Skip to main content

tv   Your World This Morning  Al Jazeera  March 24, 2016 7:00am-9:01am EDT

7:00 am
following leads police identify a third suspect in the brussels bombings but with one man on the loose. new details of a possible fifth attacker a decision on syria. secretary kerry visits moscow to see where vladimir putin stands on the fate of bashar al-assad placing blame independent investigator say michigan's governor and staff are at fault for the water crisis in flint and found at sea a missing tug boat pulled from the depths of the pacific after disappearing 95 years ago welcome to your world this
7:01 am
morning right now police in belgium are trying to hunt down a possible fifth suspect in brussels. they are looking for one man french and bell gym media reporting that sur skralence cameras caught another person walking with the man now identified as the suicide bomber there. it is unclear if this possible fifth suspect was killed in tuesday's bombings. here is what we know about the other four people believed to have been involved. police say najim laachraoui appears to have died while he blew up a bomb at the brussels airport. he was born in morocco grew up in plufls and was a bsh bsh brussels. brahim el-bakraoui set-off a bomb as well in the airport his brother khalid el-bakraoui set-off the bomb in the metro station. he was also a suspect they believe in the paris attacks and police are still looking for this man.
7:02 am
not clear who it is. the explosives he had with him at the airport went off without injuring anyone it is not yet clear if any of those men are linked to salah abdeslam, the chief suspect in the paris attacks. he was due to appear in court today. the hearing was postponed. apparently salah abdeslam won't fight extradition back too france. police say he has stopped cooperating. >> reporter: we were expecting that salah abdeslam who is being held in the maximum security prison would make an appearance today at court here in brussels for the start of proceedings against him here. it turns out that that is not going to happen. we understand that his lawyer appealed for a two-week postponement for that hearing. that was granted. we under that salah abdeslam has, according to his lawyer, refused to cooperate with investigators since tuesday's
7:03 am
events, which sheds more light on the situation regarding his detention and regarding him clearly. insofar as other things are happening in brussels today, we know that there will be a meeting of the e.u. interior justice minutes, an emergency meeting, clearly called to discuss what has happened here in belgium and brussels and to see what can be done about this at the european level. insofar as the security presence in brussels is concerned here in the city center, well, certainly, people are being frisked as they go into metro stations, but we're seeing troops of soldiers, heavily armed soldiers patrolling the streets looking for signs of trouble but also as a clear deterrent to any possibility of trouble, any possibility of fresh violence occurring. insofar as the bay that the media is covering the events today, as you alluded to, the possibility of somebody else in the metro being involved in the attacks there, the newspaper here basically saying that it
7:04 am
believes that the government here, the belgium government, let the suicide bombers go. inside their pages they also talk about the possibility that khalid el-bakraoui one of the brothers, the person who blew himself up in the metro, was seen talking to with somebody else there that is our correspondent in brussels. turkey has been in the spotlight for becoming the main transit point for i.s.i.l. retrue to say trying to get into syria. the government says it is doing its part to shut the route down. more from the turkey-syrian border. >> reporter: securing turkey's 900 kilometer border with syria is not ease whyy. they want to seal it off completely with concrete walls, watch towers and more guards. the construction started about two years ago. some residents here say it's already made a difference. >> translation: they were passing from here.
7:05 am
terrorists, man, woman, smugglers. they were all passing from here. >> reporter: turkey says it fears i.s.i.l. fighters are crossing into its territory with the intent of carrying out attacks. this is the closest we can get to the border with syria and you can see behind me the concrete wall. that was built aabout a monthing aing by the turkish authorities. the government says it wants to prevent all smuggling activities and prevent anyone from entering turkish territory illegally. western powers have accused turkey of turning a blind eye to the flow of foreign fighters in and out of syria. western intelligence services estimate more than 30,000 foreigners from 100 countries are fighting in syria. and that it you are key was the entry point for many of them. the e.u. law enforcement agency estimates between 3,000 and 5,000 i.s.i.l. fighters have returned to their home countries in europe and could be planning
7:06 am
attacks. the u.s. and nato says this 70 kilometer strip of the border between the borders is used by foreign fighters to go in and out of is syria. an i.s.i.l. stronghold is just a few kilometers away. the governor has ridiculed all accusations. he says the concrete walls will run over 800 kilometers through five turkish cities bordering syria, with cameras and radars >> translation: the men blew himself up in the middle of brussels at the metro and airport. how did they get there and how did they get the bombs? why europe then doesn't protect its borders? instead of accusing us, let's work together to solve the problem. >> reporter: turkey has increased its military power and personnel along its border with syria. but even if it succeeds in sealing the border, i.s.i.l. and
7:07 am
other foreign fighters will find another way to cross as long as there is war in syria secretary of state john kerry heads to brussels tomorrow. today he is in moscow pressing his russian counterpart over a political transition in syria. kerry told lavrov the pause in fighting there isn't enough. >> many people are very hopeful. our counterparts with whom you and i both talked in the last days are hopeful that these meetings here in moscow today have an ability to be able to further define and chart the road ahead so that we can bring in conflict in syria to a close as fast as possible kerry is expected to discuss the future of bashar al-assad during talks with russian president vladimir putin. our correspondent has more from moscow.
7:08 am
>> reporter: the u.s. said russia don't see-- u as much of s and russia don't see eye eye when it comes to bashar al-assad himself. russia does see a role for him whereas the u.s. said he would have no role in a transitional government. also that the opposition-- something that the opposition will have a hard type accepting. kerry and lavrov made it quite clear, especially john kerry, that he was expecting some substantial progress at the end of today. that's after he met his meeting with lavrov and then later on in the afternoon both men will head to the kremlin and kerry will have the meeting there with vladimir putin. it is only after that, that there will be a press conference and we will find out what exactly has been agreed upon of course we will follow that. that was al jazeera's correspondent reporting from moscow president obama heading hem from argentina today after meeting with the country's
7:09 am
president. he says one of his top priorities for last month in office is the fight against i.s.i.l. >> my top priority is to defeat i.s.i.l. and to eliminate the scourge of this bar baric terrorism around the world that coincide with the military coup backed by the u.s. military. thousands were killed in the dictatorship that followed. human rights groups are now raising the u.s. for helping to bring those atrocities to light. >> reporter: it has been 40 since since argentina was ruled by a military. a time when those opposed the regime were systematically disappeared. now the u.s. is promising to release secret documents about their role. >> translation: my husband was kidnapped. i was pregnant. so my mother started to participate in protests to demand the release of political
7:10 am
prisoners. she was taken too. i never saw her again. >> reporter: she has been trying to find what happened to her husband and her mother for decades. she says the u.s. has information that would have staved her years of pain/-- saved her >> translation: we know that the u.s. government knew about what has happening. dead persons had been kidnapped with my mother. i would have known-- saved me time if i knew she was dead. >> reporter: this used to be a detention center. hundreds of people were detained and torture here. this that you can see here says the u.s. was part of the dictatorship. human rights organizations are saying that obama is not welcome here because there are not willing to forgive or forget the role that the u.s. played at the time. many of those killed in the 70s and 80s were victims of the
7:11 am
condor plan where dictatorships persecuted opponents around the world. this man has been investigating the plan for years and he is impressed by the amount of knowledge that the u.s. had about what was happening. >> translation: henry kissingey told the minister at the time, if you have something to do, do it fast. there are lots of documents that showed the c.i.a. role, in the role in the plan. it is impressive how much knowledge they had >> reporter: argentina human rights secretary says that finding out the truth will help argentina move forward. >> translation: opening all the archives will help us. the more we know about what happened will help us unite. hiding the truth only generates more pain. >> reporter: he was able to find her mother's remains in a mass grave in 2005. thousands of others are wondering what happened to their
7:12 am
loved ones. the hope is that the release of new u.s. documents will help find them in iraq the first phase of the long awaited military operation to retake the city of mosul has begun. iraqi officials say they will focus on forcing i.s.i.l. fighters out of the areas of the city. the u.s. led coalition has been providing air support. mosul has been in i.s.i.l. hand since 2014. it's not clear how long the operation could take. it is now believed that two pieces of plane debris that were found are from malaysia airline. both pieces are consistent with panels from a malaysia airline aircraft. the plane disappeared two years ago with 239 people on board. it vanished flying to beijing. it is believed to have crashed
7:13 am
into the southern india ocean. there is a scathing new assessment of what led up to the water crisis in flint, mif began this was a report commissioned by the governor himself. as john hen ee smith tells us, the report blames the governor and administration for what followed >> reporter: it was a mixture of ignorance, incompetency >> translation: arrogance by many decision makers. >> reporter: one of the co chairs of the task force summed up what it found was behind the water crisis in flint. >> no-one asked the question what will happen if we don't have corrosion control treatment in place >> reporter: the governor himself set up the task force >> we started an independent group to go and look at this issue. to go dig into it >> reporter: in the final report he has hit hard. he says the state has fundamentally accountable. that contradicts what governor snyder said that federal and
7:14 am
local government officials bear equal responsibility >> automatic accountability for executive branch decisions obviously rest-- all. >> reporter: it points to the appointment of all powerful emergency managers like dar necessarily erly as a key failure of the snyder administration >> it did occur when emergency managers had replaced local representative decision making. we are suggesting to the government and the legislature that the law needs to be reviewed >> reporter: it places blame on the state department of environmental quality >> it is extremely trouble some to me that an agency whose primary role once again is to protect human health in the environment, came with these decisions and they never backed off those decisions. no matter how many red flags they saw. >> reporter: fostering a culture change in that agency is among the 44 recommendations.
7:15 am
snyder said he will heed >> we should learn from this. they talk about more questions should have been asked and could have been asked the report also calls for adequate funding of the state drinking water office. the task force notes that the michigan office has one of the lowest budgets in the mid west and yet the largest number of community water systems to regular lately speaking of money, what be more money to help the people in flint. hasn't the governor promised that? >> he has. two months ago we asked for 127 million dollars and that is still not coming to a vote to this day. karen waver regaild a report from the governor blaming the governor. there is a snow storm moving into the north-east. more of two feet of snow, making
7:16 am
dangerous travel. travelling l travellers were stranded in denver. things should be back up and fully running this morning, but they say it is a foot of snow that storm system is now on the move with other states in its path. let's bring in nicole mitchell >> reporter: good morning. this is what it was look like yesterday. still digging out today. there could be a refreezing over night. as we look through the day today, you can see a broad system anywhere from the mid-west all the wait way to new england bringing the snow and the southern edge of this has been severe weather. especially hail. we were seeing an anywhere amount of that yesterday and that is a threat again today. looking at the snow area, some of the heavier stuff right now, minnesota through to michigan and just starting to come parts of new leaned. high winds are one of our
7:17 am
problems. over the next 24 hours, places like michigan we could see significant amounts of ice accumulation as well. that will be even more dangerous because it brings down trees and power lines and causes additional problems. this is what we're looking at as all of this moves along. because of everything, we still have blizzard warning for portions of wisconsin, the entire area. some places could see over a foot by the time everything is done. it will take us a while to dig out. as we get into new england more of this is that mixed precipitation. you get into northern parts of maine. that will just be snow. here is an idea, a contrast. winter to red flag fire danger in the mid atlantic because of the heat and dry air. it's all part of the same system as it moves along. we will talk more about that, some of the heat, and the severe coming back
7:18 am
when we come back also split on the issue of religious liberty and contraception the supreme court may not have the answer on obamacare moving out west, candidates look to california as their best chance to stop the front runners.
7:19 am
find fantasy shows. when it comes to the things you love, you want more. love romance? get lost in every embrace. into sports? follow every pitch, every play and every win. change the way you experience tv with x1 from xfinity.
7:20 am
the latest battle over the affordable care act is now in the hand of the supreme court justices hearing arguments over the birth control mandate religious groups say that rule violates their belief. the justices may wind up leaving the issue unresolved. >> reporter: it certainly is an unusual sight, nuns
7:21 am
demonstrating in front of the high court. the sisters of the poor and other religious non-profits and universities say they cannot in good faith follow the mandates of the contraceptive requirement in the affordable care act >> the government is requiring us to make changes in our health care, our religious health care plan to include services that really violate our deepest held relative l religious beliefs >> reporter: the government does have to accommodate religious beliefs. it says it has done that. its safe based groups opt out of contraceptive coverage and the government steps in, directing the insurance company to provide the birth control free of charge. attorneys for the charities told the justices that is not good enough. that the government is hijacking the insurance plan and making the nuns complicit. attorney paul clement said:
7:22 am
>> reporter: the more conservative justices seem to agree. john roberts saying: >> reporter: the u.s. solicitor general argued the opt-out provision is a sensible balance. the court's liberal wing was on board:. >> reporter: >> reporter: some religious groups support the government and the accommodations already in place. >> petitioners in this case are simply taking a bridge too far. the government has provided a very careful system of
7:23 am
exemptions >> reporter: as is off the case, the swing vote is likely to be anthony kennedy and he seemed to side with his fellow conservatives which would result in a tie >> bottom line is we will not obey this mandate no matter how this court ruled. we believe it is going to be a split four to four decision >> reporter: a four four vote is essentially a loss for the little sisters. it will set no national precedent and most of the lower courts have ruled against their position north carolina has approved a bill that over turns a law which allowed people to use rest rooms based on their gender identity. this new law passed called the measure discriminatory and stigma tieing bernie sanders campaigning today in washington attending
7:24 am
rallies. ahead of the caucuses there on saturday. he intends to stay in the race all the way to the end. his rival hillary clinton is going to be in california trying to garner support there. she won that state when she ran against bm in 2008 but p wept on to lose the nomination. the latest poll she has a slight edge over bernie sanders in california. the golden state has the largest number of delegates, but is often ignored because the primary there is held in june and by then the race is usually decided. as gen for ln done explains-- jennifer london explanation no-one is ignoring it >> you have to go through donald trump >> >> reporter: on the road to the nomination, here is the date to circle, june 7. the last primary voting day will actually matter this time around. the state with the most to offer may surprise you. here is a minute. up guessed it. california. the country's most popular state
7:25 am
may be rich in delegates offering republicans 172 this year. but it has long been ignored by candidates who instead concentrate on early primary states. that was then; this is now. >> we are the big enchalada when it comes to delegates >> reporter: a political analyst and professor at the university of southern california. >> lo and behold, this year it looks as though we could be critical at least to the republican nomination and, perhaps, in terms of delegate totals to the democratic nomination. >> reporter: which means candidates will have to start paying attention to california. >> there's going to have to be a ground game now many. a significant real ground game on both sides. and myself sense is we will see more of the candidates than we've ever seen in a long time >> reporter: if you believe john kasich's victory speech he has
7:26 am
set his sights on the golden state >> i'm getting ready to rent a wagon, we will have the wind blow us to the rocky mountains over to california >> reporter: ted cruz is said to be the most organized candidate in california. donald trump's relationship in the state is a little trickier. >> reporter: we know hollywood has been a big fan of donald trump. will star power translate into votes? in a state as blue as the pacific ocean. even orange county one of the state's few republican strong holds is seeing the tide turn. in 2014 the g.o.p. share of voter registration fell below 40% for the first time. sometime resident a registered republican is excited. in early primary statements every vote matters, no matter how big or small the voting block, and this year california republicans are happy their vote will finally count >> i think it's a big deal.
7:27 am
i think the majority of the people need to look at the primary and the g.o.p. and i think donald trump is the front runner. i think everybody needs to lean towards him. i'm looking forward to it. my vote is going to count this time >> california can no longer be written off with a dramatic shift like we're seeing in this election amongst the electorate. they're not siding with the establishment like they typically have. voter behaviours are changing. that is creating a much more xaettive presidential psych em. i think this-- cycle. this will set the stage for all future presidential elections if you want to be a contender you better have a strategy in california. >> reporter: the state may soon become home to something like political clout maybe true. although california still won't be mathematically decisive.
7:28 am
straight ahead, police in brussels this morning hunting for two suspects in the bombings there as a backlash brews here in the u.s. >> how about a president ma defends america republican candidates call for controversial crackdowns on muslims in america. >> al jazeera america - proud of telling your stories. >> somebody to care about us man... >> we're live in ferguson, missouri. >> brick by brick, i will open it. it will take more than a few rocks to stop me from doin' what i have to do. >> suddenly heroin seems to be everywhere. >> there's no way i am willing to give up my family for a drug ever again. >> i know you all have strong opinions about the border. >> i don't believe in borders. >> our government is allowing an invasion. >> i don't really know as much as i thought did. >> people don't just need protection, they need assistance. >> what's your message then? >> we need help now. >> oh my god... the town's out of water. >> we came up here to talk to some people who are selling fresh water... fresh water for fracking.
7:29 am
>> we are a town that greed destroyed. >> what do we want? >> justice! >> these people have decided that today they will be arrested. >> i wanted to dance, and eventually i started leaving the gangs in the street alone. >> we're pushing the envelope with out science every day, we can save species. >> i'm walking you guys! >> all i wanted to see was her walk. it was amazing. >> these were emotions that i had been dreaming about for so long. >> getting to the heart of the matter. proud to tell your stories. al jazeera america.
7:30 am
>> pushing the boundaries of science. >> we are on the tipping point. >> we can save species. >> it's the biggest question out there. >> it's a revolutionary approach. >> we are pushing the boundaries. >> techknow is going to blow
7:31 am
your mind. >> our experts go inside the innovations, impacting you. >> this is the first time anybody's done this. >> i really feel my life changing. >> techknow, where technology meets humanity. only on al jazeera america. this morning, police in belgium are hunting for a possible fifth suspect in the attacks on that brussels. he reportedly was shown on surveillance cameras in the metro walking with the suicide bomber there. we are learning more about the other four believed to have been involved. one appeared to have died at brussels airport when he blew up a bomb. another set off a bomb in the airport. the third man, the one wearing the hat on the surveillance video is on the run. the explosives he had went off without injuring anyone.
7:32 am
on the far right is the brother of one of the bombers. he set off the bomb at the metro station killing himself and 20 others. dominic cain is live in brussels. what more do we know about the possible fifth suspect people are talking about today? well, the first suggestions that perhaps there was a five order suspect in these bombings that have so devastated people in this city emerged in one of the phlegmish newspapers this morning. this newspaper with the headline belgium let the suicide bombers go. on the inside, they refer to the cctv image of this other person who was seen with a bomber we know detonated his device in the metro station. since this newspaper was published this morning, we
7:33 am
understand that there is a report that police are issuing an artist's impression of this other individual who was seen talking to the bomber who appeared to be carrying an identical rucksack to what the bomber was carrying what he was seen on cctv. we do not know what has happened to that individual, so it appears as though police are working on the basis that this is a fifth suspect, this is a person who is at large. what's worth making clear here is that the evidence that the police were able to gather about these individuals, much of it comes from what they discovered at the bomb making factory that four of the suicide bombers had used and the police went there because they were taken there by a taxi driver who said he had transport three of the suicide bombers to the airport and he was curious about them and concerned because he'd offered to help them with their bags located in the car and angrily saying you must not do that so we know that three of those
7:34 am
devices were seen at the cctv at the airport. we know that the police found one of the bags at the bomb making factory that they went to and we know one of those bags was used at mel beak metro station. june the lone surviving paris attack suspect is not fighting extradition to france now. is he cooperating with authorities there in belgium? >> this is the interesting thing as far as saleh abdeslam is concerned. it was reported that he was going to resist extra addition, that he wanted to stay in belgian custody and that there were some suggestions that he was cooperating to a certain extent but now his lawyer saying
7:35 am
no, it appears that he does want to go back to france. we know that the hearings into his case here in belgium have been postponed to april 7 but there's also the suggestion that he has not been cooperating with the authorities since the tuesday attacks here at the airports in brussels and also at the maelbeek metro station. there's a degree of ambiguity about what he wants and what he has been saying. his lawyer i go suggesting that he wants to go back to paris. >> referring back to that newspaper you held up at the beginning, that headline suggesting that officials there somehow let these suicide bombers go. e.u. officials are holding an emergency meeting and security today. what is on the top of that agenda given this narrative that somehow the belgian security forces have failed. >> well, we know that this is an
7:36 am
extraordinary meeting of interior and justice ministers at e.u. level, and clearly what they want to do is to try to find some sort of policing solution, something that can be disseminated from brussels which perhaps all european union member states can implement. the question is what that might be, might it be closing borders or much tougher border checks. if that i also the case, that will threaten further the schengen zone that operates in parents of the european union border check without having to show passports, that would be perhaps the death knell for that. you can see many gathered behind me here laying flowers for tributes, expressing condolences to the vacation of the attacks, what can be done to reassure
7:37 am
these people. the government here in belgium believes the answer right now is ostentatious displays of military strength, soldiers walking around. many groups of soldiers have been frisking passengers trying to get into metro stations. that's the sort of thing, that's what the police are doing here. what the european union response will be, we'll find out later on. >> the director of the homeland and national security law program at george mason university and also a former chief counsel and senior advisor to the foreign relations committee joins us today. everything points to a massive intelligence failure on the part of the belgian authorities. take a listen to the mayor of malenbeek. >> you have the local level and there is no cooperation -- >> they're not talking to you, they're not -- >> they don't have to talk to me
7:38 am
about their investigation. what i have to do as a mayor is to be careful about what happened on the street for the security of people when we have police operation, when we have raised, but you see concerning these people who became terrorists, i didn't have any information about them. we didn't know that they become radicallists. >> they are not talking to each other, the november 13 attacks in paris, we're talking months after that, is is that still the case? >> del, you know, i mean, it's troubling what we remember hearing before 9/11, in the aftermath of 9/11, the f.b.i. not talking to the c.i.a., states not talking to local governments. even after 9/11, even after san bernardino, they're continuing to have these problems.
7:39 am
>> the mayor of turkey warning at the bomber was more of a concern. what more can be done. >> the belgian authorities have limitations on their capabilities. there's a rule they can't conduct searches after 9:00 p.m. i'm not sure that's right, but these are limitations that don't make a lot of sense. here in the united states, we've limited our intelligence gathering capabilities. some voluntarily, some with the 215 program. we've seen the threat increase world wild. >> how do you move from actionable intelligence to actually believing the person singled out is going to attack? how do you make that connection and move the forces to stop something from happening when you think it might? >> that's a great question. it's a time of when to act, when to hold back and it's always a hard question in these scenarios. how do you figure out when the
7:40 am
threat chatter is just noise or a real threat. there's so many threats on a given day, it's hard to sort the wheat from the staff. that's one of the challenges for the government and the security apparatus. >> we are not hearing a lot of talk about that encryptic technology coming out between apple and the f.b.i. how hard is encryption making it now to track suspects and who has the upper hand? >> inception makes it harder. you have the f.b.i. director telling us the garland shooters were in contact with an overseas contact but they can't get into the communications. it protects the same way our financial, our banking transactions, our purchases, there's a tradeoff here, but i think it's unsustainable to say the government cannot have access to people they know were suspect, in the case of sayed
7:41 am
farook, known terrorists. >> these are dangerous times that we live in post 9/11, but this time, in your opinion, should americans take heed? the reality is that the threat situation is increasing in europe. it is here, too. we don't see the attacks happening here yet save for san bernardino, but with these visa waiver programs in place, and we get information from europeans, it's going to be just as hard if not harder to stop them from coming here. we've got to be on alert. not traveling is hard to do, but the threat is increasing and until we make a decision to really take the fight to the terrorists where they live overseas, we are going to continue to face these threats at home. >> thanks for being with us. the brussels attacks are playing out in the presidential race and there is growing criticism over what donald trump said about who is to blame. >> it's like they're protecting
7:42 am
each other, but they're really doing very bad damage, and they have to open up to society. they have to report the bad ones and you know, if you report the bad ones, all of a sudden, europe not going to have the kind of problems, so there's something going on, and i would say this, to the muslims and in the united states also, when they see trouble, they have to report it. they are not reporting it. >> that was during an interview on a british t.v. channel. >> hillary clinton, john kasich and several rights groups dismissed the idea as outrageous and dangerous. the deputy attorney general is weighing in, saying muslim communities are one of law enforcement's biggest assets in fighting terror. some muslims in the u.s. feel scape goad for the attacks.
7:43 am
michael shure spoke with muslim leaders and they say they are finding more similarities between their rea religions than differences. >> most think of you a take you as a religious area. >> the bulk of them, i guess the billions of muslims throughout the world are probably peace loving people just like you and me. >> we believe that everyone is a child of god and we believe in i think the same god. >> being muslim in america often means being viewed skeptically and having to answer for the actions of a few. mormons know what that's like. >> if you've had an experience in your affect being miss characterized, then you start with a certain skepticism about characterizations you hear of other faiths.
7:44 am
>> jim release the church of latter day saints on the salt lake interfaith round table. >> if you get to know people and see their values and see how their families work, then i think that makes good releases easier. >> that philosophy goes a long way with muslims in utah, like muhammed, eye ma'am at the islamic center in the shadow of the rocky mountains. >> they don't look at it as us versus them. they look for common es and the koran talks about that. >> in the beginning of islam, we see that muslims were taken out of mecca and the l.d.s. folks say they were taken out of certain areas and they were boycotted in essence, so there is a lot of historical similarities. >> settled here in 1847, before
7:45 am
i go gap young led mormon pioneers west after persecution in the 1830's in missouri and then illinois. the 1870's, there were calls to ban mormon legislation. >> if there's anything, they always come and talk to us and say where you guys ok. >> we have repeatedly when these things have happened have tried to take affirmative steps in the interfaith round table to communicate love and understanding to muslims here and even sort of a desire to help protect them, because we know that they abhor the violence. >> mormons believe the rite of passage of serves as a missionary in the u.s. and abroad has informed an
7:46 am
understanding at home. >> they are willing to go to other places. they are willing to learn about other faiths through their missionaries. they are willing to incorporate what they have learned in other faiths when they come back home. >> that is why both faiths are very much at home in utah. michael shure, al jazeera, salt lake city, utah. prosecutors in new york saying they will not seek prison time for a alive convicted in that deadly stairwell shooting. officer peter lange was convicted of manslaughter for shooting a man in a dark stairway. he was facing 15 years behind bars but the d.a. now recommending six months, home confinement, five years probation when lange is sentenced next month. a new jersey police chief is on leave while allegations of racial profiling are pursued. he is accused of sending emails
7:47 am
justifying racial profiling saying black gang members rob white neighborhoods in the town and white kids bought drugs from black gangs. >> ahead of the holiday weekend, rain and severe weather hitting the great lakes and now headed east. good morning again, nicole. >> good morning, yeah, this is a broad system. the snow side is definitely through the midwest, great lakes, now into new england and extending from the great lakes south into louisiana and the accident. that's the severe weather side of it. we've got heavy rain and forms especially on you the southern end of all that.
7:48 am
we had reports of wind and hail coming with this yesterday and today could be under that similar severe weather threat. here's where we have the risk, anywhere from the great lakes down to the south with the higher elevations tennessee into alabama or mississippi that's where we have a slightly more elevated risk for that weather through the course of the day. you can see the line on our forecast map forming up, doing with the snow on the north side of it, as well. for a lot of the region, this clears by later friday with the front lingering through pores of florida, for example, just a little bit longer, but you can already see, we're going to have another system behind this. not as profound in terms of snow, but definitely more weather on the way. look at these changes, temperatures have gone through dropping from yesterday at this time over 20 degrees, so there will be a big contrast in the central united states. you can do that a little bit more broadly on the big map. ahead of this still, those temperatures in the 70's, maybe even a couple of 80's until the
7:49 am
front comes through. if you're still in the warm section, enjoy it. >> all right, nicole mitchell, thank you. >> coming up, a navy ship that vanished in 1921 without a trace. >> i remember when it went missing. how the uss conastoga found years later. president obama performing the tango.
7:50 am
7:51 am
hey how's it going, hotcakes? hotcakes. this place has hotcakes. so why aren't they selling like hotcakes? with comcast business internet and wifi pro, they could be. just add a customized message to your wifi pro splash page and you'll reach your customers where their eyes are already - on their devices. order up. it's more than just wifi, it can help grow your business. you don't see that every day. introducing wifi pro, wifi that helps grow your business. comcast business. built for business. when it comes to the fithings you love,. you want more. love romance? get lost in every embrace. into sports? follow every pitch, every play and every win. change the way you experience tv
7:52 am
with x1 from xfinity. >> the republicans have come back to power on the slogan back to normalcy. >> the roaring 20's were just starting, the pea pod dome scandal led the news and air force were starting to challenge the supremacy of air power.
7:53 am
in march, the uss conastoga left and never arrived. >> lost at sea, one of the largest sea and air searches in the 20th century up to the search for amelia ehrhardt, close to 400,000 square miles, 500 miles around oahu, all the way up to midway atoll. >> all that was known of the u.s.s. conastoga is that in an age before sophisticated weather forecasting, it sailed through the golden gate into a storm where winds kicked up to 40 miles per hour and the ship vanished. in 2009, the national oceanic and atmospheric association was mapping a marine sanctuary and turned up this thermal sonar image which appeared to show a ship wreck. five years later, noaa
7:54 am
investigators had a closer look. >> we descended on a target which as we looked at it immediately was seen to be a wreck of some age if he is tuned with marine life, indeed speaking to the fact that it is in a sanctuary, the haven for marine life, you see a pacific octopus down there, showing that this wreck now is a place of life as much as it is a memorial. >> turns out the ship and its crew of 5620 down 27 miles off the california coast in 189 feet of water. lt. earnest jones, the conastoga's commanding officer left a single daughter behind and for her daughter, jones's granddaughter, the discovery fills a big hole in her family history. >> little so overwhelming and such a close you have that the degree of definition to see
7:55 am
these pictures, to see a porthole, it's so overwhelming for all of us, but it brings to closure this big mystery we had in our families. it connects the past of 95 years ago and all stories we were told. >> she will slumber there now for the rest of her time as a fitting place tomorrow, to hold dear. the mystery has been answered. you have been found. your story will be told, your service will never be forgotten, may you rest in peace. [ bell rings ] >> former baseball player and announcer joe garagiola dying, he was 90, by his own admission he said he was a mediocre player. it was during his post player
7:56 am
days that he became a household name. he was behind the game of the week for 30 years and inducted into the broadcaster wing of the human. there are conflicting reports about the future of yukon arctic ultra marathon slugger alex rodriguez, a-rod telling espn on wednesday he's calling it quits in 2017 at the end of his $275 million contract but later telling the new york post i'm thinking in terms of my contract, which ends in 2017. after that, we'll see what happens. i've got two years and more than 300 games to play. rodriguez will be 42 in 2017, approaching some major league hitting milestones. he hit 33 home runs last season. that is the sixth most by a player 39 years old or older. >> when in argentina, you tango, a lesson president obama learned at the official state dinner there. ♪ the president declined the
7:57 am
dancer's offers but then relented and clearly joined her dancing for about a minute. he did a decent job holding his own. you see the first lady in the background there, busting out some moves with her own argentine dance partner. >> if that was me, it would have been an international incident. >> they look pretty practiced. that's why you are police department of the united states. ahead, hunting for the suspects in the brussels attacks, police trying to find two men as the city struggles to explain security lapses. >> doctors driving up the use of high priced precision drugs. we're back with more news on your world this morning. stories... one at a time. get to know the people, their struggles, their hardships and their triumphs. >> it gives me a lot of pride. >> our american story is
7:58 am
written everyday. it's not always pretty, but it's real... and we show you like no-one else can. this is our american story. this is america tonight.
7:59 am
8:00 am
manhunt for more suspects. police looking for at least two men in connection to the brussels attacks. they are poisoning the minds of young people everywhere. on the defense, president obama hitting back at critics who say his strategy against isil is not working. dirty water and politics, an independent investigation says michigan's governor was responsible for the contaminated water in flint.
8:01 am
good morning, welcome to your world this morning. i'm del walters. i'm stephanie sy. police in belgium are hunting a possible fifth suspect in the attack in brussels as they look for one man who left a bomb at the airport. french and belgian media saying surveillance cameras in the metro show another person walking with the man identified as a suicide bomber there. it is unclear if the fifth suspect was killed in tuesday's bombings. the other four people believe to have been involved, one appears to have died when he blew himself up with a bomb at the brussels airport. he was born in morocco, grew up in brussels, belgium and was a suspect in last november's paris attacks. another setting off a suicide bomb at the airport also was born in belgium and had been deported from turkey last year. >> his brother khalid set off
8:02 am
the bomb at the metro station killing himself and 20 others. he was also a suspect in the paris attacks. police are still looking for this man. the explosives he had with him at the airport went off without injuring anyone. >> not clear if any of those men are linked to saleh abdeslam, the chief suspect in the paris attacks. he was due in court, but the hearing postponed. he is not going to fight extradition to france. he has stopped cooperating. dominic cain is live in brussels. there is now word of that possible fifth suspect on the run. what is the latest there and how is that affecting the mood in brussels? well, dell, the first suggestions that a fifth suspect may be being south by the police emerged in phlegm issue media this morning. in this edition of one of the
8:03 am
most prestigious phlegmish newspapers in belgium and their headline which means belgium let the suicide bombers go. the inside pages show a person seen with that the suspect who detonated his device in the second carriage he boarded in the metro station. we don't know about whether this individual refers to whether what happened to them, but we also now know a second media outlet suggest the police issued an artists impression of this person and in this impression, the person appears to be carrying an identical rucksack to what the bomber was carrying which means if this is correct, perhaps there are two suicide bombers who the police are looking for. what's important been, much of the evidence that the police have, which they have gathered
8:04 am
in recent days came from a tip off from a taxi driver who said that he drove three of the suicide bombers to the airport and when he picked them up from the address that they called the taxi, they had five cases with them, five bags that they wanted to put in the car. he offered to help them and they were angrily refusing the help saying no, that must not happen so they couldn't take two of the cases with them. we know that three people seen in the c.c.t.v. images at the airport had cases with them. what happened to those other two cases, that is the question. we know that the police found bomb making equipment, nails, chemicals and a device at this address that they went to. the question will be what happened to this other case there, was it used by khalid at maelbeek and what happened to this other suspect. as you can see, lots of questions, but a clear suggestion that perhaps there are two people that the police
8:05 am
are actively trying to apprehend dominic, saleh abdeslam, the prime suspect in the paris attacks due in court today but now things are changing. what happened? >> well, that's right, del. there's been ambiguity about this situation today. he was supposed to appear in court in brussels in belgium and going to be transported here from a maximum security prison. perhaps that didn't happen, but we do know his lawyer was in court today and applied for a postponement of the hearing of this case. that was given until april 7. then abdeslams lawyer said apparently mr. abdeslam wanted not to resist extradition and wanted to go to france. also paradoxically, we had been led to believe that abdeslam had been cooperating with the authorities here but then we now understand that since tuesdays
8:06 am
event, he has not been cooperating with the authorities here, so clearly there is a degree of ambiguity to what's happened. his hearing has been put back to the seventh of april and his lawyer says that he's not fighting extradition. >> if he was cooperating, he did not prevent any future attacks. dominic cain for us in brussels, thank you. isil says it was responsible for the belgium attacks. while some say the group is gaining ground, president obama is defending his strategy against isil. john terrett has the details. >> president obama went to argentina to help out the newly elected president trying to end decades of debt, and international isolation in latin america's third largest economy. a day after the brussels attacks, his isil policy quickly cropped up in reporter questions. >> my top priority is to defeat isil and to eliminate the
8:07 am
cardinal of this barbaric terrorism that's been taking place around the world and we see high profile attacks in europe, but they are also kill muslims throughout the middle east, people who are innocent, people who are guilty only of worshiping islam in a different way than this organization. >> obama said fighting isil was his number one priority and that of his military and diplomats around the world. >> they are poisoning the minds of young people everywhere in the united states and undoubtedly in argentina. >> donald trump called for a ban on muslims entering the u.s. and cruz for surveillance of neighborhoods where muslims of present. >> part of the reason we have not seen more attacks in the united states is we have a
8:08 am
extraordinary successful patriotic integrated muslim american community. any approach that would single them out or target them for discrimination is not only wrong and unamerican, but it also would be counterproductive, because it would reduce the strength, the anti bodies that we have to resist terrorism. >> even as we're systemic and ruthless in going after them, he said it's important not to respond with fear. secretary of state john kerry will travel to brussels friday to expression the condolences of the united states of the victims of the attacks and meet with the prime minister. secretary of state john kerry heads to brussels tomorrow but today is in moscow pressing his russian counterpart over a
8:09 am
political transition in syria. kerry told sergey lavrov the current pause isn't enough. >> many are very hopeful, sergei, our counterparts with whom you and i have both talked in the last days, are hopeful that these meetings here in moscow today have an ability to be able to further define and chart the road ahead so that we can bring this conflict in syria to a close as fast as possible. >> kerry is expected to discuss the future of bashar al assad during talks with russian president vladimir putin. al jazeera is live in moscow. you heard the secretary of state saying he's focused on charting a path healed to end the syrian conflict. are there details coming out of his meeting with lavrov about what that exactly means? >> not yet, and i don't think there will be any details until
8:10 am
much later on in the day after actually john kerry and sergey lavrov head to the kremlin to meet with vladimir putin and then they will hold their press conference. one can imagine what they're talking about. the geneva talks have reached some sort of a stumbling block at this point. the u.n. envoy, staffan de mistura complaining about the fact that the syrian delegation, the government delegation procrastinating, not want be to tackle the core issue of these talks, which is how about this interim government, how are we going to set up this transitional government that will actually after that lead to new elections and obviously a stumbling block being the future of bashar al assad himself. now, when it comes to the two sides, u.s. and russia, well, they do agree on the need of a transitional government. they do agree onhe fact that the new syria that will emerge should be secular and unified.
8:11 am
they don't see eye to eye on the future of bashar al assad and they also don't see eye to eye on who is part of this legitimate opposition, rush complaining that some of the groups that are represented in geneva should not be there, so these are the points they will be discussing and obviously they will also discuss the fight against isil. just a short while ago, the syrian television government state channel i would say announced that and showed pictures of government forces entering the hotel corridor. that is going to make the russian position stronger. ever since they announced the surprise draw down, they are saying that the airstrikes continue and they have been talking specifically about palmyra. >> palmyra, the site of that unesco heritage site. thank you. in iraqi, the first phase of
8:12 am
the long await military operation to retake the city of mosul now underway, first focusing on forcing isil out of the areas around the city. they say they have already taken towns on the outskirts of the city. the u.s. led coalition has been providing air support. mosul has been in the hands of isil since 2014. not clear how long that operation will take. it is believed that two piece was plane debris are from malaysian airline flight 370. they are consistent with panels from a bopping 770 aircraft, the same make at flight 370. the plane vanished two years ago flying from kuala lampur to baseballing with 239 onboard. a spring snowstorm sweeping through parts of the upper midwest into the mideast, boulder, colorado getting hit hard, more than two feet of snow making for some rather extreme weather. at the airport in denver, you
8:13 am
can see it, travelers stranded, officials saying things should be back up and fully running this morning. that's because the temperatures are going to rise drastically. >> that storm system is on the move with other states in the past. let's bring in nicole mitchell with more. nicole. >> there is actually another storm system behind this one, not at much now but could brick snow to denver, which looked like this yesterday and even now this currents snow has moved out, there is still gusty winds through portions of midwest so you might be seeing the snow on the ground before you blowing on the ground a little bit but we current have snowy with a through the great lakes and it has now moved up into portions of new england. there's a severe side of this southward. i'll have more on that in the next half hour. there are still winds gusting into the 30-mile per hour range in a few places easily 20 miles per hour around the great lakes, so that's going to continue to
8:14 am
blow things around. that's in part why we have a blizzard warning still up for portions of wisconsin right now and then the rest of the region, the winter storm, because places getting over 6-12-inches of snow, pretty widespread. less snow as this makes it to the northeast, more of the wintery mix, so more places that would see some freezing mix of precipitation, although i want to mention michigan could get some of the heaviest amounts of ice accumulation, so watch for potential trees down, power lines down, things of that nature. it's northern maine that would be straight snow but there is a lot of different elements on this. i want to mention you see the reds into portions of mid atlantic, that's a fire danger. there's a huge contrast in temperatures between the snow side of this and combusty winds where we have enough to support that weather risk. so the next couple of days, all of this is what moves through, the rest of the region gets predominantly rain and this will move out by the time we get
8:15 am
through friday, most of this is moving out. if you look back behind this, already another system brewing that could bring more snow from places like denver to friday night. the first week of spring has been challenging. >> easter bonnets and snow shoes. nicole, thank you very much. authorities busted a cross border drug tunnel in california more than four football fields long. it started at a restaurant in mexico and ended in a newly build three bedroom house in california. four people are under arrest and authorities seized nearly a ton of marijuana worth more than $6 million. >> when we come back, split on the issue of religious liberty and contraception. the supreme court may not have the answer for groups pushing back on obamacare. >> the high cost of health care, the ties between those drug companies and doctors is a multi-billion dollars business.
8:16 am
8:17 am
c estc .thlais hotas hke hyson' at' ey llkeca hke cwistomin biness rnanfid , pu e.juais hotas hke hyson' at' ey ddstus azetomime y wiourofias sgeh anu'd ' yeay desev .or upde
8:18 am
. 'it'hastn i, w c u'e e dry.yoding uc pwiwiro fii a new victim is coming forward in the sexual abuse case against former house speakerical be allowed to testify when he is sentenced next month, hastert pleading guilty to violating federal banking laws, he admitted that he paid hush money to a former male student who accused him of abuse. a bill overturns a law that allows people to use restrooms based on gender identity. this new law passed the republican controlled let me
8:19 am
later. gay rights groups call it discriminatory and stigmatizing. the latest battle over the affordable care act is in the supreme court. the justice heard arguments over the birth control mandate. religious groups vital that invites their beliefs. >> that may be left unresolved. >> it's certainly an unusual sight, nuns demonstrating outside the scout. they say they can not in good faith follow the map dates of the contraceptive requirements in the affordable care act. >> the government is requiring us to make changes in our health care, our religious health care plans to include services that really violate our deepest held religious beliefs. >> under federal law, the government does have to accommodate religious beliefs. it says it has done just that.
8:20 am
the government steps in, directing the insurance company to provide the birth control free of charge. attorneys for the charities told the justice that is not good enough, that the government is highjacking the insurance plan and making the nuns complicit. attorney paul clement said my clients would love to be a conscientious objector, but the government insists that they be a conscientious collaborator. the more conservative justice seem to agree. chief justice john roberts saying the petitioner has used the phrase highjacking and it seems to me that's an accurate description of what the government wants to do. the u.s. solicitor general argued the opt out provision is a sensible balance, justice ruth bader ginsburg: justice steven briar: the swing vote is likely
8:21 am
to be justice anthony kennedy and he seems to align with the conservative, which will be a tie. >> we will not obey the mandate no matter how this court rules, but based on what we've heard, it's going to be a 4-4 decision. >> it will set no new national precedent and most lower courts have ruled against their position. lisa stark, al jazeera, washington. in the presidential race,
8:22 am
bernie sanders campaigning in washing state today attending rallies ahead of the democratic caucuses that will take place saturday. sanders saying he intends to stay in the race all the way to the ended even though he fails in the delegate count now. hillary clinton is going to be in california today trying to garner support. she won that state against president obama in 2008 but loft the nomination. the latest poll showing a slight edge over sander in the golden state. california hat largest number of delegates but the state is often ignored because the primary is held in june and the by then the races already decided. no one is ignoring california this year. >> you have to go through trump. >> this is the new normal. >> i will not take the low road. >> on the road to the nomination, here the date is circled, june 7, the last primary voting day will actually matter this time around and the
8:23 am
state with the most to offer may surprise you. here's a hint. you guessed it, california. the country's most populace state may be rich in delegates offering republicans 172 this year, but it has long been ignored by candidates who instead concentrate on early primary states. that was then, this is now. >> we are the big enchilada when it comes to delegates. >> sherry jesse is a political analyst and public policy professor at the university of southern california. >> lo and behold, this year, it looks as though we could be critical at least to the republican nomination, and perhaps in terms of delegate totals to the democratic nomination. >> which means candidates will have to start paying attention to california. >> it's going to have to be a ground game now, a significant real ground game on both sides, and my sense is we'll see more
8:24 am
of the candidates than we've ever seen in a long time. >> if you believe john kasich's ohio victory speech, he's already set his sights on the golden state. >> i'm getting ready to rent a covered wagon, we're going to have a sale and have the wind blow us to the rocky mountains and over the mountains to california. >> ted cruz is said to be the most organized candidate in california. donald trump's relationship in the state is trickier. >> hollywood is a big fan of donald trump, the reality star, he's good for business, his star shines bright on the walk of fame. will star power translate into votes in a state as blue as the pacific ocean. >> even in orange county is seeing the tide turn. in 2015, the gop voter registration fell below 40% for the first time. still eric, a registered republican is excited. in early primary states, every
8:25 am
vote matters, no matter how big or small the voting block and this year, california republicans happy their vote will finally count. >> i think it's a big deal. i think majority of the people need to look at the primary and the gop and i think trump is a front runner and i think everybody be needs to lean towards trump and i'm looking forward to it. my vote is finally going to count this time. >> california can no longer be written off with a dramatic shift in the electorate. they are not siding with the establishment like they typically have. voter behavior is changing and that is creating a much more competitive presidential cycle and i think this election will set the stage for all future presidential elections that if you want to be a contender, you better have a strategy in california. >> the state that's home to the nation's bread basket, silicon valley and hollywood may soon become home to something else,
8:26 am
political clout. al jazeera, los angeles. more on the manhunt for the two suspects in the brussels attacks. >> however authorities in europe are willing to go to stop the violence. ankara hitting back at critics saying its border with syria is the source for europe's security problems.
8:27 am
8:28 am
8:29 am
>> this morning, police in belgium hunting down a possible fifth suspect in the brussels attacks. he was purportly shown walking with the suicide bomber in the metro. we are learning more about the other four believed to have been involved. one bomber died at the brussels airport. another set or a suicide bomb at the airport. the third man wearing the hat is on the run. it is not clear who he is, but the explosives he had went off without injuring anyone. on the ride is the bomber who set off a bomb killing himself.
8:30 am
saleh abdeslam, the main suspect in the paris attacks was due in court. he won't fight extradition back to france. police say he has stopped cooperating. dominic cain has the latest. >> on the face of it, we had been led to believe that he would resist extradition and now it appears that perhaps that isn't the case. certainly that is -- those are questions being posed here. one development to bring to you. there are media reports that suggest that police have issued and artist impression of a man caught on cctv camera at maelbeek station. he detonated his device and an unknown individual was carrying an identical large bag as seen in the cctv footage. what's interesting about that is
8:31 am
that we know that the local newspaper here this morning was talking about this other person being seen at maelbeek metro station and speculating that that meant another person might be at large. if it is the case, if this report from this media outlet is accurate, that they have issued an artists impression of another individual, that might indicate that yet another person is at large, that two suspected suicide bombers may be at large and that clearly is a development that police must be investigating very firmly indeed. as far as the security on the streets is concerned, we see many police officers and soldiers patrolling this area where you can see very many people have gathered to lay floral tributes and that sort of condolence, so certainly the police have a very large presence here and now it seems they may be looking for another suspect in these suicide bomb
8:32 am
attacks. >> that is our dominic cain, who is on the ground for us in brussels. also e.u. officials holding emergency meetings today discussing security and border protection. >> the co director of the liberty and national program at barometric pressuren center for justice at new york university joins us now. your organization focuses on protecting individual rights and civil liberties when there are terror investigations on going in belgium now. what are your concerns today? >> the biggest concern that we have is that authorities in an atmosphere of fear and tension will sweep too broadly and that a lot of people that have nothing to do with terrorism are going to get caught up in these drag nets. we saw that after the paris attacks when france declared a state of emergency which is still in place which gave authorities and led to raised,
8:33 am
nighttime raised and sort of the incarceration of a lot of people. >> speaking of nighttime raised, saleh abdeslam, who was caught four months after the paris attacks, he got away from belgium authorities initially and the justice minister of belgium said it might have been because in brussels, they are not allowed to conduct nighttime raids, between 9:00 p.m. and 5:00 a.m. at the time were not allowed in brussels. they knew where saleh abdeslam was and couldn't get to him. did belgium fail in its obligations to protect national security? >> that's a really great question, but i think that we don't understand the belgium system sufficiently to take this position. if you suspect that somebody who's a known terrorist is at a location, i cannot believe that a single law enforcement agency would not go in there and arrest that guy. i'm sorry. no police agencies going. >> that's just bad law
8:34 am
enforcement in your view and isn't about civil liberties. >> two things, right, first let's extinguish between raids and arrests. a raid is when you go in and it's much broader, you're getting a whole lot of people, you bring them together and arrest them. when you go in to arrest a specific person, that's a different thing. i'm not sure what the belgian authorities are talking about here, raids or going after a particular individual. i cannot imagine that there's any restriction on the latter. >> the justice minister just to clarify said it would have required a raid to arrest saleh abdeslam and he said the night tame raid rule that they have there prevented that. let's talk about what this means for encrypted communications and that debate. you said there is a difference between a known terrorist and a potential suspect that might be linked. when we talk about say yesterday farook and san bernardino and his encrypted phone, we are talking a known terrorist that
8:35 am
apple said the government should in the have access to his phone with apple software having to be created for it. >> i don't think apple is saying that the government shouldn't have access to the phone. i think apple is saying government, you cannot make us undermine our security and the security of our customers in order to give you access to this phone. >> you think that argument is harder to make in light of the most recent bomb ins in belgium and also in light of what came out of the paris investigation, which said that the suspects in those cases used encrypted communications. >> first of all, i think there is never clarity about whether or not there has been a use of encrypted communications. you and i use encrypted communications every single day when we do bank transactions, credit card transactions. we use encryption with our iphones. it's a default setting that we all have, to say that the suspect used encryption isn't really saying very much. the question really is, is
8:36 am
whether they were using encryption in a way that was preventing law enforcement from finding out what they were up to and what we have seen in the last three attacks is small cells of people who were a., at least in the european ones well known to police, b., already had very strong relationships, either brothers, people who lived in the same neighborhood, you know, a husband and wife, and all of these people were able to communicate with each other without encryption, because they're in the same place, right? i think it's very important to sort of separate out what encryption means for everybody versus what encryption means for a particular attack. >> do you think in times of crisis there should be access to everything, including encrypted communications? >> i think that the issue here is one of security versus security, right? so every technologist i've ever spoken to says if we create a back door that would allow law
8:37 am
enforcement to get inside encrypted communications, that back door is vulnerable to expectations to everybody who wants to hack into our system. it's not a question of privacy versus security. it's a question of security for all of us and all of our internet communications and transactions versus security in particular cases. so if it's not possible, if it's not technically possible at this point to allow these kinds of back doors without com pro macing everybody's security, then i think it's a bad deal for us. >> thanks so much for joining us. dell. >> stephanie, turkey has been in the headlines because it is the main transit points for isil recruits trying to get into syria. the government said it is doing its part trying to shut down that group. we have more from the turkey syrian border. >> securing turkey's 900-kilometer border with syria is not easy.
8:38 am
the government wants to seal it off completely with concrete walls, watch towers and more guards. the construction started about two years ago. some residents here say it's already made a difference. >> they were passing from here, terrorists, man, woman, smugglers. they were all passing from here. >> turkey says it fears isil fighters are crossing into its territory with the intent of carrying out attacks. this is the closest we can get to the border with syria and you can see right behind me the concrete wall. that wall was built about a month ago by the turkish authorities. the government said it wants to prevent all smuggling activities and also prevent anyone from entering turkish territory illegally. >> western powers have accused turkey of turk a blind eye to the flow of foreign fighters in and out of syria. western intelligence services
8:39 am
estimate more than 30,000 foreigners from 100 countries are fighting in syria, and that turkey was the entry paint for many of them. the e.u. law enforcement agency estimates between 3,000 and 5,000 isil fighters have returned to their home countries in europe and could be planning attacks. the u.s. and nato said this 70-kilometer strip of the border is used by foreign fighters to go in and out of syria. an isil stronghold is just a few kilometers away. the govern has ridiculed all accusations. he said the concrete walls run over 800 kilometers through five turkish cities bordering syria with camera and radar. >> a man blow himself up in the middle of brussels at the metro at airport, so how did they get there and how did they get the
8:40 am
bombs? why europe then doesn't protect its borders? instead of accusing us, let's work together to solve the problem. >> turkey has increased its military power and personnel along its border with syria, but even if it sick seeds in sealing the border, isil and other foreign fighters will find another way to cross as long as there is war in syria. al jazeera, on the turkish-syrian border. prosecutors in new york saying they will not seek prison time for a police officer convicted in the deadly stairwell shooting. officer petering lange was convicted of manslaughter for shooting a man in a dark stairwell in 2014. he faces up to 15 years behind bars. the d.a. now recommending six years of home confinement, five years of probation when he is sentenced next month. there is a scathing new assessment of what led up to the water crisis in flint, michigan. >> this report was commissioned
8:41 am
by the governor himself. it blames the governor and his administration for what happened next. >> it was a mixture of ignorance, incompetence and arrogance by decision makers. >> a task force summed up what it found was behind the water crisis in flint. no one asked the question what will happen if we don't have corrosion treatment in place. >> the government himself set up the task force. >> we started an independent grouping to look at this issue, to go dig into it. >> in the final report, the governor is hit hard. it says the state is fundamentally accountable. that contradicts what governor snyder has said that federal and local officials bear he equal responsibility. >> the section, i'm looking at the role of the governor's office that ultimate accountability for executive branch decisions obviously rests with the governor. >> in particular, the report
8:42 am
points to the appointment of all powerful emergency managers like darnell early as a key failure of the snyder administration. >> it did occur when state oh pointed emergency managers had replaced local representative decision-making. we are suggesting to the governor and the legislature that the emergency manager law in michigan needs to be reviewed. >> the task force places blame on the state department of environmental quality. >> it is extremely troublesome to me that an agency who's primary role once again is to protect human health and the environment came to these decisions and they never backed off those decisions, no matter how many red flags they saw. >> fasterring a culture change in that agency is among the 44 recommendations governor snyder says he will heed. >> we should learn from this. there was a change in the water source and if you look at the recommend is as they talk about, there's more that could have
8:43 am
been asked, should have been asked. >> two months ago, governor snyder requested moan foreign minister the state legislature to aid in fixing the flint water system but that measure has not come up for a vote in lansing. the mayor railed against the lack of urgency in helping the people of flint. >> you were talking about the role of emergency manager in this whole crisis. did the task force report talk about any missteps that that office might have taken? >> the task force said the first person to make the call in switching to the flint river was former emergency manager ed kirstz. they said if they switched to a water source they would withhold badly needed fund. 48 more bike ergs have been indicted for their role in a deadly shootout with police in
8:44 am
waco texas last year. they are now charged along with others with engaging in criminal activity. nine were killed and 20 injured during a shootout last may. after $17 million an drawing a lot of international attention, the people of new zealand have decided to stick with their flag. the choice was between a blue flag with the union jack and stars and a crowd source design featuring a fern leaf. the vote is going to be finalized next week. today is a hindu festival to welcome spring. hindus covering themselves with colored powder to celebrate. people gather by the thousands and dance to music as they spray rainbows into the air. the holiday represents the triumph of good over evil. >> i always love to see the images from that. >> yes. cashing in on the
8:45 am
prescription drug business issues the billion dollars link between pharmaceutical companies and doctors. find fantasy shows.
8:46 am
when it comes to the things you love, you want more. love romance? get lost in every embrace. into sports? follow every pitch, every play and every win. change the way you experience tv
8:47 am
with x1 from xfinity. a now shuttered for profit college operator has been ordered to pay more than a billion dollars for ms. leading students. california attorney general sued corinthian college accusing them of targeting low income students and using false placement rates.
8:48 am
corinthian colleges filed for bankruptcy in may. there is a new link this morning of evidence between the link between doctors and drug companies and it can be measured in billions of dollars. pro publica looking at data from 2014 finding drug companies paid out the equivalent of $3.5 billion to doctors, including culling fees meals and travels. internists prescribe the drugs 25% of the game. many say the relationship is unavoidable. dr. richard barron heads the board of internal medicine and joins us thorns. thanks for being with us. is that relationship between doctors and drug companies too cozy? >> well, it's inevitable that there would be some relationship, patients in the u.s. of course can't just walk into a pharmacy and buy any drug they want so there needs to be
8:49 am
doctor involvement in the decision about drugs, and the way that the drug industry works, they spend a lot of effort on educating doctors and targeting doctors to help them know about innovations and advances. >> $3.5 billion is a lot of education and a lot of cozy. >> for sure, and of course, that number includes research where there are many doctors who are doing research in association with pharma and it includes straight up marketing and meals and pens and gifts of value that are exchanged between drug companies and doctors for sure. >> dr. barron, you can't turn on the t.v. these days without seeing commercials, there are pain killers and then pains to alleviate the pain killer constipation. there are talking colons and talking bladders. take a look. >> you never know when i.b.s.b. will show up.
8:50 am
now there's this prescription. >> long for a change? have a conversation with your doctor and ask about prescription treatment options. >> the condition called over active bladder or o.a.b. >> when you talk to older people, they say there weren't all those diseases around when they are young. are we as a culture that sick? >> well certainly there's much more awareness in medical awareness and lots of things have been medicalized. i certainly can't disagree with that. >> what questions should web asking a doctor before he predistribution a medicine and we decide we want to take it? >> i think people should always be asking what are the alternative choices, sometimes the alternative choices are no medication at all. a lot of times, as you just indicated, there may be things that could be med cammized, but a patient may say that's fine with m it doesn't trouble me to put it with whatever it might
8:51 am
be. people should always ask about alternatives which include both not doing anything or may include far less expensive generic drugs that would be equally as effective. people should ask is there a generic available, as well. >> what about side effects some some of these medications are being marketed that have side effects up to and including death. what disease is to bad that death is an acceptable option? >> certainly cancer chemotherapy and medications for hard decease do have death as a side effect. there are bad diseases out there. your point about side effects is exactly right. the patients need to ask about that, because sometimes they may develop some new symptom or problem after starting a drug and they may not recognize that that was connected to having started the drug, so it's very important to ask about side effects.
8:52 am
>> so one question that the public is often asking is they find out a drug is approved one day and pulled from shelves next. does big pharma have that much clout or too much clout? >> big pharma certainly has a lot of cloud and there's a whole regular layatory system they function in and drugs in the united states are higher than anywhere else in the world but there's a ton of innovation that they do and research that they do and they argue that those drugs don't come from nowhere, but certainly, they as a very large industry do have a lot of influence in both the way they're regulated and in marketing the products that they put out. >> let me go back to that $3.5 billion figure. is that shatters trust between doctors and patients, because we trust that our doctor is telling us to take a pill because it might make us better, but are you concerned this some doctors are pushing pills because big
8:53 am
pharma is pushing their buttons? >> i think there were some very interesting and powerful findings in the study that you mentioned. one was that a significant significant percentage of doctors reported no contact with pharma and there was no financial exchange between them and pharma and those doctors were the most likely to use generic drugs and not brand name drugs. similarly, there were doctors who were very high recipients of pharma funding, both for research and for speaking and for other kinds of things. those doctors were most likely to use the brand name products. i do think that patients should be asking their doctors are there generic alternatives here, are there less expensive alternatives here and when we move to a health care system where patients are shouldering more and more cost, their concerned about that. ten years ago if i tried to
8:54 am
prescribe a generic would say i want the brand name drug. most patients today say is there a generic alternative, because the brand name may cost me a lot more money. >> and you can always get a second opinion. thank you very much. >> thanks for your interest in the story. be when we come back, the problem with sexism and professional tennis. >> one former player said the recent controversy may be overblown.
8:55 am
8:56 am
8:57 am
former baseball player and announcer joe garagiola has died. he was 90. by his own admission, he was mediocre in his career. it was his career as an announcer that made him a household game. he was a cohost on the today show. he was inducted into the broadcaster's wing of the hall of fame. there are growing questions over how tennis treats women playing at the top level. one tournament official stepping down over remarks that many considered to be sexist. not every player thinks there is a problem. >> when it comes to the next generation of female tennis players, the university of miami prides itself on turning out some of the best new hopefuls. the hurricanes as the team here is known put in relentless hours of practice, but the statement from a former senior tennis official reverberated throughout
8:58 am
the court. >> if i was a lady player, i'd go down every night on my knees and thank god that roger federer and roger nadal were born, because they've carried the sport. >> i was very surprised that a high ranking tennis executive would make these type of comments. >> as a former player professor of sports marketing doesn't think the comments mean there is a problem with sexism in tennis, but she said the timing is deeply troubling. >> it's been a bad year for tennis. we've had difficult discussions about match fixing, performance in hansing drug and now discrimination. there is why leadership is so important. >> over the years, sexism has reader its ugly head plenty of times in tennis but thanks to the female pioneers, prize money in tournaments is now equal. having said all that, comments like the ones made in the last days could have seen to have set
8:59 am
the sport back decades. serena williams called the remarks offensive and the women's tennis association said i want stands for the principles of equality and empowerment. world number one djokovic has since apologized for suggesting that men should earn more than women, saying his comments were taken out of context. but every time players or officials make disparaging remarks about female athletes, questions about sexism he in sport remain. >> what's really sad is he rib when they were having the same conversation with bobby rigs played billie jean king. >> it is upsetting that we're having the same conversation. nevertheless, that guy is out. that's it for us here in new york. >> your world this morning back tomorrow morning at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. until then, go out and have a great day. see you then.
9:00 am
>> hello, welcome to the news hour. this is al jazeera live from doha. here's what's coming up in the next 60 minutes. the hunt is on for this suspect in the brussels airport attack and there are reports that another bomber is on the run. >> change of mind, paris bombing suspect saleh abdeslam will not challenge extradition to france. syrian government forces retake control of two isil positions in the ancient city of palmyra.

52 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on