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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  March 7, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EST

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i tell my story. you tells yours. >> face to face, the democrats square off in a fiery debate in michigan ahead of the next primary. >> remembering nancy reagan, the nation mourning the loss of the first lady, her husband's fie e fiercest protector. >> the nation holds joint military drills. bringing their sound to cuba, an american act becomes the first to perform there since diplomatic relations were restored.
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it was bitter and heated. bernie sanders and hillary clinton debating in the latest battleground state of michigan in the president's race. the water crisis and the economy there front and center. good morning. welcome to your world this morning. >> fresh off several key victories, sanders tried to turn the heat up on clinton, but the frontrunner dismissed him as a one-issue candidate. al jazeera dine an estherbrook is live in flint this morning. diane, even those these two candidates seemed to agree on a lot, there were also some clashes. reporter: that's right, stefanie. bernie sanders amped up his game last night. he attacked hillary clinton on everything from trade to welcome reform. he even got her to side with him on who should be held accountable in the flint water crisis. >> ladies and gentlemen, the democratic candidates for
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president of the united states. >> it was their 7th debate. the venue, flint michigan, michigan the subject: the water crisis. >> i believe the governor of this state should under his d derelecti derelection should lead him to resign. >> the state is derelect in not coming forward. >> both were chanllenged with te failings of the environmental protection agency. >> they should be released because they failed this city. >> president sanders would fire anybody who knew about what was happening and did not act appropriately. >> the candidates were grilled from every direction. some questions were pointed. >> your first visit to flint as a presidential candidate, five
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months after the people were told to stop drinking the water. what took you so long? >> that's not quite accurate. i was here long before that. >> jobs were also high on the list of concerns among michigan voters and with bad trade deals partly to blame for the state's job losses. sanders saw his opening and pounced. >> secretary clinton supported virtually every one of these disastrous trade agreements written by corporate america. >> i voted against the money that ended up saving the auto industry. i think that is a pretty big difference. >> sanders countered by saying he did not support the bail-out because wall street was to blame and kept up his attack on clinton for her wall street ties. the two clashed on corporate subsidies. sanders had to explain why he sided with senator ted cruz on the issue. >> boeing and other big companies get support just like their competitors do from at a time companies that they are from in the countries that
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provide the support. >> thank you. >> isn't it tragic that these large, multi-national corporations making billions of dollars a year, shutting down in america, going to china, going to mexico, oh, absolutely, they need a handout from the american middle class. i don't think so. >> the debate took a poignant turn when the father of 14-year-old ab gallon cough, a survivor of the shooting raised the issue of gun control. >> in terms of this liability thing, will you hold manufacturers liability is if they understand that they are selling guns into an area that is getting into the hands of criminals, of course, they should be held liable. but if they are selling a product to a person who buys it legally, what you are really talking about is ending gun manufacturing in america. i don't agree with that. >> no other industry in america has absolute immunity. >> candidates were asked about
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race. both invoked their civil rights records, but both supported a 1994 crime bill that led to higher levels of incarceration that disproportionately affected blacks. the michigan primary is tomorrow. 147 delegates are at stake in this primary comes just a week before two other rust-belt primaries in ohio and i will know. stefanie. >> high stakes there in michigan. cher does each candidate stand this morning among voters, diane? >> reporter: i haven't yet seen any polls after the debate. but going in to the debate, hillary clinton had a sizeable lead. the detroit free press had her about 25 points ahead of bernie sanders. it will be interesting to see if the debate influences voters tomorrow. >> diane, thank you. sanders will take part in a townhall meeting tonight in detroit ahead of tomorrow's primary in michigan the senator is coming off of his victory sunday in the main caulk under the circumstanceses.
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he defeated clinton by a 2 to 1 margin there. he won the caucuses in nebraska and kansas this weekend. clinton won the louisiana primary on saturday, and she still has a strong lead in the delegate count. if you add in super delegates, clinton is about halfway to the number needed to lock in the nomination. >> as for the republicans, marco rubio winning sunday's primary in puerto rico, he topped the 50% threshold netting all 23 kel gassed but he lags far behind donald trump and ted cruz in the overall delegate count. donald trump is in the lead with 384. ted cruz is coming in at 300. marco rubio has half that number. john kasich is a distant fourth. despite their loan numbers, the delegates of rubio and kasich are vowing to stay in the race. kasich just got another high-profile endorsement. >> welcome, my very good friend, governor john kasich. >> iran candidate john kasich received an enthusiastic
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endorsement from arnold swart sz /* schwartzenager. >> i defended his decision to stay in the race. >> i will win ohio and it will be a new ball game and i will be able to compete in a lot of they are states. donald trump inspired the most on the sunday morning show. >> it's not enough to say a vote for me. >> donald may be the only president on the face of the planet that hillary clinton can beat. >> i would rather risk losing without donald trump than to try to win with him because it will do more damage over time. >> trump maintains he is what the republican party and america needs. >> i get along with people. i am aun fire. i am very much aun fire. >> in particular florida senator marco rubio attacked trump for his crude language yet defended
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his crack at trump's fingers. >> someone is going to have to punch them back. >> the democrats were asked about the possibility of a contested convention. ted cruz and kasich were against it. >> if washington deal makers step in, in a brokered convention and steal the nomination, i think we would have a manifest uprising. >> i agree with ted cruz from the standpoint we can't let a bunch of washington insiders pick the nominee. >> the rnc chair reince priebus said it's too soon to entertain that idea. >> flags are flying at half staff in california in honor of nancy reagan. she deciied on sunday. many have been remembering her for her love and her did he have devotion devotion of her husband for 52 years, ronald reagan. a look back at reagan's life. >> in this moment, nancy reagan
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symbolized the country's grief. her did he have devotion was clear. born in 1921, ann robbins, nancy was a nickname, she became an actress but when she was mistakenly put on the black list as a suspected communist, she turned to the president of the screen actors guild, ron reagan for help. they married a few years later. >> the add mir al should have told me not to worry. >> they did one movie together. then she put her career aside to raise their two children and to help his political career from governor of california to u.s. president elected in 1980. >> i think i may have helped a little maybe. >> there were often questions about how much she helped. this incident reinforced the idea that she was really running the show. >> doing everything we can. >> she denied having that much control, but later admitted she
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did play a role in her husband's presidency? >> i was more aware, always, of people who were inrunning him, and he wasn't. so, i would step in and say, you've got to watch out for him. >> that meant she often clashed with his staff. much more after this assassination attempt. when she standed final say over his schedule, it made headlines when it was revealed she was consulting an astrologer first. as a first lady, she was often controversial, raised in the life of privilege, she was often portrayed as an elitist, targeted for remodeling the white house and replacing the china. the money was donated like many much her expensive designer gowns but that didn't stop the criticism. as first lady, she championed pairing the elderly with at risk youth and urging kids to: >> just say no. >> her anti-drug message brought the usage numbers down for a bit, but in the long run, made very little deference with the
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statistics. out of the white house, shefdz impact the debate over stem cell research convinced it could have provided help to her ailing husbands. she pushed republicans to aband on their moral objections and it was enough to force george w. bush to find a compromise. her life, she said, began the day she married her husband. her intention love and love and devotion will define her own. >> how did she change the role of first lady. >> as we heard from patty she defined the role like few other first please if you look over the course of the last one 00 years of american history, just a few others come to mind. edith wilson largely ran the white house in her husband's con
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value essence, eleanor roosevelt. nancy reagan ranked near the top. in many ways she was a traditional spouse, supportive of her husband in the white house. patty talked about her style, the china incidents where she purchased hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of china for the white house that was paid for by private contributions. some of the gowns that she wore to very expensive designer gowns, to white house state functions also criticized. feminists criticized her for that but she had a side of her that was known perhaps de-ricively as the dragon lady pulling strings of being sort of a martinette behind the scenes. >> after the reagan administration, it was revealed as was rumored at the time she helped engineer the ouster of one of the chiefs of staff, donald reagan. it was her legacy over the last 20 years or 30 years sense president reagan left office, it is her husband's legacy that she
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has been most protective of and most concerned with. >> she was fiercely protective of ronald reagan after he was shot. has the white house so far issued a statement concerning nancy reagan's death? >> she was protective after he was shot to the extent she kept people around and urge urged president reagan not to run for reelection in 1984, an election he ultimately won against walter mon daily, president obama and managers obama put out a statement upon hearing this news that raised in part nancy reagan once wrote that nothing could prepare you for living in the white house. she was right, of course. but we had a head start because we were unfortunate to benefit from her proud example and her warm and generous advice. the statement goes on to praise nancy reagan as patty mentioned for her advocacy of stem cell research an the fight against alzheimer's which claimed ronald reagan's life. flags at the capitol and duplex fly at half staff on the orders of speaker paul ryan.
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del. >> mike viqueira for us in washington. thank you very much. update on another former president. jimmy carter saying he has turned the battle in his -- turned the corner in his battle against cancer. he revealed doctors discovered four small lesions on his brain, a combination of immunotherapy and radiation ended last month. carter, who is 91, says he will continue to get those check-ups just in case the cancer returns. >> san francisco is gearing up for more rain today after a weekend of severe wind and thunderstorms. some areas got upwards of four inches of rain, leaving streets looking more like streams. fallen industries been taking downpour lights and parts of houses. dramatic footage from southern california. police saved a dozen people from the los angeles river on sunday. they were from a homeless e encampment next to the water. when the rescue team arrived, people were colllinging to tree everyone referring you'd is okay. >> flooding continues to be a problem it for residents living
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in the northwest. kevin corriveau a lot of rain. >> we are looking at another system coming through. that's why another day of rain today through tomorrow as well and, of course, they need the rain but they don't need the rain in this much interval. let me show you what's happening right here. you can see the area of low pressure off of the coast. really storm after storm coming along the shore. right now, we are seeing a fairly big one pushing through southern and central california. it's not only the rage. it's the snow. up near donor pass, it is closed because of the heavy snow that has been seen over the last couple of days. here is a local radar across the region. s san francisco, heavy rain. the rain here towards parts of los angeles as well. we have flood watches in he can't. these have been in effect across the coastal regions. those will continue for the last the 24 hours as well. down towards the coast. talking about high surf warnings
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because of that wind and circulation toward the coast. not only that will but it is the winter part of the storm there. you can see across the sierra nevadas. where they have seen 3 feet of snow. all the way down toward the next can border in the higher elevations, we are looking at winter storm warnings as well. a little break here, but tomorrow, more rain across the region. so that is why we are expecting, in terms of rain, another 8 plus inches of rain. >> they obviously need the rain because of the low water tables there but maybe a little too much at one time? >> a little less rain, absolutely. >> kevin corvo, thank you. >> when we come back, searching for solutions. >> the eu and turkib leaders hold an emergency summit to tackle the refugee crisis. >> stopping zika before the summer games, trying to get a handle on the outbreak in
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brazil.
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♪ new threats from north korea this morning. the government is now vowing to launch nuclear strikes on the u.s. and south korea. >> that threat coming as the u.s. and south korea are scheduled to hold joint military drills once again today. more than 300,000 troops on the south korean side as well as 17,000 u.s. soldiers of course, here in korea, there is a small minority who are expressing concerns whether this is actually heightening the concerns only but that kind of view will be warranted or will have metic often if this country
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we are dealing with if this country desires to express peace and prosperity for their people, which is not the case if they are talking about rather conventional war, con conventional military buildup, which is not the case. also, if we are dealing with a country that's expressing their desire for self defense, which is not the case. >> last week, kim jon un ordering the neuraling arson to be put on stand by over those sanctions. those sanctions came as a result of a recent long-range rocket launch. >> a tun easeian soldier has been killed in clashes along the oarer in ben garden. military officials say armed fighters ing an army base in a national guard out post, they opened fire with heavy weapons including rocket propelled againates. turkey trying to cop with the influx of syrian refuse ease
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earlier this month, it started granting work permits to sirrians so they can support themselves, now turksey rolling out plans for healthcare, education, housing and language training. there are an estimated 3 million syrian refugees in turkey. mats doaning i can't is taking a different approach. the eastern country is allowing certain a syrian from alleppo crossed the border but from damascus cannot. mass doaning i can't is on a popular route for refugees treeing to reach record: this weekend, another boat capsized killing at least 25 people. the turkish coast guard rescued at least 15 others. i want to go to jonah hull where european and turkish leaders are meeting brussels.
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what can we expect out of this latest meeting? going in, stefanie, there is quite a lot of optimism al among a number of the, they may have a possible solution to europe's refugee crisis. i can tell you what they are hoping to come out of it. they won't necessarily get it, of course, but two headline issues that they would like to be able to announce at the end of the day. the first, that the scald balkan route used by hundreds of thousands of refugees making their way from turkey across the agean sea into greece and up through had you macedonia, hungry. that will that route is effectively closed. a signal to refugees and also a
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signal to the people smugglers to take up. they said if there wert people in their boats, the other is they would like turkey to come to the table with more help than it has offered up to now, agreeing to riyadh mitt thousands perhaps even hundreds of thousands over town of failed asylum seekers and migrants now being pushed back from countries in europe pooling now in a humanitarian system with no where to go. they want turkey to riyadh mitt those people and repat tree ate they will so their currented tries of origin. the difficulties here, chancellor americaey is sensitive to language that suggests that the balkan route is closed because she, of course, is the architect of the i wanted door policy foto europe. she wants to talk about stemming irregular flows rather than closure, and turkey coming here
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knowing that it has the upper hand, that europe is so relying on turkish help to deal with this program has just decided in the last 24 hours to up the ante. turkey wants more back from europe. it wants the greater movement on the plan. he wants europe to agree to resettle large numbers of the syrian refugee syrian caps in turkey. >>, of course, is difficult for europe because it doesn't have any consensus and a lot of countries don't want to see any more refugees in europe, let alone those ryaning legally from turk eric that's a great break down of what's happening there in brussels, jonah. turkey's prime minister is there today. what do you expect his role to be in these negotiations? >> they will be putting all of these things to him as we pe spk and in the couple of coming hours and he will put to them his demands they had a meeting, he and chancellor merkel
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overnight up until three am. they have covered a lot of ground. turkey steel the reason, so-called action plan to try and disrupt the people smuggling networks on its shore with the agean, the front line across which so many of these people come and make it into europe. turkey made that deal in return for billions of dollars of aid and not enough process has been made as the european union is concerned on that. they will press for full implementation of that deal. they will press turkey to gee to this readmission of hundreds of thousands more failed asylum seekers from grease. of course, as i said, they will be up against stiff demands fromtie in return demands, but europe may find it very difficult to agree to. >> al jazeera jonah hull for us in brussels. jonah, thank you. >> stefanie the man in charge of the search says it is very likely the missing airline will
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be found by july marking two years since the boeing plane disappeared. authorities say they believe it went down somewhere over the indian ocean. family members this weekend marking that will anniversary suspected to be for the plane was found last week on the coast of mozambique. >> claim is now being investigated. >> a football finale. >> payton manning says he is calling it a career. how he left his mark on the league. >> is the climate change affecting heat? in northeast india, i am meeting a tea taster to find out. >>
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>> these people have decided that today they will be
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arrested. >> i know that i'm being surveilled. >> people are not getting the care that they need. >> this is a crime against humanity. >> hands up... >> don't shoot. >> hands up... >> don't shoot. >> what do we want? >> justice. >> when do we want it? >> now. >> explosions going on... we're not quite sure - >> is that an i.e.d.? first lady nancy reagan is being remembered this morning. she was best known for her love and did he have devotion to president ronald reagan the she will be buried alongside him at the reagan presidential library. no word on the funeral plans. >> mash 0 rubio won the primary in puerto rico but remains third
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behind donald trump and ted cruz. ohio governor john kasich has the fewest delegates. he did pick up an endorsement from and schwezarnegger. >> hillary linton and bernie sanders head a heated debate. senators tried to -- sanders tried to turn up the heat. >> i voted to save the auto industry. he voted against the money that ended up saving the auto industry.
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>> david leventhal joins us. good to see you again. things got a little heated last night to use the boxing analogy, there were a couple of knockdowns on both sides. was there anything to convince last minute voters? >> bernie sanders is trailing significantly in the polls, it's just a little bit too little too late for bernie sanders. he says he is sticking in all the way to the convention, that he is in this race to fight hillary clinton tooth and nail from state to state, from caucus to primary and that seems to be at this point a pretty solid done deal. the question for bernie sanders is regardless how his debate performances go, regardless how many hits he'll be able to make on hillary clinton and he had several last night, isn't going to close what is an incredibly sizeable gap not only from the the pledge delegates but also
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super delegates, free agents who can go to the convention and vote for hillary clinton and bernie sanders as they please and most of cutting hillary clinton's way. >> one of the key moments came when hillary clinton said this about gun manufacturers also being big business. take a listen. >> i also believe so strongly, gene, that giving immunity to gun makers and sellers was a terrible mistake, because it removes any accountability from the makers and the sellers and it also disrupted what was a very promising legal theory to try to get makers to do more to make guns safer for example, to try to give sellers more accountability for selling guns when they shouldn't have. that is an issue that senator sanders and i differ on. i voted against giving them immunity. >> he then tried to tie it to wall street and the bailout.
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he said the n.r.a. are one of the biggest businesses in the united states. did she score any points? >> she scored a big point there and senator sanders, who is from a very rural state who will say time and again that we can't simply do away with guns. you have in vermont a bipartisan love for hunting and shooting sports. he basically said look, we can't put gun manufacturers out of business. while that may play well back in burlington, it's not necessarily somebody that is going to play well in flint or areas ravaged by gun violence. it is a divide between hillary clinton and senator sanders when it comes to that issue of gun rights even though they are fairly on the same page when it comes to restricts guns in other rewards. >> democrats, the 1990s are calling, sanders spending a lot
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of time talking about the economic policies of bill clinton talking about nafta, is that going to resist nate more than the clinton years them telephones. a lot of people in the african-american community refer to bill clinton as the nation's first black president. >> anything that has to do with trade, nafta, the auto industry, people in michigan are going to have very long memories when it comes to issues like that, not surprising at all that they discussed those particulars in the debate last night. the question is when you talk the 1990's, the 1960's, we talk about youth voters often and what are millennials going to cut, are they going to go bernie or hillary. these issues aren't going to cut with them unless they are students of history or have a great love for those issues.
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it is a question of balance with the candidates take the stage, how much are they going to talk about backward looking issues and how much about forward looking issues. there's interplay between the two of them but you can only talk about the past so much. >> if you are talking about the wall street bailout, where some of your friends destroyed this economy. >> you know. >> excuse me, i'm talking. >> if you're going to talk tell the whole story, senator sanders. >> let me tell my story, you tell yours. >> twitter lit up but not necessarily in a good sense for sanders. why? >> you had a situation there that was reminiscent of a very bad one when hillary clinton was running for senate, it was great for hillary, bad for rick lasio.
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this is going to be political gold for secretary clinton if bernie sanders is on the comeback trail and he's on the comeback path and closing that gap that exists between delegates. she'll put up commercials or super pac organizations saying bernie sanders is just trying to keep bernie sanders in her place, you can almost see the ad's coming out now. maybe not the wisest political moment for bernie sanders even if he was doing his best to make a point that he thought in his mind was a very legitimate was not. >> younger voters did tweet about that one. dave, thank you very much. >> thank you, del. seven families are filing a class action lawsuit over the clint water crisis. they want the right to go after city and state leaders over the wore problems there. as bisi onile-ere tells us, many families feel left behind. >> what is happening in flint challenges the conscience of our
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nation. >> house minority leader nancy pelosi was joined friday by 25 members of congress. >> i said the more knowledge we have, the more we can do for you. >> the federal lawmakers heard from 60 of the city's water crisis, which has plagued the community for nearly two years. >> what we further learned today, we know that we have to act. we've come here to listen, to learn, to act upon what we will put together after this so that we can give hope and healing. >> outside a home on the city's south side, the first sign of action. >> my mission is to totally get the lead out of flint. >> flint mayor karen weaver kicked off her fast start initiative, the goal to replace all lead service lines and restore safe drinking water in the city. at weaver pleased for more
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funding, thousands in the city are doing what they can to get by. >> are you ready? >> all right. let's walk through the hallway. >> jaden sawyer is three years old. today he's among dozens of children in flint who will be tested for lead poisoning. >> you're going to feel a little poke now. >> for more than a year, flint's tap water was tainted with lead. sawyer is among thousands who were exposed. >> yolanda stewart learns of the test results in minutes. >> he tested 4.3 and that means he has a very low level. >> others haven't been as fortunate. after the city began pulling tap water from the flint river in 2014, the percentage of children with elevated lead levels in the city increased. >> we're seeing a various range of levels. there's certain areas in the community that have a higher
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level more so than other areas. >> university of michigan flint nurse robinson said that the long-term effects of lead exposure include lowered i.q. and cognitive function and behavioral problems. the can tam nation of flint's water is now at the center of a criminal investigation. >> children are still growing, so their brain is still growing, so they might be a little slower than usual to learning certain things. >> residents in the predominantly black and poor city have depended on bottled water and filters for months. michigan governor rick snyder has been criticized for his slow response. >> we didn't connect all the dots that i wish we would have. >> newly released emails from his office show that concerns over the quality of flint's water were raised early on. >> that's where i'm kicking myself every day. i wish i would have asked more questions. >> in a few weeks, he'll face question from lawmakers on
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capitol hill. yolanda stewart hopes a solution to flint's water crisis comes soon. >> i'm hoping, praying that pipes get fixed and i believe in my heart that it's going to be all right. >> bisi onile-ere, al jazeera, flint, michigan. a law school is going to be on trial accused of misleading students about their chances of getting a job. a former student at tomas jefferson school of law in san diego said the college inflated employment data. she graduated top of her class but has yet to find a job as a lawyer. past claims against other schools have been dismissed. the judges in all those cases saying the students went to school at their own risk. >> thousands of palestinian teachers taking to the streets in jerusalem's occupied west bank protesting outside the prime ministers office demanding higher wages and better working conditions. our reporter is in ramallah in
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the occupied west bank. >> there are several thousand teachers, government school teachers from across the occupied west bank who have come to demonstrate not far from the prime minister's office here in ramallah, even though they have been told it is an illegal gathering and there are many checkpoints where they say some have been prevented from coming here. they've been protesting on strike for nearly a month. one of the main chance here has gone dignity for teachers. dignity they say because the basic salary for many is just 500 u.s. dollars. they say there was an agreement years ago to boost that but it hasn't translated into reality. they are also chanting for justice, justice in comparison to other government sector workers. for example, many teachers compare their situation to the security forces for 2015. the budget from the palestinian authority for members of the security forces, there was one
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and a half times the budget for teachers salaries. they say that's simply not right, so that's led to the anger which you can probably hear and say behind me. this morning american researchers from the c.d.c. are in brazil working with health officials to investigate a possible link between the zika virus and birth defect. many cases of micro can he havely have been found in rural cases without access to health care. the doctors are going door to door to gather information. >> this is obviously something important to know. we want to get the information out as soon as possible in order to be able to understand this and to, you know, create public health activities. >> there were more than 4,000 cases says in 10 months there. brazil is scrambling to determine the case and get zika under control before the olympics begin in five months.
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one doctor happen saved thousands of lives. we have this report from la paz. >> she was a sufferer, difficulty with breathing and not gaining weight, a blood vessel which bypasses the lungs while the baby is in the womb failed to close up after she was born. >> after the operation, everything was better. i eat better. it's easy to walk up the hills, up the stairs. >> it's a problem more common with altitude and la paz is 4,000 meters above sea level. maria was another sufferer. >> two months after the operation, everything was better. i could breathe more easily and do many things i couldn't do before. >> the doctor said a extent made with a flexible alloy is inserted with a catheter.
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with local anesthetic, the procedure lasts half an hour. >> as soon as we're happy that the deposit is in the correct place, we simply pull out the wire. >> he developed the procedure as a young doctor using sheep. extentsare sewen by women in his factory. >> they call it an intelligent material. after treatments, it retains the shape we want it to be. >> solutions to big problems can be very small and simple, this small and simple. these tiny things are used to block holes in the heart and can give patients an active and healthy life. >> the hospital has treated more
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than 5,000 bolivian patients and 5,000 around the world. his product is distributed globally a german company. he's frustrated he can't do more. >> there are a large number of people suffering you this problem who don't have the money. we need to focus to ensure that this technology reaches all of those children, not just some of them. >> the doctor is critical of the bolivian authorities for not investing more in health and in the international medical community for not embracing what he says is a simple and easy to apply solution that hits bolivians more than most. the inventor of the modern email has died, he was 74. he sent that first test email back in 1971. his choice of that at symbol for
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all eye consist. parts of texas are bracing for severe weather today. >> good morning, this is on the heels of last month's severe weather outbreak, 53 tornadoes, the most february tornadoes we have seen since 1950. the outbreak today in texas is just the beginning of a three day outbreak that's going to be happening toward the south. let me show you what's going to be happening here. we have an area of low pressure in the upper left making its way down toward the accident. today, a lot of instability and moisture coming into the region. we don't really see too much now, but this afternoon, this radar map is going to look completely different and we're not just talking about the accident, we're also talking about parts of oklahoma, as well. today, the big danger is going to be large hail, possible wind damage, as well as tornadoes this afternoon, and that's going to extend up here toward oklahoma.
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as we go towards tomorrow, the area of concern isn't going to loose too much, so we could see multiple details of severe weather in the region. towards wednesday, it shifts more towards the east, but really, we are still looking at that same area. when you have rain in one location like this over a three day span, that also means we're going to be seeing the potential of flooding across this particular area. i want to show you something very interesting on the map. if you look towards the east, these temperatures, by wednesday, washington, d.c. is looking at 77 degrees. new york, our temperature today 56 degrees, by wednesday, our high would be 47 normally, so all these areas 25 to 30 degrees above normal. >> i looked a little peaked
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object don't i? >> thursday go to the park. >> i might need a sick day. many in india really on the tea industry for their livelihoods. that could be changing. >> acceptable. >> meet a professional tea taster. his job is to assess quality, but, he says, tea is subjective, like whiskey or wine, one man's drink is another man's poison. he says he's seen big changes in his 25 year career. >> the growing conditions have become more challenging. earlier in areas where you didn't need irrigation today you need irrigation, so that's an added cost. >> he has devoted his life to studying tea. he says global warming is having a serious effect on the industry.
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>> climate change is impacting the productivity. secondly, the climate change is also affecting the quality. >> there was a time when these sprinklers weren't needed, when the rainfall and sunshine was just right. the tea plant is sensitive. >> unlike annual crop which dominate our food system, tea is a perennial crop, which means it's grown all year round. you plant the sap links once and you can harvest the leaves for 50 or six years. that makes it especially vulnerable to changes in temperature, and water levels. >> a senior member of the indian tea board and a fifth generation tea planter said unpredictable rainfall has forced teagardens to install irrigation. >> he we have become completely dependent on nature and we don't
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rain, we cannot have good harvesting. you can't get your production from irrigation. it is only from rain, when there is rain, then you get good harvest. >> indians consume a third of all the tea produced in the world, nearly a billion tons every year and millions who depend on it for their livelihood search for a sign of two leaves and a bud. when we come back, making music history. >> two americans rock cuba with a free concert.
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performance enhancing drugs were shipped to his house. the nfl is looking into those claims. he has faced allegations of a sexual assault from an incident in 1996 when he was at the university of tennessee. manning retires as the all time leader in touchdown passes. he also leads in passing yards. he's tied for most ever wins by a quarterback. president obama getting ready today for a trip to havana later this month, the first american president to go to the island in 90 years. >> young cubans are enjoying the perks of the warmed relations with cuba. >> another sign of the changing times as thousands of young
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children hear a performance. it was in front of the u.s. intersection of the american embassy on the orderers of former president fidel castro in order to facilitate anti american protest right in the face of the diplomatic mission. that is the furthest thing from the minds of these young people today. there is a new president both here and in the united states and things that bring the young generation of both countries together, like this music are what are taking center stage. >> i've come to the anti imperialist without caring what's behind it. i simply love electronic music. >> this is something we've been waiting for for a long time and thank goodness they've come. >> i came here to enjoy it. >> all this less than 10 days
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before president barack obama comes to havana, cuba for a historic visit, symbol to all, but especially the young ones who hadn't been born at the height of the cold war. of course the rolling stones are set to play there later this month. tweeting thank you, we have been humbled by your love. look at that crowd. >> to critics who say this should not have been done, a picture is worth a thousand words. alaska, something changing, has gone to the dogs. >> 5-4-3-2-1. >> the iditarod is now underway, 85 mushers and their team are competing for that grueling event. there are several champions
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including one that has won three of the last four. the race is shorter because of the lack of snow. they had to decide this year whether or not the iditarod was going to be held in anchorage because there was no snow. >> they had to bring in snow by train and shorten it. it's a real thing, global warming, alaska which has seen successive warming winters there. >> it's pretty bad there. ahead, the democratic presidential candidates focus in on flint's water crisis. one says the city still needs to take action. >> we are also talking about the trump doctrine. stay with us.
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>> if you're going to talk, tell the whole story, senator sanders. >> let me tell my story, you tell yours. >> i will. >> fiery words, clashing ahead of the michigan primary. nancy reagan remembered. she dice at 94. a search for a refugee solution, tens of thousands waiting at european and turkish leaders try to agree on a plan of action. holding on to their
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heritage, native americans from california struggle to revive their dying language. welcome to your world this morning. >> the democrats who want to be president campaigning today ahead of tomorrow's michigan primary, but they spent last night clashing in a bitter and often heated debate. the water crisis and their economic policies are front and center. stretch off several key victories, sanders tried to turn up the heat on clinton but the democratic front runner hit back. >> diane esterbrook is live in flint, michigan, plenty of fireworks on the stage last night. >> oh, yeah, del, i mean bernie sanders definitely brought his a game to flint, michigan last night, arcing with clinton over
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a number of topics and even interrupted her a few times. the question is will it make a difference when voters head to the polls tomorrow. >> ladies and gentlemen, the democratic candidate dates for president of the united states. >> the focus, the toxic water crisis. the candidates wasted no time sounding off. >> i believe the governor of this state should understand that his dereliction of duty was irresponsible. he should resign. >> it is raining lead in flint and the state is derelict with not coming forward with the money that is required. >> both were challenged on the failings of the e.p.a. >> people should be fired. however up it went, i don't know, but as far as it goes, they should be relieved, because they failed this city. >> penalty sanders would fire anybody who knew about what was happening and did not act appropriately. >> the candidates were grilled
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from every direction, some questions were pointed. >> you're first visit to flint as a presidential candidate was just over a week ago. it's almost five months after the people here were told to stop drinking the water. what took you so long? >> first of all, that's not quite accurate, i was here before that. >> jobs were also high on the list of concerns among michigan voters and with bad trade deals partly to blame for the state's job losses. sanders saw his opening and pounced. >> secretary clinton supported virtually every one of these disastrous trade agreements written by corporate america. >> he voted against the money that ended up saving the auto industry. i think that is a pretty big difference. >> sanders countered by saying he did not support the bailout because wall street was to blame and kept up his attack on clinton for her wall street ties. the two clashed on corporate subsidies. scannedders had to explain. >> bowing and other big
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companies get support just like their competitors do, from the companies that they are from in the countries that provide the support. >> isn't it tragic that these large multi-national corporations making billions of dollars a year, shutting down in america, going to china, going to mexico, oh, absolutely, they need a handout from the american middle class. i don't think so. >> the debate took a poignant turn when the father of abigail, a survivor of the uber driving shooter in kalamazoo raised the issue of gun control. >> in terms of this liability thing where you hold manufacturer's liability, if they understand that they're selling guns into an area that is getting into the hands of criminals, of course they should be held liable, but if they are selling a product to a person who buys it legally, what's you're really talking about is ending gun manufacturing in
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america. i don't agree with that. >> no other industry in america has absolute immunity and they sell -- >> the candidates were also asked about race, both invoked their civil rights records but both supported a 1999 crime about him that led to levels of incarceration that disproportionately affected blacks. >> now both of the candidates are going to continue to campaign in michigan today. the polls open in less than 24 hours. del. >> diane, what about the polls, those other polls, where does each candidate stand this morning among the voters in michigan? >> well, the latest maris poll that hillary clinton ahead by 17 points. actually the latest detroit free press poll last week had her ahead 25 points. it will be interesting to see if the fireworks in the debate last night will have any text on sanders voters tomorrow. >> diane, thank you very much.
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bernie sanders is going to be taking part in a town hall meet to go night in detroit ahead of tomorrow's measure primary. both of them will be there. he is coming off that victory sunday in maine. he also won the caucuses in nebraska and alabama this weekend. clinton has a strong lead in the delegate count and super delegates, clinton is halfway to the number need to lock up the nomination. >> marco rubio won sunday's primary in puerto rico, netting all 23 delegates in the commonwealth. he still lags far behind donald trump and ted cruz in the delegate count. trump is in the lead with cruz not far behind him. they split this weekend's other contest. rubio is in first place in the did he go get count, john kasich a distant fort. rubio and kasich view to stay in the race.
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kasich got another high profile endorsement. >> welcome by very good friend governor john kasich. >> kasich received an endorsement from arnold schwarzenegger sunday. the ohio governor has yet to win a state and only managed second place twice but defended his decision to stay in the race. >> i will win ohio. it will be a whole new ballgame and i'll be able to compete in a lot of these states. >> donald trump inspired the most on the sunday morning shows. >> donald may be the only person on the face of the planet that hillary clinton can beat. >> trump maintains he's what the republican party and america needs. >> i get along with people. i'm a unifier.
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i'm very much a unifier. >> trump is attacked for his crude language. >> where i grew up if someone keeps punching people in the face, eventually someone's going to have to stand up and punch them back. >> asked about the possibility of a tested convention, cruz and kasich came out against it. >> if a bunch of washington power brokers try to steal the nomination, there will be an uprising. >> we can't let a bunch of washington insiders pick the nominee. >> r.n.c. chair said it's too soon to entertain that idea. hermela aregawi, al jazeera. >> flags are flying at half staff today in california's capitol in honor of former first lady nancy reagan. she was 94 years old and died sunday. many remember her for her love and devotion to her husband, president and reagan.
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they were married 52 years. al jazeera takes a look back at her life. >> in this moment, nancy reagan symbolized the grief of a nation, burying her husband after a long battle with alzheimer's, her devotion to and reagan was clear. it was the constant theme of their long marriage. born in 1921 in new york ann robin, nancy was actually a nickname, she became an actress. when was she mistakenly put on the blacklist as a suspected communist, she turned to the president of the scene actors gills for help, ronald reagan. that he married a year later. she put her career aside to raise their children and help his political career from governor of california to u.s. president, elected in 1980. >> i think i may have helped at, maybe. >> there were often questions about how much she helped. this incident reinforced the
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idea that she was really running the show. >> doing everything we can. >> doing everything we can. >> she denied having that much control but later admitted she did play a role in her husband's presidency. >> i was also aware of people who were running him and he wasn't, so i would step in and say you've got to watch out for him. >> that meant she often clashed with his staff, much more so after this assassination attempt, when she demanded final say over his schedule. it made headlines when it was revealed she was consulting an astrologer first. as a first lady, she was often controversial. raised in a life of privilege, she was often portrayed as an elitist, targeted for remodeling the white house and replacing the china.
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she for him and you saily urged kids. >> just say no, her anti drug message in the long run made very little difference to the statistics. out of the white house, she did impact the debate over stem cell research, convinced it could have provided help to her ailing republican she pushed republicans to abandon their objection and it was enough for george w. bush to find a compromise, allowing some research to be done. her life, she said really began the day she married her husband. her intense love and devotion to him and his legacy will in many ways define her own. >> love those picture of the reagans. mike viqueira, our senior washington correspondent join us now. a lot of people say nancy reagan redefined the role of the first lady. how did she do that? >> without a doubt, the center of contribution of nancy reagan's time in her white house
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was that she both traditional and progressive. traditional in terms of gender roles, she was criticized by many feminists for being sort of the spouse, the supportive spouse and not speaking out in her own right. some people called her the dragon lady for her sort of domineering way behind the scenes. she was instrumental in the firing of one of her husband's chief of staff, don regan. she was known to be a gate keeper. in the traditional sense, rearranging, redecorating in the white house, buying the expensive china, wearing the designer gowns to state dinners, you saw her there with queen elizabeth, one of those vintage photographs that you like so much, stephanie. in that sense, yes, a very traditional first lady but in another sense, redefining the role, stepping out, if you look at course of the first ladies,
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just a few have had such a dominant role, even if it's behind the scenes, you think of woodrow wilson's wife who looked over affairs of state when her husband was very ill. >> always scrutiny on the first lady. that to be sure, mike. what has the white house said about reagan's death? jo you're right. in a sense, the first lady can't win. there are those that say she should be more forthright and vocal and others say nobody elected the first lady, she should stay behind the scene. there's always that line to walk. michelle obama and president obama put out you a statement when building news broke mitt morning in washington. the statement reads in part, nancy reagan once wrote that nag can prepare you for living in the white house. she was right, of course, but we had a head start because we were fortunate to benefit from her proud example and warm and generous advice. the statement praises nancy reagan for her advocacy of stem
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cell research and fight against alzheimer's, flags at the capital flying at half staff, ordered by speaker paul ryan. stephanie. >> mike viqueira, thank you. jimmy carter says he is turning the corner in his battle against cancer. the former president said he doesn't need anymore treatments. last august, he revealed doctors discovered four small leagues on his brain. treatment ended last month. carter said he'll continue to get check ups in case the cancer returns. >> san francisco gearing up for more rain today, some of the areas getting up to four inches of rain, leavingion the streets like rivers. falling tree he is have been taking down power lines and parts of house witness them, as well. dramatic footage of this river rescue in southern california, police saving a dozen people follow the los angeles river. they were from a homeless
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encampment next to the water. they found people clinging to trees. everyone is ok. >> a lot of people living on those banks of the river. in fact we did a piece about that a couple months ago, a real risk to homeless people living in los angeles basin. >> we've got a guest weather person here today, kevin corriveau. >> it's great to be here this morning. >> good to see you. a busy weather morning. >> with the floods, we had one fatality, a car tried to go around booreries. >> eight feet of water there. >> that's one good lesson. if you don't know how deep the water is, do not attempt to go through that area. flood is a massive killer in terms of weather. we do have some more weather coming into play here. it comes in bands, as you can see. we have one good one coming now across california. if you look across the pacific, that's going to be another one affecting the area later on. let's go in. i want to show you how these are playing out. you can see one band pushing towards the south.
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most of the heavy rain has been across central and northern california, but that doesn't leave parts of los angeles and san diego out, as well. as a matter of fact, in the higher elevations of the mountain ranges down to the south, we are going to be seeing snow, as well. we have just up dated the watches and warnings and right now since the last hour, we have a new flash flood warning just over here towards the northwest part of the los angeles along the coast. that means flash flooding is either eminent or taking place right now, so we'll keep you updated on that. take a look at all the winter storm warnings down the mountains down to the border of mexico. we expect another eight inches of snow across that region. we've seen three to four feet of snow, great for the reservoir of snow we need for the summer, but of course, that makes a big problem, and right now highway 80 across doer pass is closed because of severe weather. this is what it looks like
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today, we're going to see rain down to the south. we're going to be seeing tomorrow, remember i showed you on the satellite the next band pushing in. up to the north, we do expect to see another eight to 12-inches of rain that i pi for the rest of the week, it's going to be off and on rain for that region. they need it but don't need it in hard intervals. >> we are going to talk about the heat. >> we are going to talk about the heat. make a lot of people how many. >> national security and the republican party. >> we'll tell you why donald trump's critics now warn that his plans to protect america might hurt the u.s. overseas. >> is climate change affecting tea? i'm in india, meeting a tea taster to find out.
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>> this weekend, trump picking up two states, but ted cruz taking cans and maine. marco rubio picking up a win in puerto rico. trumped rivals have been pointing out his inconsists. after first backing down for waterboarding suspects, he said this. >> i happen to think that when you're fighting an enemy that chops or heads, i happen to think that we should use something that's stronger than we have right now. right now, basically waterboarding is essentially not allowed as i understand it. >> and you would like it to be. >> i would certainly like it to be at a minimum to allow that.
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professor, thanks for your time. donald trump is talking about legalizing waterboarding, you have to play the game they're playing, he said, referring to isil. when you have a leading presidential candidate talking about torture, how does that affect america's standing around the world? >> it further undermines it. unfortunately, we have engaged in such practices in the post 9/11 period. my sense is that most people who know anything about national security regret departure from norms during the bush
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administration. the fact that trump says we ought to once more return to that practice and worse, recalls error that is we'd just as soon move beyond and is irresponsible. in a letter, saying he swings frommationlationism to military adventurism within the space of one sentence, trump was against the iraq war yet calls for building up the military. have you been able to make sense of his global view? >> no, i don't think he has a global view. i don't think he has any kind of a consistent view of u.s. foreign policy for for that matter u.s. domestic policy. the key to his success thus far in many respects derives from his inconsistency, what he says appeals to a large number of
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americans who have lost confidence in establishment politics. he thumbs his nose at the establishment, and at least in the near term, that has some real appeal for people. >> you wrote in an essay recently should trump ultimately succeed in capturing the presidency in all but name, the united states will cease to be a constitutional republic. that is an essay entitled don't cry for me america, clearly drawing the parallel between trump and another authoritarian. how do you think him being elected would undermine the united states constitutional republic? >> as he read trump, he doesn't even bother to make a pretense of either understanding or adhering to the constitution.
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his shoot from the hip manner, again, it appeals to a considerable number of americans, suggests that a trump president wouldn't be bound by the sort of limits imposed by the constitution. >> when it comes to foreign policy, who do you think is more dangerous, trump or the emerging gop alternative ted cruz who won a couple of caucuses this weekend who talked about carpet bombing in syria? >> i think that's a great question and the my answer is that cruz would not represent much of an improvement. this is in some respects, i think the distressing aspect of the moment we're in right now. from where i sit, it looks to me like at least some of the air is beginning to escape from the trump balloon, but the beneficiary is cruz, and there's nothing that cruz has said up to this point that suggests that he would be a sensible realistic
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steward of u.s. foreign policy. >> andrew, thank you so much for your insights this morning. >> thank you. a tunisian soldier has been killed in border clashes. armed fighters attacking an army base and post attacked with rockets and grenades. north korea threatening to attack the united states and south carolina. military drills will include troops on the south koreaen side as well as 7,000 u.s. troops. pyongyang long condemning those drills also warning of a nuclear attack in the past. >> in korea, many express concerns whether this is heightening the concerns only -- tensions only. i think that kind of view will
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be warrantied or have merits only if this country that we are dealing with, north carolina is a country that continues to express desires for peace and prosperity for their people, which is not the case. if they are talking about just the conventional regular war, conventional military build up, which is not the case, and also if we're dealing with a country that is continually expressing their dire for self defense, which is not the case. >> kim jong-un ordered the countries arsenal to be put on stand by over new international sanctions. those sanctions came as a long-range rocket launch and nuclear tests were conducted. why politics may keep the latest talks from giving tens of thousands the help they need. >> the crisis in flint, the national debate and what that means for residents living with all that contaminated water.
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>> celebrity chef, marcus samuelsson. >> i've had the fortune to live out my passion. >> his journey from orphan to entrepreneur. >> sometimes in life, the worst that can ever happen to you can also be your savior. >> and serving change through his restaurants. >> we hired 200 people here in harlem... these jobs can't be outsourced. >> i lived that character. >> we will be able to see change. >> welcome back to your world this morning. coming up on 8:30 eastern time that former first lady nancy reagan being remembered. she died sunday in los angeles,
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best known for her anti drug campaign just say no and her devotion to her husband, former president and reagan. she will be buried alongside him. no word yet on funeral plans. >> marco rubio is the winner of the latest presidential contest. he won the primary in puerto rico, but remains third in the delegate count. john kasich has the fewette delegates. he picked up an endorsement from former california govern arnold schwarzenegger. the democratic presidential debate had flipped water crisis front and center. >> i will make a personal promise to you that the e.p.a. and e.p.a. director that i appoint will make sure that every water system in the united states of america is tested and that the people of those communities know the quality of the water that they are
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drinking, and that we are going to have a plan to rebuild water systems in this country that are unsafe for drinking. >> we will commit to a priority to change the water systems and we will commit within five years to remove lead from everywhere. >> deborah hayes is the executive director of my brother's keeper in flint. she joins us live from flint, michigan at this hour. thanks for being with us again. did you walk away from the debate thinking that things were going to change or that they are going to stay the same? >> i walked away thinking that things are changing, and will change. >> which candidate do you believe better addressed the needs of the residents of flint? both of them had interesting points, but i thought that hillary addressed the needs of flint more than the other candidate. >> debra, you have been pretty
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open and honest on this issue. one of the questions that was asked is whether anyone is going to go to jail. do the residents of flint want someone to go to jail for what happened or do they want the problem fixed or do they want both? >> well, we want people to be accountable for what happened. you have to realize that this is going to be out generation, at least three to four generations out, because of this lead, and the way that we're looking at it in the city of flint, michigan is this was a terrorist act, if it was, would somebody be accountable for it? yes, and we do want the governor to step down. >> what does accountability mean, the governor stepping down? what about the others involved? >> everyone. everyone that's involved, everyone that had a hand in this, everyone that knew about this before it became this
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crisis should be held accountable. >> does that include washington? after all, it was the e.p.a. that missed what the department of environmental protection in detroit was saying, so in other words, there were warnings all the way up and down the line. what about the e.p.a.? what about washington? >> everyone. everyone that new about this problem, including washington, should be held accountable. everyone. >> now you've heard from the candidates and from congress. how concerned are you that once the cameras having, once the primary is over there tomorrow, this problem is going to be swept under the rug? >> i don't think that this problem will be swept under the rug after the candidates are gone, after all of the media's gone. i don't think it's going to be. actually, i'm seeing certain things in flint now that we are in the national spotlight, kids are involved, elderly people are involved. i can't see that a nation as
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strong as ours will let a situation like this be swept under the rug. i don't believe that will happen. >> deborah, who picks up the tab for fixing flint? there is a billion dollars in the rainy day fund in michigan. congress is saying if michigan has the money, let michigan pay. is it michigan's problem to pick up the tab or is it washington's problem? >> i think that michigan should pick up the tab and washington should pick up the tab, as well. this is no more than a disaster if it was like katrina. who picked up the tab. i think once we get to a lex like poison in our water, kids are involved, i think everyone that has funds should pick up the tab to make sure that this does not happen, to make sure that these peepes are removed from the ground. we are speaking to president obama. this message is for you, president obama, we need to you come to flint. we need you to do what we voted
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you into office to do, that's come to flint and see bus and make sure that this problem is taken care of. >> deborah hayes, as always, thank you very much for being with us and for your candor. >> thank you. the man in charge of the search says it is likely that malaysia airlines flight 370 will be found by july. tomorrow marks two years since the bowing 777 disappeared with 239 onboard. family members this weekend marked the coming anniversary. investigators are now looking at suspected plane debris found last week off the coast of mozambique. we have more. >> the bowing 777 took off en route to beijing in the early hours of march eight, 2014. about an hour later, communications from the pilot stopped and the aircraft disappeared from civilian radar. military radar tracked it on for another hour as it turned from
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its schedule flight path from vietnamese air space and vanished from radar. transmissions from one monitoring systems indicate it flew then for hours towards the indian ocean. this area that become the focus of the search effort. >> lead by the australian government, more than $130 million has already been spent on the search. ships with specialized radar mapping systems have create cred highly detailed images of the bottom of the ocean. more than 25 square kilometers have been searched, another 35,000 kilometers are still to be combed over the next months. hitch seas make it a difficult and slow job. australian scientists have made computer models of how debris have drifted since the jet
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disappeared. this flapper on is the only confirmed piece of wreckage found so far that washed ashore on the reunion islands. another piece still on suspected of being part of the jet was found in mozambique last week. >> government and airlines are discussing how to prevent such a disappearance from happening again. the technology exists but two years on, there is no standard for tracking. another disappearance remains a possibility. most of the people onboard flight 370 were chinese nationals. their families have in my the end of today to final claims against the airline. >> european leaders are gathering in brussels, belgium this morning to address the refugee crisis in europe. turkey, which is housing an estimated 3 million syrian refugees also taking part, ankara putting in place measures
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to cope with the influx of refugees. jonah hull has more on what they hope to accomplish with the talks. >> it's build at crunch time for the european refugee crisis, the sort of language being used by senior e.u. figures here, a glimmer of light at the end of the tunnel and that sort of thing, the prime minister of turkey said that he saw a possible turning point in the crisis. they believe be all of these leaders here, that they are zeroing in on a possible solution to this crisis, one heavily depend on help from turkey. at the moment, they will be working on possible link to declare as you mentioned there, the assault balkan route over which so many hundreds of thousands of people have entered the hard of germany and beyond entering from greece, macedonia, serbia, hungary, even as far as austria.
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national borders have been controlled unilaterally and they have pushed back huge numbers of people deemed to be economic migrants, not refugees and people deemed to have failed in their asylum claims. they are all growing now in a huge body of people in greece, in desperate conditions with nor to go. that's where the focus of the solution lies, the e.u. wants turkey to agree to large scale readmissions of those people so they can be repa repatriated tor country of origin. there is a broad structure of a plan. it's good on paper, it will be very difficult to implement not least because there is zero consensus among so many members of the european union here and very little appetite for anymore refugees to come their way, whether legally or otherwise. >> that is al jazeera's jonah
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hull reporting from belgium. more than 10,000 refugees are currently stranded at the greek border. they are awaiting word from that summit over whether they can continue their trek to europe. they are stuck in part because macedonia is only letting certain refugees through. we have more. >> people here are now pinning their homes on the outcome of the meetings in brussels later today. one can say that the balkan route is effectively closed because even that trickle of refugees, mostly syrians who made it across this border with macedonia were stopped at the northern border with serbia where there is now about a few hundred people stranded there. very few have actually made it further than that. now, greece is changing from a country of transit where people were giving a registration form
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that allowed them to be in this country for a month to a reception country. now there will be registration papers issued for six months to syrians and iraqis. all the other nationalities will be given that one month period whereby they have to either leave the country or they will be deported. there is an agreement in place between greece and turkey since 2012 for illegal immigration. here at the border, also some restrictions have been imposed on a daily basis. the latest one is a selection made according to your city of origin. for example, people coming from damascus were not allowed through, people coming from the kurdish town were not allowed through and people coming from baghdad from the south of iraq and north of iraq. for those who come from those areas, it is a big issue now, because they have spent all their money.
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some have sold all their properties back home to make this journey and now they are stranded here. >> well, people here are now waiting really to hear what will happen in brussels if there is any outcome at all. the border is closed since the early hours of the morning, but you might see behind me, there's very heavy wind today and all the tents are fluttering. conditions are becoming extremely difficult, specifically becauseble 130 of those who are here are children below the age of five. >> in the middle of winter. how could decisions made at this summit affect the refugees, especially those already in greece and europe? >> well, they are pinning their last hope on the outcome of this summit. the border is closed since early morning. also there is some restrictions.
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every day comes with a new restriction, so certainly a lot of worries among these refugees and really when we just walk around the camp here, people do stop here hoping that at least journalists would have an answer to the questions which we don't have that. they hope at some point the balkan route will be open again. there is no indication that will happen. many brace themselves that they will have to stay in greece a little longer, maybe a few months until this relocation program is in full swing. the big problem is that they've been here now for two or three weeks and whoever had a little bit of money that would have allowed them to reach northern europe has now run out of cash completely. over the past few days, people have been asking if we had food, shoes, blankets, that's something that did not happen in the past few weeks. >> it is a desperate situation you are describing, reporting from greece. thank you. that story puts this story
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in perspective. temperatures in the u.s. are warming up with that kevin corriveau, a lot to be thankful for. >> that's right. we are going to see warmest temperatures of the year. of course we're going into spring time. pretty much an average temperature map for this time of year. what is happening dependency on the jetstream coming into play here and right now, the jetstream is amplified over the central part of the united states. that allows all that warm air to come in. that's going to stay like that and also shift towards the east and bring those temperatures with it. as we go through the rest of the day today, you notice the amplification of temperatures. towards tuesday, that makes its way towards the east. we are talking about chicago seeing 65 degrees tomorrow. washington tomorrow at 72. by wednesday, we are looking at washington at 76 degrees, new york at 72 degrees and still staying into the seventies
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towards thursday. by the time we get to wednesday, thursday, you are going to see people on the streets, flip-flops and shorts. >> i think that's a safe prediction. >> kevin, thanks. >> tea, one of the world said most popular drinks but climate change is affecting the industry that makes it. al jazeera has more from northeastern india. >> acceptable. good point. >> meet a professional tea taster. his job is to assess quality, but, he says, tea is subjective, like whiskey or wine, one man's drink is another man's poison. he says he's seen big changes in his 25 year career. >> the growing conditions have become more challenging. earlier in areas where you didn't need irrigation, today you need irrigation, so that's an added cost. >> he has devoted his life to studying tea. he says global warming is having
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a serious effect on the industry. >> climate change is impacting the productivity in terms of distribution. secondly, the climate change is also affecting the quality. >> there was a time when these sprinklers weren't needed, when the rainfall and sunshine were just right. the tea plant is sensitive. unlike annual crops which dominate our food system, tea is a perennial crop, which means it's grown all year round. you plant the saplings once and you can harvest the leaves for 50 or 60 years. that makes it especially vulnerable to changes in temperature, and water levels. >> a senior member of the indian tea board and a fifth generation tea planter said unpredictable rainfall has forced tea gardens to install irrigation.
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>> he we have become completely dependent on nature and we don't rain, we cannot have good harvesting. you can't get your production from irrigation. it is only from rain, when there is rain, then you get good harvest. >> indians consume a third of all the tea produced in the world, nearly a billion tons every year and millions who depend on it for their livelihood search for a sign of two leaves and a bud. al jazeera, northeast india. stopping the zika virus ahead of the summer olympics. >> why hospitals in brazil say they are not getting the money they need to keep up the fight.
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al jazeera america. there's new information of the effect of the zika virus on that babies. women in brazil had babies that had health issues. we have more on what health officials are trying to do to stop the spread of zika virus. >> going from home to home in northeastern brazil, doctors from the u.s. cdc are now working with brazilian health officials to research a possible learning between the dike virus and microcephaly. babies have been born in areas
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affected by the mosquito borne zika. >> this is very important to know. we want to get the information out as soon as possible in order to be able to understand this and to, you know, create public health activities. >> it's been 10 months since the first case of zika was confirmed and medical facilities here struggle to cope. there is still a lock of information, particularly with regard to its consequences. what few doctors there are have taken to using any available technology to confer with clinics and patients further afield. >> there are over 4,000 suspected cases, less than 700 have been confirmed and tests are still being run to see if there is a connection between those cases of microcephaly and the zika virus. officials are asking everyone to do all they can to prevent being bitten by mosquitoes. >> the brazilian government has been commended by the world
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health organization for doing its best to handle a difficult situation, but its efforts don't seem to be may going their way to the areas most affected. >> we haven't received any extra money for combating the mosquito or even for treating children with microcephaly. the research we are working on, all that have, so far, it's the local government that has been paying for it. i can't wait for them to make funding available. i need to make things happen here. >> there are more babies now in need have special attention. overwhelmed health workers are doing all they can to help families cope one day at a time. al jazeera, brazil. the inventor of modern email has died. ray tomlinson passed away at age 74. he sent his first test email back in 1971, his choice of the@symbol for addresses has become a cultural icon.
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coworkers describe tomlinson as someone who did not frequently check his email. heritage at risk in california. >> native americans say they are trying to pass on their language before all of it dice out. superbowl champion peyton manning set to retire today amid investigations for what he's accused of doing off the field.
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>> peyton manning is going to announce his retirement today. the denver broncos quarterback going to four superbowls with
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the broncos and coats, won two including this year. manning has been dogged by allegations that performance enhancing drugs were shipped to his house. the nfl is looking into those claims. he recently faces allegations of sexual assault from an incident in 1976 when he was at the university of tennessee. manning retires as the all time leader in touchdown passes, passing yards and he's also tied for most ever wins by a quarterback. >> in california, a group of native americans are using talk and action to keep their language alive. as al jazeera's bob reynolds tells us, they're teaching the ancient words to a new generation before they are gone forever. >> you're listening to an ancient language, once nearly wiped out, but determined to survive. these children are learning hupa on their native american
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reservation in california. hupa's existence hangs by a slender threat said the teacher. >> there are three elder flew you didn't speakers. there's a handful of people my age or older we've come to a level where we can teach and understand and have conversation. >> the hupa have lived in this beautiful place of forest, mist and fountain forever. in the late 19th century, the u.s. government took most of their land. in the early 20th century, the government began americanizing natives, forcing children into border schools where their languages and traditions were banned. hupa children were beaten for using their mother tongue. >> you would get punished both in the school and the in the actual community at times or get turned in, so the indians had to go underground. >> amid deliberate efforts to stamp it out and the onslaught of american culture, the hupa
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language dwindled. >> it's almost like losing a finger or part of your body, so that really, the men were sick, really in this case, the world is sick. >> now, the tribe is making a determined effort to bring it back. in this classroom, tribal schoolteachers are learning basic hupa in order to teach it themselves in primary and high schools. eventually, there will be totally immersion hupa classes for children up to age six, like many native american people, the hupa suffer from poverty, crime, alcoholism and drug abuse. bringing back the hupa language and culture can help heal historic wounds. >> there's so many feelings of did he say spire. with the language comes tradition, vital to the survival of hupa people. >> restoring the language won't be easy. it's a project that will span
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generations. the goal is for these kids to become fluent hupa speakers and years later to pass on the language when they have children of their own, a language that refuse to say die and the people who have survived against the odds flowing on like a mighty stream. rob reynolds, al jazeera, hupa valley, california. this morning, a controversy new app is being launched called people. it allows you to review others like you'd review movie or restaurant. a lot of people shunning the idea as it was announced. the crater said it is a positivity app for positive people, unless of course it is used for negative. >> please don't go on that app and review me. of course i'd give you five stars. >> going on an app, you know how that is for me. your world this morning is back
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tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern. as always, have a great day. tunisia security forces under attack by armed men in libya. 45 people are dead. this is al jazeera live from doha. also ahead, diskses emerge over how to handle europe's refugee crisis. an emergency summit in brussels. palestinian teachers defy a security crack down to protest in ramallah. thousands are on strike for higher pay. is climate

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