryside
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particularly in the northern corridor close to the turkish border. it is not just coming under attack from the skies, russian air strikes, the government and the allies on the ground are also advancing as well as the kurdish armed group of wpg and the forces and opposition lost yesterday and it was a major blow because this is one of their remaining strongholds and spf and wpg say the advances will continue and for them they have no red line. turkey had said the border is a red line and will not allow wng and allies to advance and turkish shelling of their positions have resumed but it has not stopped the advance so the border town is a front line and tens of thousands of people live there already, families started to flee towards the border. there is no sign that this offensive by the government is
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going to end any time soon and hopes for a breakthrough on the diplomatic front and look increasingly unlikely. the syrian president making it very clear that he sees an end to the conflict with national agreements but that is unacceptable because it's surrender and lay siege on certain areas and people starve and forced into submission, a very complicated situation on the ground and the war rages on. >> al jazeera, zaina on the turkey-syrian border, russia said despite the truce set to take effect this week it will continue bombing groups it considers terrorist. oil up after the two largest produces of crude agree to freeze the out put and saudi arabia and russia saying the decision today during talks in qatar and both will keep pumping at january levels as well as the other major producers follow suit and the goal is to stop the
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on going slide of crude and it's trading 70% below the peek in 2014. four american journalists arrested in bahrain have been released and entered the country last week on turrist visas to cover the 2011 up rising and the government says the journalists didn't have proper visas and accused them of taking part in a riot they were covering and providing false information to the police and it's a u.s. ally and the navy fifth fleet is there. the catholic leader is scheduled to meet with young people who he says are the key to a better future. the pope has been calling on the church to fight violence and drug trafficking and as al jazeera john holman reports another focus of his trip has been making amends with mexico's indigenous people. >> reporter: pope francis to the south mexican state was all about the indigenous community that makeup most of the population in mexico's poorest
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state and the pontiff used the visit to side with them and denounce hundreds of years of exploitation. >> translator: on many occasions in a systematic and organized way your people have been misunderstood and excluded from society, some have considered your values, culture and traditions to be inferior, others intoxicated by power, money and market trends have stolen your lands or contaminated them. >> reporter: few expect his visit alone to change things but for mandez survivor of a massacre where they killed 45 people and six of his family the fact that pope francis has come means something. >> translator: i feel like this is the real pope in favor of the indigenous communities the marginalized and survivors because i lost six of my family in the massacre, i'm very happy that he came. >> reporter: mexico's government may feel differently
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and this has been a problem area for them especially famous for an army of farmers who rose up against authorities in 1994 and are still active. pope francis more conservative predecessors prefer to visit more prosperous areas and choosing an area like this who suffer marginazation and corruption and poverty and he is taking a different line and he is using the visit and saying indin d indig languages can be used during mass and it can follow to other religiouss like evangelical christianity and even islam and has the lowest percent of catholics in mexico and it encouraged the faithful and those struggling in this poverty stricken state, john holman, al jazeera, san
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cristobol. calling for prosperity. >> southeast leaders talk about cooperation and china troubles. made in cuba and the government allows the first factory in that country since the cuban revolution. ♪
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♪ president obama is in california this morning for the second and final day of the summit, the economy in china are the major topics. >> meetings proving to be more symbolic than anything else and al jazeera rob reynolds has more. >> reporter: president barack obama welcomed the ten azian government leaders to the deluxe sunny lands golf resort in the california desert and portrays
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the summit as an informal and relaxed get together yet it is heavy with symbolism highlighting the obama administration's so called pivot to asia. >> economic growth that is inclusive creating opportunities for all, mutual security and the peaceful resolution of disputes, human dignity including respect for human rights and development that is sustainable, that is our vision. >> reporter: obama wants to shore up economic and security ties and reassert influence in southeast asia but as obama met with the likes of bruna, saltan and cambodia's leader han-san a thousand people gathered nearby under a blazing desert sun to protest. >> bringing up dictators to southern california killing their own and suppressing their people. the oppressor has to stop. >> reporter: cambodia americans
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denounced han-san who had power for 30 years. >> she a dictator and never won election since 1993, never won election and won through intimidation and vote buying. >> reporter: they say there is no democracy for the people of louse. >> the government is corrupt and the vietnam have been coming in killing innocent people. it's all wrong so we are here just trying to stop that. >> reporter: human rights activists say most of the asian leaders are antidemocratic and repressive. >> the problem with the summit is it gives these leaders legitimacy, at the end of the day the u.s. commit to rights is a lot of talk in practice when it comes down to it, the united states government has shown itself to throw itself in with the leaders as opposed to the people of asia. >> reporter: national security advisor susan rice strongly disputed that. >> just because in asia as elsewhere we are obliged to deal
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with governments including in some cases those with whom we have significant disagreements on things like human rights does not mean we are legitimizing them. >> reporter: instead of human rights the number one focus here is on economic ties, trade between the united states and the asian nations is worth a quarter of a trillion dollars. rob reynolds, mirage, california. ben roedz says it's not for people with questionable human rights records. >> the united states has to engage at the head of state level with all ten asian countries, we have done that from the beginning of this administration and the fact of the matter is asian has large variance in political system and human rights records, what we do is raise those issues directly with each of the countries directly and collectively and have seen progress over the resent years and put a lot of effort in the transition in
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myanmar and so the united states raises these issues even as we have other issues where we cooperate with all the countries. we do not ex spenlt -- expect them to pick winners but it's important to speak out on a set of principles so united states and asian should look for the sea and a free flow of commerce and peaceful resolution of disputes consistent with international law and not a large nation with smaller will and trying to resolve disputes and those are the principles we would like the see the countries and the united states speaking out for, not just here but going forward and it's going to take time to resolve the issues but number one we will continue with our military to protect the freedom of navigation and we made that very clear in resent months. number two we are going to work to support countries like the
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philippines that are trying to resolve these questions through arbitration, under international law and think that is the right venue to resolve the disputes and also made clear we are going to be increasing maritime cooperation with different countries in the region and includes the announcement the president made in manila with additional security assistance to countries of the reason. rhoades says it is not meant to be hostile to china and the u.s. wants beijing to continue its peaceful rise as long as international principles are upheld. obama administration giving the go ahead for a u.s. company to build a factory in cuba from alabama and will open a plant there to assemble small trackers and it's the first to open in 50 years and part of a special economic zone started by the cuban government to attract foreign investors and the cofounder of clevis llc, the u.s. company building the factory and talked about how the decision came about.
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>> it came up in the last few years and starting in about 2070 and going back to my roots and i was from there, i was born and raised in cuba, came to the states and lived the american dream after i retired from my business, i started going back and finding out what is going on. i learned that there were some changes happening in the economy and then when i heard that president obama was going to open up opportunities for trade, my partner and i flemings decided we wanted to do joint and see how we have to bring the two peoples together and we figured out that helping agricultural through a tracker would do a lot of good for them. >> he hopes making tractors in cuba will provide opportunities for the rest of latin america and it will be up and running next year. the battle over the bench.
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>> the fight of who should say who replaces scalia. utah has become a model for ending homelessness among adults and getting wrong people off the streets is posing a much bigger challenge. ♪
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>> every monday night. >> i lived that character. >> go one on one with america's movers and shakers. >> we will be able to see change. >> gripping... inspiring... entertaining. no topic off limits. >> 'cause i'm like, "dad, there are hookers in this house". >> exclusive conversations you won't find anywhere else. >> these are very vivid, human stories. >> if you have an agenda with people, you sometimes don't see the truth. >> "talk to al jazeera". monday, 6:00 eastern. only on al jazeera america.
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welcome back to your world this morning, 7:30 eastern time. if you woke up this morning in the northeast, you found difficult driving out there, a storm dumping snow and ice. that staple system also responsible for tornadoes along the gulf coast, including one in the florida panhandle. oil prices are up this morning after russia and saudi arabia agreed to freeze output, pumping at january levels as long as other major producers follow suit. the goal is to stop the on going slide in the price of crude. it will be a busy day in south carolina for those who want to be president. there are several prayer breakfasts and rallies planned today. donald trump is still leading in most evident polls. the white house now saying the president won't nominate a replacement for supreme court
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justice antonin scalia until next week. republicans argue the seat should remain vacant until a new president is in office next year, as al jazeera reports, an empty seat on the court can have a major impact. >> one of the most cann voices on the supreme court silenced now with the death of antonin scalia. that means the balance has shifted, leaving four justice prone to leaning conservative and four liberal. with several cases pending that involves affirmative action, respective student abigail finisher sued the university of texas for denying her a spot, blaming the review which makes race one possible factor considered when considering applicants. justice scalia drew criticism for citing studies that black students may do better at slower
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track institutions. >> hopefully this race will end classifications and preferences. >> another key issue, the affordable care act coming up next month with zubich versus bur well, arguing non-profits shouldn't have to pay for contraception. justice scalia could have tipped the scales in their favor. now the most likely outcome is a tie, which means the affordable care act mandate will stay in place. >> when we work together, we have power. the plaintiffs are california school teachers who argue public employees should not be forced to pay union dos, even if they take advantage of the result with higher wages and benefits. >> the unions forced me to fund
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collective bargaining efforts that are harmful to my students. >> the case was argued in january. it looked like a slam dunk for conservatives and could have gutted the power of public employee unions, but justice scalia's absence may now mean a tied 4-4 vote and no change to the existing system. a law professor at the university of baltimore and supreme court reporter for the atlantic joins us this morning from washington, d.c., garrett, thanks for being with us. is there a danger to putting off judicial appointments waiting for elections. in 2000, bush v. gore, the courts decided the presidency, not the other way around. if there was an equally divided court in bush v. gore, we would still be counting dimples and hanging chads. >> we don't know what would have happened, we don't know who would have won. we could easily face a more dangerous situation in a close
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presidential election even than bush versus gore. we really are in unchartered territory. we have sailed into the constitutional bermuda trial here. >> fascinating conversation this weekend when it came to the courts. all the justice are linked to harvard or yale. the people want the government returned to the people. people i talked to pointed to federal judge vanessa gilmore in houston, single black mom, black female, ham to be grad. ant argued nicky haily who led the charge to get rid of the confederate flag. why is the court so elite? >> well, i think for the past 30 years, confirmations have been so contentious, there's been so much fighting that every penalty tries to choose a nominee whose credentials are flawless. no president wants the risk of -
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>> is that playless? i was thinking about the court arguing the merits of affirmative action and yet none of the justice have had much experience with that issue itself. >> justice clarence tomas is very frank about being a recipient of affirmative action when he was admitted to law school, so did justice sotomayor and the experience of the bench is pretty broad. there are other issues like all the cases coming from the west where they really are clueless, like the indian law conveyses. >> history could be made by adding an indian justice to the
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bench. >> the ballot effects are hard to see. but an extraordinary nominee is supported by lawyers and politicians on both sides of the aisle. he was confirmed 97-0 when his nomination finally got to the senate floor. no one could find any argument against him, so if you bring him forward now, it's very hard to know whether the republicans could say anything, except this is a power grab, we want power and we are going to let the nation's highest court sail on without a full steerage capacity for a year, more than a year. this would take more than a year. this has never happened before. >> if you were a betting man, would you say that there will be adjusts seat before the next election? >> i'm actually not a betting man, and so i'm not going to
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answer that. i think that the white house has got more cards to play than people give it credit for right now. we've got senators stampeding to the mic, but remember, this is the equivalent in supreme court terms of the government shutdown, and remember the government shutdown, where the republicans vowed they would never, ever back down, but the reaction and the effects were so negative that they did, so i think -- go ahead. >> would that be unthinkable? >> well, it's -- no, it wouldn't be unthinkable. the question is whether the senate will go to recent. the president's not going to use this recess, and after the case of noah canning versus nlrb, all they have to do is keep the senate in pro form abe session, meet every three days for 10 minutes and they can block the
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president's use of the recess appointment. justice brennan, the great liberal justice was a recess appointment. chief justice warren, the super chief was a resist appointment. it's not at all unprecedented. >> stay tuned, professor thanks for being with us. a planned parenthood in colorado springs is reopened, opening for the first time since november, that is when a gunman stormed the facility killing three and injuring nine others. while parts of the building remain closed, the clinic will offer all of its services, including abortions. >> planned parenthood is on the side of resiliency, on the side of believing that women and their families, youth should have access to reproductive health care. >> the man who admitted to the attack, robert dear plans to plead guilty.
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hawaii is the latest state to take emergency measures to try to stop the spread of mosquitoes that spread disease. it is dealing with an outbreak of deng five and concerns about the zika virus. >> hawaii's governor calls is a state of emergency to deal with the mosquitoes caring deng five and possibly the zika virus. >> hawaii is a perfect place for dengue fever because it has the vector mosquito present and dwellings withstanding water. >> more than 250 cases of dengue fever have been detected in hawaii the last couple months manufacture 27 of visitors and 26 children under 18. >> deng five is a much more dangerous disease than fever. it kills thousands of people
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every year. it is a disease that is spread by the same mosquito. it causes fever, muscle aches and pains, rash and has severe forms, going into shock and hemorrhaging. >> the mosquito that carries dengue fever can carry the zika virus. the 250 cases in the continental u.s. have been by travel but have been contracted locally in puerto rico and the virgin islands. >> it would not be surprising if just like chickengunya and dengue fever, we do see isolated clusters of locally transmitted zika. >> in hawaii, the officials say the state is still safe to visit and number of the dengue fever cases on the decline. they are trying to break the cycle of transmission. new worries over a popular type of heartburn drug.
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they could be raising your risk of dementia. people 75 years and older who us proton pump inhibitors had a 44% increased risk of dementia. the group of drugs include prilosec and prevacid. another study says exercise at middle age could keep the brain bigger later in life. reservers at boston university found less active people in their 40's had smaller brain volumes than people who work out. the findings could be linked to heart health and blood pressure. over the last decade, the state's housing first program reducing chronic homelessness by 90%. now the city is fighting on another front. we have this report from salt lake city. >> we are in palmer court, which is a converted former holiday inn. >> lloyd pendleton used federal
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funds to convert former hotel rooms into apartments for the homeless. >> it's small, but it works, so you can see the small kitchen that's using the plumbing on the back of the bathroom. >> the strategy was so effective, it helped reduced the number of chronically homeless in salt lake city from 2000 to 200 in a decade, but pendleton, now retired, said the state has an even bigger job ahead, getting yuck duties off the streets. >> they're issues are genuinely different. they've been abused at home so find it safer on the street than at home, so they've run away, left home, they're being kicked out. >> homelessness is a growing problem in utah for the young. young homeless adults hang out on downtown streets and on cold days inside the public library. their numbers increased nearly 15% last year. the state admits that estimate could be low. tracking homeless youth is harder than tracking homeless
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adults. oftentimes, they'll be couch surfinging somebody's living room. >> as less sent avoid shelters because they don't trust adults. utah is trying to find creative ways to get them off the streets. >> on the fourth floor, we have our community room with instrumentses, games. >> this is one of two transitionle homes for teens and young adults in salt lake city managed by volunteers of america. young adults can live here for up to two years but have to work or go to school. while it sounds like a much better alternative than living on the street, v.o.a. president kathy gray said it can be a tough sell to some. >> to have them come in and have their own bedroom, and start to talk about employment in jobs, there's a pretty big gap in there, so we have to work with the youth for months to help them reorient their own
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thinking. >> but it can be done. joseph noble's father was homeless and so was he, until the 24-year-old moved into an apartment for the chronically homeless last year. he lives with his girlfriend, two sons and dog. noble says the transition has been tough, but worth it. >> there's always that fear of, you know, what's going to happen, what, you know, if i put myself out there, am i going to, you know, am i going to fall again, am i going to lose everything, is really the biggest fear, but at the same time, it's something to strive for. i just don't want my kids to have to worry about the things that i did as a child and a young adult. >> homeless advocates say the state and others have an obligation to get people off the streets. >> we see those homeless individuals as our brothers and sisters. they're were you ever us. they're homeless citizens.
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they're not those people, they're us. >> he said utah may never end homelessness completely, but he thinks it can at least try. al jazeera, salt lake city. >> mexican officials are investigating how luxury cells were built inside a state prison with saunas, bars be a employed mini bridges in the prison. there were almost a300 food and grocery stands within the walls. authorities found these walls after a fight in the prison. the prison director and superintendent have been arrested on murder charges. that massive storm system that brought tornadoes, snow and ice now bringing a major change in the temperatures with it. >> some place within the deep freeze have had a complete reversal today. twenty's and 30's through the northern tier into the deep south more 40's. up the east coast, this corridor
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40's and 50's, some of these place were negative on sunday morning. here's the closer look. you can see it's that corridor up the coastline. you get interior and it's 20's and 30's. that moisture makes a big difference. if you're near the coast, it is rain because of the temperatures. freezing temperatures in interior new york and pennsylvania. this is a change just in the last 24 hours. you can see, philadelphia over 30 degrees warmer this morning than last. if you take it back two days, some of those temperatures by the end of today, 40 or 50 degrees warmer. the 50's only last today before that front comes through. here's a look at the rest of that front. broad moisture. the temperature really differs, then we also have another system, starting to push into the northwest. we'll see more of that into the day tomorrow. this one could finally be a little more moisture for california again. >> that is good news, nicole mitchell, thank you. honoring music's best.
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♪ >> the big winners in the grammy awards, we'll also tell you why the reason adele said her performance hit a sour note. the film industry making a comeback in iran.
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♪ a few sour notes from adele during the grammys. she blames it on a microphone that fell into the piano. >> she didn't win any grammys but history was made during sometimes an emotional night. >> taylor swift made grammy history winning album of the year for 1989. that makes her the first woman to win the grammys top prize twice. >> rapper kendrick lamar won the
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most awards of the night and delivered a racially charged performance that literally set the stage on fire. it ended with a debut of a new verse about modern slavery in memory of trayvon martin. hiphop hamilton won best theatrical album and shows part of the performance via satellite. up town funk won for record of the year. megan trainer got emotional after winning best artist. there were also moments of sadness for three musical greats. ♪ lady gaga made up her face in homage to david bowie and pay
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the tribute with a tribute to his hits. singer and songwriter glenn frey was remembered. stevie wonder and pentatonix took the stage. >> there were times when music transcends one generation to the next, last night was one of those nights. >> taylor swift in her acceptance speech had a real message of female empowerment. she is in that on going feud with kanye west. >> she is winning. >> grammies always political. an artist in afghanistan has made par tanks they are canvas, now getting a flowery makeover. they are the creation of the 28-year-old iranian. she worked for months to get permission to paint the tanks. she said her work is neither political nor anti-war.
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>> i want to make some questions in peopled mind about what is going on around them. i wanted very bright colors. >> she'd like to stay in afghanistan to paint for tanks and murals and beautify the bleak landscape of the war-torn country. the berlin film festival is highlighting the refugee crisis in europe and other issues impacting the world. two iranian filmion are getting a lot of buzz for their message. >> they are young and behind bars and forgotten by society. the teenage girls in the iranian documentary is getting attention in the berlin film festival have created serious crimes. the director said it's tragic that many would prefer to stay inside the correctional facility
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than go back to their families. >> if you show their pain, their dreams, what they think, we can try to solve our problem with us and our children. i think we can live in better world. >> another iranian production showing in berlin is fictional but based in reality. the street gang in iran has carried out kidnappings. exploring their reasons for turning to crime, social injustice is addressed. the golden bear for best film last year went to an iranian film. this year, there are four showing as well as two based by
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foreign directors. it's a sign of an industry growing in stature and diversity. >> this critic said winning the top prize in 2011 with a separation was a turning point. >> many iranian movies is trying to follow its ways and bring some tense, nervous movies which reflect the current life of iranians, usually in the big cities, usually in the middle class and to show how they try to survive on the very severe economic problems. >> weather documentaries or fiction, these films offer a rare insight into life in iran. for star wars fans, walt did knee and looks filles announced
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production has begun on episode eight. they released a short trailer showing off new footage of luke skywalker who disappeared until the end. the movie is scheduled to be released in 2017. >> literally a cliffhanger at the end of the last film there. president obama making plans to nominate a new supreme court justice as he talks about china's role in asia. oil on the rise, the deal between russia and saudi arabia to stop the steep dive in prices. we are back in two minutes with more of your world this morning. >> what in god's name makes you think that you can handle stress, anxiety, depression... post-traumatic stress? >> the closest i got was sitting in my truck, gun in hand. >> who will save america's heroes? >> i wish he'd been able to talk to somebody. >> "faultlines". >> what do we want? >> al jazeera america's
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hard-hitting... >> today the will be arrested. >> ground-breaking... >> they're firing canisters of gas at us. >> emmy award-winning, investigative series.
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tornado threats, severe storms up and down the east coast affect millions with snow, ice, rain and twisters. we need someone who can fix the problems that cause our anger and frustration and that's jeb bush. >> it's become a family affair. george w. bush campaigns for his brother os the front runner delivers a stinging blow in south carolina. facing new obstacles as the
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u.n. envoy makes a surprise visit to damascus. hawaii gears up to fight the mosquito that carries dengue fever and the zika virus. good morning, welcome to your world this morning. i'm del walters. i'm stephanie sy. it's a dangerous drive for commuters in the northeast. temperatures are rising, but the roads slick ours after the winter storm left behind snow and ice. that same system triggered damages tornadoes. john henry smith has more. >> a powerful 1200-mile long winter storm stretching from the south to the northeast will head offshore today. right on the heels of the storm that brought record cold to the east coast over the weekend, the winter storm began the work week with enough snow and wind to
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cause virginia and north carolina to declare states of emergency. some parts of virginia got nearly a foot of snow and the traffic problems that go with it, hundreds of accidents. >> i hit the inside rail of the bridge, and spun around. the posted speed limit is 60. i was doing 55. >> the roads are block ice, they're iced over. >> this massive pileup in indiana. >> when the weather starts changing, people need to reduce their speed and they just didn't do that today. >> the storm brought tornadoes across four gulf states, twisters in mississippi and the florida panhandle damage add high school full of students. in louisiana, the winds ripped apart businesses. >> i seen it like coming at me. woo it was scary. >> now comes a major warmup. that could mean flooding as the snow and ice melt e let's bring
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in nicole mitchell for more. you haven't talked the mix of weather we've seen. >> we had brutally cold air from the last system that froze the ground in this cases. we've had a relatively mild winter. some is sticking more because of that frozen ground now. it's making places that didn't see a lot more treacherous than previous storms. here every little ping, the oranges are wind damage, the reds were tornado reports. over a dozen tornado reports anywhere from parts of louisiana through florida with all the wind damage, over 100 reports total once you add everything up. this morning, we just had that watch expire for the potential for tornadoes in florida. the risk really goes down through the rest of today, but still something to watch. there could be isolated pop-up thunderstorms with all of this and still a line of heavy rain going through. as we see this extending we will into the northern tear, this is where we've had the cold enough
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air that this is starting to switch over. along the coastline, it's 40's and 50's, which is tremendously warm. you get interior, it's 20s and 30's. new york, pennsylvania, as we get farther south, hit and miss stuff especially in the elevation in the mitt atlantic, so widespread winter advisories, including winter storm warnings where we could have lake enhancement, some places could go well over a foot of snowfall and then as i said, even the places that could little lets of freezing rain, that has stuck to the ground because of the last system. more of the coast ryan sees this as rain because of the corridor of warmer air. there's a disturbance that could move through the mid atlantic, as well. once this clears out after today, we get a nice dry break for a couple of days here.
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temperatures, that corridor of warmth i was mentioning, you can see that in today's forecast. those 50's, those return to average. more temperatures in the 40's and 30's by the end of the week, but at this point, it's been such weather whiplash back and forth, i think just average and quiet makes a lot of people happy. >> nicole, thanks. hillary clinton is wrapping up a three day visit to nevada to shore up support ahead of the caucuses there. bernie sanders is attending a prayer breakfast in south carolina. later he will attend a to know hall. donald trump is still leading in the republican polls in south carolina. monday he targeted ted cruz, once again saying he will suh to challenge the senator's eligibility to become president. that if trusses doesn't take down" anti trump attack ads. marco rubio accused cruz of false attacks over same-sex marriage, campaign tactics and
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more. >> when his campaign just screams liar liar liar, that makes you wonder how he will handle putin. >> putin and many other country leaders are liars. >> jeb bush getting help on the campaign trail from his brother, the former president george w. bush. randall pinkston reports. >> if jeb bush eventually wins the republican presidential nomination, the event held at the coliseum in north charleston, south carolina may have been a turning point. former president bush joked that he has stayed out of sight after leaving the white house to work on a tree farm to work on a stump speech. turns out it was good practice not for himself, but for his brother, jeb. campaigning at an enthusiastic rally in north charleston.
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>> thank you for your hard work for jeb and for what you are going to do, which is to vote for him on saturday here in the great state of south carolina. >> polls suggest many south carolina republicans are turning their backs on jeb for donald trump, which launched withering criticism of both bush brothers. >> we do not need someone in the oval office who mirrors and in flames our anger and frustration. we need someone who can fix the problems that cause our anger and frustration and that's jeb bush. >> i always said in fact i would tell him, i said why don't you use the name bush? you're bush, use the name bush. >> donald trump still leading the polls was also out campaigning,ing his causistic criticism of jeb bush. >> the world trade center came down during the, you know within
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reign of george bush, right? it came down. so during the ronald reagan, if you remember, the debate, he mentioned about how we were safe. we weren't safe. >> i never thought in a republican deep bait we'd be talking about impeaching a republican two term president. >> jeb bush didn't speak trump's name but there was no doubt who he was talking about. >> while he was building a reality t.v. show, i'm sure it was a fantastic one, i've never seen it, i'm sure it was great. george bush brought together a team to build the security apparatus that to this day is one of the reasons why we haven't been attacked. >> a year ago, jeb bush made a speech in chicago, attempting to separate himself from his brother. >> i'm my own man. >> some political analysts say jeb bush has not gained voters on his own. >> i think it's clear south carolina is pivotal on the republican side and jeb being in the low teens to single digits
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has to break out. it's not surprising that he is relying on his brother and mother to generate support. >> they did campaign for him in new hampshire. it didn't help. he's hoping for better luck from his brother in south carolina. >> south carolina voters have put two bushes in the white house. come saturday, the republican presidential primary will determine if they will help a third bush on his way. randall pinkston, al jazeera, north charleston, south carolina. two of the world's biggest oil producing countries are taking steps they hope may boost oil prices. saudi arabia and russia agreed to freeze output at january levels. that means they'll keep pumping up wards of 10 million-barrels a day. bernard smith reports from outside the meeting. >> this was a fairly short meeting called unexpectedly, but we know that saudi arabia, russia, the world's two biggest producer have crude oil, along with venezuela and qatar agreed
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they will want to freeze prices at january levels. this is the moist delicate, gentle really of the interventions in the oil market, an attempt to stop the decline in the price of oil. it's fallen 70% since 2014, and oil producing economies are feeling the pain. the challenge is to get these other oil producing countries to at least agree a freeze, as well. that will be the next step for these four ministers, particularly trying to persuade the iranians to freeze production. iran has only just started increasing production after sanctions were lifted on it in january. saudi arabia's oil minister said that this was the beginning of a process he said that will assess in the next few months. he said we don't want any significant gyrations in oil prices. >> oil price have fallen by more
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than 70% in the last 24 months. the u.n. envoy for syria is making a surprise trip to damascus after several attacks on hospitals and schools in the country. world powers pushed for an end to the fighting, something he said is highly unlikely. >> we hear them requesting a ceasefire within a week. ok, who is capable of bringing together all these conditions within a week? no one. who will speak to the terrorists if a terrorist organization refuses to adhere to the ceasefire? who will make them accountable? who, as they say, will bomb them. if they wanted to bomb them, where can they find them? where are they from a practical perspective, all of this is difficult to implement. we are speaking about foundations on the conditions that all these terms of are met. this cessation of operations
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must be done with the aim of improving the situation or other things we are doing today in a continuous fashion. >> also this morning, russia denying claims that it was its war plane that struck that doctors without border hospital in northern syria, the bombing on monday leaving seven dead, dozens more injured. zeina hodor has more from turkey on the border with syria. >> the opposition increasingly losing ground in the northern aleppo countryside, particularly in the northern corridor close to the turkish border. it is not just coming under attack from the skies. russian airstrikes, the government and its allies on the ground are also advancing, as well as the kurdish armed group, the r.p.g.
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they lost one of their remaining strongholds in the corridor. the w.p.g. promises their advances will continue. they have no red line. turkey said the border turn to is a red line, they will not allow the y.p.g. and their allies to advance. turkish shelling of their positions resumed but it hasn't stopped the advance. the border town of azaz now a front line. tens of thousand us lived there already, families have started to flee towards the border. there i also no sign that this offensive by the government is going to end anytime soon, and hopes for a breakthrough look increasingly unlikely. the syrian president making it very clear that he sees an end to the conflict with national reconciliation agreements. for the opposition, that is unacceptable, because those agreements are just a form of
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surrender, because the government lays sieges on certain areas. people starve and are forced into submission, a very complicate situation on the ground, and war rages on. >> that is al jazeera's zeina hodor on the turkish-sir i can't be border. despite the proposed truce set to take place this week, it will consider bombs groups it considers to be terrorists. four arrested in bahrain have been released. they entered on tourist visas to cover the anniversary of bahrain's uprising. the government accused them of taking part in a riot they were covering and providing false information to police. pope francis is visiting the heart of mexico's drug country today. the catholic leader is scheduled to meet with young people who he says are the key to a better future. the pope has been calling on the church to fight violence and drug trafficking.
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as al jazeera's john hohman reports, another focus of this trip has been making amends with message co's indigenous people. >> pope francis' visit was all about the indigenous community. they make up most of population in mexico's poorest state. his visit to them in which every denounced many years of exploitation. the people have been misunderstood and excluded from society. some of considered your values, cultures and traditions to be inferior. money and market trends have stolen your lands or contaminated them. >> few expect his visit alone to change things, but for manuel mendez, one of the survivors in a massacre in which paramilitary killed many people, including
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six of his family, the fact that the pope has come means something. >> i feel this i also the real pope in favor of the indigenous communities, the marginalized and survivors. i lost six of my family in the massacre. i'm very happy that he came. >> mexico's government may feel differently. chapas is famous for an army of farmers who rose up against authorities in 1994 and are still active. pope francis' more conservative predecessors preferred heart lands when they visit mexico. in choosing chapas, he's taking a different line. >> he is using his visit to show indigenous languages can be used in mass. it may help slow down the russia of followers to other relike
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thissens, like evangelical christianity and even islam. the state now has the lowest percentage of catholics in mexico. this brief visit has at least encouraged the faithful and those suffering in this poverty stricken state. on the short list for a supreme vacancy. >> the names under consideration for the highest court in the land and what might happen if the senate says no. ♪ >> a serious moment on music's biggest night.
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this is a critical moment. if the republicans in the senate act as though they have no responsibility to work with the president to fill that vacant position because they want to wait to see how the election comes out, the people of this country should send a very clear message, that is not the way our constitution works. you have a duty, we expect you to fulfill it. >> democratic presidential candidate making her case that the senate should at least hold hearings for whoever president obama chooses to join the supreme court. the white house now says the president won't announce his he nominee to succeed antonin scalia until at least next week when the senate returns from winter recess. >> garrett epps is a law professor. last hour, he told me the u.s.
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has never been this close to having a supreme court seat empty for this long. >> the florida supreme court's recount order would have stayed in effect, we don't know what would have happened, we don't know who would have won. we could easily face a more dangerous situation in a close presidential election, even than bush versus gore. we really are in unchartered territory. we have sailed into the constitutional bermuda try ache gel here. for the past 30 years, there's been so much fighting that every president has tried to choose a nominee who's credentials are flawless. no president wants the risk of a failed confirmation. judge srinivasan is supported by lawyers and politicians. he was confirmed 97-0 when his vote, his nomination finally got
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to the senate floor. no one could find any argument against him. if you bring him forward now, it's very hard to know whether the republican's could say anything except this is a power grab. we want power and we are going to let the nation's highest court sail on without full steerage capacity for a year, more than a year, this would take more than a year. this has never happened before. the white house has got more cards to play than people give it credit for right now. we've got senators stampeding to the mic, but remember, this is the equivalent in supreme court terms of the government shut down and remember the government shut down, where the republicans vowed they would never ever back down, but the reaction and the effects were so negative that they did. the question is whether the senate will go into recent. the president's not going to use this recess. after the case of nokia canning
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versus nlrb, all they have to do is keep the senate in pro forma session, meet once every three days for 10 minutes and they can block the president's use of the recess appointment. there have been many recess appointments to the court. justice brennan, the great liberal justice was a recess appointment. chief justice warren, the super chief was a recess appointment. it's not at all unprecedented. >> in fact, we checked over the last century, there were six cases of new supreme court justice nominated and confirmed in an election year. >> the supreme court battle is playing out on the campaign trail, as well. the candidates try to win over voters while hitting the airwaves with hundreds of campaign ads. al jazeera's david shuster has the story. >> the republica republican cand their super pacs have spent three times as much on t.v. ads
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than 2012. almost half have come from one super pac that supports jeb bush. the latest spot features his brother, george w. >> the first job of the president is to protect america. our next president must be prepared to lead. i know jeb. i know his good heart and his strong backbone. >> anti establishment republicans donald trump and ted cruz have been hammering each other with attack ads. >> ted cruz, the worst kind of washington insider who just can't be trusted. >> trump pulled that spot after deciding it was too negative. cruz is hitting trump with a humorous ad. >> he pretends to be a republican. [ laughter ] >> the democratic race, hillary clinton and bernie sanders are trying to appeal to
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african-americans who usually make up over half of the south carolina democratic vote. >> something is just fundamentally broken when african-americans are more likely to be arrested by police and sentenced to longer prison terms for doing the same thing that whites do. >> the daughter of eric garner, the unarmed african-american man who dialed after new york city police officer put him in a chokehold recorded this add for sanders. >> there's no other person speaking about this. people are dying. this is real. this is not t.v. we need a president that's going to talk about it. >> in the political ad world, the most talk this year has been about two other ads both produced by the sanders campaign. the first an upbeat spot featured the music of simon and gar funk kella wrapped up 2 million hits on you tube.
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>> that ad has been talked about. >> that's the best ad i've seen. simon and garfunkel came back, man. >> the second ad going viral features faces of his supporters. >> when we stand together and demand that this country work for all of us rather than the few, we will transform america and that is what this campaign is about, it's bringing people together. >> in south carolina, there are messages that are now impossible to miss. david shuster, al jazeera. i was thinking about those kids in that anti trump ad. >> that kid was pretty good. you like the adds that inspire, as opposed to the ones that tear apart. nice ads on the sanders
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campaign. hawaii moves to protect itself from mosquitoes that carry dengue fever and could transmit zika. the president's hard line on china, his meeting with asean leaders show who is able to deal with.
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>> only on al jazeera america. >> welcome back to your world this morning. coming up on 8:30 eastern and taking a look at today's top stories, it is difficult driving this morning in much of the northeast where a storm dumped snow and ice. that same storm system is responsible for tornadoes along the gulf coast, including one in the florida panhandle. nearly a dozen homes were destroyed. oil prices up this morning, now that russia and saudi arabia reaching a deal over oil production, they will pump oil at january levels. that they say is at long as other major producers follow suit. it will be a busy day in south carolina for the republicans running to be president. there are several prayer breakfasts and rallies planned for today. they are appealing to conservative voters there. donald trump is still lead in most polls. a state of emergency in hawaii over mosquitoes that spread disease. >> the state is dealing with an
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outbreak of dengue fever and worries over the zika virus. >> hawaii's governor calls is a state of emergency to deal with the mosquitoes caring deng five and possibly the zika virus. >> hawaii is a perfect place for dengue fever because it has the vector mosquito present and dwellings withstanding water. >> more than 250 cases of dengue fever have been detected in hawaii the last several months most are residents, 27 are visitors and 26 children under 18. >> dengue fever is a much more
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zika. it kills thousands of people every year. it is a disease that is spread by the same mosquito. it causes fever, muscle aches and pains, rash and has severe forms, going into shock and hemorrhaging. >> the mosquito that carries dengue fever can carry the zika virus. the cases in the continental u.s. have been contracted by travel but have been contracted locally in puerto rico and the virgin islands. >> it would not be surprising if just like chickengunya and just like dengue fever, we do see isolated clusters of locally transmitted zika. >> in hawaii, the officials say the state is still safe to visit and number of the dengue fever cases on the decline. they are trying to break the cycle of transmission. dr. skinner is the director of global disaster response with harvard medical school, joining us with his expertise. thank you for your time. hawaii now in a state of
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emergency over a dengue fever outbreak as well as concerns about zika. how is it more vulnerable hawaii than other states when it comes to zika or other mosquito born diseases. >> this mosquito transmits dengue fever, zika virus and chickengunya. they're very hard to differentiate when someone is sick. they have fever, joint pain, muscle pain and the rash. the decision is the right one. they need more staff to detect and tree age patients that show these symptoms. >> what can be learned in the
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hawaii dengue fever case when it comes to preparation for doing fever or zika virus. there are deficiencies in vector control, they basically cut a bunch of epidemiologists after the 2009 recession, don't have enough to track mosquitoes. do other states need to he'd the warning? >> yes. we've got to look at our capabilities on the ground in the u.s. and in the care bean, central america, south americas. over the years we've seen that these skill sets, entomologists, disease detectives and people who are involved in controlling these mosquito populations, and we really have to reduce the number of mosquitoes in the environment to break the transmission of dengue fever. by declaring a emergency, you
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get more funds and staff. we look at hawaii, they are trying to do good public health by preventing further outbreaks of both dengue fever and zika virus. that's a smart thing to do. >> when you talk about trying to control the population of this particular kind of mosquito. the mosquito that carries zika virus is called the cockroach of mosquitoes, hiding in dark places. the best way to control this bug is with house to house inspections, how do you prepare the public for that and is that something we need to be talks tg about with this particular mosquito? >> it is, actually. what we're seeing from both the centers for disease control and world health organization, they've given out these travel advisories to a whole country. we're not concerned with the whole country, we're concerned where the mosquito is locally, where is it located and also where there's local transmission
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of the zika virus. we've got to identify these hot spots by good mapping and we've got to use lots and lots of maps to identify this. when we can identify the mosquito populations and where the local transmissions are, it can be targeted. it takes a lot of money and effort to control both the eggs, the larvae and adult populations and we've got to be strategic and develop plans president the best thing to do that is start to map where the local outbreaks are occurringing and where the populations of mosquitoes are. >> we do not know of any cases in the united states except for in puerto rico, i understand president contiguous 50 united states, actually also in hawaii, of any cases of local transmission. how close are we to seeing the first case of local transmission? >> as the temperature in the u.s. starts to warm up, as we get into spring and summer, those populations of mosquitoes
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will explode, and because we know the eggs are resistant, they can over winter, if you have a cup of coffee in the morning and take a coffee mug, you can put 3 million eggs in that coffee mug. we know there are a lot of eggs waiting to hatch as the temperature increases. they can breed in just a bottle cap of water. it's hard to control and break the transmission. we have to decrease the population. as the temperatures increase, we are going to see these mosquitoes increase in numbers. when people come back from south america, central america, or the car bean, they may not have symptoms, but it only takes one mosquito to bite someone who has active virus in their blood to transmit it to other people and that's where transmission can gear up. >> thank you for joining us this morning. >> you're welcome, stephanie. russia confirmed its first case of a person infected with zika.
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a 36-year-old woman contract the the virus while visiting the dominican republic. she began with symptoms after returning early they are month. president obama is in california this morning for the second and final day of the asean summit, an opportunity to strengthen economic ties and insert influence in a region now dominate by china. rob hen folds has more from the summit. >> president barack obama welcomed the 10 asean government leaders to the deluxe sunny lands golf resort in the california desert. the white house pour prays the asean summit as an informal and relaxed get together, yet it's heavy with symbolism, highlighting the obama administration's so-called pivot to asia. economic growth that is explosive, creating opportunities for all, the peaceful resolution of excuse, human dignity, including respect for human rights and development
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that is sustainable, that is our vision. >> obama wants to shore up economic and security ties and reinsert influence in southeast asia, but as obama met with the leaders, about 1,000 people gathered nearby under a blazing desert sun to protest. >> you're bringing a bunch of dictators to california, killing and suppressing their own people. the oppressor has to stop. >> cambodian americans denounce the leader who has held power for 30 years. >> he is a dictator. he never won election since 1993. he won through intimidation, through vote buying, through stealing the vote. >> laos government is corrupt and the vietnamese have been coming, killing innocent people.
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it's all wrong, so we're here just to try and stop that. >> human rights activists say most of the asean leaders are anti democratic and repressive. >> the problem with the summit is it gives these leaders legitimacy. at the end of the day, the u.s. commitment to human rights is a lot of talk. in practice, the united states government has shown itself to throw itself in with the leaders as opposed to the people of asia. >> national security advisor susan rice strongly disputed that. >> just because in asia as elsewhere, we are obliged to deal with governments including some cases with those who we have significant disagreements on things like human rights does not mean we are legitimizing them. >> the focus here is on chick ties, trade between the united states and the asean nations is worth a quarter trillion
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dollars. white house deputy national security advisor said the summit is not an endorsement of leaders to questionable human rights records. >> the united states has to engage asean, that means engaging at the head of state level with all 10 asean countries. we've done that from the beginning of this administration. the fact of the matter is asean has a large variance in political systems and human rights records. we raise those with each country individually and collectively. over the years, we've put a lot of effort into the transition in myanmar. the united states raises these issues even though we have issues we cooperate. we don't expect asean in this meeting or any other to try to adjudicate claims or pick winners. we believe it's important to speak out on a set of principles. it's important for the united states and asean a stand for freedom of navigation in the
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south china sea, it's a free flow of commerce. to stand for the peaceful resolution of disputes consistent with international law so you don't have one bigger nation able to impose its will on smaller nations, but rather the process in international law to resolve disputes. those are the type of principles we'd like to see the countries of asean and other nations speak out for going forward. it's going to take time to resolve these issues. the united states is going to continue with our military to protect the right of freedom of navigation. we've made that very clear in recent months. number two, we're going to work to support countries like the philippines trying to resolve these questions through arbitration under international law. we think that's the right venue to resolve disputes. we're going to increase our own maritime cooperation with different countries in the region. that includes the announcement the president made in manila that he will be providing
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different security systems. >> none have what they are talking about is meant to be hostile cowards china, saying they want beijing to continue its peaceful rise as long as international principles are upheld. wet weather has brought california some relief this winter season, showing a slight drop in drought areas across the state, but there's obviously a long way to go. let's bring in nicole mitchell, is the weather now bringing any good news total west coast? >> it will get a little farther south this time. clearly the east coast is the more active right now. a lot of what that come in has come in to the northwest. when you have get farther to the south like california, not too much more than a typical winter. we should be wetter in the winter, these are the wet months but a lot instead has gone to the northwest. this next system bringing more rain to california is definitely beneficial. this is more into the day
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tomorrow we get bands to the south. i'm not talking a heavy dousing rain in a lot of cases. a lot of the coastline, maybe a half inch, quarter inch, isolated spots as much as an inch. it's northern california and northward we're talking three, four inches or more, but definitely every little bit at this point helps. higher elevations, portions of the sierra, we could be talking snow. really it's going to be the rain. the northwest especially washington state where we've already been getting bands recently, that we already of flood concerns. this is the portion of the country that has stayed more consistently mild while the temperatures on the eastern side of the country really haven't been able to make you be their minds recently. >> we were checking, groundhog had nothing to say about rains or droughts on the west coast. >> he needs to retire, that
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punxsutawney phil. >> getting youth homeless off the streets. >> why it may be harder than getting adults off the street. at this mexico prison, wait until you find out what they had.
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a planned parenthood clinic in colorado sprint is back open three months after a deadly siege. the clinic opened its doors monday for the first time since november, when a gunman stormed the facility killing three and injuring nine.
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parts of the building remain closed, but the clinic offers all services, including oh bothersion. >> planned parenthood is on the side of resiliency, on the side of believing that women and their families should have active to reproductive health care. >> the man who admitted to the attack plans to plead guilty. his lawyers expressed questions over his mental competency. utah a model for fighting homelessness. the state's housing first program reducing chronic homelessness by 90%. now the city is fighting on another front. we have more from salt lake city. >> we are in palmer court, a converted former holiday inn. >> lloyd pendleton used federal funds to convert former hotel
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rooms into apartments for the homeless. >> it's small, but it works, so you can see the small kitchen that's using the plumbing on the back of the bathroom. >> the strategy was so effective, it helped reduced the number of chronically homeless in salt lake city from 2000 to 200 in a decade, but pendleton, now retired, said the state has an even bigger job ahead, getting young adults off the streets. >> their issues are genuinely different. they've been abused at home so find it safer on the street than at home, so they've run away, left home, they're being kicked out. >> homelessness is a growing problem in utah for the young. young homeless adults hang out on downtown streets and on cold days inside the public library. an annual homeless count found their numbers increased nearly 15% last year. the state admits that estimate could be low. tracking homeless youth is harder than tracking homeless adults. oftentimes, they'll be couch surfing in somebody's living
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room or living 10 to an apartment. >> adolescents avoid shelters because they don't trust adults. utah is trying to find creative ways to get them off the streets. >> on the fourth floor, we have our community room with instruments, games. >> this is one of two transitional homes for teens and young adults in salt lake city managed by volunteers of america. young adults can live here for up to two years but have to work or go to school. while it sounds like a much better alternative than living on the street, v.o.a. president kathy gray said it can be a tough sell to some. >> to have them come in and have their own bedroom, and start to talk about employment in jobs, there's a pretty big gap in there, so we have to work with the youth for months to help them reorient their own thinking. >> but it can be done. joseph noble's father was homeless and so was he, until the 24-year-old moved into an apartment for the chronically homeless last year.
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he lives with his girlfriend, two sons and dog. noble says the transition has been tough, but worth it. >> there's always that fear of, you know, what's going to happen, what, you know, if i put myself out there, am i going to, you know, am i going to fall again, am i going to lose everything is really the biggest fear, but at the same time, it's something to strive for. i just don't want my kids to have to worry about the things that i did as a child and a young adult. >> homeless advocates say the state and others have an obligation to get people off the streets. >> we see those homeless individuals as our brothers and sisters. they're one of us. they're homeless citizens. they're not those people, they're us. >> he said utah may never end homelessness completely, but he thinks it can at least try. al jazeera, salt lake city.
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saunas, bars be a mini fridges, air conditioners all found inside a state prison. mexican officials are investigating how the luxury cells were built inside a prison. there were nearly 300 food and grocery stands within the walls all discovered after a deadly riot there. >> authorities have been clearing out literally tons of luxury comes from a prison in northern mexico that was the scene of a deadly prison riot. 49 were killed in the city of monterey during a bloody battle between rival factions. clearly there were a lot of lurksry items at stake, removing televisions, aquariums, beds larger than the standard issue. they found many, many statues of the death saint. the saint many in the drug trade worship and many of the downtrodden people worship, as
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well. all of these luxury items, literally tons show just how endemic corruption was at the prison. the directors of prison has been arrested on murder charges as a result of that riot. it's a sign of just how corrupt prisons are across mexico. chapo guzman was able to pay people to dig a tunnel out of his prison nearly 200 kilometers wrong. pope francis in mexico is going to visit a prison in the city of juarez as he programs up his trip to mexico on wednesday. the prison had more than 3000 inmates inside at the time of the riot. that is 35% overcapacity. honoring the best in music. >> big names pick up grammy awards, but was a a racially charged performance that grabbed headlines.
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♪ adele says that wasn't her greatest performance at the grammys last night. didn't sound that bad to me. she blamed the issues on a microphone that fell into the piano. >> those sour notes weren't the only surprise at the show.
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>> taylor swift made grammy history winning album of the year for 1989. that makes her the first woman to win the grammys top prize twice. >> rapper kendrick lamar won the most awards of the night and delivered a racially charged performance that literally set the stage on fire. it ended with a debut of a new verse about modern slavery in memory of trayvon martin. hiphop hamilton won best theatrical album and shows cast via satellite. uptown funk won for record of the year. megan trainer got emotional
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after named best artist. there were also moments of sadness for three musical greats. ♪ lady gaga made up her face in homage to david bowie and paid tribute with a tribute to his hits. singer and songwriter glenn frey was remembered. stevie wonder and pentatonix took the stage in honor oe earth wind and fire. >> there were times when music transcends one generation to the next. >> reminded me of beyonce's superbowl performance, it was black power 2.0. >> i like that, 2.0. an artist has been painting
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tanks. she worked for months to get permission from afghan army officials to paint the tanks. she said her work is neither political nor anti-war. >> i wanted to make some questions in peopled mind about what is going on around them. i wanted very bright colors. >> she'd like to stay in afghanistan to paint more tanks and murals. >> a short trailer was released for the next star wars. that is luke skywalker. laura dern and benicio del toro will join the cast. that's it for us here in new york. your world this morning is back tomorrow beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern. have a great day.
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as the situation worsens in syria, try try to get aid to besieged areas. hello, this is the world news from al jazeera. after violent clashes, uganda's opposition warns the upcoming elections will not be free. i'm at a center for unaccompanied refugee children where a series of attacks countrywide have left

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