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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  February 18, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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campaign crunch - new numbers showing donald trump may be losing his lead as we inch closer to the next primary. >> president obama plans a visit to cuba, the first president in eight decades. a deadly explosion in ankara. the government is launching counterattacks. >> i'm scott heidler in sink for. how territorial disputes in the china sea are causing a rapid military build up welcome to your world this morning. i'm stephanie sy.
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>> and i'm del walters. the road to the white house heating up. two cases to go until the sarl your and caucuses in nevada. the battle tighter than ever. >> john henry smith is here with more. bernie sanders and hillary clinton locked in a dead heat in the polls, and the republicans running a close race. >> ted cruz inched ahead of donald trump in a national poll, with the backing of 28% of voters. unseeding trump who is at 26%. that's within the margin of error. it's not clear if the survey catches movement in the race. in the latest town hall each candidate talks about why he is the most qualified to be presidents. >> my campaign is not about the past, but the future. what we are going to you. i can say this without any hesitation. i'm as conservative as anyone running for president.
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but i am a 15 year conservative, who has proven time and again the capability and willingness to take conservative ideas and turn them into solution. >> i can guarantee i had more 2am phone calls than the rest put together had to make life and death decisions, had to derive situations from interns and residents that didn't know a lot. but you have to get the right information, make the right decisions, put together complex teams to accomplish things that had not within accomplished before. >> we make it an election, so we come out with a mandate from the people. that's what i intend to do. >> donald trump participated in a separate town hall meeting hosted by m.s. n.b.c. he talks about how he is different. >> i think i will set myself apart. my policies are better, i'm a different business person.
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they never employed anyone. i'm a better leader. i'll bring the country better than they are going to do. look at ted cruz. he's nasty. he doesn't have one republican endorsement from the senate. and he works with them. hard to believe. >> donald trump moves from m.s. n.b.c. and cnn for a second night of talent hall grilling. coming down to the wire. it's getting hot out there. >> john henry smith, thank you senator marco rubio getting a boost. the state's governor endorsing him. as al jazeera's stark reports. the pair want to show a new face of the g.o.p. >> ladies and gentlemen, if we elect marco rubio every day will be a great day in america. >> i'm so honoured that you close to join the team. she embodies for me everything that i want the republican party and the conservative movement to be about. >> before this coveted
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endorsement, the campaign attracted enthusiastic crowds. >> we love being here. the momentum is growing, the great folks have been willing to come out and see me. >> he won the support of the president. >> help me welcome marco rubio. like a prized fighter entering a ring. rubio took aim at president obama, with a well-work line. >> we are going to have to undo the damage that president obama has done to this country. now, when i say that, and i say it more than once the press is "he's repeating himself." rubio trying to make light of his disastrous performance at the new hampshire debate
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repeating a line four times, a debacle that helped to sink his campaign there. he seems to have recovered and endorse. from governor nicky hayley, with an 80% approval rate is a huge get. we asked marco rubio about it. >> we'd love her endorsement. i would hope it's positive for the campaign. i hope he'd lead south carolina with a tail wind. it is a big blow for jed bush, who reportedly courted governor hayley. bush is near the bottom of the republican field, with donald trump still in front. but marco rubio's supporters, like his low-key style. >> i think he's the most mature guys, the youngest guys, i belief. he's not shouting, yelling, and knows his stuff. >> bringing america to what it was originally. fixing what was done wrong. >> sounds like donald trump. >> no. no. he is too hot-headed. >> the florida senator is hoping
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for second place. fighting neck and neck with ted cruz. >> let's say he comes in second. the best case scenario. then i think it gives him the opportunity to continue to fund raise, to continue to try to run a strong campaign in the super-tuesday. >> the once tea party favourite is seen as mainstream, touting an inclusive brand of conservatism which he says will allow him to bring the party together and beat the democratic nominee, to become the 45th president of the united states. >> the scoreboard is on. did they have a game before. or is that the 45th president of the united states? huh. [ cheering and applause ] as for the democrats, hillary clinton campaigns in nevada ahead of the caucuses there. wednesday she was in chicago with the mother of sandra bland, the young african american woman
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dead in a gaol cell. days after being arrested after a traffic shot. >> we owe it to them to reform police practices to make no other young woman like sandra bland is ever pulled out of a car for no good reason and thrown into a gaol where she is found dead. earlier this week clinton spoke about breaking down racial barriers and spoke about ending 2 million to end the school to prison pipeline in many neighbourhoods. >> and she dismissed comments by rapper, quoting an activist who says a ute rift doesn't qualify you to be president of the united states. it sparked a debate on social media. the candidate does not believe that agenda is a reason to vote for or against someone president obama will not attend anton in scalia's
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funeral. the president will pay his respects at the supreme court on friday where his body will lie in repose. vice president joe biden plans to attend the funeral at the largest catholic church in north america. >> former supreme court justice weighs in on who should appoint the placement. she says it's unfortunate that the decision is politicized. >> when you hear one side saying they'd like to wait for the next president in office to appoint a justice, what do you agree? >> i don't grow. we need one there now to do the job. let's get on with it o'connor was the first woman to serve on the supreme court, she was nominated by president regan, and retired in 2006. some republicans are breaking with party world offer whether the president should nominate the next justice. the president should nominate someone to fill scalia's seat
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and later he backtracked. he is open to hearings and judiciary committee chairman. he will wait until a nominee is named to decide whether to schedule them. >> president obama could be the first present to visit cuba, and the white house is expected to announce a trip to the ilted. they say -- to the island. they say it will happen within months. days ago cuba and u.s. agreed to restore passenger fights. it was one of the latest steps. the president of the turkey vowing to retaliate after a deadly car bombing. 28 were killed. a convoy of military personnel near the parliament said it be the target. turkish world blaming kurdish rebels from syria. our correspondent is live in ankara. turkish president recep tayyip erdogan is saying he'll retaliate.
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tell us what he has to say today. >> there were strong words coming out from the president. as well as the prime minister in that attack. you talk about it taking place 12 hours ago, 300 meters from where i'm standing noum. as you say, it targeted a military convoy. 27 personnel killed and one civilian as well. the government pointing the ginger at the y.p.g. it is the kurdish armed group based in syria, that has links with the p.k.k. which is a separate militia in turkey that has been at war with the decades. the u.s. is considered an ally in the fight against i.s.i.l. turkey says it's nothing more than what it calls terrorists. that's why we heard the international community, the allies and the u.s. should take
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a stronger stance. here is what recep tayyip erdogan should say. >> the pyd and y.p.g. in the north of syria, and the thinks with the p.k.k. in turkey turns on it. there's a strong link between them. it will help the allies to understand. we have been saying this, and sooner or later our allies will understand. with evidence of the links, and the terrorist organizations supporting them. they'll be judged. >> reporter: now, security situation in turkey has been deteriorating over the past few months, this is the latest in attacks. a couple of weeks ago i.s.i.s. claimed responsibility for a bomb blast at a popular tourist destination, and twin bomb blasts carried out by kurdish separatists rocking the capital, killing 100 people. all of this, it is linked to war in syria. turkey says that the international community has to put its money where its mouth
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is, and support it in creating a buffer zone on the border with syria sending in troops. it can't do that. russia controls the skies, and unless n.a.t.o. and allies want to go into confrontation with russia or get an agreement with moscow, whereby it allows for the buffer zone, and allowing for turkey to go in after what it claimsar organizations, then the volatile situation will continue. and you can expect attacks like this to happen. turkey hopes it will be the last of the attacks, and will serve as a wake-up call to washington and others around the world that more action is needed. as it stands now, the war in syria, the only side prepared to back up talk with military mights has been russia, syria's allies. >> jamal, thank you very much doctors without borders says the death doll from an air strike reached 25.
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the international aid group says the attack was deliberate and believes the syrian government or russia was responsible. it called for an independent investigation. aid trucks finally reached several besieged towns and villages in syria. rob matheson has the details. a ray of hope in the midst of war. over 100 trucks carrying humanitarian aid spreading out to the besieged towns. in madaya, near the lebanese border, they are bringing medical supplies and a mobile clinic, as well as food. thousands are dropped by forces supporting president. at least 40 people have died of malnutrition in the town since october. it must be lifted from all areas. dropped people are suffering. >> this convoy is heading for the town in the north.
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around 20,000 have been cut off by armed rebel groups. >> heavy gun fire rattles near, close to damascus. rebels guard the entrance, carrying supplies for 30,000 trapped here. more aid is expected to arrive in the east. parts of which are held by i.s.i.l. the convoys are parts of an agreement reached. but there's no deal to make sure the supplies keep coming, and not all the terms under siege can be reached. >> translation: why doesn't the northern countryside of homs get aid. it calls for aid to reach all areas. is it waiting for the forcing of ceasefires before aid can enter. >> the northern countryside of homes has been a battle ground.
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the u.n. says food shortages could get worse for 120,000 that live here. the last u.n. aid convoy was in october. now the opposition controlled east of aleppo city, with tens of thousands lived. close to being besieged. a pause in the fighting has been agreed. there's no sign it will happen, an international task force will healed a meeting to discuss the practicalities on ending the war. first they need to see who a regarded on the opposition and the so-called terrorism groups. >> let's talk about the weather. it is going to rain in parts of draught-stricken california. >> this has been a snow pack system, i would say. a lot of places covered with this. so you can see this is the first round that came in. it made it to southern california. another batch today. this one is a little more
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oriented. some will make it southward. that, too, is more north-west. northern california and north. come of this is pulling into the central united states. there's a lot more activity in the western half of the country. >> this is what we have. you can see the different bands lining up. in terms of snowing anything in the great basin, cascades, seer areaa picking up decent amounts of snow. some of the heaviest amounts will be in the sierra. one or two feet in higher elevations. otherwise decent rain. some of this making it to southern california. here is the forecast for the rest of the day. you can see we get a little less into central areas. at least we have gotten little batches, and as i mentioned that snow. also, all the areas that you see in brown, they are high wind watches or advisories or
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warnings. as the system pulls out, there's really some potent winds ahead of this. there's moisture that hits the northern tear of the country, and it could be ice as well. so, this is going to start to cause other problems, including record temperatures. more on that coming up. >> we like the different type of temperatures. thank you. >> a hospital hacked. >> talk about a medical center held for ransom. officials paying up to get control of the computers. >> emotional message about immigration along the border.
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pope francis will arrive in rome after an historic trip to mexico. >> he took part in a brief farewell ceremony before boarding a plane to mexico city. before going to the u.s. mexican border. it's a crossing point for thousands of migrants the the plight made a central theme. heidi zhou-castro has more. >> reporter: the vatican downplayed the controversy of the pope's visit to the border. saying that he cared for the migrants and refugees around the world, not just here. the pope's messing was one of compassion, allowing fellow man to be helped, to seek a life of dignity or peace. an historic image with his feet planned in mexico, pope francis issued his message across the
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border, into the immigrant community of the american side of the rio grande. >> the plight was the centre piece of the map. >> translation: in this place i want to implore divine mercy, i want to give the gift of tears, the gift of conversion. >> reporter: he is at the center of a human trafficking trade, a midway point for hundreds of thousands of migrants. the pope acknowledged the suffering endured on the journeys, the hundreds of miles travelled over deserts and mountains. >> translation: enslaved, kidnapped, extorted. >> reporter: it was a huge message. a lot of us come, we want to the cross over. it brings us a good life. we do it at the risk of our own safety. france arrived for compassion, and compared the plight of latin american migrants to that of refugees around the world.
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calling it a humanitarian crisis and tragedy. >> reporter: we don't want statistics, we want to measure by names, by stories. >> reporter: on the american side the pope's message was filtered through a simulcast. due to security concerns. roadblocks had people through the border fence, seeing them with their own lives. >> too near, too far. >> reporter: the realities of a divided border that even the pope could in the erase. here and wares, a crowd of 2,000 people gathered to hear the pope's message in person, bringing many in the audience to tears. pope francis is not only the first latin american pope, he's the first pope to visit the border region heidi zhou-castro reporting from mexico. during the visit pope francis focused on the drug cartels,
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urging cartels to resist the working with them federal grand jury indicting bundy and others. they faced down the government agents who tried to seize bundy's cattle over unpaid crazing fees. he and his son, among the charge, occupied with a federal wildlife center. >> a hospital is defending how it ended a hacking attack. it paid thousands to end a cyber threat. fit for a hollywood film. >> reporter: hollywood presbyterian medical center admits it paid up after cyber thieves took control of computers, demanding a payment of $17,000 of digital currency. >> once it infects the system, it affects file after file.
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it's a key to undo it. think about it as a virus and an anecdote. >> the key is the anecdote. >> in a statement the hospital says the efficient and quickest way is to pay the ransom, and detain the encryption key. in the best interests of restoring operations, we did this. the hacked computers had been offline for a week. including those needed for lab working pharmaceutical orders and the emergency room. handwritten notes, faxes. >> the signs said do not use the computers. what is going on here, what's going on with the computers. they said they were hacked. >> reporter: in an email to al jazeera, the fbi confirmed it is investigating a cyber compromise to determine the person or group responsible. but: a similar attack happened to a south florida plastic surgeon two years ago. >> all be knew there were
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internet blackmailers saying we had to pay them in bitcoin or lose the files forever. >> it took a week, but after paying the ransom in bitcoin he received the codes and regained control of the file. experts warn we'd see more like this. >> it's the easiest form of armed robbery. we are not fast enough to get this down. it will happen more and more. >> according to a global network support, there was a 25% increase in ransom attacks. the hospital says all systems are back to normal, they were cleared of malware and they are working with experts to see how it happened. >> investigators discouraged victims of paying the ransom. >> for fear of more attacks. >> you can't go for weeks without records. and oftentimes amounts are low, that 17,000 - well, it may pay to pay off. >> it wouldn't be low for a
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small business. that is worrying. >> it's like the new form of bank robbery. regardless of how you feel, it's bad out there. >> that's right. thank you when we come back, solving some of medicine's biggest mysteries. >> we take you inside the facility where people with unexplainable mysteries try to get answers. >> and the world's cheapest oil more expensive. why venezuela is hiking the price of petrol.
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>> every monday night. >> i lived that character. >> go one on one with america's movers and shakers. >> we will be able to see change. >> gripping... inspiring... entertaining. no topic off limits. >> 'cause i'm like, "dad, there are hookers in this house". >> exclusive conversations you
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won't find anywhere else. >> these are very vivid, human stories. >> if you have an agenda with people, you sometimes don't see the truth. >> "talk to al jazeera". monday, 6:00 eastern. only on al jazeera america. welcome back to your world this morning. a new national poll shows tell the cruz inching ahead of donald trump for the first time in the race. the numbers are however within the margin of error. tonight republican candidates gather for another television town hall. last night he there clashed over privacy, security and foreign policy. >> turkeys president voluntary to go retaliate after a car bomb attack blaming kurdish rebels from syria. it has launched airstrikes. the white house is expected to announce today that president obama will visit cuba in the next months. it's the latest step towards
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normalize relations between the two countries. the pentagon said the military build up on the islands in the south china sea must stop. it is a sellers market for defense contractors. >> the sky over the south china sea is becoming crowded. several nations, including vietnam, philippines and malaysia accuse china of moving in on theirson territory. china refute this, saying 90% of the south china sea is theirs. what's undeniable is that the steadily increasing tension has led to a military buying spree. >> i think china's military expansion, it's increases and its defense spending and its actions in the maritime area have in fact triggered something
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of an arms race. >> a united states military footprint in the region is not new. it's been steadily growing over the last several years. >> militarization of the south china sea and particularly the artificial islands that will be used for military purposes by china is a concern tort united states, but doesn't pose an excess 17 she will threat. >> i can't tell you how much it means to me to go out here and see all this joint air power and what we're doing at team america and being out here to show our commitment. >> part of that show is this, the p.8 poseidon, one of the most sophisticated aircraft in
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the sky. the united states frequently flies them over disputed territory. >> whether it's singapore or the philippines, all over the asia pacific, we're able to easily within the span of a short amount of time put you have one of our jets there and operate out of that region and support our region allies. the philippines has taken its territorial dispute with china to the hague and recently announced it's buying $100 million worth of military equipment to boost maritime security, it says. if the situation in the south china sea continues object this track of heightened tension, the region could remain one of the defense industries dream markets for years to come. >> scott heidler, al jazeera, singapore. >> european leaders are in brussels today for a meeting on the migrant process, trying to overcome divisions inside the e.u. over handling the influx of refees. german chancellor angela merkel leading the charge for a plan relying on all countries to
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accept a refugee quota. some want to close their borders altogether. voting underway in uganda for presidential and parliamentary elections. the president face as strong challenge seeking to extend his 30 year rule. the main opposition leader is running against him for the fourth time. he has called him a dictator and now questions the fairness of the elections. venezuela raising gas prices for the first time in 20 years. the president says the hike is needed to balance their economy. in a nation where petroleum is heavily subs sides, government revenues falling because of low oil prices. >> according to the state run oil company, fuel subsidies can cost the country as much as $15 billion a year. president maduro said at the current prices, the state was paying to fill up people's tanks. >> this national fund for
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missions will receive every extra resource needed generated by the venezuelan gasoline prices. >> the magnitude of this price increase in a country that sees newspaper petrol as a national right, people didn't wait for president maduro to finish his speech before rushing to pet troll stations to fill up one last time. while people want to take advantage of cheap fuel, most feel the increase was long overdue. >> i think it comes too late and it should have been done slowly, not suddenly. >> the move comes as president maduro faces a strength they understand political opposition. two months ago, his ruling socialist party suffered a major defeat in parliamentary elections due to anger over the
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crisis. raising the price of fuel isn't easy. in 1989, a similar increase in food and gasoline prices led thousands to the streets to protest. so traumatic were the events of those days that fears of a repeat of kept prices frozen for close to 20 years. battling food shortages, and now power cuts, venezuelans fear an increase in petrol prices will naturally lead to an increase in the cost of transport, food and basic services. economists say the measures, though welcomed could still fall short in the country that even at the new price still have the world's cheapest petrol. the world health organization is asking the international community for funds to fast track vaccines and
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research for how zika virus spreads. there are cases in 39 other countries besides brazil now. thousands are going door to door to educate people about mosquitoes. the teams are armed with insecticides, putting those in areas where still water collects. the effort is costing $125 million. most effort is focused in rio, where the olympics will be held this august. half a million people are expected to attended the games within including 10,000 athletes and 20,000 members of the media. mario is a communications director for rio 2016, joining us from rio this morning via skype. thank you so much for your time. in a statement, you said the
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venues are being in expected daily for mosquitoes. an american soccer player hope solo expressed specific concerns about the soccer stadiums because they're not all in rio proper, some are near the rain forests where there may be more mosquitoes. what are you specifically doing in those venues? >> we are treating all the venues alike. first of all, allow es to good morning to you and everybody in new york and the u.s. we checking the venues for soccer the same way we're checking all the other venues. it's funny, though, because in the rain forest area where we are going to have soccer matches, the rate of infection is not as high as it is in the northeast side of brazil. anyway, we are not leaving anything to chance and we are checking all the venues the same way on a daily basis, because checking the venues and areas for stagnant water is still the
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fastest way to curb the evolution of the mosquito, the reproduction of the mosquito, so it's the safest way to protect the athletes. >> some health experts worry that the olympic games could actually spread zika globally as visitors to rowee return home. some say the games should be postponed or canceled. have you thought about what you would do if that happens? >> we have to focus on what we can do. zika virus crisis is global and affects everyone on the planet and we are working with the world health organization. it's sue soon to speculate what could be done with the games. we need to work to protect our athletes and guests to make sure she will be safe. that's what we are seeing.
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you just reported that world health organization wants more money to accelerate research so we can find either a vaccine or specific means, scientific means to combat the mosquito. that's where we need to focus now. we just had carnival in brazil. more than 2 million people came to the streets all over the world and we haven't seen change in the pattern of infection or any specific change due to carnival. we need to have attitude of wait and see and protect the venues. >> brazil has deployed soldiers to help with the spread of zika. has that diverted attentions away from security operations to make sure the olympics in rio will be safe? >> not in any way. the government has deployed more than 200,000 soldiers. they will be working with health officials. their main task is to access
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homes and business in order to find for places where there is -- >> does that divert from from security operations that are important. >> no, no, no, no. brazil has a sizeable army. we have about more than a million in the brazil yep army, so we have plenty of people to do security and to do cam bass of the mosquito. >> other health experts have been saying that the bigger threat to health may be the water quality of olympic venues, including the bay in rio. where are you in terms of making sure that the water is safe for those athletes? >> we are doing a lot of work on this especially around the bay. there is pipes to divert dirty water from the bay. this should be completed before the end of this month, actually before the end of march.
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we have a series of measures that we are going to implement well before the competition to make sure the water is clean. >> you are a long time sports journalists before you got into communications. i want to ask you this right now, what is your greatest worry right now? is it zika, is it completing the venues, is it security leading up to the august 5 ceremony? >> the greatest worry is engagement. we need to tell a story. zika scarce people, security scarce people. water quality scarce, we need to make sure we work against these obstacles. we need to do our homework and engage the world to a beautiful event that is going to be the game. my biggest worry is the ability for us to tell our story and to prove we're going to have great games in rio. >> there were mass protests ahead of the world cup games in brazil. they ended up going off without a hitch, but given the calls for
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your president's impeachment and now the zika virus scare, as well. how do you prepare for that? >> the main preparation for protests is dialogue. we've been using dialogue since we took over and we haven't got any protest on the games, because people know exactly what will be left is a legacy and they know exactly how much money we are spending in the games, so no pro tests so far. if we have some, we are going to deal with them, but so far, the strategy is successful, dialogue and transparency are the best medicine to avoid protests. >> mario, thank you so much for joining us from rio de janeiro. >> thank you so much, a pleasure. serious money problems in illinois where the governor wants to cut billions from the budget to end the stalemate.
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the money fight there is having a huge impact on the state's most vulnerable residents. >> let me get your blood pressure. >> kristin ward is a nurse who treats drug addicts at chicago's ken more center run by lutheran social services. ward was a drug addict herself, spent months in jail and finally hit rock bottom before coming here. >> the environment, what i felt was like a very safe, comfortable place to heal and grow. i was at a bottom that no one wanted to help me, and this was the only -- this was my only choice. >> most of the services here are going away because the state is locked in a budget stalemate between first term republican governor and a democratic controlled state legislature. this is the longest illinois has ever gone without a state budget. the state has not paid about $6.5 billion of its bills. each side is blaming each other. >> the majority party in the general assembly thought that
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just raising taxes to fund those services, they could do it. they haven't even moved a fingering to do that. >> we ought to get busy, sit down, what can we do to solve this budget problem. payment to say lottery winners have been delayed, but the cuts to lutheran social services represent the biggest and most ominous cuts yet. >> we are just adding to the amount of people in illinois who cannot access services. >> the ward will stay open, but another flower for cold turkey detox is closing as is the residence haul for female addicts. >> i don't even know the word for it. it's just making it harder and more difficult for everybody. >> the human services department tell us the patients he here will have other options for treatment but the director says that's like ford shutting down and g.m. and chrysler having to pick up the slack. >> the simple nature of going
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someplace where you're familiar, where you trust the staff, that's going to be gone. >> 12 fight to get into treatment center, because they're closing all these places and people want to get in. they want help. >> lutheran social services says the state owes it $6 million for services and hasn't made a payment in seven months, so it's laying off 750 people around the state, affecting nearly 5,000 patients and senior citizens. >> like purely knowing that i deserve to be happy. >> there is no patience for the politicians in this budget stalemate. >> if it's about the money, they're going to be paying for it with jail or prison, and it's going to be more money. >> even the alcohol rehab clinic where frank harris got clean years ago is now closing. he and kristin ward fear for those who are just like they used to be. andy rowsen, al jazeera,
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chicago. a campus is allowing handguns on campus. the president doesn't think guns belong but says he is going to follow the new state law that requires public colleges and universities to allow concealed carry. under u.t. austin's plan, concealed guns would normally not be allow the in dorms or buildings open to the public. a sprawling campus is gaining attention for what goes on inside. patients show up with extraordinary and most unexplainable symptoms. al jazeera's lisa fletcher introduces us to one young patient whose disease is taking her memories. >> this is building 10, a surprisingly generic name for the facility at epicenter for rare and untreatable diseases. here scientists are scrambling to find a cure for a fatal
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genetic condition that destroys memory, motor skills and the lives of kids like 15-year-old julia cains. >> what does it do to you? >> it builds up cholesterol in my brain that causes me to forget things a lot and not memorize things like other people memorize things, and it causes me to not walk right, like my walking is not stable. my handwriting is sometimes sloppy. >> do you remember life before the disease? >> uh-uh. >> do you remember being able to run around or remember things easily? do you remember life being different? >> if i looked at something,
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then or someone brought something up, i'd probably remember it, but just sitting here, i can't think of anything that i did when i was little. >> julia says she doesn't worry about the future. for now, she's looking forward to her upcoming 16th birthday and her first prom, hosted by the tim tebow foundation for teenagers with special needs. >> is it hard sometimes to stay positive? >> yes. >> but you're determined. >> yes. >> give me the next five years for julia. what do you see? >> a grownup, and a pretty grownup, and i'm going to have a bunch of adopted kids. >> why? >> because i like kids.
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>> why adopted? >> because i don't think i'd be able to have any with this disease. >> those are going to be some pretty luck wry kids. >> uh-huh. >> al jazeera, bethesda maryland. it airs weeknights at 9:30 eastern, 6:30 pacific. no word from the governor of south dakota whether he is going to sign a law, the state legislature approving a measure that would require transgender students to use bathrooms and locker rooms of their biological sex, not the sex of their choosing. high winds are causing multiple problems across the central united states. let's bring in nicole mitchell for that story. nicole. >> good morning. it's at that point out of the west, and that is the setup. ahead of this, it's a southerly
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flow and strong one at that, a really big pressure gradient when the pressure changes dramatically, you get the high winds. in pores of the southern plains, you can see the flow switch around to the south, winds gusting over 20 miles an hour in some cases. it's going to be more profound to the rest of the day. northern plains and coming out of the rockies could be hurricane gusts, bad for high profiles. red flag warnings for fire danger in february because not only are the winds, but we have a low humidity with that southerly flow coming more out of mexico versus the gulf flow. high temperatures, wichita, lubbock into the 80's today, those would be records. the warm air spreads into portions well into even the rockies, billings at 61 degrees today, so that system will cause a number of problems as it moves across the country. >> and it's moving east. >> it is. >> nicole, thank you very much.
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life on the border, the berlin film festival showcasing a children who say a refugee camp is their home.
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this weekend we find who gets the top prize at the berlin film festival. one movie is getting a lot of attention, called life on the border. it was made by the very children, refugee children who are also the subject. >> strictly speaking, it's not a documentary, but it's probably as close as you can get to experiencing this refugee camp without traveling to the syria border. life on the border was filmed by aid children after fleeing war
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and isil attacks. a group of kurdish filmmakers taught them to use cameras and helped them script scenes. some of the stories that emerged were just too traumatic to show. >> some of the kids, we wanted to make, to give them the camera to talk about themselves but it was terrible, so we didn't want to tell them to shoot this story. what's happened before. it's like two times happened to them. >> the movie does feature harrowing scenes like where children-year-old co director and his sister returned to the bombed out town of kobani looking for their parents' home. there are lighter moments, like
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where they got to see a hollywood blockbuster. now the children's own film is getting a special screening in berlin, thanks to some rule bending. >> it goes against our regulations. we won't screen films made by children, but this was so strong and the theme so strong and what is coming out of these film is so strong and necessary, we really do need to show that here in berlin, so we traded a platform for it. >> the experience of intense for all involved and for one member of the team led to death threats. he is now seeking asylum in germany. >> i had to leave iraqi kurdistan. i went to turkey and on to greece by boat and now i'm in germany. it's hard for me doing great work and they be forced to leave my country. >> the issue of immigration has become a lot more controversial here since the country took in more than a million refugees in
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2015. with films like life on the border, this year's film festival is providing a reminder the conditions many of those refugees have left behind. ahead in our next hour, the minority vote, democrats work to win from blacks and la teen knows, two groups that could swing the primaries and election. european leaders talk about backing turkey after a syrian refugee is now blamed for that deadly bombing in ankara. we are back in two minutes. >> what in god's name makes you think that you can handle stress, anxiety, depression... post-traumatic stress? >> the closest i got was sitting in my truck, gun in hand. >> who will save america's heroes? >> i wish he'd been able to talk to somebody. >> "faultlines". >> what do we want? >> al jazeera america's
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hard-hitting... >> today the will be arrested. >> ground-breaking... >> they're firing canisters of gas at us. >> emmy award-winning, investigative series.
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the final stretch, donald trump, ted cruz todaying barbs as trump's lead shrinks before south carolina voters head to the polls. turkey's president vows to go after syrian kurds after a bomb rips through ankara. a california hospital pace money to get its commuters back on line. olympic organizers in rio say it is safe to come to the games, but health experts warn
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the danger is very real. good morning and welcome to your world this morning. i'm del walters. i am stephanie sy. it is neck and neck in the race to the white house on both sides of the aisle. we are two days from the primary on the republican side and democratic caucuses on the democratic side. bernie sanders and hillary clinton now neck and neck locked in a dead heat in nevada. on the republican side, the latest national survey shows ted cruz has inched ahead of donald trump. it's the first time that's happened so far this race. in the latest town halls, each candidate talked about why he is the most qualified to be president. >> my campaign is not about the past, it's about the future, about what we're going to do. i can say this to you without hesitation, i am as conservative as anyone running for president, but i am a 15 year conservative who has proven time and again the capability and the
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willingness to take conservative ideas and turn them into conservative solutions. >> i can guarantee you that i've had more 2:00 a.m. phone calls than anybody else, all of the rest of them put together, had to make life and death decisions, derive information from residents who didn't know a lot but you've still got to get the right information, make decisions, put together complex teams to accomplish things that have never before been accomplished before. >> we come out of november 2016 with a mandate from the people and that's exactly what i intend to do. >> donald trump participated in a separate town hall meeting hosted by msnbc. >> i think i will set myself apart because my policies are better. i'm a much better business person, they've never employed anybody, ever. i'm going to bring the country far better than they're going to do.
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far better than they're going to do. ted cruz is a nat city guy. he doesn't have one republican endorsement from the senate and he works with the senate. think of i have the, hard to believe. >> tonight trump moves to cnn for a second straight night of town hall grilling. he'll be joined by john kasich and jeb bush. >> senator marco rubio getting a huge boost with just days to go before the south korea primary. the state's governor nikki haley indoorsing him. >> ladies and gentlemen, if we elect marco rubio, every day will be a great day in america. >> i'm so honored that you chose to join our team, because she embodies everything for me that i want the republican party and conservative movement to be about. >> even before this enforcement, marco rubio's campaign was attracting enthusiastic crowds. >> we feel great. we love being here on that our campaign keeps growing, flows greet folks have been willing to come out and see me.
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>> he already won the support of the state's african-american senator tim scott. >> help me welcome the next president of the united states, marco rubio! >> like a prize fighter entering a ring, rubio took aim at president obama with a well worn line. >> we are going to have to undo the damage that barack obama has done to this country. >> when i say that and i say it more than once in the press, they say he is repeating himself, so. >> rubio trying to make light of his disastrous performance at the new hampshire debate when he repeated a line critical of obama four times, a debacle that helped sink his campaign there.
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nikki haley's endorsement is a huge get. we asked rubio about it. >> we'd love her endorsement. i hope it would be very positive for the campaign. i hope he leaves south carolina with a tail wind. >> it is a blow for jeb bush who had been courting govern hailee. bush remains near the bottom of the republican field in the state with donald trump still in front, but rubio supporters like his lowe key style. >> i think he's the most mature guy. he's the youngest, but he's not shouting, yelling and he knows his stuff. >> just bringing america back to what it was, fixing what was done wrong. >> sounds like donald trump. >> no, no. he's too hot headed. >> let's say he comes in second, best case scenario, then i think it gives him the opportunity to
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continue to fundraise, continue to try to run the strong campaign in the super tuesday states. >> the once tea heart favorite is now seen at more mainstream. he is touting an inclusive brand of conservatism which would allow him to bring the party together and beat the democratic nominee to become the 45t 45th president of the united states. >> the scoreboard is on. did they just have a game right before, or is that the 45t 45th president of the united states? huh? [ applause ] >> lisa stark, al jazeera, on the campaign trail in south carolina. hillary clinton is campaigning today in nevada ahead of the caucuses there. wednesday, she was in chicago with the mother of sandra bland, the young african-american woman found dead in a texas jail cell last summer days after arrested during a traffic stop. bernie sanders is also trying to court minority voters while dismissing comments by rapper killer mike. the rapper spoke at a sanders
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rally in atlanta, quoting a democratic activist who said a "uterus doesn't qualify you to be president of the united states." the comment sparked a debate on social media. a spokesperson for sanders said gender should not be a reason to vote for or against someone. we'll talk much more about the minor groups democrats trying to court to help lock up the nomination. president obama saying he's not going to attend antonin scalia's funeral. some republicans are angry about it. he said he will pay respects at the supreme court on friday when his body will lie in repose. he plans to send vice president joe biden to saturday's funeral at the largest catholic church in north america. former court justice sandra day o'connor weighing in on who she thinks should replace scalia's appointment. she said it is unfortunate the decision is being politicized. >> when one side says they would like to wait for the next president, what do you think?
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>> i don't agree. i think we need somebody there now to do the job and let's get on with it. >> o'connor was the first woman to serve on the supreme court. she was nominated by then president ronald reagan. she retired in 2006 to care for her ailing husband. some republicans seem to be breaking ranks with the party leaders over whether hearings should be held for the next justice. senator of nevada saying the president should nominate someone to fill scalia's seat. his office later back tracked. then second in command to mitch mcconnell said he's open to hearings. chuck grassley has already said he will wait until a nominee is named to decide whether to schedule hearings. a deadly car bomb attack went off in ankara wednesday. 28 people were killed. a convoy of military personnel near the turkish parliament was the target. turkish leaders blame kurdish
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rebels from syria. >> the p.y.g. and y.p.g. have links to the p.k.k. in turkey we have touched upon. we have said repeatedly there is a strong link between them. this attack will help our allies understand. we've been saying this that sooner or our allies will understand and those that support them will be judged. >> president erdogan has launched airstrikes against kurdish positions in iraq. the strikes have killed 70 fighters. we have a report from ankara. >> strong words from the turkish government, both the president erdogan and prime minister pointed the finger at the y.p.g., a syrian based kurdish armed group which the west, the u.s. and allies claim is fighting isil. turkey believe it is an off shoot of the p.k.k., the kurdish separatist group at war for
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decades now and it considers them a terrorist organization. this angers turkey, because it says the u.s. and allies because turkey is a nato member should not be dealing with the y.p.g. and consider it as a terrorist organization. the turkish authorities identified a 24-year-old syrian occurred as the perpetrator behind wednesday's attack, saying it has detained 14 our culprits it claims were responsible for this. in the past 12 hours, turkish air force planes have bombed kurdish sites in northern iraq as well as shelling sites inside syria. turkey said this latest attack should serve as a wake up calm to the international community that a buffer zone needs to be created inside syria, that it needs ground troops under the umbrella of an international coalition, that it's not enough to fight isil, some action has to be taken against the kurdish
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groups which the governments using the kurdish groups as a performy in its fight against ankara. this can't happen as long as russia continues to control the skies. the russian air force has been bombing parts of syria for several weeks, if not months now. unless nato backs up turkey and goes into confrontation with russia or some sort of international agreement can be forged whereby some sort of buffer zone can be formed, these attacks could well continue for weeks and months to come. >> the u.s. and nato condemned the attack in ankara. activists blame the deaths of at least 15 syrian civilians on u.s. led coalition airstrikes. the syrian observatory on human rights said the strikes targeted isil controlled villages in the northeast and warns the death toll could rise. nine isil fighters were killed in the attack. president obama will become the first u.s. president to visit cuba in almost 90 years.
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the white house expected to announce a trip to the island sometime in mid march. it will be part of a broader latin america tour by the president. days ago, the u.s. and cuba agreeing to restore passenger flights between the two countries. that is one of the latest steps as they continue to normalize relations. >> president obama creating a new commission to handle cyber security, appointing his natural security advisor and chief executive to lead the team. the task is to issue guidelines on the nation protecting itself from future cyber threats. there's a hospital in california this morning defending just how it maced to end a hack attack on one of its servers. >> it paid thousands to end a cyber threat fit for a hollywood film. >> hollywood presbyterian medical center paid up after hackers held them up for ransom. the kiber thieves took control of the california hospital computers demanding a payment of $17,000 in digital currency
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called bit coins. >> once they in effect your system, it's contagious and they in effect file after file after file. it's a key to undo it, like a virus and an antidote. the key is the antidote. >> the hospital says the witchest and most efficient way to restore our systems and administrative functions was to pay the ransom and obtain the decorruption key. the hacked computers had been off line for a week, including those needed for the emergency room. all the signs said do not use the computers. i'm like what's going on with the computers? they said wedding hacked. >> inn email to al jazeera, the f.b.i. confirmed it is investigating a cyber compromise at the hospital in order to determine the person or group responsible, but due to the on going investigation, we're not at liberty to provide specific
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details. a similar attack happened to a south florida plastic surgeon two years ago. >> all we knew was that there were these internet black malars saying we have to pay them in bit coin immediately or we would lose all our files forever. >> the doctor said it took about a week, but after paying the ransom in bit coin, he received the codes and regained control of his files. i.t. experts warn we are likely to see more affection like this. >> it's a form of the easiest armed robbery that you can have. we are not fast enough in curbing this down. this will happen and unfortunately more and more. >> according to a global network security report, there was a 25% increase in ransom attacks last year. >> all the systems are back to normal. they are working with experts to understand how this happened and how to protect themselves in the future. >> for obvious reasons, a lot of the incidents are kept secret, but we do know that some police departments have also been hacked. >> a police department in
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massachusetts, also a sheriff's department in tennessee. in those cases, those departments paid about $600 in bit coins. a lot of times, the ransom money they are asking for, it's such you a has toll not have the files, they just pay up. >> the f.b.i. wants them to report it, but why report it when it costs so little to get it back but it's still a crime. rain in california. >> some of other recent systems have only gotten rain to the northern portion of the state. this last system, you can see that moisture flow all the way to southern california. as i put this in motion, that spreads through the rockies, another one coming in, a little bit more of that rain for portions of california and another behind this. the northwest stays moist for the next couple days. at least a lot of the state of california this time around did get some areas of rain. not enough to cause too many flood concerns.
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a lot of the higher elevations are getting some areas of snow. that is great news for the snow pack. here's a look at some of that moisture. northern parts of the rockies, cascades, portions of the sierra picking up snow. along the coastline, california northward is the heaviest amounts of rain, just for today could be three or four inches in some case. the heaviest amount of know, northern areas of the sierra, but most of that is above 5,000 or 6,000 feet. all these areas of brown, as this system pulse out, incredibly high winds, portions of the rockies moving into the northern plains, over hurricane force, high profile vehicles yet another thing to worry about as he head out today. trying to win over african-american voters. >> hillary clinton getting key endorsements, but her rival gaining ground especially with younger black voters. security in the south china
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sea, an arms race with the u.s. at the front of the pack. ((úz@9
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the democratic presidential candidates in nevada. yesterday in chicago, hillary clinton talked race and all the police shootings in the city. we have more. >> at a rally to get out the vote in the city's historic bronzeville neighborhood, hillary clinton found support from a grieving mother. >> from now until november,
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let's fiercely support this lady. i present to you secretary hillary rodham clinton, our next president. >> her daughter was arrested in waller county texas in july after an altercation with a police officer during a traffic stop. she was later found hanged in her jail cell. >> we owe it to them to reform police practices, to make sure that no other young woman like sandra bland is ever pulled out of a car for no good reason and thrown into a jail where she is found dead. >> while clinton is polling strongly among black voters in chicago, some are still on the fence. >> my mind has not been made up, but i feel as though her heart is in it. >> after a narrow victory in iowa and double digit loss to bernie sanders in new hampshire, clinton looks to shore up support among black voters ahead of the primary in south carolina, where they make up more than 50% of democratic
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voters. >> to outline what i intend to do to break down the barriers. it's important that we look at everything that holds people back and yesterday my core emphasis and commitment to knocking down the barriers and holding back african-americans. >> clinton and sanders have been criticized by the black lives matter movement. still, clinton has rebounded with support from others like the civil rights legend representative june lewis. clinton aligned herself with president obama who has a 90% approval rating with african-americans. >> she rebuked sander for not standing strongly with the president. >> today, senator sanders said president obama failed the presidential leadership test. this is not the first time he has criticized president obama. in the past, he's called him weak, a disappointment. >> one of us ran against barack obama. i was not that candidate.
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>> it's a strategy some political watchers say could help win the support of black voters here in the primary a month from now. >> it's not lost on chicago voters that he chose her to be his first asks, so that association is very strong, a very wise strategy for her to cue closely to the president's agenda and policies, and this is a winning strategy. >> for now, clinton maintains a huge edge going into the next primary. muck likely african-american primary voters, clinton polls at 63% to sanders 23% in south carolina. maintaining support of african-american voter is important for the democratic candidate date to be well beyond the primaries. al jazeera, chicago. sandra cooper owens is a professor of african-american history at queens college. thanks for being with us. i want to show you this bernie sanders appearance right after he announced. black lives matters protestors
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interrupts his speech. >> now he is embraced by the daughter of eric garner. how did the protest movement because part of the political mainstream, because he's using her embracing of him in his campaign ads. >> this has a lot to do with black lives matter. it was started on social media in 2012 by three clear identified black young women and they then moved from kind of arm chair activism to galvanizing of movement of younger folk, so i think once you had the interruption that happened with a few of the members at his campaign rally, he had to take very seriously that there was intersectionalty which was a huge term they use within the movement, that race and class
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are intersectional, that they are linked. >> in the 1960's, the battle cry was don't trust anybody over 30. now it seems it is don't trust the establishment, regardless of who the establishment might be. in this case, it would seem to be hillary clinton. >> right. >> and even though bernie sanders is an older person, he seems to be the one that is anti establishment. >> i think that's the perception, right? he's still a career politician, in many ways, so he is inside the establishment. i think his democratic socialist orientation makes him'm seem at least for a lot of these younger voters a little more authentic. right? >> is black lives matter now mainstream? beian say at the superbowl, den cercla mar at grammys, has it found a new voice in hollywood as much as it was harry belafonte back in the 1960's?
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>> i think black lives matter became mainstream once it was interesting to journalists, once it was interesting to americans who were trying to understand what unapologetic blackness meant, which is one of the principles of black lives matter, so what then happens is a lens is focused and tightened on this group and beyonce is a member of that generation, and so i don't necessarily know if the leaders of black lives matter see her as a spokesperson, as king might have saw harry belafonte, but i think they certainly are overjoyed and embracing this display, right, especially during the superbowl and day before when she came up with the release of the formation video of the championing of black beauty, and south everyone black culture, and clear black culture and these are principles in the linking forces that black lives
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matter has talked. >> you're on a college campus, explain to me when you ask the question where do you get your information from. >> twitter. >> twitter. >> it's twitter. >> so new news from any organizations that would be considered to be the mainstream media. >> not really. this isn't to say that they aren't tapped into some of those news sources, but i think that the news sources aren't tapped into social media and largely for those who are young, young folk interested in the kind of platform of black lives matter, they are getting it from social media. >> what that is if this movement can't deliver? we were looking at them, occupy wall street, kony 2012, he's still there, bring back our girls, the kidnapped girls in nigeria, boko haram still
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missing. what that is if this movement may, promise it can't deliver on? >> that's the thing. i think some of these women and leaders coming out of this movement are really, really smart. they are not making promises, because as much as they are politicized, they recognize that for them at least, they are working within a system where those promises probably can't be kept or met. what they're doing is trying to raise awareness. >> are they smart or has the media given them a platform to just be angry, not necessarily guided angry, but just angry. >> if you look at their website, these are smart people, right? just like anybody who was interested in kind of, you know, in the 1960's, it was nation building, consciousness rising. these are young people who are formally educated, they are using a lot of the theories that come out of political science, history, critical race studies, and what they're doing is making
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that kind of theoretical link accessible for people in their age group and so they're also putting theory into practice. what that means is if they're talking about intersectionalty, then someone like beyonce who has clearly been influenced like that is going to include big frida. >> i said they didn't have a voice, they do now. >> they have a voice. >> i've got to start tweeting more. securing europe's borders, turkey blames a syrian refugee for a deadly bombing as the e.u. asks how to handle a flood of migrants. rowee olympic organizers talks about protecting athletes from zika.
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>> mdma helps with the therapeutic connection. >> exclusive access to the... >> our fears are dancing between us. >> techknows team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> this is what innovation looks like. >>...can affect and surprise us. >> i feel like we're making an impact. >> awesome. >> techknow, where technology meets humanity. >> only on al jazeera america. . a new national poll shows ted cruz inching ahead of donald trump for the first time in the race. the numbers are within the margin of error. tonight, those republican candidates gather for another t.v. town hall. last night, they clashed over privacy, security and foreign policy. a california hospital paid
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$17,000 in bit coins to end a cyber attack on its computer system. the hollywood presbyterian hospital saying it fells it was the best way toned the attack that locked off some critical systems and knocked them off line. turkey's president erdogan views to retaliate after a car bomb attack in ankara, blaming kurdish syrian rebels for the attack. it has already launched airstrikes against kurdish positions in iraq issues the government in turkey said the person who carried out that bombing registered as a refugee. >> european leaders against an open door plan for the refugees are now concerned that will happen in their country, as well. many are meeting in brussels today to talk about migrant policies. german chancellor angela merkel leading the charge for a plan that release on all the countries in the eu to accept a refugee quota. some states are against that and want to close their borders altogether. we are live in brussels this morning.
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emma, who exactly is pushing back against angela merkel and why are they so against it? >> it is the eastern block nations trying to push against angela merkel. she was supposed to hold a meeting with some of them earlier today, but what happened in ankara has prevented that going ahead. we've heard in the last half hour or so about hungary saying it wants to build a fence along its bored tore keep migrants out. it already has several border fences, and it is interesting to think at this moment here in europe, we are talking about integration, but also talking about building fences. >> also, this two day summit focused on stopping the uk from leaving the european union altogether, is that not also true? >> yes, this will be the thrust of today's meetings here in brussels. david cameron arrives earlier
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today. he has had a big week and face as big day here in brussels. he arrives saying he is battling for britain and doesn't want it to go away without a deal that suits britain. a lot is at stake for him and for the european union, because of course britain is the third biggest economy in the e.u. there are some major sticking points with the deal that david cameron wants to get with the e.u. some nations are very much against him getting what some people reward as concessions. remember whatever deal he gets here in brussels, he has to take that back to the u.k., which is planning to hold a referendum on e.u. membership perhaps as early as june of this year. >> emma, thank you very much. >> lawmakers in arizona pushing a bill that would block new refugees from resettling in their state. a house committee passing that mash on wednesday. 3600 refugees have resettled in arizona, that state receiving more than $13 million in federal
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aid to help refugees with their transition. the trial is underway in phoenix for a man accused of supporting isil, prosecutors opening their case on wednesday against four the 44 get. he is charged with orchestrating a violent attack at a cartoon contest in texas last year that was designed to show i am packages of the prophet mohammed. satellite images in the south china sea seem to prove surface to air mills silence on the island. the tensions have made it a seller's market for defense contractors. al jazeera's scott heidler has the latest. >> the sky over the south china sea is becoming crowded. several nations, including vietnam, the philippines and malaysia are accusing china of moving in on their sovereign territory. china refute this, saying 90% of the south china sea is theirs. what's undeniable is that the
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steadily increasing tension has led to a military buying spree. >> i think china's military expansion, it's increases and its defense spending and its actions in the maritime area have in fact triggered something of an arms race. >> a united states military footprint in the region is not new. it's been steadily growing over the last several years. >> militarization of the south china sea and particularly the artificial islands that will be used for military purposes by china is a concern for the united states, but doesn't pose an existential threat. >> the u.s. wants its presence felt.
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>> i can't tell you how much it means to me to go out here and see all this joint air power and what we're doing as team america and being out here to show our commitment. >> part of that show of strength in the region is this, the p.8 poseidon, one of the most sophisticated aircraft in the sky. the united states frequently flies them over disputed territory. >> whether it's singapore or the philippines, all over the asia pacific, we're able to easily within the span of a short amount of time put you have one of our jets there and operate out of that region and support our region allies. the philippines has taken its territorial dispute with china to the hague and recently announced it's buying nearly $100 million worth of military equipment to boost maritime security, it says. if the situation in the south china sea continues on this track of heightened tension, the region could remain one of the defense industries dream markets for years to come. >> scott heidler, al jazeera, singapore.
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there's a push this morning to raise funds to com ability the zika virus. the world health organization wants at least $56 million from the international community to fast track vaccines and research how the virus spreads. most of the effort is focused on rio de janeiro where the olympics will be held this august. >> the government is working very hard pulling out all the stops, working with the international olympic committee and brazil is also working with them to look at what are the appropriate measures we could put in place to ensure that visitors and athletes have a safe and enjoyable olympic games in rio de janeiro. >> the communications director for rio 2016 talked to us about easing the concerns of athletes who fear contracting zika. >> we are checking the venues for soccer the same way we are
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checking all the other venues. in the rain forest areas where we will have soccer matches, the rate of infection is not as high as it is in the northeast side of brazil. anyway, we are not leaving anything to chance and checking all the venues the same way on a daily base, because checking the areas for stagnant water and everything is still the fastest way to curb the evolution of the mosquito, the reproduction of the mosquito, so is the safest way to protect the athletes. >> some health experts are worried that the olympic games could actually spread zeke globally as visitors to rio return to their home countries. if the world health organization were to say that the games should be postponed or canceled, have you thought about what you would do? >> we have to focus on what we can do. zika crisis in a global crisis,
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it affects everyone on the planet and we are working under the guidance of the world health organization. i think it's too soon for to us think and speculate what could be done with the games. we need to work to protect athletes, to protect our guests and to guarantee the games will be safe. that's what we are doing. you just reported the world health organization wants more money to accelerate research so we can find a vaccine or scientific means to combat the mosquitoes and that's where we need to focus now. we just had carnival in brazil, more than 2 million people went to the streets, people from all over the world came to enjoy the carnival and we haven't seen any change in the pattern of infection or any specific change due to carnival, so we need to have careful policy of wait and see, keep protecting the venues
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and the athlete. >> brazil dispatched soldiers to educate people about the zika infection. here's what marco rubio said last night. >> some of the neighborhood kids, older kids one day were taunt be my family saying why don't you go back on your boat to your country. i was seven years old, i didn't know what they were talking about. i said my mom doesn't even swim. she's afraid of water. i got to tell you for the most part in my life, i never saw it as a reflection on america. i saw it as a reflection on those kids and what they were saying. my parents never raised is to feel we were victims. they raised us to believe our destiny and our future, we lived where if you work hard and
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persevered, you could achieve. i don't deny there are people in this country who have had a different experience. if you look back on the history of the country, we have film issues that i believe to this day we are fighting through. >> minority voters could make or break the contests in south carolina and nevada. llatinos are an important vote for both parties. bernie sanders is now gaining traction. lucy flores in a congressional democratic candidate from nevada and bernie supporter joining us this morning. lucy, thank you for join you guess and thank you for your time. >> absolutely. >> let's start with the democrats. how decisive could the latino vote be in the clinton-sanders rate? >> it absolutely can be decisive and has proven to be in the past. this is a demographic that both candidates have been very
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aggressively courting in nevada, a little latino population is close to 30% of the population and close to 20% of the voting population, about 17 to be exact. this isn't a small number, and we have seen in the past both in primaries and during caucuses that the latino demographic has absolutely been the deciding fact or. it's critically important for these campaigns, both bernie and clinton to be able to court and count on their support. >> what issues are driving latinos in nevada and which candidate they end up supporting, including yourself? >> well, you know, i a couple of weeks ago endorsed bernie sanders, and i think that the reasons that i endorsed him, his focus on income inequality, has focused on corruption in politics, this idea that government isn't working for every day people anymore, that very much resonates with the
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latino community and frankly everyone. this is a message that resonates across gender, across ethnicity, across everything, and so when you ask latinos what's the most important thing that matters to you, they talk about jobs, they talk about access to a good quality education for their kids. they talk about their futures and this is very much in line with what bernie sanders has made priority in his campaign. >> that list of issues you just mentioned that are important, you did not talk about immigration. i know that hillary clinton has been talking a lot on the stump about how senator sanders rejected a 2007 bill that would have made and given millions of immigrants legal status. he has been very protective, though, of the american class, working class. is that a weakness for him among latino voters, that rejection of the bill in 2007? >> absolutely not. when we talk about what happened
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with that bill and the reason why he didn't agree with that bill and frankly that other democrats also did not agree with that bill was because of the temporary worker provision in that bill. frankly that it turned people into indentured servants, didn't give people an opportunity to become citizens. he was very much against that. where he stands now on immigration, his policy moving forward, frankly, secretary clinton not too long ago said that we should be sending the children, the refugee children from central america back and that we needed to send a message through those children. i think that you start to find pretty clear distinctions between the two of them on where they stand on immigration, but, you know, i didn't mention immigration because yes, that's a topic that's important to the latino community, but it's not -- and in effects a lot of
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people in nevada, we do have one of the largest proportion of undocumented in nevada, however they are more concerned about jobs and education and these issues that matter to -- >> that's so interesting, because that's something our previous guest in the program also talked about. she called it the intersectionalty. i almost wonder if bernie sanders has brought out a post racial generation of voters. are you seeing that by the way in young voters in nevada? >> absolutely. this is a message that resonates across genders and ethnicities. when we talk about income in quality, we are talking about the in quality that exists because of other reasons and you have to attack these issues from all sides. this isn't something that can be
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completely siloed. these around siloed independent issues. it's important to talk about economic opportunities for new immigrants and for their families and of course, you know, fixing the immigration system because that affects the outcome of our economy. we know that when we fix our broken immigration system, it's going to improve our economy. all of these issues are very much related and ultimately people need a job and need education to be successful. >> lucy flores, thank you so much for joining us this morning on al jazeera. my pleasure. we're going to talk about a state facing real life decisions every day, illinois making tough cuts trying to stay afloat. >> we look at the effects that is having on those with addiction.
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a man accused of killing four inside a washington, d.c. mansion has been indict, facing 20 charges, including 12 counts of first degree murder. he is accused of killing three members of the family and their housekeeper in may. prosecutors say he then set the family's $4.5 million mansion on fire. he faces life in prison if convicted. no word from the governor of south dakota if he will sign a law requiring transgender students to use the bathrooms and locker rooms of their biological sex, not the one of their choosing.
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if the governor signs it, it would be the first state to have such a law. manny pacquiao said animals do not engage in same sex acts and concluded gays are worst than animals. nike called the comment abhor remember. pacquiao has since apologized. >> a lot of rain, higher elevations with the snow and ahead of this system, a lot in terms of high winds. these pick up through the day. the flow with this is still a dry flow and as all of this moves into the midwest, it is going to cause my profile vehicles, for example, you're going to have a problem. northern parts of this says winds could be hurricane force. we get into the central plains, 40-50-mile per hour gusts. we already have gusts starting to approach 20 and 30-mile an hour, but all that have coming
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together. the southern flow is warming things up. we have this red flag, fire danger through the course of today widespread in the central and southern plains because of the combination of high winds and low humidity spreading things out. record setting temperatures again for this region, including wichita or lubbock into the 80's today. some place could shatter records by a few degrees. that warmth spreads northwards, billings at 61. the eastern half of the united states has quieted down pretty significantly. the next system that could change that. there could be a little ice today in the northern parts of the midwest because of that temperature shift. that little bit of moisture shifts across the great lakes, not a lot, but just some nuisance weather the next few days. >> boring weather for you. difficult chases they are
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making in illinois. >> many blame politics for cuts that could hurt the state's most vulnerable.
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things are back to normal in chicago one day after the parents in the community took part in what they called a walk in, protests at more than 200 school districts. there is a bitter fight over a new contract. the entire state of illinois is dealing with serious money
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problems. the governor wants to cut billions to end a budget stalemate. as al jazeera reports, the money fight there is having a major impact on some of the state's most vulnerable residents. >> kristin ward is a nurse who treats drug addicts at chicago's kenmore center run by lutheran social services. ward was a drug addict herself, spent months in jail and finally hit rock bottom before coming here. >> the environment, what i felt was like a very safe, comfortable place to heal and grow. i was at a bottom that no one wanted to help me, and this was the only -- this was my only choice. >> most of the services here are going away because the state is locked in a budget stalemate between first term republican governor and a democratic controlled state legislature. this is the longest illinois has ever gone without a state budget. the state has not paid about $6.5 billion of its bills.
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each side is blaming each other. >> the majority party in the general assembly thought that just raising taxes to fund those services, they could do it. they haven't even moved a finger to go do that. >> we ought to get busy, sit down, what can we do to solve this budget problem. payments to lottery winners have been delayed, but the cuts to lutheran social services represent the biggest and most ominous cuts yet. >> we are just adding to the amount of people in illinois who cannot access services. >> the floor ward works will stay open, but another for cold turkey detox is closing as is the residence hall for female addicts.
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>> i don't even know the word for it. it's just making it harder and more difficult for everybody. >> the human services department tell us the patients he here will have other options for treatment but the director says that's like ford shutting down and g.m. and chrysler having to pick up the slack. >> the simple nature of going someplace where you're familiar, where you trust the staff, that's going to be gone. >> it's going to be a fight to get into treatment centers, because they're closing all these places and people want to get in. they want help. >> lutheran social services says the state owes it $6 million for services and hasn't made a payment in seven months, so it's laying off 750 people around the state, affecting nearly 5,000 patients and senior citizens. >> like purely knowing that i deserve to be happy. >> there is no patience for the politicians in this budget stalemate. >> if it's about the money, they're going to be paying for it with jail or prison, and it's going to be more money. >> even the alcohol rehab clinic where frank harris got clean years ago is now closing. he and kristin ward fear for
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those who are just like they used to be. andy rosen, al jazeera, chicago. the actors behind the sitcom good times are going to be getting back together with help from the public. they are launching a kickstarter campaign. they want top shoot a new movie, calling is a ducudramedy comedy. 1974-1979, it still lives on in indication. >> i just checked, they're at $5,150. they're trying to get a million dollars to get the movie going. >> that does it for us here in new york. >> your world this morning back tomorrow morning beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. we'll look at the new push for justice in flint, religious
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leaders joining in the calls for change. have a great day. turkey blames kurdish groups for a bomb attack in ankara and says bashar al assad is behind it. here are the rest of the top stories on al jazeera. 16 more suspected isil members are sentenced to death over one of iraq's most notorious massacres. claims are voting irregularities in uganda as the president seeks to extend his 30 year rule. the berlin film festival showcases work by child refugees.

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