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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  February 24, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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donald trump wins big in nevada as marco rubio and ted cruz fight it out for second place, is donald trump unstoppable heading into super-tuesday. >> tornados tearing through the south killing three, millions more in their path awaiting the next move. >> closing guantanamo, concerns about the plan to shut the prison warnings about the zika virus, authorities revealing more than a dozen cases in the u.s. may have been sexually transmitt
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transmitted. >> we weren't expected to win too much. now we are winning, winning, winning the country. [ cheering ] >>. >> and soon the country will start winning, winning trump celebrating a win. i'm del walters, welcome to your morning. stephanie has the day off. donald trump had a decisive victory with close to 60% who caucused. marco rubio barely beating ted cruz for second place, ben carson, john kasich in single digits. melissa, what is behind the big win by donald trump? >> well, whenever we had the chance to speak to nevada voters, their eyes light up. there's a sense of exhilaration that he's breaking the rules of
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politics. [ chanting ] >> reporter: it is a win for donald trump in nevada. the real estate mogul with three back to back victories, and a surge of momentum heading into super-tuesday. >> we won with the eadvantagealicals, we won with young, we won with old. we won with highly educated. we won with poorly educated - i love the poorly educated. >> reporter: donald trump was a heavy favourite and in the caucuses he towered over the top two rivals, with nearly double the support of his nearest competitor. despite the latest results, the two candidates battling to be the chief challenger are optimistic, and not ready to back down. it is believed that donald trump is vulnerable. >> the deniable reality is that
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the only campaign that has beaten donald trump, and the only campaign that can beat donald trump is this campaign. >> marco rubio left nevada to rally in michigan. it's not one of the states in the superprimary. sending the message that the campaign will make america better. >> we'll take our message to the people with super tuesday looming it could be tougher for any candidate to pull together the support they need. surveys show he's made headway in the home state texas, and is leading in florida. rubio's territory. a winning streak that increasingly seems unstoppable. >> we'll bring in so much funny and so much everything. we'll make america great again. we'll make america great again. >> you know, it's interesting,
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we spoke to a life-long democrat who decided he is going to vote for trump. i asked him what if trump doesn't make it to the general election, who will you vote for, and he would consider voting for bernie sanders, i was surprised. he said it makes sense. they are two sides of the same coin, they are antiestablishment. he said i'm working class. we are angry, fend up. >> i take it that is the big issues for voters. the fact that somebody is coming from outside. >> absolutely. the other thing that everyone is talking about as we went from table to table and talking to people is immigration. in nevada, that's a big issue. democrats shifted. people were blunt, saying hispanics would arrive. they have taken our jobs. >> melissa, thank you very much. >> on the democratic side hillary clinton and bernie sanders making a last-minute
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pitch to south carolina at a town haul meeting. coming days before the state holds its primary. >> both candidates bernie sanders and hillary clinton taking a last chance to talk to the voters of south carolina. this was a town hall meeting setting. there were no fire works between the candidates. they appeared on stage with the host separately. members of the public got to arriving them tough questions in what was an intimate setting. band was up first. his main task to convince he was not only a progressive but he could get things done. >> do we have the guts to take on the power of the insurance companies. do we have the cuts to take on the pharmaceutical injury with 1300 paid lobbyists. i believe when the americans stand up and sit health care is
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a right of all people, not a privilege. i believe we can do that. >> with vital african-american votes in play, justice reform, a key sanders pledging. >> there is something wrong when african-americans in south carolina and others around the country get nervous about walking down the street and going into their car and are stopped by a police officer. that should not be happening in america. >> secretary clinton is ahead in the polls. sanders needs their votes if he's to win, nodding in their direction with a personal direction. >> dad came from poland. i'm running for president. no one asked for my birth certificate. maybe it's the colour of my skin. i don't know. >> clinton forced herself is she too close to wall street banks like goldman sachs. >> why is there one standard for me, and not for everyone else.
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>> i have a record. it's far different from the republicans, because they think, actually, and have said that the cause of the great recession was too much regulation on wall street, which is a joke. >> she may be ahead among vital finance minister voters. clinton took no chances. ask the gun violence to stand uch. >> racial issues have to be addressed. otherwise we are never going to be the nation we should be. >> and the state department emails, the topic will not die down, client asked to defend using a private internet server in her own home. it turned over 60,000, nobody has been transparent or open. i'm not worried about it. it's worth making the point that african american voters make up half the vote and will do on saturday. hillary clinton is sticking
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around, campaigning for most of the week. bernie sanders leaving town. an contact of the lead in the polls that secretary clint has. >> the president call -- marco rubio says people should be hut into guantanamo, not bivening let out. >> we are not giving back the naval base. not only are we not going to close guantanamo. if i'm president. if we capture a terrorist alive. they are not getting a court hearing. they'll go to guantanamo and find out everything they know. >> the plan to close gitmo may be dead on arrival. and house speaker rejecting the proposal calling it neither smart nor safe. the president gave is number of reasons why it's not the case.
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jamie mcintyre has more. >> the president insisted he is clear eyed about the hurdles facing the closure of guantanamo. the politics are tough. he urged congress and the american people to step back and take a look at the facts. >> 7 years after signing an order to close guantanamo, a bruised and battle weary president obama was reduced to pleading with an unsympathetic congress to give his final plan a chance. >> i don't want to pass the problem to the next president, whoever it is. if, as a nation we don't deal with this now, when will we deal with it. will we let it linger on for 15 years, 20 years, 30 years. >> over the years, 800 prisoners have been held at guantanamo. of that more than 500 were released to other countries during the bush administration. president obama transferred 147 more and there are 91 left.
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the pentagon sent them to deal with the 91 and permanently close the camp, which is argued to be a stain on reputation and a recruiting tool. the plan transfers 35 detainees cleared for release to other country by the summer. accelerating elegibility reviews for the other potential transfers. proceed with league at action against 10 detainees, including foreign prosecutions and work with congress to bring the other 46 to a secure facility in the united states. >> pam pea argued moving detainees -- president obama argued moving detainees to a supermax prison would save costs, and cases such as boston marathon bomber shows the u.s. can and does convict and incarcerate accused terrorists
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in court. >> part of the message is we are holding a bunch of dangerous terrorists in the united states because we threw the book at them. and there has been no incidents. we have managed it fine. >> reporter: as the president marshalled his arguments for closing gitmo, there's one thing he didn't mention, something the white house doesn't talk about. that the president is a lame duck in the final months, and he could as commander in chief issue an executive order, bringing the remaining detainees to u.s. soil, that could provoke a constitutional crisis karen greenburg is the director of national security at fordham university law school and says a problem with president obama's guantanamo bay proposal is that it doesn't end indefinite detention. the plan i would have put forth to close guantanamo would have
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happened before i made pronouncements about it at the beginning of the presidency. it's easy to have the hindsight. president obama says the same thing, is this the plan. i don't think there's indefinite detention. if it whittles down the detainee category, which is what is happening, those not clear tore release - president barack obama said they'll go frequently before the review board. and will take people off the list. key to closing guantanamo. >> there are 46 people in guantanamo deemed unreleasable. meaning there's not just evidence to try them. they are too dangerous to release. in the next hour we talk to an attorney, for a number of gitmo detainees we are learning about what happened in calais mass oo. the suspect went to a gunshot,
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bringing a tactical image. a gun score releasing these images. dalton has been charged with murder. he killed six and injured two others. severe weather hitting parts of the country after dangerous storms brought tornados to the south-east. al jazeera's correspondent has more. >> the storms ripped through florida. knocking down trees. in louisiana, hundreds of trailers were destroyed. two people were killed and dozens injured. emergency workers are still searching for people believed to be trapped under the debris. a lot powered up in the areas. the best way is to come in now with more equipment. we can get down into the areas and find paperwork.
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>> a third was killed in mississippi, the storm moved to southern alabama. thousands were in the dark when high winds knocked down trees. the florida highway controlled a 26 interstate stretch. thousand are without power and that storm system moving up the east coast threatening parts of the mid-atlantic, it is part of a nasty storm. >> we talked about this. unfortunately everything came to fruition. this is going back to yesterday. as it continued to development and pulled its way out of texas and moved along, there were over 100 different reports of severe weather. a lot was high winds, but about 30 reports, and well over 20 of those were not dupe lick active of different tornados across the region. you can see where the storm is
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now causing problems. in the big picture major players - easy to see where all of that is. that is snow on the northern side of it. we have places under a blizzard warning because of the same storm while we are dealing with the severe weather. through the south. heavy showers from south carolina into florida. but the main area of this is lifting up through the mid-atlantic bringing rain up the east coast during the day. even if this is killed, high winds. i was talking to my colleagues with mississippi, and they said the big c130s, because of high winds they had to strap them down, everything was so strong, there are areas under tornado watch. that means the potential, nothing indicated on radar at the time. as we get to the north, because of heavy rain we have flood
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concerns. it little more up the coastline, from south carolina, up to portions of marylands for example, we have the risk, and that still is some of that damaging wind and the possibility for tornado again. those are the biggest threat. in the meantime you have to have support. we had the '60s, and '50s, well-up portion of the east coast. getting on the back side of that. colder air coming in. more 50s. temperatures in the 30s. we'll talk about it a little later. >> agreeing something and hold on is what you are saying. >> the truce drawing near, a planned break is days away. there are doubts that all sides put down their weapons. you may be surprised to hear about child brides, thousands in the u.s.
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don't get stuck on hold. reach an expert fast. comcast business. built for business. we are less than three days away from a truce taking effect in syria. secretary of state john kerry was on capitol hill defending his plan. the u.s. is taking a wait and see approach. there can be no lasting peace while syrian president bashar al-assad remains in power. >> as long as bashar al-assad is there, you cannot stop the war. because of the grievous event that have transpired over the course of the last years. people do not see how someone who has gassed his own people, driven so many of them into refugee status and displaced, tortured them, starved them.
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barrel bombed them - how he can be the glue that brings the place back together is behind anyone's understanding the u.s. is discussing plan b option, but he didn't specify what options were on the table. and russian's president vladimir putin speaking with bashar al-assad about the truce. rory challands has more. >> moscow and damascus have similar points of view on the prospects of negotiating the syrian crisis. the point of view are not identical. russia essentially had to tell president bashar al-assad to shut up when bashar al-assad said that he was going to carry on fighting and retake the whole of syria. russia said "no, that's not on the agenda, bashar al-assad should take russian leadership on this. and all the sides here should be
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agreed on the benefits of this brokered u.s. russian deal for a ceasefire. now it seems that the bashar al-assad government has been cowed, in a sense, and as you say, bashar al-assad in the phone call confirms that damascus is ready to assist in the establishment of the ceasefire. of course, vladimir putin and bashar al-assad claim that they are going to be carrying on the fight against the various so-called terrorist groups like i.s.i.l. and others. they maintain that that is the case. >> that is rory challands in moscow voters in bolivia rejecting a controversial amendment allowing e.v.o. morales to run for a fourth time. he's been praised for boosting the economy. administration was plagued by scandals leading up to the referendum, including allegations that he may have
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been involved in influence in kooub a, the older both -- cuba, the older brother of fidel and raul died. ramon stayed out of the lime light. becoming a farmer. he was a consultant for the ministries of agriculture and sugar. >> china spent fighter jets to the south carolina. adding tensions to a delicate situation in the disputed islands in. tom ackerman has more. >> reporter: the satellite images taken and released by a washington think tank show possible radar facilities deployed on artible islands in in the spratly claim. one of the islands in further from its own showers than to vietnam, philippines and borneo. the chinese installed missile batteries on another island further north. that means it's evident to the top officer in the region.
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>> china is militarizing the south china sea, and you have to believe in a flat earth to think otherwise. >> the chinese object tist establish effective control over the sea lane and air space. after beating with the secretary of state john kerry, he deflected questions about knengss, and expressed health that flight and controls would be halted. >> china, the united states and asian countries committed to non-militarization. we hope the parties will work in the same direction. >> chinese raised their own concerns about u.s. policy on the korean peninsula. north korea's weapon and missile fest in defines of u.n. resolutions stalled talks of installing a thad ballistic shield. it upset china, warning that it
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could destroy its relations with south korea. an announcement at the start of missile talks was delayed while wang met with kerry. kerry says the thad system would be a defensive response to north korean threats against the u.s. >> we stated publicly, openly and clearly what the conditions are for not having to consider the deployment. and that would be the denuclearisation. china's foreign minister made no mention. metres official indicated what stricter measures might sway the north korean government from its current force. rescuers located the wreckage of a small plane that crashed in central nepal, apparently flying into a mountain west of kathmandu.
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all 23 on board are dead, including two foreigners, receiving a restart down on what was supposed to be an 18 minute flight. when we come back, concerns over the zika virus. a growing number of cases may have been transmitted through sex. top republicans doubling down on not holding any hearings for president obama and the nominee.
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>> this is one of the most important sites in the century. >> this linked the mafia and the church. >> why do you think you didn't get the medal of honor? >> i can't allow you not to go into that because that is your job. >> we gonna bring this city back
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one note at a time. >> proudest moment in my life. >> people take money. wicked people. >> you are creating a society that can be rotten to the core. >> anas risked his life to report the truth. >> to save his people. >> doesn't matter who you are, i come with my cameras. >> only on al jazeera america. just in case you thought winter was in the rearview mirror, these are images from st. louis missouri.
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drivers trying to negotiate the roads. the storm system moving across the nation and in the north-east. welcome back to your wor this morning, 7:30, time to look at the top stories. mid west snow is not the only severe weather. thousands are wait power after severe storms set a wide part to the east. three people killed. the storm system moving to the mid-atlantic region. hillary clinton and bernie sanders are making their pitches, both taking part in the democratic town halt meetings, south carolina holding its democratic primary on saturday. it was a big win in nevada in the caucuses, with the support of 46% of those that caucused. it's a third straight victory.
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>> we had some great numbers coming out of texas: and amazing number coming out of tennessee and georgia, and arkansas and a couple of weeks layered florida. we love florida. >> lincoln mitcham. joining us in the studio. thank you for being with us. the establishment is pulling its hair out. could america elect a president that. that candidate has to get by bernie sanders and hillary clinton. i posed the question because of a washington post editorial saying this is a pox on the
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republican house. when we speak in american republics about republicans, there's not a there-there. there's not a secret office in washington. this is a process that to a great extent is in the hands of the people, and the people are republican voters and independence. if they, whoever they are wanted to do something, it's not sure what it could do. marco rubio is now going to the meeting saying hey, are you going in second. you novembered out ted cruz -- nosed out ted cruz. >> if the they in the republican party are embracing the candidate, the exit poll shows 74% of those polled thing that they think muslims should be banned. if i am hispanic or muslim, should i pack and leave? >> no, if you are latino,
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muslim, neither of those things but believed in civil liberties and the constitution, you should vote democratic in november. there's an alternative. this is not the election. >> let's look back at the people listening and saying - they have been saying that since june. they have been saying he want win or do this or that. i'm not saying he can't win, i'm saying don't give up on the united states. you have other options now. if you are those things, if he does win. we have a supreme court that we are seeing games from washington in who sits on the supreme court. we have a court, a way of determining whether or not the things are constitutional. if we want to play it out. how does one respond. >> republicans - should he get one, reject it. this is someone with - who we have no idea what his governing
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style is. he's not someone that takes well to being told you are wrong, you can't do this. this is volatile. we are not there yet. >> let's talk about the democrats. bernie sanders embracing the obama legacy. is he on solid ground and is he friendly to the white house. >> there's not a logic. the illogic summed up in two words. president obama. if you are running in the democratic establishment, it is at fault. 2016 is a strength year to do that. we have a president, president obama, who ran as a progressive. if you run against the establishment. >> he is the hope and change candidate. >> if you run against that establishment and president obama, who is beloved among the left. there's an illogic there. bernie sanders has a difficult needle to thread. >> is the door open to a third
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party one. ? >> no. there's a possibility that some right wing true conservative type gets 8-10%, 5% of the vote. if it is bernie sanders, which is the more left of the democratic candidates, driving through the middle is difficult. especially as bernie sanders will have no problem. and hillary clinton less of a problem consolidating the democratic base. and it is likely to win the election. >> what does the primary say about the evangelical vote and values? >> it says it's complex. donald trump does not embrace the social - reflect the social conservatism at the heart of the values. he sees - he's pulling on a heart string of those voters, which is the make america great
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again. the looking backgrounds appealing to evangelicals. the healing voters not through biblical teachings, through harkening back. >> hold onto your passports if you are offended. >> bottom line is voting participation. >> also this morning. the battle of o supreme court seat. republicans doubling down on promise not to give any nominee a vote. jonathan betts has more days after justice antonin scalia was laid to rest battle lines are clear. the top two senate republicans said they will not cooperate with president obama. >> i believe the overwhelming view of the congress of the senate, in the senate is that this nomination should not be
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filed, this viccansy should not be filled by the lame duck president. >> mitch mcdonnell was urged not to consider the name saying they'd not be considered or firmed. that pick republicans insist should be left to the next president. >> it's not about the parliamentary, but the principal. it being that it's up to the people, no matter who they choose to make the nomination for an important seat. >> republicans are using vice president joe biden's words. in 1992. then senator biden urged the republican president to hold off on choosing the supreme court nominee. >> president push considered following the practice of the majority of predecessors, and not name a nominee until after the november election is
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completed. >> it was said it was out of context and about a hypothetical. a vacancy didn't happen back then. joe made a few statements. in this one instance, it didn't mean a thing. nothing was pending. hoe has a right to speak. >> the white house said it will send a nomination to the senate. and hopes to find fractures among republicans. two moderates said they'd break ranks to vote on a nominee. >> this would be an unprecedented need to criticize a branch of politics. >> it's unprecedented. republicans refusing to meet with a nominee and democrats refusing to background. the american people sent us here to do a job, plain and simple. it's time for senate republicans to do their job
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apple fans coming out to support their company in its battle with the fbi over cell phone encryption. small groups battled supporting the tech giants. apple has until friday to file a formal opposition to a court order requiring it to help the f.b.i. this morning there are questions over how the zika virus is transmitted. the c.d.c. looking at a dozen cases that may have been spread through sex the c.d.c. has not confirmed how more than a dozen people contracted zika and said it may have been transmitted through sex. two of the cases involved women who had sex with men that travelled to infected areas. >> looks like zika virus can collect in the bodily fluid. it was easily found in urine,
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saliva, and it now appears that sexual transition may happen a little more frequently. >> the virus is spread by mosquitos, and generally causes mild symptoms. it's believed to be linked to thousands of cases of birth defects in brazil the the new information means stopping the spread could be more difficult than thought. >> most people don't have symptoms, it is more visible. it can spread further, it's more prevalent than we know. >> the fdi put out rules to protect the blood supply, calling for people travelling to affected areas to not donate blood. more infections could happen, including here in the u.s. >> with a right combination of abundant mosquitos infected with a zika virus, a susceptible
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population that has not seen the virus, and a lack of knowledge about the virus, things - this virus could spread rapidly. >> there's no court or treatment. it's heaped a rapid test will detect the virus faster. by inserting the blood into a computer. it can detect the virus within minutes. >> it is available for patients at houston methodist and children's hospitals showing symptoms, there's no way to treat the virus. doctors hope this will help for a faster treatment, faster vaccine. >> what is happening with the efforts to suppress the virus itself. >> there are several methods they are taking, trying to control the population, and one that is researched is to spread a gene through the mosquito
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population making it impossible to carry the virus. they are trying to develop that. >> they are racing against time. >> a nurse from scotland surviving ebola is back in the hospital for a third time. she contracted ebola, treated in england and sent home in january of 2015. she was readmitted in october. doctors found the virus in her brain tissue, there are new developments in the eric garner says. paramedics agreed to pay $1 million for the family. the settlement is confidential and not part of the 1.9 settlement. critics charging that paramedics waited too long. and a jury awarding $72 million to the family of an alabama woman, the family argued jacky's
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cancer was the result of using johnson&johnson baby powder and shower to shower. top based products could cause cancer. >> supplies of food and temporary houses - few if any buildings are left standing. al jazeera has more from it. >> the damage is repeated in the villages dotted along the coastline of the island. here you could see the basic structure of the houses even if the walls and the roofs are missing. everything has been flattened. i'll take you inside. you can see the dangers people face, apart from the heat and shelter. there were bits of core gayed iron. there's wiring. and i'll take you inside what used to be somebody's home or living room of sorts. a kitchen.
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i'm not sure what is out the back. you see up to the trees, the roof has totally gone. let me show you the force of the wind. the ship, the taminger moored 5km down the coast. the wind swept it off its moorings, incredible. the force of wind that must have done that. on this island, and it seems to be the case across fiji, people on the hole managed to shelter. it does plain why despite the level of destruction, and the power of the wind relatively few died. andrew thomas reporting from fiji. 42 people have died since the cyclone on saturday. the number will likely rise. >> at home the storm in the south could be producing blizzard positions. we say the drivering force. that is -- driving force. that is nast yim. >> that's a precursor in the
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wind and snop. as we move across the country, here is the broad system. active whether, including through the gulf coast and up the mid-atlantic. some of this switched into some sleet and snow as it moved to the north-east. a little more rain in today. and the another round coming in. on the backside of this. it's pretty much straight up snow as this converts over. you may have had rain. it will switch as the day comes on. and colder air comes in. it will be associated with high winds. making it worse. as we get through the rest of the day see how the area of snow progresses. the system moves out a little tomorrow. some of that lingering snow coming through with a second round of that region. totals in the meantime. right in the corridor near lake superior. we have places going over a foot
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of snow. high winds on top. gusting over 40 miles per hour, could go over through the day. 50 minneapolis winds, that's why the areas are highlighted in red. the blizzard warning, because there'll be temporary white out conditions. >> spring is not far. >> thank you a panel of scientists saying they have figured out what is causing the takata air bags to explode. a number of factors, moisture, high humidity and heat causes the glix. they were hired to investigate why the air plastic bags explode. the problem causing at least 10 deaths and 139 injuries. consumer reports with the latest list of top auto brands. u.s. and asia edging outs u.s. producers. audi, assault occasioning actual bodily harm roe, lexus, porsche and b.m.w. buick is number 7, the only
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u.s.-made car in the top 10 university coaches fighting back for their school. >> i think we are stereo kind and i want to get that point across. i take it personal. >> the athletic department defending reputation over sexual harassment claims. the baby gorilla whose unusual birth is getting attention.
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a south african university closed for now. black protesters beaten buy white spectators during a rugby match, through the university of a free state. black university students interrupting about the outsourcing of jobs. some ran on to the field leading to the clashes major league baseball pouting a player on leave. jose reyes will be suspended
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until a criminal case against him will be resolved. reyes is accused of assaulting his wife while they were in hawaii. he is scheduled to go on trial on 4 april coaches in tennessee defending themselves and the their school against sexual harassment claims. they claim the university is safe for women decide a lawsuit saying otherwise. >> reporter: all 16 university of tennessee head coaches together, defending their programme against claims the school mishandled sexuality harassment cases. >> i don't think anyone felt like it. the reputation tarnished by a long-style fix. the university created a hostile environment and didn't investigate claims against male student athletes in football and will basketball. ut coaches say women on their teams don't feel hostility.
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>> women have not been treated better than now. the female athlete has never had more resources and support. >> they are probably surprised what has been said about tennessee in the national media. that's not the tennessee that they live. >> reporter: the head football coach was apologetic. >> everything is about the alleged victims. we take that very, very seriously. >> reporter: jones got defensive. >> it's easy to sit and judge when you don't live our day every day. >> reporter: the university has gone on its own offensive filing a motion to have payton manning's name released after a 20-year-old incident in which a 20-year-old trainer claimed manning sexually assaulted her. manning claimed the contact was accidental he reached a settlement with the accuser. the lawyers say mentioning manning in this suit would be
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immaterial, impertinent and scandalous in all the lawsuit mention six cases of alleged harassment. five in the last three years. the suit does not go after any of the alleged perpetrators, just the university. the women say it didn't do enough to help them the lawsuit is also an assault on a football player. >> the assault is not of a sexual nature, but fellow players twice attacked wide receiver drey balls after he allegedly drove a victim of assault home from the assault and encouraged her to press charges. he has since transferred to another school john henry smith thank you there is a growing crisis in the united states. child brides. the united nations estimating 39,000 girls under the age of 18 are married each and every day. and the problem is not just in developing countries. in the u.s. child marriage is
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legal in every state. al jazeera's erica pitzi reports one group is working to change that. >> posing for wedding photos, an older man with his bride. a girl who looks no older than 12. the scene is staged. they are actors. the people walking by are not aware. many disgusted by the skeptical. some stepped in to object and the groom responds. the video, which has gone viral is produced by an international advocacy organization, hoping to raise awareness where taking a child pride is legal. >> reporter: we watched the video with activist. >> this is in lebanon. this is a country far away. >> reporter: yet you are saying this is happening in the united states. >> this is legal in the united states and this is hatching in
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the united states. >> reporter: reece was 19 and living in new jersey when her personalities arranged her marriage. she was an adult but had no choice. >> because of the way i was raised in an insular community and the way arranged marriage was conducted. i did not have the opportunity to give consent. >> reporter: within a few weeks she realized it was wrong. >> i was trapped. >> reporter: after 12 years she found the courage to take her two daughters and leave him. her experience prompted her to form unchained at last. helping women and girls escape forced marriages. >> it's shocking that they get married. the second is that child marriage is happening. it's not just archaic laws.
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most are girls, married to adult men. every state has exceptions allowing people under the age of 18 to wep. it allowed 16 and 17-year-old's. in arizona, there's no minimum age for marriage if they have a judge's approval. minors can marry if they are pregnant. >> a child cannot consent. a long-time relationship of this magnitude. we have to accept and a child says yes, it's not really a yes. >> reporter: once a minor is married in many states they are considered minors under the law making it difficult to take action including divorce. >> you are allowed to get
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married, not divorced. they are at an age they may experience domestic violence. >> good luck with that. >> reporter: reece's groups are looking to ban child marriages. the fight is taking place one state at a time with legislation introduced in marylands, virginia, york and new jersey. nothing changed yet, leaving the girls vulnerable. >> imagine if she called you and asked for help and you had to say sorry, i can't help you. >> if you worked with her and tried everything to get her out, and after all your hard work, there was nothing you could do, and you never heard from her, and you knew that she was married. it needs to stop and finally, before we go, it's called an extraordinary event, a zoo in scotland
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performing a c section on a gorilla. the bristol zoo releasing images of the a baby girl. born 10 days ago. weighing in at 2 pounds, 2 ounces. mother and daughter are doing fine ahead in the next hour, apples encryption debate. the tech giant digging in for a fight. it details more in the fbi's case. also criticized around the president's plan to shut guantanamo bay, not well received, especially those representing inmates. we'll talk to a lawyer representing several detainees, we'll be back in 2 minutes with more. stick around until then. >> hunted to the brink of extinction.am >> this radiocarbon dating method can tell us if trade of ivory is legal. >> it could save a species. >> i feel like we're making an impact.
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>> techknows team of experts show you how the miracles of science... >> i'm standing in a tropical windstorm. >>...can affect and surprise us. >> wow, these are amazing. >> techknow, where technology meets humanity. >> only on al jazeera america.
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>> soon the country is going to start winning, winning, winning victory in nevada. donald trump racking up another win in his face for the republican nomination. deadly storms rolling through the south east and the threat isn't over. the severe weather lying ahead. spreading the virus, new cases of zika proving that it is sexually transmitted
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welcome to your world this morning. donald trump is heading into next week's center tuesday with shall-- super tuesday with a big momentum. he won by a wide margin in the third straight win in the republican contest. he pulled in close to 46% support of those who caucused. marco rubio a distant second, ted cruz not far behind in third. melissa chan is live for us. he not only winning by huge numbers, he has a broad coalition of supporters as well. >> reporter: absolutely. donald trump himself said he is a winner, winner, winner and he is right in so many different categories. he won and beat out marco rubio
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and ted cruz. even the lat ian eowe-- lat ib-- latino vote went for donald trump. people are excited that somebody is breaking all the political rules. it is a win for donald trump in nevada. the real estate mogul now with three back to back victories under his belt and a surge of momentum heading to super tuesday >> we won with evangelicals, with young and old, highlied indicated, we won with poorlied indicated. i love the poorlied indicated. -- poorly ed indicated >> reporter: he was a heavy favorite heading into the contest. he towered over his top two rivals with nearly double the support of his nearest competitor. the two candidates to be his chief challenger in the race are still optimistic and not ready
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to back down. ted cruz told supporters he believed donald trump is vulnerable now the field has gotten smaller >> the undenial reality that the first four states has shown is that the only campaign that has beaten donald trump and the only campaign that can beat donald trump is this campaign. >> reporter: marco rubio left, sending his message that his campaign is focused on making america better >> we're going to take our message, principles, to people that live today the way that i grew up >> reporter: but with super tuesday looming it could be tougher to pull together the type of support they need to topple donald trump. he has already made headway in cruz's home state texas and leading in florida, marco rubio's territory. a losing streak that seems
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unbeatable >> we're going to make america great again folks, i'm telling you. >> reporter: just something more about donald trump's supporters. they come from all over. it was talked about, actually talked to a caucus goer who decided to decided to vote for donald trump. what if they weren't on the ticket. will you vote for whoever is the republican nominee and he said he would actually vote for bernie sanders. he went on to explain they're two side of the same coin. they're anti establishment. he said i'm working class and the working class is angry. it is time for a change was there one big issue that emerged among the voters that you talked to in nevada? >> reporter: there was a very clear issue that came up as we went from table to table. everybody said immigration was a big problem.
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the demographics of nevada has changed in the last two decades. there are more hispanics now than before. people at the caucuses said there are more hispanics and we are seeing our jobs being taken away thank you for that. a late night. thank you very much. the democrats meanwhile gearing up for the south carolina taking place on saturday. hillary clinton and bernie sanders making last-minute pitches. our correspondent was there. >> reporter: bernie sanders was up first, his main task to convince voters he is not only a progressive but can get things done, free education and health care reform among his priorities >> do we have the guts to take on the power of the insurance companies, do we have the guts to take on the pharmaceutical industry who has 1300 lobbyists in washington? i believe that when the american people stand up and say, do you know what, health care is a
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right of all people, not a privilege. yeah, i believe we can do that. >> reporter: with vital african american votes in play in south carolina, justice reform, another key sanders pledge >> there is something wrong when african americans in south carolina and around the country get nervous about walking down the street or going into their car and being stopped by a police officer. that should not be happening in america. >> reporter: hillary clinton is ahead in the polls including with african merngs. sanders need their votes. nodding in their direction with a personal reflection >> my dad came from poland. i'm running for president. no-one has asked for my birth certificate. maybe it's the color of my skin. i don't know judge hillary clinton was forced to defend herself against his attacks in the opening minutes of her turn. is she too close to wall street banks like gold man sachs. why is there one standard for me and not everybody else?
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i have a record. it certainly is far different from the republicans because they think, actually, and have said that the cause of the great recession was too much regulation on wall street, which is an absolute joke. >> reporter: she may be ahead among vital african american voters but clinton took to chances asking mothers who lost their sons to gun violence to stand up >> racism, education issues and all the rest have to be addressed. otherwise we are never going to be the nation we should be. >> reporter: and those state department emails the topic just won't die down. she was asked to defend using a private internet server in her own home yet again >> i have turned over 55,000 pages of emails. nobody in any cabinet position has been as transparent or open. i am not at all worried about it. >> reporter: john terrett the presidential candidates also tackling obama's plans to close guantanamo bay.
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marco rubio says the u.s. people says u-- should be putting people back in not out >> not only are we not going to close guantanamo bay, but when i'm president if we capture a terrorist alive they're not getting a court hearing or sent to nevada, they're going to guantanamo bay and we will find out everything they know the president says closing the prison after 14 years is the right thing to do, something he first promised when he ran for president in 2008 >> let us do what is right for america. let us go ahead and close this chapter. and do it right. do it carefully. do it in a way that makes sure we're safe. but gives the next president more importantly future generations the ability to apply the lessons we have learnt in the fight against terrorism
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there is are still 91 detainees there. 35 will be released to other countries by this summer which would accelerate reviews for other potential transfers. ten of those are facing legal action and that would continue. the white house is pledging to work with congress to bring 46 to a secure place here in the u.s. as our correspondent reports dealing with congress is going to be an uphill fight >> reporter: president obama has a long road ahead of him to get republicans on board to close guantanamo bay down. he admitted as much as he made his address >> in congress i recognise in part because of some of the fears of the public that had been fanned off by misinformation, there continues to be a fair amount of opposition to closing guantanamo bay. if it were easy, it would have happened years ago as i wanted, as i have been working to try to get done. there remains bipartisan support
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for closing it. given the stakes involved for our security, this plan deserves a fair hearing >> reporter: president obama talked about while there may have once been bipartisan efforts, it is not the case any more. they came out reacting against the president as plan. the top republican in the senate mich mcconnell says worrying about bringing prisoner to the states, he thinks it is a perfect place for terrorists. he says while this may get a hearing on capitol hill, don't expect it to go very far. >> we will review his plan but it clues bringing dangerous terrorists to facilities in u.s., he should know the congress has been expressed against that proposal. >> reporter: the senator is not alone in his concerns. we saw other republicans on both the house and senate side of
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capitol hill pushing back against the president's plan. if they have hearings it will give them the chance for them to give their perspective and not to debate what to do that is our correspondent. house speaker paul ryan rejected the proposal calling it neither smart nor safe. this morning thousands are trying to clean up after a strong tornado leaving three dead. >> reporter: the storms ripped tli alabama-- through alabama and others, knocking over trees. hundreds of trailers were destroyed of the at least two people were killed and dozens injured. >> it sounded like a train coming through here >> reporter: emergency workers in the town west of in new or leans are leafed to be trapped under debris >> a lot has piled up. we couldn't get into and we are
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hoping that's where the teams are coming into those piles and try to find people >> reporter: a third person was killed in mississipi. thousands of alabama were in the dark when high winds knocked down trees. a 26 mile stretch of interstate 10 was closed and drivers were urged to stay home. thousands across the region are still without power that severe weather moving up the eastern seaboard. this is a very dangerous storm >> reporter: both the storminess, wind, we have plenty areas of rain and also a snowy side. i will have more on that in the next half hour. this is as it was developing in texas yesterday. it intensified, which means more of a pressure change, and higher winds. that was one thing. a lot of the damage we saw
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yesterday was actually wind damage, but we had over 20 separate tornado reports as this moved along, especially close to the golf coast. this morning still part of that line is in two portions of florida. for example, some of the heavy rain up through south carolina. on the broad weather picture you can see this is really our big player. zooming in on this, an event that is extending through south carolina into florida. the weather will move up as we get back into the heat of the day. when you see these different watch areas, which means the potential for a condition there is kind of a widespread area. this one is a line of yellow right where the storms are. we are under a tornado watch. we also have a greens that are concerns. the rest of the area still high winds even behind this system. as it continues and we get more of that heat of the day, so most
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of our severe weather happens in the afternoon or evening hours, this extends from south carolina into merryland where we could see some severe weather redevelop hail and high winds and possibly even tornado once again. in the meantime that little corridor keeping temperatures warm, that will change after the system moves some places will be warmer as the night progresses than before. we are three days away from that truce taking place in syria. john kerry says the u.s. is taking a wait and see approach warning there can be no lasting peace while bashar al-assad is still in power. >> as long as bashar al-assad is there you cannot stop the war. because of the grievous events that have transpired over the course of the last years. people don't see how someone who has gassed his own people, driven so many of them into
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refugee status and displaced, tortured them, starved them, barrel bottomed them, how he is going to be the glue that brings the place back together is beyond anybody's understanding he says the u.s. is talking about plan b option if the agreement fails. he did not specify what that was. we are now understanding that vladimir putin and syrian president bashar al-assad talking today earlier. what was discussed? >> the russians are basically trying to make sure that at least on paper president bashar al-assad is signed up to the russia-u.s. brokered ceasefire plan. remember that about a week ago bashar al-assad kind of went off message, really, and said that he was prepared to keep on fighting and until he had taken back the whole of syria. the russians effectively told him to shut up and that he should accept russian leadership
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should be annulled wear of how much russia had invested militarily, politically, financially, in his regime and basically get back with the program. so i think that is the kind of walk that was going on in this conversation. bashar al-assad as broadly complied. this conversation with bashar al-assad wasn't the end of it. putin has been on a diplomatic rampage today. he has had phone conversations with the bashar al-assad, iran president, netanyahu and also with the saudi arabian king. i think a signal is being sent that russia is now a force to be reckoned with in the middle east the concept particulars are lining up - sceptics are lining up. they doubt that they are committed to the agreement. does the ceasefire agreement signal that moscow is ready to consider a political transition that may not include bashar al-assad in power? >> bashar al-assad is a figure
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head of regime government system, whatever you want to call it, and, yes, russia has been doing its jut post to make sure that this figure head is as powerful as he can possibly be given the circumstances, but there are plenty of signs, not least the fact that russia has signed up to the geneva communique and this whole political transition process that basically is trying to get bashar al-assad out of power. that suggests that at least if russia can be sure that what replaced bashar al-assad is to his liking and maintains or even enhances russian's influence in syria, then yes bashar al-assad might at some time leave office thank you very much. a small plane that crashed in central nepal has been found.
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all of the 23 people on board are dead including two foreigners from china and kuwait. that was supposed to be an 18-minute flight. a battle between apple and the f.b.i. the other times government asked for help in hacking into an iphone. hopes of repairing a school's damaged image.
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when you're on hold, your business is on hold. that's why comcast business doesn't leave you there. when you call, a small business expert will answer you in about 30 seconds. no annoying hold music. just a real person, real fast. whenever you need them. so your business can get back to business. sounds like my ride's ready. don't get stuck on hold. reach an expert fast. comcast business. built for business. there are new details this
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morning in apple's battle with the f.b.i. over encryption. they're using a 200 year old law trying to unlock a phone. it is a strategy that the agency has used in nine other cases already filed. our correspondent tells us the stand-off is sparking protests across the country >> reporter: it is hard to imagine anyone rallying to the defense of a multi million dollar corporation. that is the time that we live in. that's what is happening with the apparatus of apple corporation has made this one court case into something much alarmer. the-- larger. the battle over access to one single mobile phone has become a war for community opinion.
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it was said: on tuesday people with gathering at stories all over the city. >> i think we are challenged about what the solution is >> reporter: the chairman of the intelligence committee who had been considering a bill to criminalise a company's refusal to help the government break through kripgs has backed away from the possibility. -- encryption. apple has until friday to file a response. they're the director wrote that instead about privacy: while apple in a letter to customers monday suggested that the government:
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meanwhile the phone in question sits somewhere in f.b.i. custody, its secrets intact >> reporter: it is worth noting in a few years we will be having a different debate as the technology changes. appear emis trying to take itself out of the equation that-- apple is trying to take itself out of the equation. many in statements about this case are saying they're not sure what world we will be living in and it should be up to the american people to figure it out. this is a turning point. which way is it going thank you for that. going to the u.s. policy manager at access now. it is for digital rights around the world.
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this is a phone that belonged to the san sanbernardino, the county. why not help the f.b.i. unlock the phone >> sure. they would like you to think that this is about one phone and one instance. this is about forcing apple to build new software that would make it easy to break into any phone around the country. we already know that the f.b.i. has several active cases where they're trying to do the same for other phones. at the federal level. at the state level in new york 175 cases where they're waiting for the precedent to be set so they can also force their way into these phones. it is not necessarily about one phone in a case about terrorism but phones across the country and the world what is the difference between a search warrant for my house or the trunk of my car and my phone. both of them contain sensitive
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who did something wrong it is information i don't want the f.b.i. to have but we live in a society of laws. >> sure. encryption is really special. once you start breaking into encryption you're starting to undermine it for a lot of people. there's no way to build a vulnerability that can't get out or be used to do bad to everybody. it is creating a master skeleton key for an entire neighborhood and thinking that it won't be abused or in somebody's houses or a criminal won't be able to copy it. they're asking apple to build software to make it break in and undermine encryption on all their phones isn't the real shrugs to tell people not to store everything on their phone? -- real solution >> people don't store everything on their phone. that is something that f.b.i. has taken advantage off.
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some are in the i cloud. appear emcan turn that over to the f.b.i. under a warrant. they will back things up. it is really not even known why the f.b.i. needs to get into the phone. it is highly unlikely that there is something of relevance in this phone apple says a back door will be opening pandora's box. how long before a hacker goes on line with the solution to the f.b.i.'s problems without the safeguards that the f.b.i. promises it will uphold? >> that's going to be the case no matter what, but if apple has to develop that technology it is going to be much easier for bad guys to reverse engineer it. it will be hard for apple to argue that china can't order that other countries can't start ordering them to build the same software to start undermining
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people's phones. in some countries it's a matter of life and death. it's not the same situation that we're seeing here thanks for being with us this morning >> thank you when we come back, obama's plan to close guantanamo bay widely criticized, but what does it mean for the 91 men being held there? we will talk to a lawyer who represents several of those detainees. power brokers as a possible true in syria, the white house welcomes one arab leader who was trying to keep the region stable.
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>> people take money. wicked people. >> you are creating a society that can be rotten to the core.
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>> anas risked his life to report the truth. >> to save his people. >> doesn't matter who you are, i come with my cameras. >> only on al jazeera america. we weren't expected to win too much and now we're winning, winning, winning the country. and soon the country is going to start winning, winning, winning welcome back to your world this morning. now 8.30 east coast time. donald trump with a win at nearly 64% support. marco rubio and ted cruz rounding up the top three. this is donald trump's third victory. the super tuesday now days away. hillary clinton and bernie sanders making their pitch to south carolina. 59 delegates are up tore grabs
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there. the primary in south carolina will be saturday. we are now less than three days away from a truce taking effect in syria. this morning putin speaking with bashar al-assad about the deal. secretary of state john kerry defending the plan saying lasting peace cannot happen while bashar al-assad remains in power. many in congress saying no to the president's plan to close guantanamo bay. paul ryan rejected the proposal calling it neither smart nor safe. the president gave reasons why he thought that was not the case. >> reporter: the president insisted he is very clear-eyed about the hurdles facing the final closure of guantanamo bay. the politics are tough, but he urged congress and the american people to "step back and take a look at the facts". seven years after signing an order to close the detention center, he was reduced to
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pleading with an unsympathetic congress to give his final plan a chance >> i don't want to pass this problem on to the next president whoever it is. if as a nation we don't deal with this now, when will we deal with it? are we going to let this linger on for another 15 to 30 years? >> reporter: over the years some 800 prisoners have been held at guatemalan. of that more than 500 were released to the other countries in the bush administration. president obama transferred 147 more. there are now 91 left. what the pentagon sent congress was a four point plan to deal with those 91 and permanently close the camp which obama argue sz a stain on the reputation and a bargaining tool for america's enemies. it would clear 35 detainees to other countries by this summer,
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accelerate eligiblity reviews for the other transfers, proceed with legal action against detainees, including foreign prosecution and work with congress to find a way to bring the other 46 to a secure facility in the united states. obama argued moving retain ees to a super maximum prison in the u.s. would save up to 85 million dollars a year. he says cases such as boston bomber show the u.s. can and does dwikt and incarcerate accused terrorists in the courts. >> part of my message to the american people is we're already holding a bunch of really dangerous terrorists here in the u.s. because we threw the book at them. there have been no incidents. we have managed it just fine. >> reporter: as the president marshalled his arguments for closing guatemalan, there was something he didn't mention, something that the white house
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does not want to talk about, but the president is a lame duck could in his authority issue an executive order bringing the remaining detainees to u.s. soil and closing guatemalan in defiance of can degrees it but that could create a constitutional crisis a senior staff attorney represents several current and former guantanamo bay detainees. thanks for being with us. you represent two men from yemen who have been held without charges and they are due for release, even though they were approved for release in 2014 and 15, tell us the other side of this story that there are people being held at guantanamo bay without due process >> right. there are currently 91 people being held there. currently 35 of them have been approved by the administration, by the government's own
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intelligence defense, law enforcement officials for transfer. most of those men have been approved for transfer since 2009 and have been waiting for release since then. two of my clients are in that category you represent two that took their own lives. what happened there? how bad are conditions there that is causing people to kill themself? >> they died in 2006. the circumstances of their deaths are still unclear. the government claims that they took their own lives. there are guards who are stationed at the base at the time who claim that they might have been killed in interrogations, perhaps. i think those reflect the very desperate times and the sort of brutal more overtly sort of brutal physical kinds of torture that people experienced in the early years of guatemalan.
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guantanamo. guantanamo. today they are different, improved situation. there are some still held in conditions of solitary confinement, men that are forceably fed through their noses have they seen their families? >> they have not. they have phone calls every couple of months at best on a video, but there has been no family access. letters are very hard to come by. sometimes men are transferred to third countries because they won't be sent to their home countries, for example yemenis. they get on a plane after being held at guatemalan for 14 years the republicans especially and the u.s. states argue these people are a threat to national security, they're a terrorist. after september 11 people would
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say why even risk it? >> those claims are contrary to the facts. they are not facts that organizations like mine have. they are facts that the administration, the government has. it is false. it is inaccurate to say that everyone at guantanamo is dangerous when the administration itself has approved for now 35 of them for transfer. that means a determination by every government agency with a stake in these detentions who have said that these people are not security threats to the u.s. and can be safely released. there are dozen is more men who are waiting for a process of government review in order for the government to determine if they can be transferred. everyone leaving guantanamo is sign off on by the secretary of defense. by officials charged with u.s. intelligence, national security, homeland security. these are rigorous reviews that happen the president said yesterday if not now, when.
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are you convinced that these detainees that your clients are ever going to be release and do you believe that the president sincerely wants them to be released? >> it is a political matter. we have seen a certain momentum in recent months. the administration certainly can at least transfer the man it has approved for transfer. it can at least work its way through the remaining men who are awaiting for review in order to determine if they can be transferred. those are steps president obama has talked about for years. those can happen and those can happen very quickly. as for the plan to close guantanamo, we need to en susur that bottom line it is not a plan to close but to relocate guantanamo to the u.s. as for men who have been
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approved for transfer or waiting for approval for transfer, absolutely those men should be released and can be released thanks for being with us >> thank you very much president obama this morning out with a blog post defending his right: republicans doubling down on their promise to not give any nominee any vote. our correspondent has more. >> reporter: just days after justice scalia was laid to rest, the battle lines over his replacement are clear. the top two senate republicans said they will not cooperate with president obama >> i believe the overwhelming view of the republican congress of the senate and the senate is
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that this nomination should not be filled, this vacancy should not be filled, by this lame duck president >> reporter: mich mcconnell urged obama not to put forward a name because he or she would not be considered nor confirmed. it should be left to the next president >> it is not about the personality. it is about the principle. the principle being that it's up to the american people in this next election, no matter who they choose, to make the nomination for this important seat on the supreme court. >> reporter: republicans are also using vice president joe biden's own words against the them in 1992 he urged the republican president to hold off on choosing a supreme court nominee >> the president bush would consider following the practice of a majority of his predecessors in not naming a
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nominee until after the november election is completed. >> reporter: he said that was out of context and about a hypothetical since a vacancy didn't happen back then >> i understand joe has made a few statements over the years about a lot of things. in this one instance it really didn't mean a thing because nothing was pending. >> reporter: did he make a mistake? >> no. he has a right to speak >> reporter: the white house says it will send a nomination to the senate and hopes to find fractions amongst republicans. two moderates said they would break ranks to vote on a nominee >> this would be an unprecedented acceleration of politicsicing. >> reporter: it is unprecedented ground. republicans refusing to meet with a nominee and democrats refusing to back down >> the american people sent us here to do a job plain and
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simple. it's time for republicans to do their job the war in syria also on the docket at the white house today. the president is scheduled to sit down with the king of jordan to talk about the peace keeper in that region and refugee crisis. they're taking in more than 600,000 refugees since the war began. jordan warning that it has reached its limits in taking in those refugees. our correspondent reports some people say they've had enough. >> reporter: there are traffic jams here all the time now. the population has doubled in the past five years. 100,000 syrian refugees out-no.90,000 jordanians. these university students are celebrating their graduation, but it will be even more difficult for them to find jobs. the municipality here is struggling to cope with the
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people feeling struggling. >> assistance should be directed to the landowners and the rest to the syrians. in the past most of the assistance and support was directed to the syrians but not to jordanians. >> reporter: there are religious and cultural links between the two people. many in the north of jordan feel they're now paying the price for their hospitality. >> when the syrian refugees first started coming, jordanians welcomed them into their homes but now there are more syrians than jordanians there is a different feeling here. people don't see an end to the conflict and some are starting to worry that those temporary guests are becoming permanent residents. they're saying they're competing with syrians for the lowest paid jobs. >> under the law they are not allowed to work. if they can find another source of income in addition to the assistance they receive, it doesn't matter how much it is. >> reporter: this man runs this
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cell phone shop by himself. he says some businesses employ syrians for less than $3 a delay. they can no longer able to rent apartments >> we have become slaves to the rents. they say they have many from syria who can pay. >> reporter: they're saying the syrians is changing the nature of this tribal authority >> translation: jordanian society is conservative by nature. you never saw a man and woman walking in the street without being relatives. with the syrians coming everything is permissible. >> reporter: it is not enough money being powder in. they say they are also suffering back in this country thousands of people know power this morning after a storm struck a wide part of the south-east.
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at least three people were killed. the storms crossed tornados and hail. the system is moving up towards the mid-atlantic region. is it going to weaken at all? >> not as widespread with the severe weather but still a risk. we might not see as many reports of severe weather. here is the broad system. as we get into this mid-atlantic today it will be anywhere around here with the biggest threat for weather. i wouldn't be surprised if we saw tornadoes today. on the back side of this, some heavy snow. first spreading up the east there was that initial boundary of kind of a sleet/snow mix, then a lot of places switched over to rain. as this colder air side comes in, there is another switch over to snow again. so you might go from rain to snow once again. it will happen in the extreme parts of new england as well.
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that snow is heavy in some cases. we're looking at this corridor here, that's going to be heaviest amounts of all of this. because of that we have some blizzard concerns. as this continues to pull out, maybe some lingering tomorrow into portions of the north-east and then finally we do clear out some of that colder air will stay in the region. heaviyest amounts of snow. the winds with this system are very strong. some can could gust over 50. that combination could create some white-out conditions and that's why there are blizzard areas, south of lake michigan. that could be the worst. i would expect a lot of flight delays up and down the east coast today too thank you. when we come back, fears over how the zika virus is spread.
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health experts investigating new cases that they say could prove the virus is transmitted through sex. after ten deaths and millions of recalls, investigators say they know what may have caused qantas air bags to explode.
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al jazeera america. a team of u.s. government disease detectives is in brazil in the case of the zika virus working with brazilian health workers to determine if it is causing a surge in berth defects
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there-- birth defect there. it is one of the epicenters of the outbreak. this morning the cdc looking into more cases that may have been spread through sex. >> reporter: the cdc hasn't confirmed how more than a dozen people contracted zika, but they say it may have been transmitted through sex. two of the cases involve women who had sex with men who had recently travelled to infected areas >> it looks like zika virus actually can collect in people's bodily fluids. it's more easily found in urine, saliva and also sexual fluids like semen. it now appears that sexual transmission might be happening more frequently than we thought it >> reporter: it is typically spread by mosquitos and the infection causes mild symptoms but it is believed to be linked
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to thousands of cases of birth defects in brazil. this new information means stopping the spread of zika could be more difficult than previously thought >> most people don't have symptoms. that means the virus doesn't shoep itself. it's more invisible to us. it can spread father. >> reporter: the fda put out rules to protect the blood supply. it calls to people who travel to affected areas to not donate blood. more infections could happen here >> with the right combination of abundant mosquitos infected with a virus such as zika, a suss acceptable population-- suss sebl tibl population, this could spread very rapidly >> reporter: there is no cure or treatment, but researchers are hoping a new rapid test will
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help detect the virus faster. it takes a small fluid by inserting it into a computer they say they can detect the virus in minutes the rap rapid test is available to people who are showing symptoms and have affected countries. there's still no way to treat the virus, but doctors hope with this rapid test they may be able to develop a treatment and possibly a vaccine what about guidelines for protecting ourselves in light of this zika being transmitted through sex? >> reporter: so far the cases that they've seen are males infecting females, not the other way around. they're saying if males have gone to the affected countries to practice safe sex and if women who are pregnant or want to get pregnant they should not be travelling to the affected countries thank you very much. when we come back, turning a
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blind eye to sexual assault on campus.
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major league baseball placing a player on leave following domestic abuse charges. he is going to be suspended until the criminal case against him is resolved. he will be paid you while he is on leave. he is accused of assaulting his wife while they were in hawaii.
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he will go on trial on 4 april. coaches in tennessee are defending themselves over sexual harassment claims. the say the university is a safe place for women despite a lawsuit that says otherwise >> reporter: all 16 university of tennessee head coaches together defending their program against claims the school mishandled sexual harassment cases. >> i don't think everybody up here feels like there's an alarm sitting here >> reporter: the reputation tarnished by a lawsuit filed by women who claim that the university created a hostile environment and didn't investigate claims against males in football and basketball. women on their teams don't feel any has till >> i've been here for 18 years and women have never been treated better than they are now. the female student athletes have never had more resources and
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more support >> i think they're surprised at what is being said by tennessee in the national media. that's not the tennessee that they live. >> reporter: head football coach said he was apologetic >> everything is about the alleged victims. we take that very, very seriously. >> reporter: jones also got defensive >> it is easy to sit out there and judge when you don't live our day every day >> reporter: the university has now gone on its own offensive filing a motion to have utl m peyton mannings name from the lawsuit. he said a female trainer claimed manning sexually assaulted her. although manning has claimed the contact was accidental he did reach a settlement with his accuser. in the motion the lawyers say that mentioning manning in this suit would be "immaterial, impertinent and scanned allows" well, all in all the lawsuit mentions six spastic cases of--
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six cases of harassment. it does not go after the alleged perpetrators. just the university who the women say didn't do much to help them what is the claim they're making? >> they're claiming that the school violated title 9, to discriminate on the basis of gender. the women say the school showed a policy of indifference towards the assaults that were allegedly happened on campus john henry smith. thank you. scientists are saying they know what air bags exploded. it is high moisture mixed with heat. they were hired to investigate why the air bags explode shooting shrapnel at passengers causing 10 diths and 139 injuries. the latest list of the world
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brands edging out producers from the u.s. here are the top five. all of the ratings based on reliability and good driving quality. number 7 is the only american car to crack the top ten. eating chocolate could help your brain. researchers in the journal appetite say eating chocolate on a routine basis helping memory, abstract reasoning and pashl memory. the spsh spsh spacial memory-- spatiam memory. so eat lots of chocolate. we're going to take a look at the flint water crisis. it is just about what he knew about the led contamination. also a reminder you can check us out 24 hours a day by going to our website aljazeera.com where the news never stop. stephanie is back tomorrow morning. we will see you then.
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[ gunfire ] >> unholy alliances, the u.k. said there is evidence the kurds are siding with assad and russia. that's very disturbing. hello again from doha, this is the world news from al jazeera. also ahead. >> thank you very much, everybody. donald trump trumps bid to be the presidential candidate, he celebrates a big win in vegas. several gulf countries issue a travel ban for their nationals on traveling to

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