Skip to main content

tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  March 17, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EDT

7:00 am
supreme court show down. president obama's pick for the high court heads to capitol hill trying to win over relationships, but they vowed there would be no confirmation hearing. >> it seems clear that president obama made the nomination, not with the intent of seeing the nomination confirmed, but in order to politicise it for the election how the promise of much needed water in one community evaporated
7:01 am
>> my life beginning the battle of his professional life trying to convince republican senators to consider his nomination to the supreme court. good morning and welcome to your world this morning he is the chief judge of the dc federal appeals court is meeting with democrats who back his nomination. republican, even those who admit he is qualified, says garland is not going to get a hearing john, garland speaking on the phone with mitch mcconnell, so would who will he be meeting today? >> reporter: that's right. i think he was being polite. he said i'm speaking because i don't want to appear remote and completely removed, but there will be no confirmation hearing.
7:02 am
it's not something that we wish to happen. today the judge does, indeed, go up to cap toll hill. meeting two democrats. they appear to be dug in on this rather comblesively on message and that is that they reject in nomination. fog personal with him but-- nothing personal with him but they don't want this nomination. they say there will be no confirmation hearings. i think the stakes are too high. we have a four four court at the moment. four liberals and four conservatives. whoever is going to pick the nomination is going to change the complex of the court. a well liked judge who looks like everyone's favorite grandfather caught in the middle of this row. >> reporter: i a morning in the rose garden president obama stared down his opponents
7:03 am
announcing a nominee to replace justice zcalia who died last month. >> a nominee who is widely recognised not only as one of america's sharpest legal minds, but someone who brings to his work a spirit of decency, modesty, integrity, even-handedness and excellence. >> reporter: 63-year-old merrick garland is on the nations second highest court, a job held for 19 years. he has a reputation more moderation while being servetive on criminal justice issues. earlier he oversaw the federal prosecution of oklahoma bomber amongst others. >> people must be confident that a judge's decision $are determined by the law and only the law. for i judge to be worthy of such trust he or she must be faithful to the constitution and to
7:04 am
statutes passed by the congressment he or should me put aside personal views or preferences and follow the law. not make it. >> reporter: president obama called on republicans in the senate to give him a fair hearing and up or down vote. if you don't it will be an abdication of the duty. >> it will indicate a process for nominating and appointing judges that is beyond repair. it will mean everything is subject to the most partisan of politics. it will provoke an endless cycle of more tit for tat and make it impossible for any president to carry out their constitutional function >> reporter: if the president hoped his words might bring the two sides together, he was wrong. within minutes majority leader was on the floor of the senate. there will be no hearing
7:05 am
republicans who think the next president will be a republican want their man to choose a successor not obama >> it seems clear that obama made this nomination not with the intent of seeing the nominee confirmed, but in order to politicize it for purposes of the elections >> reporter: in other words, if the senate doesn't give him the confirmation hearing and an up or down vote, it will become a 2016 campaign issue and a pick stick for the democrats to hit the republicans with >> reporter: after today i don't think much will happen because the senate goes off on a two weeks recess. it will be a while before we hear about the story again but lots going on behind the scenes that is there been any softening since his nomination was announced? >> reporter: the white house thinks so. it is limited. chuck grassly, the powerful and
7:06 am
influential chairman of the judicial committee, says he is prepared to meet were the judge after the recess is over providing somebody books the appointment for him. after that a limited number of republicans stepping up to the plate, mark kirk from illinois, kelly iot from new hampshire, facing challenges, susan collins, jeff lake of arizona, also aron hatch of utah says he is open for a hearing. that is it. it looks as if the republicans are prepared to take a big risk. that risk is that the relationship will win the white house in the 2016 race and so they will get a favorable nomination then. the risk is the down side, of course, is that hillary clinton will win it and she will end up appointing somebody who is far younger than this judge and far more liberal bernie sanders saying hold on, just in case she gets the
7:07 am
nomination as far as where the g.o.p. presidential candidates stand on this, ted cruz a former supreme court clerk is backing his fellow republicans in the nomination fight. he is also blocking his republican presidential challengers for dropping out of next week's fox news debate. donald trump says there have been too many debates and he will be giving a speech to apec instead. that prompted john kasich to pull out too. fox says it can't hold a debate with one participant so it has been cancelled. more than 36 hours after polls closed in missouri, there is no results there. absentee ballots are still being counted. ted cruz nor bernie sanders said they will dispute the results.
7:08 am
bernie sanders will be in flagstaff tonight. he has been telling supporters he stands a good chance of winning many of the coming contests stocks are up. it will be careful with future rate hikes. that is because of global economic concerns. the fed says it will carry out two of those. that is down from four and lifted 1 point expecting all the hikes to be taken off the table. the bags is demanding the immediate release of an american student being held in north korea. the white house saying that beer is abusing used as a pawn to pursue the agenda. a student has been sentenced to 15 years of hard labor for stealing propaganda banner at a hotel as a soouf near. obama issued an executive order imposing new sanctions in pyongyang's tests protesters are calling for
7:09 am
dilma rousseff to resign. she has named former president lula da silva as her chief of staff triggered the protests. she made the move to shield him it is said. >> reporter: tens of thousands of people are back on the streets. some gathered at the presidential palace, others across the country's large cities. dilma rousseff's appointment of her mentor and predecessor lula da silva was meant to restore public trust, but it has done the opposite. lula da silva who was credit with lifting millions out of poverty overture hig administration is facing charges of fraud and money laundering in relation to petrobras. taking the post gives him ministerialial immunity. dilma rousseff said that wasn't with why she gave him the position >> translation: i am sorry, he is coming. he is going to help. we will look at controlling
7:10 am
inflation. >> reporter: shortly after she said that, a federal judge who was leading a wider corruption vepgs released details of a conversation between dilma rousseff and lula da silva. he had been tapped by federal police although she and lula da silva have denied allegations of wrongdoing, people say they have had enough, not just of politicians but of the entire system of deep-rooted corruption. the investigation has been going on for two years now. it has brought down 100 business
7:11 am
executives and politicians and could bring down the entire dilma rousseff administration. she insists she is doing what's best for brazil. many people don't agree. some politicians are already leaving the ruling coalition government. praz ilis in the midst of the worst recession it has seen in decades and people feel that her leadership just isn't competent enough to lead them out coming up we will talk to the director of the brazil institute at the woodrow wilson center about the impact of the unrest in brazil the saudi-led military operation in yemen could be winding down. a spokesman saying they're going to be focusing on stabilization and reconstruction. they didn't specify when the bombing mission will be complete. the u.n. estimating almost 6,000 people have been killed by the air strikes and fighting since the operation began a year ago.
7:12 am
the u.s. metro system back up and running this morning. it was shut down all day on wednesday because of an emergency inspection. 26 defects were found, all of them are being addressed. that shut down forcing 700,000 commuters to find another way to get around a tornado is being damaged for damage at southern illinois. it was on the ground for seven and a half miles. it was a quarter mile wide. no-one was hurt. elsewhere in the mid-west the issue is snowment parliaments of northern minnesota got up wards of a foot of it, especially in the high elevation. strong winds made it tough to get around going to our resident minnesota expert and native. >> reporter: i'm jealous. there hasn't been enough snow. i never got out cross-country skiing. a little late in this season.
7:13 am
here is the area. this area here is the low pressure over the great lakes. there was a front, so rain through the north east and then droos the south. that will cause other prognoses. in terms of where we still have the snow, you can see it is starting to window down and become more diffusiond. so some areas getting a couple more inches, but most of this is over. we do have winter storm warnings up to the end of this hour and then the winter weather advisory. a lot of these areas, you a couple more inches. when you add it up it brings places close to i foot. more of this.stur will band east ward through the course. so more chances for more rain. that could be snow. this causes some temperature changes around the country. as we look to the mid-section of the country, temperatures along the east coast still into the 60s. a reinforcing cold front over
7:14 am
the next 24 hours. look at portions of the central planes. we're looking at somewhere like mere could be in the upper 60s. by tomorrow those temperatures drop about 20 degrees so enjoy it while you can through the day today thank you. in parts of california el nino has eased the devastating drought. it is visible in these images north of zacram ento. it's what it looked like today but then a year ago. our correspondent went back in southern california. >> reporter: this is the way of life for the residents here. in the bathroom, in this kitchen. >> we don't have water for washing clothes, the dishes or bathing. >> reporter: in this backyard
7:15 am
her water lifeline is a trank in a tree. >> reporter: this is the extreme measures you have had to put in? >> yes >> reporter: more than half of the people here have no running water and haven't for nearly two years. have you got barrels to put water in? when we met this woman she spent much of her day delivering bottled water to her neighbours. >> we will get you some. >> reporter: informed she is still at it busier than ever, but not just helping out residents >> there are businesses that are also out of water, sanchez awe owe and rodriguez, a tyre shoip and businesses down springfield drive. they actually closed because they had no running water >> reporter: east porterville has no central water system.
7:16 am
so the majority relies on shallow wells that have run dry >> we're like many other third world countries at this moment. we haven't resolved this issue. many people consider issues with tornadoes and her contains, but this is a slow start. >> reporter: el nino was supposed to bring rain and relief. for many drought stricken communities, el nino rains have been a large know show. here el nino has delivered a couple of quick storms. it is enough to turn the grass green but not nearly the drenching needed to end the drought. you still have a pick-up full of bottled water. >> yes. i will be delivering water for quite a while >> we would receive to expect rain through this calendar day
7:17 am
but only 3 or 4 inches, so an inch below average >> reporter: that's an inch below in an el nino year. time is running out to make any difference on according to a weather scientist >> imagine a last bucket of what we would formally speck to receive. the bucket is only hassle filled. even if we get a lot of pre-siptation in the next few months, it is not likely to see that buck filled >> reporter: from these above ground tanks to mobile showers and now a draught resource center. resource coordinator says every day as much wells run dry, 30 to 50 people come to the center in desperate need of help. >> reporter: how hard has it been on the community? >> it has been very hard. we hear stories from people all
7:18 am
the time. especially the elderly people. they're not flushing their toilets, they don't do their laundry. we're doing our best to provide immediate sentence here at our draught center, but there's only so much we can do. she says she is one of the fortunate few. she could drill a deeper well. it has come with a price >> i feel like, i get a well they don't. i feel very bad, but that's good, it has spurred me to help other people. >> reporter: drilling new wells take time and money. as the el nino leaves residents in the dust, hope is also running dry. jennifer london building a better life in america we will tell you how syrian refugees are finding hope in the
7:19 am
u.s. the debate over legalizing pot. what the science says about the dangers of long-term use.
7:20 am
7:21 am
new information this morning on a deadly car bombing in turkey's capital earlier this week. t a.k. has now claimed responsibility. the bombing left 37 people dead. t a.k. is an affiliate of the kurdish p.k.k. which is in a decade's long fight against the turkish government. john kerry believes peace talks could decide the issues in syria he talked spo lavrov asking
7:22 am
for the issue to continue. they have given the negotiators time to fine common ground >> we're continuing these proximity talk. it was the government side that was here 24 hours ago although there were in the afternoon some other inviteees from the opposition who are not walmart of the main opposition block and in the coming hours it is the main opposition back here at the talks. in many ways it's not just that meeting that's important because if you remember, some of the key issues are not being dealt with in the main talks. they're being dealt with by two separate task forces that are being set up. i think here those task forces, there will be fresh pressure on the syrian government. not only are they feeling the pressure because of the russian pull out but you have to cessation of hostilities two and a half weeks on that has been going. you will hear consistent comments now coming from western diplomats that the main violator
7:23 am
is the kirn government. there has been a reduction of about 80% of the violence, but the syrian government is the one that is violating it. they will come under pressure in the task force on that. they will come under pressure on the other task force on humanitarian affairs because it is said that the syrian government is not doing its bit, letting supplies into certain areas. derayaa is where nothing has gone in despite this task force being set up some weeks ago now. again, the syrian government under pressure there. then there's a third area that was laid out in the u.n. security council resolution that set out this process that had to happen before the talks took place and nothing has happened. geb, i think the pressure is on the government and that's with regard to detainees, particularly women and children being held by the government in their jail cells. we understand from staffan de mistura, the mediator, that he is adding that task to the task force on humanitarian, a third
7:24 am
way that the government is coming under pressure james bays reporting. the state department has voiced concern over a proposed kurdish autonomous region in syria. officials say it be l a threat to the reunification officials to meet today to solve the refugee crisis. the proposal is to send new refugees who arrive in greece back to turkey. for each migrant return one syrian asylum seeker in turkey will be resettled in the e.u. in return tr you key has asked the e.u. to double the amount of aid for refugees coming into the country. that war in syria causing millions to flee their homes to find a better place for their families, our correspondent sat down with a family living in michigan. >> reporter: this man fled syria with his wife and seven of his children two years after the civil war began. >> translation: life was bitter and tormenting. being homeless, we moved from
7:25 am
one mouse to another, from place to place, to a small town another, trying to escape arrests, kidnap and race and so forth >> reporter: after spending three years in a refugee camp in jordan, they resettled in michigan six months ago >> translation: i feel that i'm reborn again. >> reporter: with the help of a nop profit they're renting this two storey house having gone years without schooling the children are student at the local elementary school. this man was a carpenter he is looking for work to support his family. >> translation: i believe america is the mother of the world. the rule of the law in america is above all. everybody is adhering to the law. in america there is an equal opportunity regardless of being poor or rich, influential or not. >> reporter: it has been five years since the conflict began.
7:26 am
the war has displaced more than 11 pillion people and has claimed more than 250,000 lives. he says that he has very little hope that an end to the war is near. >> translation: peace will only be attainable in syria if all foreign elements pulled out by force and i mean by american force. all foreign armies must go out of syria and leave syria for syrians. >> reporter: he says that he often thinks of the family he left behind. he says that he hopes to visit syria some day. michigan is now home. >> translation: that was my dream when i was in syria, to have a better future for my children. that was only a dream, but when i think we're here we can achieve this dream up next, the supreme court
7:27 am
nominee we take a closer look at merric garland, the judge obama is fighting to get on the brench a gentle joint caught in the conflict.
7:28 am
7:29 am
>> these people have decided that today they will be arrested. >> i know that i'm being surveilled. >> people are not getting the care that they need. >> this is a crime against humanity. >> hands up... >> don't shoot. >> hands up... >> don't shoot. >> what do we want? >> justice. >> when do we want it? >> now. >> explosions going on... we're not quite sure - >> is that an i.e.d.?
7:30 am
welcome back to your world this morning, 7:30 eastern time. a fourth day of talks underway in geneva this morning over the war in syria. secretary of state john kerry says there is an urgent need for a political transition. he spoke to his russian counterpart sergey lavrov today about maintaining the fragile truce. the american release of an american student is being demanded in north korea. the university of virginia student has been sentenced to 15 years of hard labor for stealing a propaganda banner from a hoe tell as a souvenir. >> meeting with democratic senators who backed his nomination, the chief judge of the federal appeals court faces an uphill battle being confirmed.
7:31 am
judge garland spending nearly 20 years on that appeals court. >> many consider his background impeccable. david shuster takes a closer look at his career on the bench. >> mr. president, it's a great privilege to be nominated by a fellow chicagoan. >> born and raised in the midwest, emit have emerged from central casting, graduating from harvard law school then after clerking for two esteemed federal judge, practiced corporate law at arnold and porter, one of the nation's most respected firms. he became a partner after only four years, and four years after that, he ditched the wealth and prestige to join the justice department as an entry level federal prosecutor. >> it was the sense of responsibility that serve the community instilled by my parents that led me to leave my law firm to become a line prosecutor in 1989. >> in 1997, president clinton
7:32 am
appointed him to the federal bench. jewish and married with two daughters, merrick garland has now spent 19 years on the d.c. circuit court. he is known as a judicial moderate, a consensus builder and likable. >> because he's so impeccably credentialed and such a soft spoken human being, it's going to be harder and harder for the senate republicans to say they won't meet with him. >> he's i should iropinions that suggest a narrow view of second amendment gun rights and is considered tough on criminal justice, a profile on scotus blog notes that he "rarely votes in favor of criminal defendant appeals of their convictions." experts note lower court judges are generally beholden to supreme court precedent. >> even if we can read his paper trail on the court of appeals and it is a very moderate paper
7:33 am
trail, it's unknown how someone will vote as adjusts on the supreme court. >> at 63 years old, he is the oldest supreme court nominee since the nixon area. if confirmed, he would be lucky to serve on the court for 20 years. antonin scalia served on the fort for 30. it underscores the contention by democratic that is gar land's nomination is a modest one, and may ratchet up president obama's pressure on the republican-led senate to allow a vote on garland's nomination. >> i am grateful beyond words for the honor you have bestowed upon me. >> david shuster, al jazeera. the ohio supreme court has ruled to the state can try to execute an inmate again after a botched first attempt. in 2009, the execution of 59-year-old ronald brome was called off.
7:34 am
administrators couldn't find a vein for the i.v. since the drugs never entered his body, it was ruled he never faced the death penalty. he was sentenced for killing a teenager. one prosecutor saying he'll stop using grand juries. as al jazeera's john henry smith tells us, it is a reaction to a shooting and protest that followed. >> for 18 days last november, protestors in minnesota camped outside of police headquarters and demanded justice for jamar clark. >> the gun went off, so that's what i saw, but the guy was not fighting back. >> police say the 24-year-old was fight, them when officers shot and killed him last november. >> witnesses contradict that, saying he was handcuffed. in light of other high profile police shootings in which grand jury found no cause to bring
7:35 am
charges. protestors demanded that freeman not use a grand jury. >> grand jury's will no longer be used to consider police shooting cases in the county. >> the decision ends a four decade long tradition there of using grand jury's in police involved shootings. in that time, not a single officer has ever been found guilty of wrongfully shooting one. freeman said the decision to not use grand jury's in she's sort of cases will make the system more fair and accountable but doesn't think others should them follow his lead. >> in other communities, they may feel the use of the grand jury in police shooting cases is appropriate. >> community anger connected to other high profile police shootings have cost prosecutors their jobs. in cuyahoga county, ohio tim mcginty lost a primary. he concluded the shooting of tamir rice was reasonable. anita al-jazeera lost a
7:36 am
reelection bid. she waited more than a year a charge the officer who shot la i don't know mcdonald 16 times. a study found 2600 police shootings between two and 2011 were deemed justified. only 41 officers had to face charges for shootings in that same time frame. >> where does the minnesota decision leave the two officers in the clark shooting? >> prosecutor freeman said while he's making up his mind, he is consulting with the major u.s. attorney. new dials this morning in the death of a maryland he police officer. investigators say officer colson was deliberately shot by a fellow officer outside a police station in landover maryland on sunday. they say colson was in plain clothes and the officer who shot him may not have realized who he was. three brothers were charged with
7:37 am
starting the gunfight. police say one of the brothers wanted to be killed. >> marijuana is legal in some form in 40 states and could be a big boon for the u.s. economy if legalization trends continue. according to a new report, the cannabis industry could pump up to $44 billion into the u.s. economy by 2020, including direct sales and other businesses that have popped up to support the industry. voters in several states will decide whether to legalize or expand medical marijuana programs. al jazeera's jacob ward looks at where the science stands on the safety of pot. >> marijuana could soon join alcohol as the other great legal intoxicant of american life. at least 10 states are expected to put marijuana measures in front which either lawmakers or voters this year. >> the scene that i'm in now is about as normal as it gets in
7:38 am
american life. just think about drinking and all the occasions at which it is appropriate. you lost your job, let me by you a drink. you got a job? let me by you a drink. birth, death, marriage, doesn't matter, anything can be an excuse to drink in this country and that's why alcohol who become such you a huge and fundamental industry. we know what big alcohol looks like as a cultural phenomenon and powerhouse, but what will big marijuana look like if that drug becomes liam in the united states? >> bruce livingston runs a watchdog organization called alcohol justice. he said to understand how marijuana might change america, it is crucial to understand how challenge became so influential. >> it's product placement, youth oriented, controlling the policy sector, having massive lobbying at the local, state and federal
7:39 am
level. >> if marijuana becomes legal across the country, it's promoters will have a lot to learn from sports and booze which is in our movies and traditions. >> half the challenge in the united states is sold around december during the holiday season. it's often given as a gift. you show up at a party, you bring a bottle of wine or a six pack. >> editor of wired magazine adam rogers says we'll know that pot has joined challenge as a mature commodity when the marketing comes to resemble that of small batch liquor. >> when you look at connoisseurship of alcohol, nobody reviews wine on how drunk you get or what that feels like. what you review it on is the different flavor notes, the aromatics, the skillfulness in
7:40 am
which the creators create it with. we talk about it asar artisanalar craft. keith mum frees is a member of the governor's blue ribbon commission studying marijuana. he said for the sake of public health, marijuana must be constrained by regulation and taxation. >> brockly, you just make sure it's clean and the pesticides aren't bad and public will sort it out. they will bias much is good for them and regulate. the problem with marijuana is they change our judgment over what is good enough, what is safe, what feels good, what doesn't feel good. the way you can regulate problemly which is let the market handle it, people will judge brockly on its marriage. you can't do that with detective
7:41 am
substances. >> marijuana legalization will not just be a legal shift. someday we may be congratulating new parents with a vaporizer or sending brownies to a retiring colleague. marijuana is likely to change the traditions of american life. the chicago city council raising the minimum wage for smokers from 18-21. that decision following new york, boston, cleveland and kansas city, all of those cities raising the age requirement for buying tobacco products, the city increasing the cigarette tax and banning chewing tobacco at sporting events. >> anger in brazil where thousands are protesting on the streets, furious in the president appointed the former president to her cabinet. desilva was detained last month in connection with a government corruption scandal. critics say his new role is to protect him from being prosecuted. the director of the brazil
7:42 am
institute at the woodrow wilson centers joins us from washington this morning. condition move be interpreted as anything other than president rousseff trying to shield her former mentor from criminal proceedings? >> that's the obvious conclusion. that's why streets erupted yesterday in saw paulo and brasilia, protests will likely continue. also one of the reasons of bringing a sortful politician to the presidential palace was to start a movement to prevent the impeachment of president rousseff in congress. that seems to be also now compromised or made more difficult, and the act itself of president rousseff to trying to
7:43 am
protect to use the nomination clearly to protect her predecessor from a criminal investigation outside of the supreme court, that is in itself probably in some legal experts are saying crime that impeachable crime, so you have added another possible reason for impeachment. now on the other hand, there will be questions about the legality of the taping of the president, actually the judge that had ordered them had suspended order of taking former president lula and president rousseff, obviously -- >> let me just clarify that. what you're talking about is the reason these protestors are out there is because these phone conversations between lula and
7:44 am
delma were released showing she was trying to protect him. >> lula was very poplar, rousseff is his protege. both have been accused of taking part in the multi-million dollars graph scheme with the oil company petro brass. how much support do they still have? >> president rousseff has virtually none and former president lula has seen his popularity very much diminished. there are polls that suggest that he would have problems today if he run for president, as he clearly intends to do. his party, the workers party that is to have a third of the electorate in brazil is barely registering 15% right now.
7:45 am
i think the crisis deepens now, accelerates. we don't know really where we are going, the situation is very dramatic and obviously the economy continues to go in a free-fall, this current situation makes deal with the economy even more complicated. >> paulo, thank you so much for your time this morning. >> you're welcome. there has been a major development this morning in the future of sea world, the park saying it is now ending that controversial orca breeding program. the current at the park will be the last generation. them not be released back into the wild. they said the killer whales would die off if they were released. they face protests of their
7:46 am
treatment. one country in west africa is trying to protect giraffe before they go extinct. >> this is the natural reserve. some 50 miles south of niger. it stretched as far as the eye can see, but soon, it shows up grazing. there was a time when these exclusively west african spotted giraffe roamed from senegal to lake chad. hunting reduced them to a small group, found only in niger. authorities here have been trying to protect what remains of this species. they are proud of the result. >> in 1996, we had just 50. now as we speak, we have 452 giraffe. >> we tried to get a closer look but as we approached, we were
7:47 am
told not to disturb them. the giraffe behind me is not the biggest in the park. the biggest is very famous and you can spend an entire year looking for him, because this is a very large park, more than the size of lebanon, about 11,000 square kilometers. nature here is quiet and beautiful and the giraffe seem to share bolt qualities. >> the giraffe is a peaceful animal. if you don't make a noise, you can come less than 15 meters. sometimes it would stair at you as you stair for it. i love them as if they were a pet. we name them. one was named after me. unfortunately he died. >> the people in the area hardly share this affection. >> we don't see any use to them. they just destroy our crops and eat the trees. we lived here a long time before
7:48 am
the giraffe. now they are a problem for us and there i see nothing we can do about it. >> another problem affecting both people and giraffe k.d. of two years of drought resulting in meager crops and door vegetation. tourism is also on the decline. >> at the beginning, we made some in come but now there's a crisis because of insecurity. we used to receive large numbers of visitors, nine groups a day. now it's six a week. >> there is concern that drought can affect the numbers. >> they are so grateful. >> majestic. you never think about the fact that they can be a nuisance to local farmers there. the group finding refuge in the boy scouts.
7:49 am
7:50 am
7:51 am
♪ that's the voice of frank sinatra, jr., dying at the age of 72. he suffered a heart attack in florida where he was set to play a concert.
7:52 am
michelle obama opened up about that education and her future. queen latifah and missy elliot joined the first lady on stage. she talked the obstacles in her career. >> tate, there are 62 million young girls who were not in school. what i could do as a little girl, try my best to control my own fate, i'm trying to carry that spirit over to the 62 million girls. >> mrs. obama ruled out her own run for president, in case you were wondering, in part, she said because of her two daughters. she said they already felt the pressures of having a residential parent. >> being a boy scout, not just learning the knot's and badge, there is a troop made up
7:53 am
entirely of boys whose families are trying to find a new life in america. >> the troop is just like any other troop. the boys do adventure sports, cook their own males at camp and are awarded merit badges for a job well done. >> when we go to some camps and when we do activity, when we come back, we get a badge. >> is that special to you? >> yeah. >> colorado's troop 1532 is different. >> we're all from -- >> this band which boys is made up entirely of refugees, possibly the most diverse troop in the u.s. they still remember their own home countries national anthems, like are a ban da's.
7:54 am
these refugee boy scouts and their families come from a who's who of repressive countries and rejeeps where war, poverty, ethnic persecution and corruption, sometimes all four are the norm. burma, congo, rwanda. >> when they ask me, i say i'm a citizen in congo, because where i was born, i was born in rwanda, but in a camp of congo, so i'm really not sure where i'm from. >> where they are from now is aurora, a suburb of denver, home to thousands of immigrants and refugees, it's one of the most eye verse cities in america. >> troop 1532's scout pipeline starts here, a refugee-only
7:55 am
medical clinic in aurora. the child of indian immigrants, clinic director p.j. parmer felt left out of american society until he joined the boy scouts, vowing that never let any kid feel like an outsider. he gathered his teenage patients and started a troop from scratch. >> it's like taking them straight out of the docks to the mountains. >> the scouts aren't well off. their families can barely afford the basics, so he pays for scouting supplies. >> the kids show up sometimes in tennis shoes and jeans and so we bring all this extra gear for them so they're warm. >> a cold climate was foreign to this family, they are burmese and escaped persecution to live in refugee camps in malaysia before making their way to colorado.
7:56 am
he said his scout uniform helps him gain acceptance into american society. >> if i wear this, they know that i'm in boy scouts. >> then what will they do? >> they will talk to me, maybe. >> respect you? >> yeah, ask me about the boy scouts. >> for boys who might be enemies if they had stayed in their war-torn countries, scouts is a unifier. >> this is how they prefer to sleep. >> they pile up on top of each other. >> shoulder to shoulder, yeah. >> for these boys, troop 1532 is more than an after school hobby, it is a place to call home. >> i consider myself an african who grew up in america. >> carrol mckinley, lake george,
7:57 am
colorado. >> sometimes you can learn an awful lot from boy scouts and kids. >> definitely, very heartening story. >> yeah, it was. coming up, president obama's supreme court mom newspaper faces an uphill battle. what merrick gar land's next move will be in his bid to get past republicans. indiana approving a bill restricts abortions. some say the physical and emotional costs are way too high. we will be back in two minutes. stick around. >> every monday night. >> i lived that character. >> go one on one with america's movers and shakers. >> we will be able to see change. >> gripping... inspiring... entertaining. no topic off limits. >> 'cause i'm like, "dad, there are hookers in this house". >> exclusive conversations you
7:58 am
won't find anywhere else. >> these are very vivid, human stories. >> if you have an agenda with people, you sometimes don't see the truth. >> "talk to al jazeera". monday, 6:00 eastern. only on al jazeera america.
7:59 am
8:00 am
it is tempting to make this confirmation process simply and extension of our divided politics. >> confirmation fights, merrick garland looking for support in congress today but some republicans are refusing to even meet with him. finding a solution in syria, the plan to set up an independent state for the kurds draws a sharp response from washington. anger in brazil, some say
8:01 am
the president went too far in protecting her mentor from a corruption scandal. the multi-billion dollars pot industry and how it's reshaping the american economy. >> welcome to your world this morning. merrick garland beginning the uncertain quest for a seat on height court. republicans, even those that say they're impressed with his credentials say his nomination will not go forward. john terrett is live in washington. good morning. who will garland meet with today? >> good morning. he'll meet with patrick leahy this afternoon and harry reid, both democrats, so it doesn't
8:02 am
really count, not really. yesterday he had a telephone call mitch mcconnell and said basically i'm talking with you to be toll light and not too rude, but we will not have a hearing on this. the line is they will reject this nomination. he is caught in the middle of a political struggle.
8:03 am
>> president obama stared down his republican opponents, announcing a nominee to replace justice scalia who died last month. >> i've selected a nominee who is widely recognized not only as one of america's sharpest legal minds, but someone who brings to his work a spirit of decency, modesty, integrity, even handedness and excellence. >> 63-year-old merrick garland is chief judge on the u.s. court of appeals in d.c. known as the nation's second highest court, a job he's held for 19 years. garland has a reputation for moderation while being conservative on criminal justice is. he oversaw the prosecution of oklahoma bomber timothy mcveigh and unin a bomber ted kaczynski. >> people must be confident that a judge said decisions are determined by the law and only the law. for a judge to be worthy of such
8:04 am
trust, he or she must be faithful to the constitution and to those statutes passed by the congress. he or she must put aside personal views or preferences and follow the law, not make it. >> president obama called on republicans in the senate to give garland a fair hearing and then an up or down vote. if you don't, it will be an abdication of the senate's duty. >> it will mean everything is subject to the most partisan of politics, everything. it will provoke an endless cycle for more tit for tat and make it impossible for any president to carry out his constitutional function. >> within minutes, majority leader mitch mcconnell was on
8:05 am
the floor of the senate, there will be no hearing. republicans who think the next president will be a republican want their man to choose a successor, not obama. >> it seems clear that president obama made this nomination not with the intent of seeing the nominee confirmed, but in order to politicize it for purposes of the election. >> in other words, if the senate doesn't give garland a confirmation hearing and an up or down vote, it will become a 2016 campaign issue and a very big stick for the democratic to say hit the republicans with. >> the senate goes away on two week vacation today. the president is asking them to think about the ramifications of not giving judge gar land an up or down vote. >> the so-called biden rule, how is the vice president pushing back on that? >> of course there is no biden rule. it's something that the republicans have made up and using it to their advantage.
8:06 am
look at these pictures from 1992. this is joe biden as the judiciary chairman in the senate in the era of george h.w. bush and making a case for not figure a seat for a judge who was expected to retire back then in the final year of his presidency. whoops, is this another joe biden moment, no says the white house, saying that in that same speech that you're looking at now, joe biden also indicated that if the president, h.w., put forward a consensus pick, then he would give that person a fair hearing and an up and down vote. they are arguing that that's exactly what president obama has done with judge more rick garland, he is a consensus candidate, 63 years old, unlikely to serve very long and he is a moderate, so a consensus candidate then. justice joe biden was pointing out in 1992 all those years ago,
8:07 am
steph. senator ted cruz who himself is a former supreme court clerk backing his fellow republicans in that supreme court fight. he is also mocking his republican presidential challengers for dropping out of next week's fox news debate, but front runner donald trump saying there have been too many already and he is giving a speech instead. that prompted john kasich to pull out, as well. fox news statement saying they can't hold a debate with one person, so it's been canceled. 36 hours after the polls closed in missouri, still no clear runner there. donald trump and hillary clinton holding on to slim leads, but the absentee ballots are still being counted. whoever comes in second could demand a recount, none are saying they will do that. clinton holding rallies in nashville and atlanta, sanders looking towards arizona, which holds primaries next week.
8:08 am
he holds a town hall meeting in flagstaff tonight. sanders telling his supporters that he stands a chance of winning a lot of the upcoming contests. the german embassy and school in istanbul are forced to close after threats made by the t.a.k. claimed responsibility for an attack in ankara earlier this week, which left 37 people dead. p.a.k. is an filialty of the turkish p.k.k., whiff is in a decades long fight against the turkish government. >> the state department objecting to another group getting its own autonomous region in syria. >> we won't recognize any self rule, semi autonomous zones in syria. your broader question is really this is something that needs to be discussed and agreed upon by
8:09 am
the relevant parties in geneva. >> secretary of state john kerry saying he believes the geneva talks could decide the future of syria, but the group proposing that split, the p.y.d. has not been invited to these talks. al jazeera's dip editor james bays reports from geneva. >> well, we are continuing these proximity talks, so it was the government side that was here 24 hours ago, although there were in the afternoon here in geneva some other invitees from the opposition who aren't part of the opposition block in the coming hours, it is the main opposition block who were back here at the talks. in many ways, it's not just that meeting that's important. some of the key issues are not being dealt with in the main talks, but by two separate task forces that have been set up. i think here, those meeting, those task forces, they'll be fresh pressure on the syrian government. not only is the syrian
8:10 am
government feeling the pressure because of that russian pullout, but you have that cessation of hostilities now, two and a half weeks that's been on going. you hear consistent comments now coming from western diplomats. there's been a reduction of 80% of the violence, but the syrian government is the one violating it. they will come under pressure from the task force on that. they will come under pressure for humanitarian affairs. the syrian government is said to be the one not doing its bit, letting supplies into certain areas. again, the syrian government under pressure there. then there's a third area that was laid out in the u.n. security council resolution that set out this process that had to happen before the talks took place and nothing has happened. again, i think the pressure's on the government and that's with
8:11 am
regard to detainees, particularly women and children being held by the government in their jail cells. we understand from staffan de mistura, the mediator that he's adding that task to the task force on humanitarian, a third way to the government is coming under pressure, i think. >> that is our james bays who is in geneva. john kerry, the secretary of state expected to travel to moscow to meet with russian president vladimir putin. >> in brazil, protestors are filling the streets calling for president rousseff to resign. the latest protest was sparked after she named the former president to her cabinet. critics say she made the move to protect him. >> tens of thousands of brazilians are back on the streets, some gathered in the presidential palace, others across the country's large cities. rousseffed appointment of her
8:12 am
predecessor desilva was meant to restore public trust but has done the opposite. lula credited with lifting millions out of poverty is now facing charges of fraud and money laundering in relation to petro brass. taking the cabinet post gives him ministerial immunity. penalty rousseff insists that isn't why she gave him the position. >> i am sorry, he is coming, he is going to help. we are learning to growth fiscal stability. >> shortly after that, details of a conversation between rousseff and lula were released. lula had been tapped by federal police.
8:13 am
>> demonstrators say they've had enough of the entire system of deep rooted corruption. >> the corruption investigation has been on going two years now and brought down 100 business executives, politicians and could not bring down the entire rousseff administration. through all this, president rousseff insists she's doing what's best for brazil. many brazilians don't agree. some politics are already leaving the coalition government. brazil is in the worst recession in decades and some feel rousseff's leadership isn't competent enough to lead them
8:14 am
out. i spoke to the director of the brazil institute at the woodrow wilson center. he told me rousseff brought lula into her cabinet to protect not only him, but herself. >> one of the purposes also of bringing president lula, a very resourceful politician to the presidential palace was to start a movement to prevent the impeachment of president rousseff in congress. that seems to be also now compromised or made more difficult, and the act itself of president rousseff to trying to protect, to use the nomination clearly to protect her predecessor from a criminal investigation outside of the supreme court, that in itself is
8:15 am
probably in some legal experts are saying a crime, impeachable crime, so you have added another possible reason for impeachment. >> in the backdrop of brazil's economy is suffering from inflation and low oil prices. its currency slid several percentage points just this week. >> the obama administration demanding the immediate release of an american student held in north korea, the white house saying he is being used as a pawn to pursue a political agenda. the university of virginia student has been sentenced to 15 years hard labor for stealing a propaganda banner from a hotel just as a souvenir. wednesday, new changess sanctions were approved against pyongyang in response to their nuclear test and rocket launch earlier this year. the d.c. metro system back up and running this morning. it was shut wednesday for emergency inspections. 26 defects were found, all now being addressed. the shutdown forced 700,000
8:16 am
commuters to find another way to get around. >> a tornado is blamed for damage in central illinois. these images are from peoria county where storms broke windows, brought down tree limbs and even sent a trampoline flying. no one was hurt. elsewhere in the midwest, the issue is snow. minnesota got a foot in higher elevations, other places just got a lot of rain. strong winds made it very tough to get around. >> residents not out of the woods yet. nicole mitchell, it has been a busy weather year. >> spring isn't even here, we've got a little bit of everything going on. the severe weather that we were talking about, the tornadic stuff was two days ago as the system initially went through. the low pressure sat and spun over the great likes. it switched to more snow. you can see how the front went through the northeast off the
8:17 am
coast and is kind of laying across the south. that will cause other problems later today. we'll have more on that coming up. the snow side of this is starting to wind down, so we've gotten the heaviest stuff so far. we're looking at a little bit over the next 24 hours. a lot of that is going to be about one to three inches, so not as much. the other thing we are seeing with this system is some temperature contrasts. what has happened here is through today, we've got the initial front that's already come through but then another one will reinforce behind it. temperatures haven't gone down too much on the east coast. that's great news. watch contrasts as we get into tomorrow, some of the 50 or the 60's for new york drop into the 50's. it's the midsection of the country, somewhere like wichita kansas today will go from near 70 degrees to a 20-degree drop into the day tomorrow, into the 40's. that's a pretty big contrast for us over the next 24 hours.
8:18 am
otherwise, as i said, that system also laying across the south, that's where we could see some new flood concerns, because storms are going to reignite along that area and add rain to the region. >> march is unpredictable, a little bit of spring, a little bit of winter. indiana looking at strict new rules on abortion clinics. >> including banning the procedure if there is genetic disorder and making the woman pay for cremation of the fetus. one community ending the practice of a grand jury to investigate police shootings.
8:19 am
8:20 am
8:21 am
>> we can't imagine life without them, nor would we have considered abortion in that situation. every child is a gift from god and again, every child is a wanted child. >> the bill also requires women to make multiple trips to a clinic. they must first view a fetal
8:22 am
ultra sound and hear the heartbeat 18 hours before an abortion and requires the mother to pay for the fetus to be cremate or buried. opponents say it adds stigma. a petition with 27 signatures opposed the measure. >> there are no questions that there are provisions in this about him that greatly act as intrusion. if approved, indiana would join north dakota as the only states to ban abortions for genetic abnormalities. >> good morning, thank you for your time. much of the support for limiting abortion access comes from religious groups. are there many faith leaders
8:23 am
that are for a woman's right to choose and against this bill? >> yes, our coalition is for reproductive justice and many denominations have scienced statements that they support families boots to make their own decisions about how to plan their families. it is a huge commitment to parents and we support women and families in doing what they need to do to take care of their families. >> constitutional issues aside, you make an argument for why this bill is not moral. can you police explain that further? >> it will race infant and maternal mortality. it will curb suffering of babies. there will be more competition for the scarce service that is there are for people with disabilities. these are such a stress on families and it disrupts families, bankrupt families, and it disrupts parenting of existing children.
8:24 am
>> let me parse that out what you said now a bit. how does it increase infant mortality? >> because there are no services provided to care for these children and more children will be born with disabilities, severe disabilities, not just down's syndrome, but any disability or potential disability. >> is what you're saying is that this law sort of addresses what advocates of it perceive as life before the birth of the child but doesn't consider what happens to the child after he or she is born. >> that's right. it's not just about down syndrome,ment focus has been on this would prevent women from making the choice to have an
8:25 am
abortion if it's specifically because they have a child that in you the row has been diagnosed with down syndrome. it applies to other deceases one in which a baby deteriorates quickly and has a strong likelihood of dying before thing a of four, correct? >> yes, with lots of suffering. >> a lot of states have started to pass bills that restrict women's access to clinics in these indirect ways. what other aspect of this bill in indiana is extreme, in your view? >> the requirement to bury or cremate embryonic or fetal remains from a miscarriage or an abortion is something we just haven't seen before. it's surveillance of miscarriage. >> what do you think that is intended to do? is that supposed to put an economic burden on mothers? is it meant to shame them in some way? >> all that, and i think keep
8:26 am
track of them, and it opens the possibility of investigating miscarriages that seem suspicious to a provider. >> do you think that this bill's terms could be enforced, the bill requires that doctors refuse abortions to women who elect to have them because of a fetal abnormality, but couldn't a woman just say she's electing an abortion for a different reason? >> you have doctors encouraging patients to lie. it really is very hard in these terrible situations to be trying to figure out what your doctor is really trying to tell you. it violates informed consent. >> thank you so much for joining us with your within on this issue this morning. >> thank you for having me, stephanie. another debate over religion
8:27 am
and politics playing out in georgia. >> business leaders are urging the governor to veto a religious freedom bill. we're going to talk about to one of merrick garland's former clerks about what he might be like if he does make it to the supreme court.
8:28 am
8:29 am
>> stopping the next generation of isis recruits. teaching the youth on the front lines. working towards a better future. >> this is one of the most important sites in the century. >> proudest moment of my life.
8:30 am
welcome back to your world this morning. coming up on 8:30 eastern, taking a look at today's top stories. a fourth day of talks in geneva over the war in syria. secretary of state john kerry said there is an urgent need for political transition. he spoke to sergey lavrov and emphasized the importance of maintaining this garage jail truce. anger in brazil after president rousseff appointed the former president to her cabinet it was he was detained last month for a corruption scandal. critics say it is a move to prevent him being prosecuted. merrick garland will be meeting with democratic senators who back his nomination to the supreme court. he faces an uphill battle to get confirmed. wednesday, senate majority leader mitch mcconnell said he
8:31 am
will not act on the nomination p.m. judge garland has spent nearly 20 years on the court. >> david shuster takes a closer look at that life on the bench. >> mr. president, it's a great privilege to be nominated by a fell chicagoan. >> born and raised in the midwest, hi might have emerged from central casting, graduating from harvard law school then after clerking for two esteemed federal judges, practiced corporate law at arnold and porter, one of the nation's most respected firms. he became a partner after only four years, and four years after that, he ditched the wealth and prestige to join the justice department as an entry level federal prosecutor. >> it was the sense of responsibility that serve the community instilled by my
8:32 am
parents that led me to leave my law firm to become a line prosecutor in 1989. >> in 1997, president clinton appointed him to the federal bench. jewish and married with two daughters, merrick garland has now spent 19 years on the d.c. circuit court. he is known as a judicial moderate, a consensus builder and likable. >> because he's so impeccably credentialed and such a soft spoken, decent human being, it's going to be harder and harder for the senate republicans to say they won't meet with him. >> he's issued opinions that suggest a narrow view of second amendment gun rights and is considered tough on criminal justice, a profile on scotus blog notes that he "rarely votes in favor of criminal defendant appeals of their convictions." experts note lower court judges are generally beholden to supreme court precedent. >> even if we can read his paper trail on the court of appeals
8:33 am
and essentially it is a very moderate paper trail, it's unknown how someone will vote as justices on the supreme court. >> at 63 years old, he is the oldest supreme court nominee since the nixon area. if confirmed, he would be lucky to serve on the court for 20 years. antonin scalia served on the court for 30. it underscores the contention by democratics that garland's nomination is a modest one, and may ratchet up president obama's pressure on the republican-led senate to allow a vote on garland's nomination. >> i am grateful beyond words for the honor you have bestowed upon me. >> david shuster, al jazeera. >> jay michael son writes for the daily beast and clerked for justice garland.
8:34 am
do you think he will be on the supreme court bench? >> it's possible he'll look like a very attractive nominee. >> you clerked for him. what can you tell us about the man and i guess the way he thinks? >> a lot of people say here is someone who applies the law. that was my experience. this is someone with a high degree of integrity, working for him just out of law school and just an honor to work through the law, not just having a result in mind, but figuring out how the law was going to come out. that was really impressive. >> the d.c. circuit court is closely watched, they say it is the other supreme court. does ideology play any role in his rulings or the way he thinks? >> really rarely. that's true of most of the judges on the circuit. you have to read the tea leaves to see what the phills fee of government is. one exception is criminal law
8:35 am
where judge garland is more on the moderate to conservative side, former problem himself, but really doing the law in a conservative way. conservatives are looking for anything to talk about. there's only one case relevant here and all the judge did is rule it should have a rehearing. it's a mountain out of a molehill. >> what did the case involve. >> is there an individual gun right. it was applying the law at the time. i don't think that there's anything really there to grab on to. it was applying the law coming down from the supreme court. >> d.c. having strict gun laws, heller of course saying that he wanted to have a gun in d.c., supreme court rules in his favor and now you have guns in d.c. garland has already worked with chief justice john roberts. will he play well with the others. it seems he and roberts will get
8:36 am
along. >> it seems that way. this is not a scalia or follow mass that has his ideological viewpoint and will do that. it's possible that justice garland would be slightly to the left of justice kennedy but to the right of the more liberal justice, this would be a centrist player on the court. >> liberals say he is too moderate, moderates say is too liberal. does that make him just wait? >> you would think we'd have a more liberal appointee, but a con sense candidate in an ordinary year would make all the sense in the world. >> thanks for being with us. >> ply measure. michigan's governor will testify in front of lawmakers for the first time about the flint water crisis. he blames failures at all levels
8:37 am
for the water supply. the e.p.a. representative is expected to point the finger at the governor's office. a change in policy in one minnesota county could change the way officers of chard. one prosecutor will stop using grand juries to make that call. it's a reaction to a police shooting and protests that followed. >> for 18 days last november, protestors in minnesota camped outs police headquarters and demanded justice for jamar clark. >> the guy was not fighting back. >> police say the 24-year-old was fighting with him when officers shot and killed him last november. witnesses say he was handcuffed. in light of other high profile police shootings nationwide in which grand jury's found no cause to bring charges, protestors in minnesota demanded that the prosecutor not use a
8:38 am
grand jury in this case. freeman has obliged. >> grand jury's will no longer be used to consider police shooting cases in the county. >> the decision ends a four decade long tradition of using garage's in police involved shootings. in that time, not a single officer has ever been found guilty of wrongfully shooting freeman said the decision to not use grand jury's in she's sort of cases will make the system more fair and accountable but doesn't think others should them follow his lead. >> in other communities, they may feel the use of the grand jury in police shooting cases is appropriate. >> community anger connected to other high profile police shootings have cost prosecutors their jobs. in cuyahoga county, ohio, tim mcginty lost a primary. he concluded the shooting of 12-year-old tamir rice was reasonable.
8:39 am
anita alvarez lost a reelection bid. she waited more than a year a charge the officer who shot laquan mcdonald 16 times.
8:40 am
more rain is expect in flooded areas in texas and louisiana. the governor warned residents in the risk is not over. >> people need to remember about the possibility that the water could continue to rise for another day or two. >> the river crested at seven and a half feet, almost double its flood level. emergency personnel encourage residents to leave. the same story in mississippi, residents are bracing for more flooding there. more than 600 homes have been damaged. cresting rivers threaten more homes now. water levels are expected to rises into the weekend. >> i saw a guy who had a gun, a dog, groceries, he ain't going anywhere. >> clearly sounds like those are his priorities. >> that same system bringing us
8:41 am
the snow had a front with it. the front did move while the low pressure area didn't too much. the southern end of that is stalling through the south, interacting with gulf moisture. this isn't going to be as prolific a rainfall than what we had seen. because we have so many areas, all the areas in green were places we are still dealing with flooding in some of the rivers that haven't crested yet. a lot of place will only get an inch or two. you can see for the next couple days, we have spotty showers running through the south and that can add to what we're already dealing with. it really takes until we get probably to saturday for more of this to lift out of the region in our heaviest flooding areas, mississippi through texas, up in arkansas and definitely louisiana for this to clear out once again, so we do have those chances for rain that could cause problems. the other thing we ever with the
8:42 am
front, a slight risk for stronger storms. the biggest risk with all of this would be hail developing. watch for those potential thunderstorms through the day. could be a couple thunderstorms on the north side of this, as well, less likely that those would produce anything severe. temperatures, if you like the warm stuff, it is the midsection, central plains. a lot of 60's through the day today. by the time tomorrow, some of those change to 40's and 50's with the next front coming through, changing the chance for severe weather, but you might not like the temperature drop. there is as controversial religious freedom bill in georgia heading to the governor's desk. the new version balances religious freedom and protecting against discrimination, supporters stay. the bill will protect pastors and churches from being forced
8:43 am
to protect same sex marriages and religious groups to have to serve or employ people with conflicting beliefs. several business groups warned the bill will cost the state billions in lost revenue. no word whether the republican governor is going to sign it. he has said he won't sign any bill that promotes discrimination. >> today, st. patrick's day in new york is called a day of history and hospitality. several lgbt groups will be marching under their own banners. a ban had been in place for two decades. sierra leone is clear of ebola. there are new concerns of a third flare up. money does sometimes grow on plants, how the marijuana industry is gearing up for huge growth.
8:44 am
8:45 am
8:46 am
al jazeera america. >> ebola has killed more than 11,000 people in west africa. a big breakthrough against dengue fever, a new vaccine protected every patient in a study. they hope to put the vaccine on
8:47 am
the market in 2018 and use the same technology to create a vaccine against the zeke virus. >> marv is legal in some way in 40 states. sales are expected to hit between $6 billion and $11 billion by 2020. the overall impact is expected to soar from $14 billion this year to more than $24 billion by 2020. some opponents worry about its long standing effect on society. >> jacob ward has the details. >> marijuana could soon join alcohol as the other great legal in tox captain of american life. at least 10 states are expected to put marijuana measures in front of lawmakers or voter this is year. >> the scene that i'm in now is about as normal as it gets in american life. just think of about drinking and
8:48 am
occasions at which it is appropriate. you lost your job, let me buy you a drink. you got a job? let me buy you a drink. birth, death, marriage, doesn't matter, anything can be an excuse to drink in this country and that's why alcohol who become such you a huge and fundamental industry. we know what big alcohol looks like as a cultural phenomenon and powerhouse, but what will big marijuana look like if that drug becomes legal in the united states? >> bruce livingston runs a watchdog organization called alcohol justice. he said to understand how marijuana might change america, it is crucial to understand how alcohol became so influential.
8:49 am
>> the play book is advertising, advertising, advertising. it's product placement, youth oriented, controlling the policy sector, having massive lobbying at the local, state and federal level. >> if marijuana becomes legal across the country, it's promoters will have a lot to learn from sports and booze which is in our movies and sports and traditions. >> half the alcohol in the united states is sold around december during the holiday season. it's often given as a gift. you show up at a party, you bring a bottle of wine or a six pack. >> editor of wired magazine adam rogers says we'll know that pot has joined challenge as a mature commodity when the marketing comes to resemble that of small batch liquor. >> when you look at connoisseurship of alcohol, nobody reviews wine based on how drunk you get or what that drunk feels like. what you review it on is the different flavor notes, the aromatics, the skillfulness in
8:50 am
which the distillor created it with. artisanal craft. keith is a member of the governor's blue ribbon commission studying marijuana. he said for the sake of public health, marijuana must be constrained by regulation and taxation. >> broccoli, you just make sure it's clean and the pesticides aren't bad and public will sort it out. they will buy as much as is good for them and regulate. the problem with marijuana is they change our judgment over what is good enough, what is safe, what feels good, what doesn't feel good. the way you can regulate brocolli which is let the market handle it, people will judge
8:51 am
broccoli on its merits. you can't do that with detective substances. >> marijuana legalization will not just be a legal shift. someday we may be congratulating new parents with a vaporizer or sending brownies to a retiring colleague. marijuana is likely to change the traditions of american life. a major development this morning at sea world. the theme park said it is ending it's controversial orca breeding program. those at the parks will be the last generation. the scout troop in colorado giving refugees a place to call home.
8:52 am
8:53 am
8:54 am
♪ >> sounds kind of close. that is the voice of a singer who followed in his father's footsteps, frank sinatra, jr. died in florida. he did sound like his famous dad and made a career singing the songs that frank, sr. made famous. being a boy scouts is not just about tying knots and earning merit badges.
8:55 am
>> troop 1532 is just like any other boy strikeout troop. the boys do adventure sports, cook at camp and are awarded merit badges for a job well done. >> when we go to some camps and when we do activity, when we come back, we get a badge. >> is that special to you? >> yeah. >> colorado's troop 1532 is different. >> we're all from -- >> this band which boys is made up entirely of refugees, possibly the most diverse troop in the u.s. they still remember their own home countries national anthems,
8:56 am
like rwanda's. these refugee boy scouts and their families come from a who's who of repressive countries and rejeeps where war, poverty, ethnic persecution and corruption, sometimes all four are the norm. burma, congo, rwanda. >> when they ask me, i say i'm a citizen in congo, because where i was born, i was born in rwanda, but in a camp of congo, so i'm really not sure where i'm from. >> where they are from now is aurora, a suburb of denver, home to thousands of immigrants and refugees, it's one of the most diverse cities in america. >> troop 1532's scout pipeline starts here, a refugee-only medical clinic in aurora.
8:57 am
the child of indian immigrants, clinic director dr. p.j. parmer felt left out of american society until he joined the boy scouts, vowing to never let any kid feel like an outsider. he gathered his teenage patients and started a troop from scratch. >> it's like taking them straight out of the docks into the mountains. >> the scouts aren't well off. their families can barely afford the basics, so he pays for scouting supplies. >> the kids show up sometimes in tennis shoes and jeans and so we bring all this extra gear for them so they're warm. >> a cold climate was foreign to this family, they are burmese and escaped ethnic persecution to live in refugee camps in malaysia before making their way to colorado. he said his scout uniform helps him gain acceptance into american society.
8:58 am
>> if i wear this, they know that i'm in boy scouts. >> then what will they do? >> they will talk to me, maybe. >> respect you? >> yeah, ask me about the boy scouts. >> for boys who might be enemies if they had stayed in their war-torn countries, scouts is a unifier. >> we have eight in a row, and this is how they prefer to sleep. >> they pile up on top of each other. >> shoulder to shoulder, yeah. >> for these boys, troop 1532 is more than an after school hobby, it is a place to call home. >> i consider myself an african who grew up in america. >> carrol mckinley, lake george, colorado.
8:59 am
a major league baseball player seems to be putting devotion to his son ahead of the games and millions of dollars. chicago white sox first baseman quit for he said personal reasons after the team asked him to limit his 14-year-old son's visits to the ballpark. the team penalty asked him not to bring his son every day, which he has reportedly done during the last season. he forfeits $13 million this year walking away, the team saying laroche could change his mind. they have encouraged him to think about it. >> a lot of questions about the real reasons he chose to retire and how much that had to do with these rules. >> his dad is a big leaguer. >> how would you like it if i brought belle every day to work? >> i'd love it. >> you probably would. >> your world this morning is back tomorrow beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern. have a great day.
9:00 am
>> hello and welcome to the news hour. these are some of the stories we'll be covering during the coming 60 minutes. >> leaders from syria's kurdish control regions vote to form an autonomous region. the south african president is shouted down in the parliament while answering questions about his links to a local

49 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on