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tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  March 15, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EDT

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>> welcome back to your world this morning. voters in five states going to the polls this morning picking candidates for president. >> the polls are open in all five, ohio, florida, north carolina, missouri and illinois. much of the focus is on the republican winner takes all primaries in ohio and florida. a loss in either state could keep donald trump from winning the nomination. >> several rules passed in recent years require government i should photo i.f. in the polls in north carolina. we have this report from raleigh. >> there are two key voting rights. playing out not just in the halls of power in the
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legislative offices, but in voting booths, as well. in 2011, republican lawmakers took control of the state legislature and redrew the lines of the voting districts to where they now control 10 of the 13 districts in the entire state. critics say that was blatant manipulation in order to gain and control more power. the other issue is the rules of voting. those were also changed, as well and made much more restrictive, everything from the type which identification that voters have to show before they caste their ballot to where and when they can register to even the amount of time they can vote have all been made more confusing and more restrictive. people are saying that endangers many people from being able to exercise their right to caste their ballot and vote. >> minorities, they again, low information, low income, many african-american, we have an
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emerging latino population in north carolina, as well. they may not understand what the new rules are. they may be confused. they may be intimidated by it particularly with the history of race relations not only in america but in the south, which is where north carolina is. >> adding to the confusion, there are now more than 10 different lawsuits pending challenging the different voting law us that have been put in place here in the state. why is this so important? because north korea is one of the fastest growing states anywhere in the country and it's equally divided between republican voters and democratic voters. the voting challenges here are happening in other states around the country, as well as the political parties push the legal boundaries to try to gain every vote they can. let's break it down with lincoln mitchell.
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we have seen fights, protests like nothing we have seen since the republican convention of 1968. is there anything in the polls to suggest this is affecting the voting? >> on the republican side, not really. we see that weeks ago, we saw marco rubio trying to make his last stand. kasich is holding on in ohio. >> is ohio enough of a fire wall against trump at this point, tara? >> no, what's stunning about ohio is john kasich, the governor has an 80% approval rating. his lead is narrow against a man where rallies have violence
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breaking out, has said the most object hornet things and that is stunning. >> we have an ad where women quote that he is saying. >> real quotes from donald trump about women. a person who is very flat chested is very hard to be a 10. >> i'd look her right in that fat ugly face of herself. >> look at that face, would anyone vote for that? >> she had the height, she had the beauty, she she was crazy, but these are minor details. >> i like kids. i won't do anything to take care of them. i'm supply the funds and she'll take care of the kids. >> it doesn't matter what they write, as much as you've got a beautiful piece of [bleep] >> that must be a pretty picture, you dropping to your niece. >> she was blood coming out of their eyes, blood coming out of wherever. >> consultants work on these ads
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months before they air. some ask what took the party so long to come out with these anti-trump ads if they wanted to stop him in ohio and florida. >> they never took donald trump seriously. they didn't think he was going to be a contender. everybody remembers they were calling him a summer fling and then it became he's just the fall, he'll go away, then it became fear, we don't want to take on the pig directly because you wrestle with the pig in the mud, you get dirty. it's reached critical mass. the party is very, very scared and concerned about what he will do to the candidates particularly in the senate. the house is different. the house is gerrymandered, so many districts are so safe no matter who's at the top of the ticket, but the senate is different. the democratic held the senate just a few years ago. the senate is an opportunity for control to be regained by the democrats and that is what is scaring republicans. >> how could you not know that
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donald trump was growing by looking at the crowds? he was not speaking alone on the podium. there were a lot of people showing up at his rallies and bernie sanders rallies on the other side. >> just remember, too, a lot of people were showing up, as well as ben carson's rallies, didn't get as much attention, he had rallies with 6,000 and 7,000 as well and he was up on stage whispering. donald trump is the guy who commanded million dollars speeches at one point. >> let's talk about the issues for a second. let's talk about the issues for a second. donald trump's mental on the stump has been about nafta, about free trade. that helped him in michigan, it may help him in ohio and it's also helping sanders. is that the issue we should be focusing on? >> with regards to trump, you have to listen closely to get any cub substantive message.
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you are hearing ego send terrorism. this is about trump. the mental for trump is i know nothing about anything and if we as a country know nothing about anything, we will be great again. that is a surreal message, but to dignify it by saying he's making a sophisticated argument about nafta, about foreign policy, he is making a vague regardingment. you have to listen closely. the appeal is the mean spiritedness. that has show the shone any mental on the part of donald trump. bernie sanders is very different, very different, clearly. >> let's talk about the democratic campaign. could we see a repeat of michigan for sanders and would that be enough to built momentum for him? >> certainly we have five states going today. if you listen to what everyone is saying, everyone understands clinton will win florida and north carolina. florida is the biggest delegate prize. sanders will be more competitive
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in missouri, ohio and illinois. he could conceivably win those states, i don't think he will, but if he wins by a narrow margin and loses north carolina and florida by a narrow margin, hillary clinton will get the delegates. the narrative will be that sanders is winning, but meanwhile, clinton is piling up the delegates. he's got to get more delegates than her today, which is unlikely. >> if i live in north carolina how do i feel about the fact that the sanders campaign that said it's got this broad tent is walking away from two states, unc, north carolina state, all the people in florida, those young people saying what happened to bernie? >> this is strategy, he is can send traiting on the rust belt. he feels like north carolina and
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florida, his youth is hardened. it doesn't matter if he campaigns a lot. it might increase turnout more, but the youth vote is solidly behind bernie sanders. he has that pretty much covered. the problem for hill i will in illinois is rahm emanuel, mayor rahm emanuel is a big problem. you see bernie sanders in the state of illinois, some polling actually showing he's ahead. i'm not sure that's the case but some polling is showing that and part of that is that african-americans, if you look in illinois, they're not inge huge numbers but bigger numbers than the other states are gravitate to go him. >> it depends on the margins. >> these are not winner take all states. >> right. >> he is losing this primary because he wrote out the deep south. yes, he has no chance of winning florida and north carolina, but if you up 5%, you get a handful more delegates and to not do that is a big mistake. >> we will have more ahead. >> we will have complete coverage tonight, as well on
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aljazeera america beginning at 7:00 eastern. the obama administration is expected to back away from a plan that will allow oil and gas drilling off the coast, some saying the decision could be announced today. it is being driven by backlash from all of the coastal communities who fear an oil spill like the deep water horizon disaster. researchers say rising sea levels could disrupt the lives of 13 million people in the u.s., more than the current estimates. nearly half of all affected will be in florida, the rising seas already endangering coastal communities there. they could rise three or more feet over the next century with greenhouse gas emissions aren't cut. >> another campaign issue. with spring's rival three days away, some places are already feeling like summer. temperatures well above average especially for the
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southern tier of the country, houston close to 90. we do have big changes depending where you are. the northeast starts to warm up a little bit again after that cooldown and all the rain and wind yesterday, some slight improvements. where we will really see the changes is through the midwest. watch minneapolis dropping by the time we get tomorrow from the 50's into the 40's. that's with that next system coming through. ahead of this, we have a couple different problems. where you're still in the core of the warm air, warm air, dry conditions and winds moving in with that system are widespread especially cans and oklahoma, fire danger for today and this area you see in the darker browns from iowa into about illinois, some of those wind gusts could go up to 40 or 50 miles per hour. back to you guys. >> thank you, nicole. >> if you have seen the movie the passion, you know just how important potatoes can be at least on mars. scientists are growing the vegetables in hopes of easing
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hunger here on earth. >> it's billions of years old, the oldest desert on earth. this patch of the desert in southern peru even looks like it could be from another world. nasa scientist change the sky to orange and you are on mars. >> we found the closest similarity to the soil on mars. we have done experiment from the missions that having to mars. the basis for life are almost non-existent here. >> that's why science terrorists from nasa and the national potato center believe it's the perfect soil to grow in soil conditions like on mars. >> the potato is the ideal candidate. it has conquered all the climate conditions on this planet. there are more than 4,000 varieties in peru.
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>> researchers say the martian atmosphere has high levels of carbon die objection sided which will help potatoes grow. scientists and university students are collecting data and testing samples of the soil for the experiment. researchers will build a greenhouse simulating mars. 100 varieties have been chosen for the experiment. >> they will not be genetically modified by transformed by traditional breeding carrying male and female plants to create a new variety, a new clone. we are is your sure it will be positive because potatoes have the high ability to adapt. >> because the soil of the scenery and antiquity of this desert is the earth's closest equivalent to mars, scientists believe it's tremendously important for this and other experiments, however, they're
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worried that this place may be in danger of disappearing. >> scientists want peru's government to stop squatters who could destroy the soil and say this land must be protected because be if the plan succeeds, potatoes could be grown anywhere and help ease world hunger. while growing potatoes on mars might be a long way off, at least now, it's not completely science fiction. al jazeera, peru. the discover of to new dinosaur could explain how tie ran source rex evolved. the remains are 90 million years old, two years older than me. researchers found them in uzbekistan. he was the size of a horse with a large brain. scientists said it took much longer for the brain to evolve than his braun. >> we have all of the advanced senses that t rex has, really
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keen hearing, keen eyesight and presumably keen smell and so that this evolved in a much smaller creature that basically was when the ecological opportunity became available for titietie ran soarous to be the r dinosaur. up next, freestyling with obama. >> constitution, the poet at us, i'm freestyle and you know this. obamacare -- >> the crater of the hit music hamilton takes his music to the rose garden with the president.
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into sports? follow every pitch, every play and every win. change the way you experience tv with x1 from xfinity. the university of connecticut women's basketball team will begin march madness at the top, the overall number one seed in the ncaa tournament. the huskies are looking for a fourth consecutive national championship. here's a look at the other number one, south carolina, notre dame and baylor. play begins friday. for the first time today, a nfl official admits there is a link between the game and traumatic brain injuries.
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as john henry smith tells us, that's a major change from what the league has long maintained. >> on capitol hill monday, a round table discussion on concussions was playing out as a routine affair. >> children bump their head. where do you draw the line between that boo boo and going to the e.r. >> until attention turned to the nfl. researcher an makia testified that she beliefs there is a link between chronic traumatic enaccept lop thee and playing football. then the nfl's senior vice president asked about it. >> certainly dr. mckie's research shows that a number of retired nfl players were diagnosed with c.t.e., so the answer to that question is certainly yes. >> with that answer, jeff miller became the first nfl senior official to admit a link between
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c.t.e. and playing football. from commissioner roger goodell to the lead brain energy researcher dr. mitch berger, the league has staunchly maintained no proven link exists. >> that was not the unequivocal answer three days before the superbowl by dr. mitchell berger. >> the league has been defending itself and ultimately settled a lawsuit by former players alleging it knew of football's dangers and didn't warn them. shortly after miller's comments, a lawyer representing some of those players filed an objection with the court. he argues miller has now directly contradicted the leagues position in that case. >> the nfl has so far not offered explanation for jeff miller recognize comments or whether his view is shared among senior leadership or whether miller was just speaking for himself. >> what about the numbers, they speak loudly. what were the concussion numbers
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this year? >> 2014-2015, concussions rhodes 58%. that's the highest increase in four years. of course, that may be due to greater reporting of incidents of concussions as it may be for concussions themselves. >> they can't address the problem if they can't agree on what's causing it. google goes before congress to fast track self driving cars on the road. they want lawmakers to change regulations to make that happen. they are set to show congress that google cars could address the amount of parking space. they complain rules get in the way, for example requiring a r only makes sense if there's a human driving the car. >> amazon is trying to patent a system that lets you pay for online services with a selfie. they filed for a system based on facial recognition. for extra security, customers
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may be prompted to smile, blink or tilt their head. amazon said it is more secure than pass words. there's a selfie of del. >> i was getting ready to say. >> they are too easily hacked. >> i was thinking about using somebody else's face for more money. >> the music world is in austin, the accident this week for the south by southwest festival. live performances there net about a billion dollars a year. as al jazeera's rob reynolds tells us, not all the perform ears sees those profits. >> around sundown things start getting weird. there are several thousand musicians in town to play the festival. making a living playing music has never been easy, but in today's shifting technological and business climate. it's more complicated than ever. rapper greg anthony who goes by young going to said he works all the angles. >> you got to be out here every
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day, trying to look for different gigs. you got to have your c.d.s, merchandise, i got spotify, the cloud, everything. right now, the clubs ain't paying how they used to pay. >> the odds against acts playing here becoming rich and famous are enormous. >> majority of the people have to be musicians. they have to be artists. that's kind of something that's down in their soul. as opposed to being a pop star. >> that's true for leslie sisson of the moving panoramas. >> our artistic ambition has nothing to do with money and fame. the average income of the every day musician is extremely unfair. we work extremely hard. all the bands at the show are my friends and they struggle. >> many musicians rely on day jobs and eke out cash selling c.d.'s and merchandise at their
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shows. >> austin is called the live music capital of the world and performances bring in about $1.5 billion every year. the musicians who live and play here survive on quite meager earrings. >> average musician in austin makes less than $25,000 a year. >> the music industry is in flux. the old record companies are investing in technology companies that threaten to put them out of business. there are music streaming services like spotify and sound cloud. giants like you tube and apple are juggling revenues from advertising or subscriptions. a lot of money is flying around and a lot of it is out of the reach of many musicians. old school punk rocker of dead kennedys is a harsh critic of the tech takeover of music. >> there's been a lot of mispromoted by the tech industry that artists can connect directly with their fans and
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people, there is less gate keepers, but these are all myths create by tech people in order to sell their advertising. goggle makes more money off dead kennedys than we do and they didn't put any blood, sweat and tears in. >> musicians walk a difficult path, but to sisson, it's worth it. >> the most important thing is playing shows. you become a better musician. >> so the bands play on. rob reynolds, al jazeera, austin, texas. a little bit of musical and political history playing out at the white house. ♪ >> that's the cast of hamilton singing about his transformation from impoverished immigrant to founding father. he told school able children that he hope the story would inspire them to seek out a better future. the show's crater showed off skills with help from the president. >> it's the oval office, oh my
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gosh, i can't believe i'm there. it's so much intimidating than if it was square. opportunity knocks and i can't stop. i'm here with the president in my pot and i might drop. >> how good is that? [ laughter ] >> you think that's going viral? that's going environmental! >> this isn't his first time performing in the white house. he performed an earlier version of a song during a white house event. how many of the candidates running for office now can do that? >> can freestyle? i think that should be a litmus. >> that would flip voters in michigan and a lot of other states, too. voters in five states head to the polls. it could be the end of the line for two republican candidate dates who need wins in their home state. >> straight ahead, we'll answer questions about flint, the man responsible for the ill-fated water is testifying before congress. who he is blaming for the
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contamination there. we talked to an activist on the ground. we are back in two minutes with more of your world this morning. stick with us.
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winner take all in the race for the white house. republican voters in ohio and florida deciding today to keep the hometown candidates in the race or all but guarantee a trump nomination. bernie sanders battles to upset hillary clinton and breathe new life into his presidential run. >> russia said its job is done in syria but critics say moscow only succeeded in helping bashar al assad stay in power. a new discovery shows how
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the t rex became the world's most feared dinosaur. good morning, welcome to your word this morning. i'm del walters. polls are now open in five states holding presidential primaries today. two states have the potential to change the race to the nomination. florida and ohio have the most delegates at stake so the republican and democratic candidate dates have been very, very busy there trying to bring voters into their camp, votes happening today in north carolina and missouri. marco rubio needing a big win in florida to stay alive in the race. a survey gives trump a commanding lead, almost double of rubio. ted cruz and john kasich are far behind. rubio holds his cuban appeal will trump trump at the polls. ohio is the home state of
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john kasich who is hoping to stop trump there. monday, he had mitt romney by his side. romney was the 2012 republican nominee. clinton leads the polls in ohio for the democrats, but bernie sanders is hoping for an upset. let's begin with jonathan betz in miami, good morning. today as we've all been saying, is do or die for rubio. what does he say to voters to try to lure them away from trump. >> good morning to you. absolutely do or die for marco rubio. he has been pushing hard against donald trump. a year ago, this would have been unthinkable that a local politician, marco rubio, the junior senator from florida, is trailing badly by donald trump in the polls. he has been focusing hard on trying to blunt trump's momentum, saying that trump is not qualified to lead the republican party, much less the
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country. marco rubio has been focusing especially on those protests and the violence has been breaking out at the trump rallies, saying this should concern all republicans. take a listen to what rubio had to say recently about this. >> the republican party and american politics is at a crossroads now. we have electorate that is really frustrating. we have to decide are we going to make them more angry or acknowledge their anger and frustration. that's what i want, to offer it to be turned around in this campaign. >> he said voting for any other candidate would be a vote for trump. he is trying to slow trump's momentum in rubio's home stated. >> let's talk about the departments. hillary clinton has been leading in the polls. is there a real contest there at all between her and sanders?
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>> not really in florida. you're right, hillary clinton has a very, very comfortable lead here, by 20 percentage points and most polls here against bernie sanders, he's poplar with women, she is poplar with minors in florida, but she is still focused on florida. she has been campaigning hard here. she is going to have her watch party in miami tonight. the reason why is she has to have a big win in florida. unlike the republicans, which has a winner take all approach, the democratic side has awards to delegates proportionately. without question, she is ahead here but face as tough fight in ohio and other midwestern states, which is why it's so important for her to have a victory here in florida. >> thanks, jonathan. >> a win in florida as you heard jonathan talk about would add to the huge lead in the delegate county. experts believe ohio might be the lynch pin. a win there would put trump in the position to take the
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nomination if donald trump takes ohio and a loss would mean a contested convention. that's exactly what ohio governor john kasich is hoping for in his home state. it appears that that could happen. kasich is polling ahead of trump in ohio and that is a change in recent days where the two have been neck and neck in ohio. we are live in cleveland. the polls open about an hour and a half ago. what is the turnout like so far and what have you been hearing from the voters? >> well, del, the sun has just risen in cleveland and more people are showing up to vote. we'll show you what the process is like, people item through the door over there and sign in at this front desk and told to come to one of four tables depending on their precinct. what is interesting about ohio is that when people register ahead to vote today, they do not have to register for a certain party. they really can be undecided
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until the very last moment. we spoke to voters earlier and asked them why they came out today. >> i just don't think trump is a good fit for me or individuals of my race, so that's why it was very important for everyone to get out and vote. >> who did you vote for? >> hillary. >> why is that? >> because i want to give a woman a chance, to see how they can work in the white house, too, besides the men all the time. how about that? >> and the economy is the number one issue according to polls here for voters in ohio. the unemployment rate is similar to the nation's unemployment rate, however the average median household income is lower than the nation's. >> what is at stake in ohio for the republicans? >> a lot is at stake for both parties, particularly for the republicans. they have 66 delegates up for grabs and it's a winner take all
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state. john kasich, the ohio governor hopes to stop donald trump's nomination here. if he doesn't, he said he would drop out of the race but if he does, it would make it harder for trump to secure the nomination before the convention takes place here in july. >> racks anna, thank you very much. one thing trump will not have to worry about is facing criminal charges. a north carolina sheriff's office will not file charges against him for what happened at his rally. that is when a man sucker punched an anti trump protestor when he was led out. they said a review of the evidence does not rise to the level of inciting a riot. trump has said he will consider paying the legal fees of the man who made the punch.
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>> when etch says that he is prepared to pain the legal fees for somebody who sucker punches somebody, what he is essentially saying is go do it, supporters, go beat up people. >> a permission slip? >> absolutely. it's more than a permission slip. it's an enticement saying you can beat up people, that's what this campaign is about, don't worry about it, i'll pay the legal fees. >> sanders ended monday on clinton's home turf, at roosevelt university in chicago. he hopes to energy young voters there like he did leading up to a win in michigan last week. clinton spent her night talking about gun control. >> the gun lobby really in tim dates elected officials and they just basically vote the way they're told. my opponent talks about powerful lobbies in washington and there are a number of them. nothing is more powerful than the gun lobby and until we're ready to take them on and hold them accountable, we will not be
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in a position to try to begin to reduce the deaths from the epidemic of gun violence. >> clinton said voters should consider where a candidate stands on gun control in the election. the n.r.a. has praised bernie sanders for saying gun manufacturers should not be held liable for shootings. vladimir putin calling pulling out of syria a step toward peace. one dip saying goals had been largely achieved against isil. >> i think that it should be --ble, we believe that we have helped undercut their infrastructure and destroy much of their infrastructure. the fight against terror is going to continue. >> senator john mccain criticizing russia's move saying the air campaign was unsauce stainable from the start. he said it now gives russia the upper hand in peace negotiations saying they have changed the
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military facts on the ground and cradled the term for a political settlement more favorable to their interest. end quote. the russian decision to pull out comes as indirect talks are being held in geneva to try to end the war. trademarking five years since that conflict began. james bays has more from geneva. >> well, we've been hearing from both sides here at the talks in geneva over the last 24 hours or so, but the latest development has come from the actually mediator of these talks, the u.n. envoy, staffan de mistura, who has just released a statement, saying that this is a significant development, the news of the russian withdrawal or at least a start of the russian withdrawal. he hopes it will be something that will have a positive impact on these talks. remember, they only got underway again. we've had talks here before, but only got underway here again in the last went to four hours.
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we've seen the government side, which had been pretty defiant come here to the united nations and meet with staffan de mistura. what takes place here on tuesday in a few hour's time is the same meeting taking place this time around with the main opposition block behind the negotiations committee coming to the united nations to meet mr. staffan de mistura. i think they know the context, the background has all changed with that russian development. i think more questions than answers about what mr. putin is trying to achieve by this pullout, whether he was worried about getting bogged down for a long time against russia, whether he felt he had already put all the wards in favor of the regime and wants to lock in games with these talks or whether there's something bigger, whether the russian government perhaps now is beginning to jetson or thinking of jetsoning president assad after five years of war. >> that is our dip editor james
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bays in geneva. >> think resolution to the fighting in syria could affect the international effort to get isil out of that country and iraq. russia and the u.s. will continue to go after targets there. i asked the spokesman for the coalition what the u.s. is doing to pressure isil in mosul. >> what we call in the military shaping operations are underway. the shaping operation are what we do to kind of prepare for the final assault into the city. in this case, we've done everything from drop leaflets. we do strikes inside the city of mosul, almost every day. those strikes will be against leaders, they will be against infrastructure, specifically their ability to make war like i.e.d. factories, explosive factories, chemical weapons plants, et cetera and of course we'll strike their fielded forces in an effort to chip away and weaken them. kurdish forces in iraq
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captured a palestinian american man who fought with isil. the man turned himself in at a peshmerga checkpoint in northern iraq. at the time of surrender, he had a large amount of cash, cell phones and three forms of i.d. one was a virginia driver's license. when asked, relatives denied anyone in their family has fought with the group. >> no, no, no. >> what's your name? >> 250 americans are believed to be fighting with groups in iraq and syria. the state department is looking into the case. police in germany trying to figure out what was behind an explosion in berlin be a a bomb going off in a car. the driver is believed to have been killed. it is not clear if they were loaded with explosives or it was placed there. police have now launched a murder investigation in berlin. >> myanmar electing the next
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president. >> more flooding along the mississippi river. there is worries it could take out more roads and homes. one mayor called the situation the worst he's ever seen in the region. in south carolina, hail storm was the issue monday,ese pellets rained down. power was knocked out for thousands of people. there could be severe weather to parts of the midwest. >> two different systems causing the different things, so let's break those down. the first, part of what left all the rain through the south as lifted through the northeast and there was the severe end on the southern tail where that low pressure was circulating, but
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this has cleared out for the most part. there is still lingering moisture that will continue to clear out for pores of new england, we've been following this from the west coast, dumping snow and now pulling out into the midwest causing additional problems. you can take a closer look at this. you can see the tail end of this, there have been a couple thunderstorms, haven't seen anything produced so far but through the course of the day through the heat of the day, we could watch that. as one system clears, the next one really stalls out along the great lakes. there is a band of moisture through tomorrow or overnight that could go through the northeast, hit and miss showers mostly with that. where the main portion of the system stalls out and cold air comes in, there could be snow with this particular system, even though string is officially just a couple of days away. we'll watch that. this takes us through thursday with lingering moisture even that far out. the severe weather is for today,
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that line as it develops in the heat of the afternoon, what we are watching is around illinois we could watch for that wind and hail, the primary threat. illinois toward iowa, that should be the corridor we are most likely to see an isolated tornado or two, so that is not out of the question, either. with that system going through, we are definitely seeing temperature drops, so somewhere like billings that was rather warm a couple of days ago, warm into the 40s, which is not bad for this time of year. the real warmth is ahead of this system. we have 80's, even towards 90 in houston today. now that a lot of that rain will clear out of the northeast, somewhere like new york finally goes back up after that cold and rainy and windy day yesterday. >> sounds like voters in the midwest need to get out early. >> illinois is probably the one that will have the most problems. the man responsible for switching flint's water supply testifies before congress tate. >> an activist says darnell
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early is not going to be taking the blame alone. a top nfl official connects football hits to brain damage.
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melissa mace is a flint resident and water activist and joins us from flint. how optimistic are you that this process is moving in the right direction? >> the steps are definitely there. my only concern are that the people that are under oath actually do what they're supposed to do and tell us exactly what happened. >> today is the first time we'll hear from darnell early. is it too little too late? >> no, because are still arguing over who authorized the switch and blaming our local officials and local finishes blaming the emergency manager. we need the emergency management law brought out to light so other states can see how awful
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it actually is and the horror that is come from the complete stripping of democracy. >> who do you blame? >> i definitely blames the emergency managers but that comes from the governors. he put this in place. they answer to him, so you know they reported to him. we all know he did. we blame the michigan environmental water quality. that is their one job. they failed at that one job. the county health department, the city, the state, every single person that was involved in the cover up, they are also to blame. >> do you have concerns that darnell early could possibly become the scapegoat? >> i do, but i also know just from seeing him in interviews and see him completely dismiss us that he's a little tougher than that. he's not going to take it all. i think he'll take down other people with him if it gets too heavy on their shoulders.
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>> governor rick snyder that taken responsibility, but there has been that flood of emails that raises questions about what did he know and when did he know it. are you concerned about the committee getting to the bottom of that issue? >> i think they'll touch a nerve. my fear, i think they'll put his p.r. spin on that it or plead the fifth so he does not incriminate himself. congressman are sharp and smart. most of them are, and very angry, so i don't think they're going to let him go with just that. >> are you going to be satisfied if no one goes to jail when all is said and done? >> absolutely not. again, i don't believe they setous to poison us, but as soon as everything failed and their main objective was to protect their ownselves, protect their image especially the governor and they did nothing, that's criminal. they knew it happened, they may not have meant it but as soon as they knew and had the ability to help us and to listen to us and
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to actually answer our cries for help and they refused to, they need to go to jail for that. >> your sons are 11, 12 and 17. is there anything that can be done or said at this point to stop you from being concerned about their health? when are you going to feel free of this episode? >> you know, looking at the way things are going, i don't think i'm ever going to feel free, because we don't even know how bad it's going to get. i'm already seeing them slip in places that i never ever thought i'd have to worry about them before. to see them get sick so easily and they tell us we are not going to see the full effects of lead poisoning for five years, so we have more to go and to know what we don't know what's all in our water. there's still an argument whether it's safe to bathe and scientists say it's not, the city, state, and county are telling us it is. we don't know how much more sick we're going to get, how long this is going to take to get clean water.
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i feel like this is going to be with us for the rest of our lives, we just have to turn it around and make it the best we probably can and continue to fight. >> thank you very much and good luck today. >> thank you. new guidelines today for state courts from the obama administration. the justice department says local judges should stop jail people who don't pay fines or fees. the practice was exposed last year in a review of the court system in forego son, missouri. the justice department warns that such moves vital federal law and erode community trust. >> out of time for some of those campaigns on the edge. >> today's contest could save the presidential dream for three candidates or secure nominations for front runners. >> the right to vote, in connection's strict new voter i.d. laws could keep thousands from casting their ballots in the target state.
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>> pushing the boundaries of science. >> we are on the tipping point. >> we can save species. >> it's the biggest question out there. >> it's a revolutionary approach. >> we are pushing the boundaries. >> techknow is going to blow your mind. >> our experts go inside the innovations, impacting you. >> this is the first time anybody's done this. >> i really feel my life changing. >> techknow, where technology meets humanity. only on al jazeera america. welcome back to your world this morning. polls are open in five states where voters choose which presidential candidate they want to get the nomination. >> today, marco rubio hoping to defy the polls that have him
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industrial trailing in florida. also ohio governor john kasich hoping to advance, as well. hillary clinton leads big in florida but face as tough night in ohio and illinois. let's talk about the state of the race with lincoln mitchell, a national political correspondent for the new york observer and tara odell, political consultant. tara, can either trump or clinton clinch the nomination today? >> the issue is still the issues i talked about a few weeks ago, the other candidates are not leaving the race. for hillary clinton right now, bernie sanders is in it to maybe win it. he's not going anywhere. that's the bottom line. he's not leaving. as well, head cruz thinks he can put up a big fight against trump. he thinks they're in a situation where they're one-on-one and he still has a chance. >> are they going to be presumptive nominees by the end
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of the day, lincoln? >> if trump wins ohio and florida, he's the presumptive nominee. rubio has to drop out. ted cruz will stay in and will still make a run at it, but it will be harder. on the democratic side, bernie sanders may not be in it to win it but is definitely in it until california. >> why is he in it until california? one argument said he is hurting the clinton campaign staying in so long, the other says that he is making her a stronger candidate. >> i think he is making her a stronger candidate but be clear, you still want your primary to be wrapped up. you don't want to be in a prolonged protracted campaign. it's good in that -- she's always faced sharp attacks but she's going to face the kitchen sink no matter who the republican nominee is. it's good for her, but from a campaign perspective, you still
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don't want it. >> a voter was interviewed with a telling sound bite, basically saying i'm here because i don't want trump. she was a democratic voting in an open primary away are we starting to see that sort of energy where there is such fear perhaps among democrats, maybe also among republicans that is galvanizing voters to turnout? >> i don't think that's enough in a republican primary to stop donald trump. it will be a major issue in november. donald trump will galvanize huge numbers of democratic to say vote against him. >> we hear bernie sanders is making in-roads in ohio, that he may pull off ohio, illinois, as well. how palpable is the fear in the clinton campaign that he is going to pick up both states in missouri to do well. >> it is not a very big fear. if he wins all three states, it prolongs the inevitable, i think. his campaign is now one of
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narrative, look i can win here, i can win there. >> the problem with with the campaign is narrative is an issue. what hillary clinton does not want, what her team does not want is more momentum for it. even though they had debates to sharpen her message, to punch back, that's important, but at the same time, you don't want to look weak going into a general election. him staying in the race, him taking these states, particularly illinois if that happens, she's from illinois. >> that doesn't look good. >> you look weak going into general election and that is what she doesn't want. you don't want to look weak. >> she doesn't want to bully the guy out who has new energy in the campaign. if she hits too hard on the bernie has to get out, she looks
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like she is bullying him. i would caution about reading too much into a prolonged race. when you're in october and november, no one says back in april, this person who could vulnerable. >> that is true. what is his best chance for winning today and if he gets a wider margin in the races ahead, could we see a contested con convention in july? he has a very clear path forward. if kasich and rubio both lose, trump one-on-one against cruz, cruz will win some states, but trump will pile up the delegates. >> there was that sound bite from the woman we interviewed in cleveland. she sheepishly said hilly, because isn't it time for a
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woman. what happened to the narrative that everyone thought would be dominant that there was the possibility that this country might elect the first female president and that was going to sweep hillary clinton into office? where is that narrative now? >> that was much stronger in 2008. this time around, there's less enthusiasm for hillary clinton. in 2008, she was coming out as a popular senator and now is a pretty bruised secretary of state. that is cutting into that narrative. also again, you had bernie sanders winning some of these states in a commanding way and winning women voters. that's also undercut that. i think there's still a sizeable portion of -- >> narrative -- >> first woman, yes -- >> stay tuned. we're going to have to leave it at that. thanks for being with us. >> thank you. >> voting in north carolina today could be affected by that state's strict new voteri d.
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law. several rules passed there require government i should photoi d.s with the polls and another law affecting congressional districts. >> there are two key voting rights issues playing out not just in the halls of power in the legislative offices, but in voting booths, as well. in 2011, republican lawmakers took control of the state legislature and redrew the lines of the voting districts to where they now control 10 of the 13 districts in the entire state. critics say that was blatant manipulation in order to gain and control more power. the other issue is the rules of voting. those were also changed, as well and made much more restrictive, everything from the type of identification that voters have
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to show before they cast their ballot to where and when they can register to even the amount of time they can vote have all been made more confusing and more restrictive. people are saying that endangers many people from being able to exercise their right to cast their ballot and vote. >> minorities, they again, low information, low income, many african-american, we have an emerging latino population in north carolina, as well. they may not understand what the new rules are. they may be confused. they may be intimidated by it particularly with the history of race relations not only in america but in the south, which is where north carolina is. >> adding to the confusion, there are now more than 10 different lawsuits pending challenging the different voting law us that have been put in place here in the state. why is this so important? because north carolina is one of the fastest growing states
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anywhere in the country and it's equally divided between republican voters and democratic voters. the voting challenges here are happening in other states around the country, as well as the political parties push the legal boundaries to try to gain every vote they can. >> we'll have complete coverage of the results tonight here on aljazeera america. our in depth covering begins at 7:00 p.m. eastern time. the obama administration is expected to back away from a plan to allow oil and gas drilling. that decision could be announced as early as today. it would halt drilling for at least another six years. it is driven by a backlash from coastal communities who fear an oil spill like the deep water horizon disaster. for the first time, an nfl official admitting there is a link between concussion and traumatic brain injuries. >> on capitol hill monday, a round table discussion on concussions was playing out as a routine affair. >> children bump their head. where do you draw the line between that boo boo and going
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to the e.r. >> until attention turned to the nfl. researcher an makia testified that she believes there is a link between chronic traumatic encephalopathy and playing football. >> then illinois congresswoman jan schakowsky asked the nfl's senior vice president for health and safety about it. >> do you think there is a link between football and degenerative brain orders like c.t.e.? >> certainly dr. mckie's research shows that a number of retired nfl players were diagnosed with c.t.e., so the answer to that question is certainly yes. there are a number of questions that come with that. >> you are speaking for the nfl, right?
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>> you asked the question whether i thought there was a link and i think based on the doctor's research there is a link. >> with that answer, jeff miller became the first nfl senior official to admit a link between c.t.e. and playing football. from commissioner roger goodell to the nfl's lead brain energy researcher dr. mitch berger, the league has staunchly maintained no proven link exists. >> i feel that that was not the unhe equivocal answer three days before the superbowl by dr. mitchell burger. >> i am not going to speak for dr. berger. >> the league has been defending itself and ultimately settled a lawsuit by former players alleging it knew of football's dangers and didn't warn them. shortly after miller's comments, a lawyer representing some of those players filed an objection with the court. he argues miller has now directly contradicted the league's position in that case. >> the nfl has so far not
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offered any further explanation for jeff miller's comments or whether his view is shared among senior leadership or whether miller was just speaking for himself. in court documents, the nfl said 30% of their players were likely to develop cognitive disability later in life, but that's still not an admission of a link between c.t.e. and football. more flooding today along the mississippi river. floodwaters have been rising after days of rain. there are worries they could take out even more roads and homes. thousands of homes have already been damaged in mississippi and louisiana. one mayor called the situation the worst he's ever seen in the region. >> the temperatures are rising in the middle of the country, but so are the concerns. good morning again, nicole. >> definitely temperature changes over the last couple of days. first in the northeast, where it was cooler yesterday because of the rain and cloud cover will serve to nudge better as that
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clears through the course of the day today. more 60's, but it's the south that's been quite warm, even by southern standards for this time of year. houston is close to 90 degrees today and that coming through the midwest on the plains is part of our problem, keeping things dry and warm and a fire hazard. i'll get into that in a second. tomorrow, we will see the northern tier of the country, 50's today, into the 40's tomorrow. drop as that system goes through. cold enough that in minnesota or wisconsin, the dakotas, not out of the question will start to see a little snow with that. where we've gotten the warm air and then that system coming in is going to bring more areas of wind. the areas highlighted in red, kansas, oklahoma, not only are we warm and dry, but the wind could fuel any fire dangers through today. where the wind will be more
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significant, this core core from iowa into illinois, that's where we'll watch for winds gusting into the 40, possibly 50-mile an hour range. this is similar to earlier where we could have our severe weather risks. in terms of different places going to the polls today in our primary states, i would say illinois probably has the most dodgy weather going forward. otherwise, as we mentioned, the system into the new east and new england continues to clear through the day. this one in the midwest is going to be our new trouble maker, including that risk for severe weather and snow on the backside of all this. back to you. >> nicole, thank you very much. google going before congress today trying to fast track getting self-driving cars on the road. they want lawmakers to change regulations to make it happen. goggle is set to tell congress to the cars could ruse the amount of space devoted to parking in the u.s. and make the roads safer. google is one of many companies working on the cars and complain that current rules get in the way, for example requiring a r
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only makes sense if there is a human driving the car. amazon trying to patent a system that lets you pay for on line purchases with a selfie. they fade an application for a system based on facial recognition for extra security. customers may be prompted to smile, blink or tilt their head. amazon said it would be more secure than pass words which of sometimes too short, simple or hacked. imagine when yourself gets declined. hard to wrap your head around that one. >> so speak. we continue, mind over body. >> scientists find a link that could explain how one of the world's large of the predators involved and we are not talking about man. throwing down some beats. president obama helps a broadway musical send takes showcase his stuff.
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al jazeera america. we're finding more now about the evolution of one of the dinosaur worlds most ferocious predators, the t rex. >> they found a 90000000-year-old fossil about the size of a horse. it could be the missing link. >> with the size of his jaws, scientists believe he could eat a an animal the size of a gorilla. discovery of the tehran soar russ in 2004 revealed to
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scientists that the national museum of history in washington, d.c. sheds new light on the revolution. tyrannosaurus had to get smart before they got big and with the evolution of t rex, this was 100 million year evolutionary journey. >> it took much longer for t rex's brain to evolve than its braun. >> we have all of the advanced senses that t rex has, really keen hearing, keen eyesight and presumably keen smell and so that this evolved in a much smaller creature that basically was when the ecological opportunity became available for tyrannosaurus to be the giant super predators. they were prepared top bulk up
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and increase in size. >> economical dominance happened suddenly. what triggered it is a mystery. you just saw a paleontologist who joins us live from manchester, england. thanks for being with us again. paleontologists celebrating. what is so big about this little t rex? >> well, i think it's always a great day when we get to announce a new dinosaur. it's even more special because it's a new tie ran sour russ, a minute my me version of the t rex, one of the closest cousins of the t rex and helps us understand how t rex was able to become so big, so dominant. >> doesn't this turn evolution an its head and counter the argument that we grow smarter as we grow older? after all, doesn't seem to indicate if anything, t rex got bigger and dumber as he got
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older. >> well, t rex probably didn't get dumber, but it definitely got bigger, so the story looks like it goes something like this. this his the story of how evolution makes a giant predatory freak of nature. tie ran sour russ started out small, the size of us. they stayed that way for about 100 million years. some evolved larger brains, better senses, a really great sense of hearing and then suddenly, those exploded in size, they became top predators and stayed that way until that asteroid came down and struck out the dinosaurs and ushered in the age of mammals. >> scientists have been sitting on this now until 2004 based on what we saw in kristin's report there. why have they be sitting on this sign so long? >> well, you saw my good friend hans from the smithsonian in that report. hans for a decade led a series
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of expeditions sue uzbekistan. i wish i could say i was on those expeditions, but i was actually in high school back at that time. they found so many fossils of dinosaurs, at her contactles. he handed me a fossil and said what do you think of this. i looked at it and could see right away that it was part of a skull of a tie ran soar and that started this project. >> what's a few million years between friends, but it really
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is vast stretches of time and what happened is that the tyrannosaur group as a whole started out small and stayed that way for most of the time. about ate million years ago, all of the tyrannosaur's got really big. this is one of the last surviving small tyrannosaur's before they transitioned into super predators like the t rex. >> there seems to be an argument in the studio here about a male getting older and dumber. do we know this particular t rex you found was male or female? i just want to set the record straight. >> we don't and you know what, that turns out to be one of the hardest things about dinosaurs, figuring out if you have a male or female. it's very hard to do that based on the bones alone, so we don't know. when we talk about t rex being the king of the dinosaurs,
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really it was the king and queen. that's a mystery for the next generation of paleontologists to solve. >> you can tell how excited he is by the discovery. he didn't want to answer that last question. >> no, he didn't. up next, freestyling with obama. ♪ june the crater of the hit musical hamilton taking his talents to the rose garden. stay with us.
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a new easing of restrictions for cuba. americans can travel without an official organization. it still has to be an educational trip but you don't have to sign up with a sponsored company. cubans in the u.s. will be able to earn nowhere money for basic left-field line. changes take effect tomorrow. the music word is in austin texas this week for south by southwest. austin one of the few cities where musicians can still make it big. not all of the performers see the profits.
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>> around sundown things start getting weird. there are several thousand musicians in town to play the festival. making a living playing music has never been easy, but in today's shifting technological and business climate. it's more complicated than ever. rapper greg anthony who goes by young goth said he works all the angles. >> you got to be out here every day, trying to look for different gigs. you got to have your c.d.s, merchandise, i got spotify, you tube, sound cloud, everything. right now, the clubs ain't paying how they used to pay. >> the odds against acts playing here becoming rich and famous are enormous. >> majority of the people have to be musicians. they have to be artists. that's kind of something that's down in their soul. as opposed to being a pop star. >> that's true for leslie sisson of the moving panoramas. >> our artistic ambition has
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nothing to do with money and fame. the average income of the every day musician is extremely unfair. we work extremely hard. all the bands at the show are my friends and they struggle. >> many musicians rely on day jobs and eke out cash selling c.d.'s and merchandise at their shows. >> austin is called the live music capital of the world and live performances bring in about $1.5 billion every year. the musicians who actually live and play here survive on quite meager earrings. >> average musician in austin makes less than $25,000 a year. >> the music industry is in flux. the old record companies are investing in technology companies that threaten to put them out of business. there are music streaming services like spotify and sound cloud. giants like you tube and apple are juggling revenues from advertising or subscriptions.
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a lot of money is flying around and a lot of it is out of the reach of many musicians. old school punk rocker of dead kennedys is a harsh critic of the tech takeover of music. >> there's been a lot of myths promoted by the tech industry that artists can connect directly with their fans and people, there is less gate keepers, but these are all myths create by tech people in order to sell their advertising. goggle makes more money off dead kennedys than we do and they didn't put any blood, sweat and tears in. >> veteran and newcomer alike, musicians walk a difficult path, but to sisson, it's worth it. >> the most important thing is playing shows. you become a better musician. >> so the bands play on. rob reynolds, al jazeera, austin, texas. a little bit of musical and political history playing out at the white house. ♪ >> that's the cast of hamilton
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singing about his transformation from impoverished immigrant to founding father. president obama told a room of school age children that he hope the story would inspire them to seek out a better future. the show's creator showed off skills with help from the president. >> it's the oval office, oh my gosh, i can't believe i'm there. it's so much intimidating than if it was square. opportunity knocks and i can't stop. i'm here with the president in my poss and i might drop. >> how good is that? [ laughter ] >> you think that's going viral? that's going viral! >> this isn't his first time performing in the white house. in 2009 he performed an earlier version of a song during a white house event. >> i love the mat rein in the background playing drums. high moment for him.
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we are back tomorrow at 7:0. have a great day. hello, welcome to the al jazeera news hour. top stories, russia begins pulling out its military from syria as talks on how to end the conflict enter their second day. >> on the fifth anniversary of the war, thousands still risking it all to find safety. >> a new president for myanmar, parliament has elected a civilian leader after more than half a century of military rule.

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