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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  February 17, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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>> tension in the south china sea today. china accused of sending missiles to a contested island. >> the presidential candidates unleash their harshest attacks in the battle for votes, since carolina and a report that federal bureau of investigation wants apple to help them hack the san bernardino murderers cell phone. apple says no many visit the mexican-american border - the pope visits, but not before schooling the crowds new provocation in the south china sea this morning.
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the pentagon and taiwan say beijing put surface to air missiles on a dispute island and it happened as president obama was meeting with south asian world. welcome to your world. i'm stephanie sy. >> i'm del walters, china's foreign minister says the western media is hyping the issue but does not deny the presence of the missiles. it's been detected on woody island. they are claiming the island and china is building on it. >> reporter: china's response bears scrutiny. the foreign minister in a statement said western media was hiving or manufacturing stories, but did not deny that the ad took place, as they say, two surface to missile batteries has been deployed on the island. >> translation: i hope that media everywhere, including those in western countries will
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bring your attention to the lighthouses that we have built on some of the islands in in the south china sea. which have been very useful in ensuring the safety of the pagers in those water -- passengers in those water. >> reporter: china said it had intention of mill tar icing the islands in, claimed in this incident in vietnam and taiwan, in the interests of the spratly island, where there are claims by the philippines, it says that it holds the right to defense, and the personnel and its people who live on the islands in. as far as the united states and its allies are concerned, china has a militarizing ambition, and its counter reclaim of territory, making the islands in bigger in terms of physical size. the u.s. president wrapped up, so that the u.s. could oppose
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that, and would continue to carry out missions which it would make clear that it wanted to protect the right of freedom of navigation for all countries in the area. it had finished a second mission where it sailed a worship to the parasol islands in. and china protested against that. seems this will be seen as an escall eyeings, and we'll see more such in the future. >> harry fawcett reporting from sole. the south china sea made many millions in regional trade. it sent a message to north korea over a recent rocket launches. it deployed stealth fighters to fly over japan, landing south of seoul. escorted by u.s. fighters jets. the pentagon said the 22s are one of many capabilities
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available for the defense of this great nation. the battle of carolina, three days to go before the primary. the candidates took part in a town hall meeting. donald trump is at 38%, a lead over his rivals. cruz with 22%. lisa stark has more on the campaign from casey. south carolina. >> republicans continued to duke it out in the first in the south contest. one day after his brother, president george w. bush campaigned on his behalf, jed appeared outside a gun manufacturer in col u bia to mick his case for the presidency. >> they joked about having an older brother stumped for him. >> he is a person of integrity. it's great that he game, and i think it made a difference. >> the man who was in the polls, donald trump came out swinging,
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going after the record and doubling down on his criticism of the former president. >> he kept the country safe. >> what does that mean after. what about during 9/11. i was there. i lost a lot of friends. the worst attack ever in this country - it was during his presidency. >> trump continued to take aim at his rivals, namely ted cruz. i've never seen anybody that lied as much as ted cruz. he goes around saying he's a christian. i don't know, you'll have to study that. >> trump had threatened to sue cruz, accusing him of lying about trump's position on gun rights and the affordable care act. >> operating from two checklists, the bible and the united states constitution at a rally, cruz did not
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mention donald trump or his threat. he made a patriotic appeal to voters with a military presence. promising a drachlt increase in forces and equipment if he's in the white house. >> people will be forgiven this election season for thinking at times it seems like a bit of a stretch. i can't imagine why anyone would think that. but time for frivolity is over. the time for games is over. we need a leader who is prepared to be demander in chief. cruz supporters mobbed the candidate after the rally, liked what they heard. >> he's a conservative and has the courage to do what we needed him to do. making america strong like it used to be cruz is locked in a fight
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with second place with rubio, both courting large south carolina evangelical vote. >> i'll impose the first amendment light, for your faith. at home, work and besides and the democratic primary in south carolina, a week from this saturday. the surveys showing leaning towards hillary clinton. cnn giving her 50% support. cruz is at the 38%. >> south carolina - depending on the african american vote. sanders talking about the changes he would make if he became president. >> what we'll talk about is reform. we'll end a situation where african-americans are killed.
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[ cheering and applause ]. >> sanders visited south carolina, clinton was in new york meeting with civil rights world, including al sharpton, and clinton spoke about increasing opportunities. >> i'm tear down those things holding african-americans across racial linls. our country can only live up to its potential when every single american has a chance to live up to theirs. >> african-americans make up 30%. funeral arrangements are set for supreme court just antonin scalya. his care and bench were draped in black public. scalya be be in repose at court on friday. president obama will not nominate a replacement until next week. tuesday he called for the senate to give his nominee a hearing. >> we'll find someone who is an
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understanding legal mind. someone that cares about democracy and rule of law. there'll not be any particular position on a particular issue that determines whether or not i nominate them. but i will present someone who will indeputably be qualified for the seat, and any fair-minded person, even somebody who disagreed with my politics would say, would serve with honour and integrity on the court the senate continues to say the availablingansy should be filled by the next president. the head of the judiciary committee said tuesday that he might consider hearings. stay with us, in the next half hour we'll talk to a former spokesman about the debate over appointing a new justice and with republicans are opposing it this morning there's a
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battle over security and government overreach. >> a judge ordered apple to help the fbi hack into a phone used by a san bernardino shooter. al jazeera's correspondent reports. >> in a letter to customers, apple's c.e.o. called the court's order chilling. saying judges are asking the tech giant to hack its own users. the court is ordering apple to hack the group. the federal bureau of investigation hasn't been able to get into that phone for two months. the password wipes the data on the phone after 10 incorrect tries, disabling it if the federal bureau of investigation tries tens of millions, without risking data inside. federal bureau of investigation director james comey stated encryption is making it difficult for the agency to do its work.
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>> our job is to look at a haystack the size of this country with needles, that are invisible to us. >> inside the phone way be information about syed farook and his wife's tenuous connection to i.s.i.l. it's a critical junk of time that the federal bureau of investigation can't account for him. it's unclear if apple turn off the passwords or develop something to obey the order. it makes it harder for apple and investigators to gain entry. >> the battle is a traditional one between society and the cost of privacy. >> apple had five days to respond to the order. >> alan's sister had no way to comprise it. hundreds of millions of users. and others would agree with
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apple what extend is apple willing to work with the federal bureau of investigation? >> tim cook says the country did everything within its power and lawsuit to help the data through subpoenas, and agency with engineers to advise them. he thinks that's where their responsibility lies. >> especially where they can do something and the government can't. >> we'll follow this case. also this morning the united states plan for a massive cyber attack on iran, if they curb tehran's nuclear ability. they want them to limit the air defense system. intelligence saying they deport a separate plan to disable an iran nuclear enrichment site aid convoys sent to seven
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besieged areas. the u.n. says humanitarian agencies are preparing to go into parts of rural damascus. they are expected to depart in a few days. sufficient as the syrian army begins an offensive in northern syria today marks five years since libyans rose up and ousted muammar gaddafi. the revolution was sparked in february 2011 by a large protest in benghazi. it spread across the country and was met by a violent reaction. te took control of tripoli. >> it was an emotional night in paris. eagles of death metal heading a show. survivors and relatives attending the concert at the olympia theatre called on oo
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chance. 89 people were killed and there was 89 seconds of silence in memory of the victims. the french government will extend a state of emergencies, expanding police powers to carry out searches and arrest. >> parts of california are cleaning up after 110 miles per hour. they knocked down powerlines. the storm caused an accident where a truck watt on its side. also. they could be given relief from drought. thanks to rain and snow. and good morning to go. as the east coast significantly
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looks. here is some of the video coming down. yes, that's damage from the storms yesterday, this system cleared through. we'll continue to see some problems on the east coast. there were over a dozen different reports of tornados and wind damage. most were going up and down the coastline. looks like maybe we can put that up. definitely in california, we are looking at more of the rain that continues to come in. you can see that through the coastline. that will be northern parts of california, it will make it through the state in general and it received the north-west again, gets the rain, and
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beneficial. some of the snow over the next couple of days could be one two two feet. definitely picked for the know pipe as well with everything else out there. >> pope francis wrapping up a 5-day trip. crowds in the country made him a lit angry. >> he was telling the people stop being selfish. the pope holding pass. hun drefth of thousands expected to attend. heidi zhou-castro has more. >> for seven years they have been divided. half the family members informant photo live across the border in mexico.
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maria and grassian live here, near the u.s. border. they have not seen their three adult children and three grandchildren since the couple decided to outstay their visa in 2008. becoming unauthorized immigrants. >> my life was full. i had everything. we had to leave. the two say they left mexico after receiving death threats from a gang. in the u.s. they live in a trailer, surviving a job washing dishes. we can hardly afford rent, electricity, food. seeing the doctor. the consolation - daily phone calls with their daughter. without paper, they can't make the 50 mile journey across the
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border to see her in person. we can. children grew up here on the outskirts. now they are helping to raise her nephew who met her grandparents. it is difficult not to have contact. to not hug them. today they remain a dangerous place. we are blocks away from the family's home. between the trucks another body in the streets. in the neighbourhoods dominated by cartel violence. it is still too risky for her personalities to return. it was until recently the most dangerous city in the world. >> there's so much violence, murders, gangs, owning a beside is too dangerous.
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without a way for either side to across the boarder. the family's one chance to meet face to face is here. at this spot the border fence is all that separates mexico from the united states, and the two sides of the family. the family is catholic. they hope that the pope's visit to the border brings attention to the suffering of families, divided by immigration status. in 2013. 70,000 immigrant parents were separated by deportation, a situation that this couple can relate to. >> i'm happy. i have it deep inside me i want to be with children.
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i want to change the hearts of america's world. >> for now, she tells her mother not to cry. this is the closest they come to an embrace. s. >> sometimes fences don't make good neighbour. >> when we come back - president of the company responsibility for poisoning hundreds of thousands learns his fate and a trial - a grim reaper case.
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>> three years and prison and
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37b00,000 in fine. for poisoning the water supply of hundreds of thousands of west virginians. . in january 2014. 10,000 gallons of chemicals used to clean cold in the river in west virginia. >> this is the place worth fighting for. citizens took to the streets as 300,000 were ordered not to dripping the supply. jennifer was nine months pregnant at the time. >> we haven't drunk the water in the house, it didn't taste or smell right. >> she and her family did not drink the water. the centers for disease control issued a caution for pregnant women, she was worried. she got the thumbs up that the water was safe, 48 hours went
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by. the public is consuming the water. that is concerning. >> al jazeera hired an independent environmenting consulting company to take samples from jennifer's home. it came up negative to a chemical that spilt into the river. other resident like rochelle and her daughters boiled tap water, and used boiled water and wondered if the chemical smell in the air would go away. >> so emotional and mentally stressing. you don't know what to do. we've had mixed messages. >> over is are $1,000 was spent on medical bills. >> i have gotten sick. i've been on antibiotics. west virginia's governor was tested in homes for the chemical
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mchn. for many, it was not enough. >> i think people are upset bit legislators who saw the devastation. we are the people whose lives were interrupted. the wholt economy. and it was at a stand still. with respect worried. >> reporter: robert ray, al jazeera america have you had the chance to talk to the residents. >> we are not going to comment to the media at this point. >> reporter: i have to ask. in august 2013, gary sullivan and five other executives pled guilty three other pollution charges. >> i believe the only true determinant in these cases is to send a message that if you engage in this conduct, you are close to gaol time.
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executives are used to writing checks for things, they are not used to checking. >> are you a criminal? >> so far five of the six former officials that pled guilty to the clean water act have been sentenced. they were put on probation, ordered to pay fines, and one received minimal gaol time, 30 days. >> today the result would lead to identical effects on the community. that's according to a new report in the west virginian border. last week a federal judge slapped the industry with a $900,000 criminal fine for the spill. the judge said the brust countries are ever likely to pay a penalty. the mood was symbolic. >> the trial is under way in one of the notorious bases.
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the prosecutor's the sleeper killed nine women and a teenage girl. the automekan yick and father of two was arrested in 2010. the women were shot or strangled, and discovered in dumpsters and alley ways. >> evidence in this case will tell a story. a story of a serial killer that stalked the streets of los angeles. it was the perfect place or time for the serial killer to roam the streets of los angeles. >> the defense says before the trial is done they'll present a different story from the prosecution case. he faces the death penalty when we come back, more on what is called the battle for the rich. >> i am going to present someone that is qualified for the seat. >> president obama's message to the republican controlled
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senate. >> destination cuba. destroying daily flights from the u.s. to china.
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>> what in god's name makes you think that you can handle stress, anxiety, depression... post-traumatic stress? >> the closest i got was sitting in my truck, gun in hand. >> who will save america's heroes? >> i wish he'd been able to talk to somebody. >> "faultlines". >> what do we want? >> al jazeera america's hard-hitting... >> today the will be arrested. >> ground-breaking... >> they're firing canisters of gas at us. >> emmy award-winning, investigative series. welcome back to your world this morning opinion it is
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7:30 eastern. u.s. and taiwanese officials sigh china positioned missiles on a disputed island in the south china sea. the apparent provocation comes as president obama was wrapping up a summit of asian leaders. >> the f.b.i. believes a phone has vital information crucial about isil, but apple said the government order is overreach and could set a dangerous precedent. funeral services are set for antonin scalia. the court draped his chair in black fabric, following tradition. president obama said he will move forward with a nomination to fill the seat despite republican opposition. the bat toll fill that supreme court seat is intensifying and could get ugly. james richardson is a former
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spokesman and advisor for the national committee, joining us this morning. thank you for being with us. as you know, 14 republican senators would have to vote for an obama appointee for he or she to be confirmed. what is the likelihood? >> no likelihood at all. there's no political will in the republican caucus to move on a nominee and that's certainly been indicated by both the majority leader and by the chairman of the senate judiciary committee. >> despite the hard line position you refer to by senator mcconnell as well as candidate ted cruz, the head of the committee has not ruled out holding hearings. why do you think grassley is even considering it? >> i think it's actually smart that they should hold a hearing. i think that it is incumbent on the republicans in the senate to not only oppose the president's nominee, because in my view, i think nothing in this penalty's history indicates that he will
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be magnanimous and submit a really moderate candidate but instead will, you know, put up a lightweight. >> do you think a moderate candidate, someone like sri srinivasan, do you think a moderate like limb would get through the nomination process? >> i don't know if it's instructive to consider that right now because they always float out moderate names early from the process like s.r.i. he really sailed through, but i don't think obama is going to put sri up for the seat. i think when the rubber hits the road, he will put up someone who appeases his base. >> some say president obama might nominate attorney general loretta lynch, who would be the
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first african-american woman on the court. it could galvanize democratic voter turnout. what would you advise republicans to do in that scenario? republicans have an opportunity to oppose the nominee but explain why they oppose it. this would be the first time in two generations that the composition of the court would lean left. it would be a democratic majority court. if you look at the nature of cases that are pending just this term, the stakes are so high. we are talking about voter rights, abortion, access to health care. >> affirmative action, yeah, the stakes are indeed high. i want to ask you, james, your opinion of justice scalia. you are a republican, but you are also gay. as the justice who wrote the robust deny decrying the courts
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ruling legalizing gay marriage, what are your thoughts on his legacy? >> scalia has a really tremendous legacy for america jurisprudence as a very strict originalist. obviously i took issue with the justice's view of marriage on a personal and political level, but even people who oppose scalia vigorously still appreciated his view of the law. they appreciate his writing. it was really beautiful, really forceful, and that's, you know, i disagreed personally, but certainly at the end of the day, i respected him, i respected the legacy that he left, the jim print he left on the court and american culture. >> if the republicans get to decide who replaces him, would you favor someone more moderate on issues such as gay marriage? >> well, the issue's already been decided, so i don't know why we really need to evaluate a
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potential nominee view on marriage. the issue is settled now, so there's no really need to relitigate the issue now. you know, same-sex marriage is the law of the land. i can marry whom ever i like, you can marry whom ever you lik- >> it is still being litigated on the state level and is not universally across the board being applied. >> you know, instances of county clerks fighting this are few and far between. there's almost universal acceptance from county clerk to state level. the issue's settled, even republican presidential candidates say that short of ted cruz, everyone agrees this is settled, the country needs to move on. there are more pressing matters here, transcendent matters like the rice of isis and we're still talking about same sex reason
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and there's no reason. >> the named plaintiff tweeted out his condolences upon justice scalia's death. thank you for joining us this morning. >> thank you for having me. also this morning, the democratic presidential candidates saying they back president obama's calls to get a hearing. in nevada, to win the state both democratic candidates have to appeal to native americans. >> presidential politics are coming to nevada. this week, the democrats caucus here. it's the first major state on the campaign trail with a native american population and the challenge for candidates is to get the vote out. most travel communities are like
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this reservation outside reno. >> our culture is the lake. we do everything we can to protect our water. it would be great if candidates could come to these places, our reservations and our communities and see what we are trying to protect and what we want them to invest in. >> there are 32 tribal communities in nevada where mining is a big industry. the potential voters we spoke with were concerned about impacts to the environment, but there's a desire to find a candidate who shows a real respect for tribal culture and sampty. here in nevada, that rules out republican candidates who have given significant support to native american voters. that leaves bernie sanders and hillary clinton vying for attention. the challenge is how to get the vote out in communities that have traditionally been excluded from the political process or don't care.
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for the first time in decades, american passenger flights will soon head to cuba. al jazeera's john henry smith has more. >> u.s. and cuban officials were all smiles after signing an agreement that will make it probable for people in both countries to fly freely between them. >> today is an historic day in the relationship between cuba and the united states. >> the agreement will allow for 20 round trip flights daily between the u.s. and havana. it will also allow for 10 other daily round trips in and out of nine other cuban airports. those numbers are not for each airline. they are for all airlines combined. with this arrangement in effect, the airlines of both countries may in addition set up business agreements together, such as lease contracts between aircraft or with airlines from third
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countries. >> airlines have 15 days to apply for those limited routes and air carriers aren't the only ones who hope to cash in. >> i hear often from u.s. businesses and know they are unquestionably excited about the new opportunities for change that today's agreement will facilitate. >> it represents a critically important milestone in the united states' continued efforts to engage with cuba and normalize our relations. >> this move comes two days after the obama administration allow saul about herren that will's tractor company be the first to build an assembly plant in cuba in 50 years. he believes cuba has learned from the past. >> they realize that they have to become part of the global economy to be able to keep going with the achievements of the
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revolution. >> so far, the airlines that made clear intentions to secure routes to cuba include american, delta, jet blue and cuba america. they are lining up. >> can cuba handle all these flights? >> good question. the airport already has a 50% increase in tourism and only one of its five terminals is what most would consider modern and both cuba and the u.s. will work on improving that in the coming months. >> plus with homeland security, you need to get those all up to date. residents in flint, michigan paying the highest water rate anywhere in the country, all of this despite that lead contamination in the water. a public interest group finding they paid $864 a year, twice the
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national average and three times more than the residents of detroit pay. a lawyer in flint who sued to lower those rates said they are high because officials tapped water money to pay for other city bryceion. >> the f.d.a. is out with new guidelines to keep zika out of the blood supply, saying people should not donate blood if you have seek da or if you've traveled where the virus is active. the f.d.a. considers the risk likely. there are reports of transfusion associated infections in other countries. there are more calls today for new ways to deal with the nation's heroin he deppic including a radical new program that gives addicts a place to shoot up supervised. ali velshi reports. >> with are you taking me to? >> we're going over here right quick and then we're going to go
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down to the bottom. >> ok. >> walk with michael daily, known as highway mike. he can show you a new york that most people never see. >> these are normal spots where we come to, and where we'll come to, where we use at. >> is it a hardesty to find places to use? >> not really, but you know what, a lot of times we want a secluded, we don't really want to be around society. >> all around the city, from parks like this to abandoned buildings and underpasses, people are shooting up heroin. >> what's the danger of being out here alone? >> definitely o.d.ing, if you're getting a shot and don't know what you have, if you don't do the taste test first and just rushing in and doing. >> we know individuals in new york do not have a stable, sterile place to inject drugs. we have lost so many people to overdose, so many people, young people, wonderful people,
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artists, creatives, smart, wonderful people that didn't need to die. in 2014, new york saw more deaths from heroin overdose than from homicide. those who inject in public places are twice as likely to o.d. driven by a fear of arrest or being discovered. they often russia their injections and increase their odds for overdose. that's why frost is leading a coalition lobbying city officials to allow a radical idea, a place where addicts can inject drugs safely under the supervision of health professionals. >> what we know is the facilities work. we need to fight for them. >> this is the kind of thing a safe facility is meant to address.
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you can find these in hundreds of places around manhattan. i'm in the middle of a populated area, traffic everywhere, but it's little secluded spots like this where people come to use their drugs. with a facility, they'd have somewhere to go that's safe in the event they overdose. >> about 100 exist worldwide. the lone north american location operates out of vancouver. >> since its opening, 2 million injections was taken place there. that's two mill injections that are off the streets of our city, out of parks, railways, out of bathrooms and no one has died. those 2 million injections have taken stuff off the streets and given people a chance to live for another day. >> mark fought a pierce political battle to open insight in 2003. studies have shown that insight reduces overdose rates, lowers the transmission of h.i.v. and hepatitis c. and saves money in the long run.
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>> for every dollar spent here, you are saving $4 in assistance of police and ambulance and all that stuff that goes along with the public use of drugs. >> despite the evidence, an injection facility in new york is anything but an easy sell. >> it's not really helping anybody benefit themselves in the way of like getting clean and starting a new life. >> some charge the facility would just enable drug users, and others like logan lewis, a director at camelot say injection facilities failed to get to the root of drug abuse. >> it's like taking a person who has a fever of 104 and sticking them in a bathtub full of ice. will it get rid of the fever? of course. with him it sox the problem? of course not. >> the facilities can in fact cure drug abuse. >> it deglamorizes it. they discover that people that
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go to the injection sites more likely 30% more likely than someone on the street to attend detox or treatment. >> one new york city council member has already come out in support of a supervised injection facility, but the department of health declined to say if it will consider the idea. still, highway mike says the day drug users finally have a safe place to inject can't come soon enough. >> as a user, we'll go down there and have all our equipment and what we have to use. if we're by our self and something happened, that person wouldn't be found until the next person that happened to use happened to be going that way or maybe the smell or the stench. >> al jazeera, new york. cancer researchers calling it unprecedent and extraordinary. a new therapy where patients' own cells are used to target and
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kill cancer. the treatment tags t cells with a receptor that kills a certain type of blood cancer. in the first trial, the cells disappeared. they argue that it is a last resort because it can overload the other cells. in trials, two died. it sent the rest of the patients into remission. before treatment, they were given less than five months to live. avoiding the morality police. >> the app helping young iranians get around government checkpoints. meet america's top dog, the pooch who ran away with the most prestigious canine competition.
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in iran they are turning to technology to get around reality police. >> in this you tube video, a woman in iran resists arrest by the iranian authorities who patrol the streets in vans to enforce the islamic female dress code. >> a new app is aimed at helping citizens avoid confrontations like that and get away from those patrols. >> this is a way for them to see how people are frustrated by years of the use of moral police
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on the streets to stop people and warn them or fine them or even take them to jail for the way they dress up. >> much like waze lets you warn other drivers about police speed traps in this country, the morality police let people see where there are patrols so people can avoid the area. the creators of this app told a human rights group more than 1,000 users were using it within hours of release, but it was blocked by the government within a day. still, users have found ways to get around the ban and download it. it's also seen as sending a message. >> it shows how people are using social media applications to challenge government restrictions. >> a human rights group says by march of 2014, the guidance patrol handed out almost
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3 million warnings. about 200,000 of them were to women who had broken the dress code. >> the app is out on android but creators hope to develop it for the iphone, as well. saying they've received requests to launch it in arabic for saudi arabia. >> fascinating to watch that story. how much is the morality police used there as a political tool? >> iranians we spoke with say they are very much out on the streets during religious holidays and election times because hardliners want to show they're taking a conservative stance. they do come up to you and say well, your hair's out of place. one woman said she was stopped for holding her boyfriend's hand. >> a bunch of people got in trouble for redoing the happy video, as well, so they're clearly trying to find ways to get around the morality police. thank you. the grammys this week is showcasing the best in music around the world but there is now an organization dedicated to
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preserving little known music from around the world from mexican ma rashy at the smithsonian. >> at grammys, alabama shakes being honored, you can hear echos of blues legend lead belly or the 1920's blues perform ears recorded by paramount records which has been reissued and on monday won a grammy for best box set. music cherished, its mission to present the strains of authentic music to the widest public audience. songs from the black civil rights movement, by lingual
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latino children's tunes and mexican mariachi out of california, records that have a worldwide clientele and keep this independent label afloat. >> it has declined but likely, we've been able to maintain and grow our collections and the revenues we require to support our non-profit mission. >> this was recorded in 1958. >> the smithsonian also keeps a vigilant guard over the musical past of the u.s. and more than 180 other countries. these shelves hold the 2200 albums collected by moses ash who founded folk ways records. it was acquired by the smithsonian along with 10 other labels, growing the label to 45,000 tracks in all. >> now is the most optimum time to preserve it. >> tracks threatened by the ravaging of time, so dave walker's job is to save them.
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like this tape of soviet protest songs recorded nearly half a century ago. >> it's high priority for us to go back in time and preserve based on fragility and content to assure this is preserved not only for immediate us but future generations. >> the smithsonian staff intend to do the same for other nations and to keep it all for prosperity. tom ackermann, al jazeera, washington. there is a new top dog this morning. the winner of the westminster dog show. >> best in show dog tonight, 2016 is the german shepherd. >> the short heard pointer known as c.j., short for california
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journey. his owner said he has a sparkle that makes you want to stop and look at him. >> his grandmother carley won in 2005, strong blood line, that short haired pointer. ahead, america's tainted water, west virginia residents may get the justice they want for the chemical spill that ruined their tap water two years ago we are back in two minutes with more of your world this morning. >> go one on one with america's movers and shakers. >> we will be able to see change. >> gripping... inspiring... entertaining. no topic off limits. >> 'cause i'm like, "dad, there are hookers in this house". >> exclusive conversations you won't find anywhere else. >> these are very vivid, human stories. >> if you have an agenda with people, you sometimes don't see the truth. >> "talk to al jazeera". monday, 6:00 eastern. only on al jazeera america.
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a threat at sea, china accused of setting up mitt silence on a disputed island just hours after the u.s. files to secure those same waterways. we've almost gotten accustomed to how obstructionist the senate has come when it comes to nominations. the president challenges lawmakers to do their duty and consider his supreme court nominee. apple set be a dangerous
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precedent, the government trying to unblock a phone. be flights to cuba, after 50 years. welcome to your word this morning. i'm del walters. i'm stephanie sy. taiwan and the u.s. say there is evidence that china has put surface to air missiles in the disputed area in the south china sea. >> china is not denying. vietnam claims that island, china continues to build on it. we have the latest from seoul. >> woody island has been in beijing's hands since 1974. in 2012, china formally declared a city on this tiny speck of land, home to more than 1,000 people. now according to taiwan which
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claims the island along with vietnam, it's also home to two advanced surface to air missile batteries. china didn't deny that the reports were true. >> as for the limited and necessary self defense facility that china had built on the island stationed by chinese personnel, this is consistent with self preservation and self protection that china is entitled to under international law. >> what for china is self defense, united states sees at militarization. the u.s. navy sailed war ships within a few kilometers of child's currently controlled by china but whose sovereignty is disputed. president obama has promised more of the same. >> i think it's clear that this is part of a projectry towards china preparing these islands for possible deployment of either military fighters or missiles. this has been the great father
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in washington, that this would deny these areas of the ability of u.s. navy ships and other navy ships to deploy freely without the threat of the use of force. >> taiwan's president-elect is due to take office in may with a mandate to cool recently improved relations with beijing. she's called for self restraint. >> i think the south china sea is a region that everyone pays close attention to especially on the issue of the dispute over sovereignty in the south china sea. it is a compare actively sense situation. we call on all sides to stick to the principle that resolving the dispute in a peaceful manner. self restraint is most important. >> the tensions between the world's two largest powers in the region extend to the korean peninsula as well. after the rocket launch, the u.s. is in talks with south korea about deflying a missile system known as fad.
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that is something beijing is opposed to, seeing it as a direct threat to its own military interest. >> some in washington want to pressure china to reign issue from pyongyang. american if 22 stealth fatallers demonstrating what the u.s. calls to its commitment to defending its ally. it's a show of force that will be noted just as much by the leadership in beijing. china's apparent aggressive military move coming as president obama wrapped up the two day summit with saw the asian leaders. al jazeera reports. >> there were a few formalities at president obama's meeting with asean leaders. diplomacy was meant to stimulate can did it conversation which brought about a joint
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declaration from working together on trade to shared principles an maritime security. >> freedom of navigation must be upheld and lawful commerce should not be impeded. the united states will continue to fly, sale and operate wherever international law allows, and we will support the right of all countries to do the same. >> previously, asean had difficulty agreeing an any statements to deal with maritime security. four are in disputes over portions of the south china sea, a fact highlighted on wednesday by reports that the regional super power had stationed surface to air missiles on disputed woody island in the group. china wields a huge influence both economically and militarily over the group. a few did not want to go against their powerful neighbor. asean regional block is 50 years old, but the loose grouping of 10 very different culturally and
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socially countries is seen as toothless. this sense a clear message to the member states that they must work together for effectively to face shared challenges. >> there are more than 600 million people living in asean and despite in differences, they've just been integrated into a single economic community. the potential of the region's sway as a block is central to the united states' so-called rebalance to asia pacific. >> asean integration and role in asia pacific is all very much in the united states interest. >> bringing asean leaders to sunny lands is seen as the united states reasserting a leadership role over a region where china's dominance is increasing. president obama hopes getting them to agree on the so-called sunny land declaration is a step in the right direction.
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>> president obama addressed the vacant u.s. supreme court seat. he does not plan to name a replacement for justice antonin scalia until next week but called for the senate to give his nominee a hearing. >> we are going to find an outstanding legal mind, somebody who cares deeply about our democracy and rule of law. there's not going to be any particular position on a particular issue that determines whether or not i nominate them, but i am going to present somebody who indisputably is qualified for the seat, and any fair minded person, even somebody who disagreed with my politics would say would serve with honor and integrity on the court. >> most senate republicans continues to the vacancy should be filled by the next president
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but the head of the judiciary committee, senator charles grassley did say that he might consider holding hearings. i spoke with a former spokesman and advisor for the republican national committee. he said it's unlikely that republican senators would vomit for a president obama appointee. >> there's no will to move on a nominee. that's certainly been indicated by both the majority leader and by the chairman of the snoot judiciary committee. >> despite the hard line position that you referred to by senator mcconnell as well as senator ted cruz, the head which the judiciary committee has not ruled out holding hearings. why do you think grassley is even considering it? >> i think it's actually smart that they should hold a hearing. i think that it is incumbent on the republicans in the senate to not only oppose the president's nominee because in my view, i think nothing in this president's history indicates that he will be magnanimous and
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submit a really moderate candidate, but instead will put up a lightweight. >> so far, the white house has not offered any names of potential nominees to succeed justice antonin scalia. the president would not characterize the ideology of the person he might pick, saying they would be well qualified. funeral arrangements of set for justice scalia. following tradition, the court draped his chair in black fabric. the funeral will be headlight saturday. that playing out in the presidential race, as well. the next contests are saturday when republicans vote in south carolina and the democrats caucus in nevada. the latest poll showing a virtual tie in nevada, hillary clinton holding the edge among women, better than sand with those under 55. in south carolina, a new poll shows donald trump has a massive lead over his rivals. at 38% in that survey. ted cruz is second at 22%.
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lisa stark has more on the gop campaign from south carolina. >> republicans continue to duke it out in the first of the south contest. just one day after his brother, president george w. bush campaigned on his behalf, jeb appeared outside of a gun manufacturer in columbia to make his case for the presidency. >> as i have a proven record of electability. >> he also spoke about having his older brother stump for him. >> he is a person of integrity and shares south carolina values in that regard. it's great that he came. i think it made a difference. >> the man who leads in the poll, donald trump came out swinging, going after george w.'s record and doubling down on his criticism of the former president. >> i've heard for years he kept the country safe after -- what does that mean after? what about during 9/11? i was there. i lost a lot of friends that were killed in that building. the worst attack ever in this
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country, it was during his presidency. >> trump also continued to take aim at his republican rivals, namely ted cruz. >> but i've never seen anybody that lied as much as ted cruz and he goes around saying he's a christian. i don't know, you're going to have to really study that. >> trump has even threatened to sue cruz, accusing him of lying about trumps positions on gun rights and the affordable care act. >> operates from two check lists, the bible and the united states constitution, and that is senator ted cruz. >> at a rally at a national guard armory, cruz did not mention trump or his threat. instead, he made a patriotic appeal to voters in a state with a heavy military presence, promising a dramatic increase in combat forces, and equipment if he's in the white house. >> people will be forgiven this election season for thinking at
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times it seems like a bit of a circus. i can't imagine why anyone would think that. but the time for privilege valuety is over. the time for games is over. we need a leader prepared to be commander-in-chief. >> supporters liked what they heard. >> he has commitment and has the courage to get done what we need to do to make america strong like it used to be. >> cruz is looked in second place with marco rubio, both courting the south carolina evangelical vote. >> i'm going to protect your first amendment right to live out the teachings of your faith and every at spect of your life at home, at work and in your businesses. al jazeera on the campaign trail in south carolina. >> this morning, a court order
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is sparking an intense debate over privacy and security and government overreach. a federal judge has ordered apple to help the f.b.i. hack into a phone used by one of the san bernardino shooters, but apple is saying no. al jazeera's hermela aregawi reports. >> in a letter to customers this morning, apple c.e.o. tim cook calls the court order chilling. he says a judge is essentially asking the tech giant to hack its own user. the court is asking apple to disable the password on sayed farook's iphone. the f.b.i. hasn't been able to get into that phone for two months. farook used the phone as an employee of the county health department. the data is wiped after 10 incorrect tries, disabling it would allow the f.b.i. to try tens of millions of passwords without losing data inside. encryption is making it
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incredibly difficult. >> our job is to look at a hey stock the size of this country for needles that are increasingly invisible to us because of end to end encryption. >> inside may be information about sayed farook's and his wife's connection to isil. it's unclear if apple can turn off the password lock feature or develop something to obey the court order. apple added new technology last year that makes it harder for hackers and investigators to get in. >> the battle is the traditional one between the security of society at the cost of individual privacy. >> apple has five days to respond to the court order. so far, the c.e.o. says it won't comply. >> apple started offering it's default encryption and insists
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it cannot bypass the safeguard without compromising the information of hundreds of millions of users. tech privacy advocates agree with apple. >> to what extent is apple willing to cooperate? >> tim cook said the company has done everything within its power and law to help. it has handed over some information it has been subpoenaed for and provided the f.b.i. with engineers that can advise them. >> hemp argue, thank you. a judge is going to sentence one of the executives blamed for that disastrous chemical spill in west virginia in 2014 that poisoned the water supply for hundreds of thousands of people who live there. gary southern is facing up to three years in prison. we are live in charleston, west virginia, will gary southern face any lengthy prison time? >> it's tough to say, del, good morning, to you. he is one of six executives that are sentenced in this case.
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one received 30 days last week. it's tough to say how much gather southern will receive. odds are, we will receive a longer sentence, because of the criminal fraud charges that are put against him. he's definitely going to get a big fine, but as far as any kind of, you know, massive prison sentence that goes beyond three years, clearly that's not going to happen because of the plea deal that was reached back in 2014 in august. >> what about the legal ramification of this case, this toxic spill? >> as far as criminal prosecution against the six exception, those are over as of today, as of the sentencing of gary southern. now, there could be civil cases going forward, but not against freedom industries, because they are bankrupt, no longer in existence. of course the water company here could have cases brought against them. there are those who think this
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cleanup was not adequate, that the process was not enough. if they don't see enough moving forward and enough containers looked at, above ground containers where the chemicals leaked from and seeing everyone do their jobs, we could see more ramifications in the weeks and months to come. this is called the chemical valley. >> a lot of people that write on the subject say that before flint there was charleston. what is the current water situation there? >> it's fine. as far as e.p.a. testing goes and any kind of independent environmental testing, the water is clean according to the officials here. as far as flint goes, yeah, clearly charleston, sort of headed the way two years ago, remember, this has been going on all over the country. water is always a scenario where there are things, chemicals leaking into the water systems. it's been a problem, you know, since the beginning of a modern
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water and treatment systems where people can drink them if the united states. it's also an issue, clearly a big time issue in flint right now, but seems like charleston is on its way to more better efficient ways with the sentencing of gary southern, president of former freedom industries today. >> robert, very much. before flint, now the residents of sebring, ohio, stockton, california saying their water maybe bad, as well. >> this is an example of corporate responsibility. parts of south florida cleaning up after winds of 110 miles an hour uprooted trees near miami, knocked down power lines and for roofs off buildings. the storm caused several accidents, including one on i-95 where a truck was thrown on its side and had its top ripped off. there were no injuries. the attention now shifting to the west coast where more rain is on its way. good morning, nicole.
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>> we're definitely shifting our attention today, so the one system well off the coastline. i want to mention that tornadic activity went through the gulf coast back to louisiana. a lot of people cleaning up today. we've had a press decent break into most of the west coast, a little bit of the northwest has some on and off, but nothing widespread. now where finally you can see up and down the coastline starting to get more of that. even this one could impact portions of southern california where we haven't had the rain for a while. as this continues to flood in over the next couple days, southern portion of this, maybe an inch or two, a lot of places will get a quarter off half inch, but definitely the heavier stuff, still northern california northward. this is today into tomorrow and then after that, by the time we get to friday and the weekend, it looks more like the northwest again. then for the higher elevations, that is some decent amounts of snow. could be one or two feet in the
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northern portions of sierra and elevations above 5,000 or 6,000 feet. look for mountain passes to be on the difficult side. widespread, this is beneficial rain and snow is beneficial snow pack. ahead of this, the difference is area of winds. ahead of this is a southerly flow, so while the west coast is wet, southern pores of the planes, portion of new mexico, texas could set record highs because of the warm air ahead of it. >> i like this map better than last week's. help on the way for the most desperate in syria. >> getting food and water to millions as hope is still dimming for the fighting there. pope francis cause as stir in mexico. today he travels to the u.s.-mexico border. we are live in juarez, coming up.
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>> they are still in damascus. late yesterday, there was a meeting between the special envoy staffan de mistura and foreign minister. staffan de mistura said the government has a responsibility to deliver aid to the people. the syrian government gave approval to deliver aid to areas. those trucks have still not moved to. undoubtedly, there are difficulties already activists have posted videos on the internet showing aid trucks close to besieged areas, but they belong to the syrian arab red crescent and not the u.n.
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the agreement to deliver aid to areas falls short of the needs of half a million people, half a million people live in 18 besieged areas according to the united nations and some in the opposition are asking the y why aren't you delivering aid on those areas. the syrian government has come under criticism for delivering weapons of war. >> where are we on the truce? does that seem realistic at this
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point? >> there couldn't be a ceasefire until. >> partners with the west for example say they are working with syria's linked al-nusra. until there is that agreement, there is going to be difficulties delivering aid on the ground. the united states saying the
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pentagon wanted to limit -- key parts of the power grid. intelligence agencies reportedly developed a separate plan for a covert cyber attack to disable one of tehran's nuke enrichment sites. >> oil prices higher this morning. >> four of the world's largest oil production countries agree to reduce oil production levels. iran say it is illogical when they have just started to export oil again. u.s. flights to cuba will soon be a reality. it may not be easy to get there. securing the south china sea.
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the latest provocation with chinese missiles placed on a disputed island.
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>> what in god's name makes you think that you can handle stress, anxiety, depression... post-traumatic stress? >> the closest i got was sitting in my truck, gun in hand. >> who will save america's heroes? >> i wish he'd been able to talk to somebody. >> "faultlines". >> what do we want? >> al jazeera america's hard-hitting... >> today the will be arrested. >> ground-breaking... >> they're firing canisters of gas at us. >> emmy award-winning, investigative series. welcome back to go your world this morning. it is 8:30 eastern. taking a look at today's top stories, apple will fight a
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court order to unlock the phone of sayed farook, one of the san bernardino shooters. the f.b.i. believes the phone has vital information about isil on it, but apple said the order is government overreach and could set a dangerous precedent. >> it is sentencing day for one executive blamed for the chemical spill in southern virginia. gather southern facing three years in prison. southern is one of five executives who pleaded guilty to federal pollution charges. u.s. and taiwanese officials say china has put missiles on an island in the south china sea. the apparent provocation comes at president obama was wrapping up a summit of south asian leaders. pope francis wrapping up his visit to mexico today. these are live images from juarez, mexico, the crowd lined up at least 10 deep to see the pontiff, also a large security
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presence, as well. hundreds of thousands of catholics are expected to attend mass. >> for seven years, the montez have been a family divided. half the family members in this photo live across the border in juarez, mexico. maria and graciano live here, they haven't seen their family since the couple decided to outstay their visa in 2008, becoming illegal immigrants. >> my life was full. i had everything in juarez, but we had to leave. >> the two say they left mexico after receiving death threats from a gang. they owned a grocery store and had been targeted for their relative wealth.
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now in the u.s., they live in a trailer, surviving on his job washing dishes. >> we can hardly afford rent, electricity, food, seeing the doctor. their consolation, daily phone calls with their daughter in juarez. without papers, they can't make the 50-mile journey across the border to see her in person, but we can. [ knocking ] >> the montez children grew up on the outskirts of juarez. now she is helping raise her nephew who never met his grandparents. >> it is very difficult not to have contact, to not have them or tell them i love you. >> today, juarez remains a dangerous place. we're blocks from the family's home. there, between those two trucks, yet another body in the streets.
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in these neighborhoods, still dominated by cartel violence. >> marta said it's still too risky for her parents to return, the most dangerous city in the world. >> owning a business here is too dangerous. my parents' safety is more important. >> without a way for either side to legally cross the border, the family's one chance to meet face-to-face is here. at this spot, the border fence is all that separates mexico from the united states and the two sides of the martez family. >> the family is catholic. they say they hope the pope's
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visit to the border brings attention to the suffering of families divided by immigration status. in 2013, nearly 72,000 immigrant parents were separated from their children by deportation, a situation the montes can relate to. >> i'm happy but have a sadness because i want to be with my children. >> i want the pope to touch the hearts of america's leaders. we need reform so that many families can be together again. >> for now, marta tells her mother not to cry. this his the closest they have come to an embrace, seven years and counting. >> adele, during his visit yesterday, pope francis chastise the mexican authorities for not providing opportunities to mexico's youth, whom he terms the wealth of this country to
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find opportunities and stay at home. he said his hope for mexico is that it willful fill its own potential so younger people will not have to migrate. >> you're covering has been incredible. i want your comment on this, donald trump criticizing the event yesterday, saying that he thinks the pope is working with mexico to keep the border open. how's the church responding? this morning, the vatican responding saying pope francis is a champion for refugees and migrants around the world, not just here on the u.s.-mexican border. the vatican said of course the pope is not working with mexican authorities and his message for christians around the world is to fulfill their duty of caring for migrants and refugees who are seeking a life of dignity and peace. >> also we saw something yesterday that we don't normally see, the pope jostled by the crowds. describe the excitement and miss
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reaction. >> he told the spectators pulling at his arms, making him fall on top of a handicapped man not to be selfish. those messages resonate with the public here and people have been excited for his six days in mexico. the cap stone of that visit, the excitement is the greatest. behind me, the buses are waiting, filling with people taken to the juarez fairgrounds where the pope will say mass 10 hours from now. these people getting up early, hoping to be as close as they can to pope francis. >> heidi zhou castro, live in juarez, mexico, thank you very much. for the fits time in decades, american passenger flights will head to cuba. it is the latest development as the two countries normalize relations. john henry smith has more. >> u.s. and cuban officials were all smiles after signing an agreement that will make it possible for people in both
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countries to fly freely between them. >> today is an historic day in the relationship between cuba and the united states. >> the agreement allows for 20 round trip flights daily between the u.s. and havana and for 10 other daily round trips in and out of nine other cuban airports. those numbers are not for each airline. they are for all airlines combined. >> with this argument in effect, the airlines of both countries may in addition set up business agreements together, such as lease contracts from air crafts between them or with airlines from third countries. >> airlines have 15 days to apply for those limited routes, and air carriers aren't the only ones who hope to cash in. >> i hear often from u.s. businesses and consumers and i know that they are unquestionably excited about the new opportunities for exchange that today's agreement will
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facilitate. >> it represents a critically important milestone in the united states' continued efforts to engage with cuba and normalize our relations. >> this move comes two days after the obama administration allowed saul berenthal's tractor company to become the first u.s. company to build an assembly plant in cuba in over 50 years. he believes cuba has learned from the past. >> they realize that they have to become part of the global economy to be able to keep going with the achievements of the revolution. >> u.s. officials estimate the first commercial flights between cuba and the u.s. will begin sometime between june and october. >> so far, the airlines that have made their intentions to push sue routes to cuba clear include american, delta, jet blue, southwest and united. >> a lot of americans, myself included eager to go to cuba.
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how does this agreement change things? >> technically under the law, it's still illegal for americans to fly to cuba, but the obama administration has produced 12 permitting categories under which travel is allowed. those with exceptions have to take charter planes. it's only 40 minutes from miami to cuba, so now allowing commercial air carriers on those routes should bring prices down. >> you can go to cancun and catch a flight over. >> there's always a way. >> a new survey find residents in flint, michigan paid the highest water rates in the country despite the lead contamination. flint residents paid $864 per year, twice the national average. it's also more than three times what residents inch detroit pay. a lawyer in flint who sued to reduce those rates say they are
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high because officials tapped water money to pay for other city operations. cancer researchers are calling it unprecedented and extraordinary, a new therapy where patients' own cells are targeting the disease. the treatment tan the t cells with a reaccept for that kills a certain type of blood cancer. in clinical trials, 94% of patients symptoms vanished completely. doctors warn there are side effects to the therapy. >> it's important to stress while they saw an impressive response rate, response doesn't actually equal you're at that they need to follow these patients over the long term. one thing we do know about cancer is it's very good as wriggling it's way out of therapy and develop resistance. we need more research and long term safety data but it is a step forward. >> it is often consider add last resort. it overloads defense cells. in the trial, 20 patients suffered fevers and other side effect and two died, but it sent
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the rest of patients into remission. during treatment, they were given less than five months to live. >> last week, we suffered through brattal cold, record snowfall, now there is record heat in parts of new mexico and texas. nicole mitchell, it's only february. something is weird. >> the rest of the country is saying that's not where you need the heat anyway. >> we need it here. >> this is the setup. it's gotten very quiet, the last system moved on. a couple little disturbances in the northern tier, but this big next system coming in from the west and ahead of that, we're going to pick up a southerly flow especially for the midsection of the country. as this comes in, that flow to the northwest. this first band of moisture, already by thursday and moving through the great lakes on friday, that could bring some areas of snow and ice, so we'll have more on that. the temperatures with that southerly flow, you can see the warm air bubble northward,
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denver 68 already today. taking a closer look at the portions of the southern plains, including new mexico, the panhandle of the accident, we could see that really, really warm air, records set possibly today and into tomorrow and tomorrow's forecast, that warm corridor of air all the way up to billings, northern portions of the plains could get up to 6. there's always a downside of all of this, between the wind, lower humidities and all that warm air really drying things out, we have a red flag fire warning in effect. this starts tomorrow versus today. today with the warmer air coming, we'll start to dry out and temperatures will really crank and dry things out and then the wind tomorrow is going to impact all of that. definitely, a tale of two portions of the country. >> i agree with del, which i rarely do. >> you never do. >> i have to note that on my calendar, that one time. >> i'm thinking maybe we can take the show on the road, too,
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if stephanie will agree with me on that. avoiding the morality police. >> the app helping young iranians live their lives without fear of oversight.
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hillary clinton today will hold a rally with the mother of sandra bland, the young black woman who died in texas. >> as you can see here, she was speaking in harlem.
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>> i want to tear down all the barriers that hold back americans across racial lines, because our country can only live up to its potential when every single american has the chance to live up to theirs. >> bernie sanders also spending time trying to connect with african-american voters. he was at a rally at the university of south carolina on tuesday. there he talked the changes he says he would make if he becomes president. >> talk about civil justice, what we are going to talk about is police department reform. we're going to end a situation where people, often african-americans are killed while in police custody. >> while the african-american vote is considered crucial in south carolina, the native american vote is key for democrats in the nevada caucus this weekend. al jazeera's tristan atone reports. >> presidential politics are coming to nevada.
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this week, the democratic caucus here. it's the first major state on the campaign trail with a native population and the challenge is to get the vote out. most travel communities are remote like here on the reservation outside reno. >> our culture is the lake. that's where we get our culture from, so we do everything we can to protect our water. it would be great if candidates accounted come that these places and to our reservations and our communities to actually see what we're trying to protect and what we want them to invest in. >> there are 32 tribal communities in nevada where mining is a big industry. the potential voters we spoke with were concerned about impacts to the environment, but more deeply a desire to find a candidate who shows a real respect for culture and sovereignty. that rules out any republican candidate date. >> i'm hillary clinton, and i
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approve this message. >> that leaves hillary clinton and bernie sanders vying for attention, even if there are questions about their sincerity. the challenge now, how to get the vote out in communities that have traditionally been excluded from the political process or don't care. al jazeera on the indiana colony. using technology to escape the restrictions. >> young iranians using a new app to stay out of trouble for so-called immoral behavior. change. >> gripping... inspiring... entertaining. no topic off limits. >> 'cause i'm like, "dad, there are hookers in this house". >> exclusive conversations you won't find anywhere else. >> these are very vivid, human stories. >> if you have an agenda with people, you sometimes don't see the truth. >> "talk to al jazeera". monday, 6:00 eastern.
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only on al jazeera america.
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in iran, they are turning to technology trying to go get around that countries motherty police. signature visits say its part of an effort to move the country forward and help express they're freedom. >> in this you tube video, a woman in iran resists arrest by the iranian authorities who patrol the streets in vans to
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enforce the islamic female dress code. a new app is aimed at helping citizens avoid confrontations like that and get away from those patrols. >> this is very important to see how people are frustrated by years of the use of moral police on the streets to stop people and warn them or fine them or even take them to jail for the way they dress up. >> much like, is let's you warn our drivers about speed traps in this country, the motherty police app let's people avoid the area. the craters of this app told a human rights group more than 1,000 users were using it within hours of release. it was blocked by the government within a day. still, users have found ways to get around the ban and download it. it's also seen as sending a
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message. >> it's very symbolic, shows how people are using social media applications to challenge government's restriction. >> a human rights group said by march of 2014, the guidance patrol handed out almost 3 million warnings, about two hush thousand to women who had broken the dress code. >> the app is out an android, creators hope to develop it for the iphone and launch it in arabic to help avoid these patrols in saudi arabia. >> what is the punishment? >> most is a warning or small lecture. sometimes there's a fine or prosecution but for the most part, it's hey, don't do that petitioner fix this, that kind of thing. the iranians we spoke with said at one point or another, everyone recalls being stopped. >> small lecture. i do that to del. >> apple is using that encryption technology and government wants to get around
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it, a controversial here getting rid of a controversial in iran. >> trying to. a collection of little known music from around the world, songs from the civil rights movement and mexican mariachis is being preserved by the smithsonian. >> in the sounds of this year's grammy winner alabama shakes. ♪ >> you can here echos of blues legend lead belly. or the 1920's blues performers recorded by paramount records which has been reissued and on monday won a grammy for best box set. music cherished by the center for folk life and cultural heritage, it's mission to
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preserve original music to the widest public office. mel did es from the u.s. virgin islands, by lingual children's tunes and mexican mariachi out of california. records who have a worldwide clientele and keep this afloat. >> luckily we've been able to maintain and grow our collections and the revenues required to support our northern profit mission. >> this was recorded 1958. >> the smithsonian also keeps a vigilant guard over the musical past of the u.s. and more than 180 other countries. these are the 2200 albums collected by the founder of folk ways records. it was acquired by the smithsonian, greek the collection to 4200 albums, 45,000 tracks in all. >> now is the most optimum time
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to preserve it. >> tracks threatened by the having as of time. dave walker's job is to safe them. ♪ >> like this tape of soviet protest songs recorded nearly half a century ago. >> it's high priority for us to go back in time and preserve based on fragility and content. part of what we do as an archive is assuring that this material is not only preserved for immediate use, but for future generations. >> just as they've documented america's political and social struggles through its music, the smithsonian staff intends to do the same for other nationed and keep it all for posterity. >> a state have the art satellite is causing a buzz within the science community. >> terrance bassly explains why. >> it's taken eight years to develop for $340 million.
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the sent national 3a is one of the most advanced earth observation satellites ever made. orbiting 1400 kilometers above the plan net, instrumentses measure the temperature, color and height of the sea surface. it can detect the thickness have sea ice with precision. >> we carry an infrared raid i don't mean at her which is able to measure the sea surface temperature accurate to .2 degrees celsius, which is quite something. the data collected will be freely available for anyone to use almost immediately. this means it will help scientists monitor changes in sea level, marine pollution and ago gal blooms. it can track forest fires, the movement of ships and even the mass migration of people across borders. >> the slight will help monitor systematically all over the world different bio geochemical
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parameters in the ocean which by themselves are able to monitor the fishing industries, agriculture over the land, water resources and also the sea surface temperature, which will feed into our weather forecasts. >> described as europe's eyes in the sky, sent national 3a is the third of seven planned observation and security satellites. al jazeera. that's going to do it for us here in new york. i'm del walters. i'm stephanie sy. have a great day. we leave you with live pictures of pope francis in his pope mobile just arriving in juarez, mexico, one of the countries most dangerous cities. >> we'll be back here tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. we hope to see you then. stay with us.
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aid trucks finally moving towards besieged towns in syria. hello again from doha, everyone. this is the world news from al jazeera. china is accused of deploying missiles to a contested island in the south china sea. thousands gather in protests demanding the resignation of the government in kosovo. >>

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