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tv   Sykes- Picot Lines In The Sand 2016 Ep 2  Al Jazeera  August 27, 2019 4:00am-5:04am +03

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regions around the amazon it's really not clear exactly what their role is they say they're going to be working with the local fire brigades some of their planes their large transport planes have been spraying water in some areas but it looks. by many people's standards to really just be a ploy a public relations ploy by president also not all to meet these criticisms that are coming from around the world he is a military man himself a former military man he sees the military often as a solution to some of the country's problems so they have been seeing their presence is no but i say not quite clear at this stage exactly where they're going or what they're doing don't know shimer thank you very much indeed really attention is on the amazon right now but there are currently more fires reported to be burning in central and southern africa than in the amazon and nasa says 70 percent of the active fires in the world are in africa it satellite data shows fires raging through large parts of angola and the democratic republic of congo and spent
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spanning as far east as madagascar and a large number is believed to be due to slash and burn practices by farmers has been compounded by shorter rainy seasons why it's orange dinah's data scientists and drought specialists who focuses on african agricultural trends he says the lack of rain in the past 3 years is having a huge impact the real issue is that the impact of these brush fires is getting worse if you look at a lot of parts of sani abacha parts of the african continent particularly the west african said hello this used to be a regular occurrence during the dry season and when the rains would come around. there would allow for grasslands to grow again but unfortunately we are seeing a very significant increase in variability of rainfall it's making the rainy seasons very volatile and less predictable. still ahead this half hour israel sends tanks and troops to its borders with lebanon and syria after carrying out acts
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strikes in both countries. and the u.s. congress you to call john to talk of the opioid crisis perhaps on the court or a verdict is expected in the next hour. ahead though that we've got this mini heat wave across central areas of europe of sunday and london 33.3 degrees celsius the hottest bank holiday ever recorded but we have got cloud around and also some rain but let's have a look 1st of all at those temperatures across this particular region so as we go through tuesday 35 celsius in paris 32 in london and 33 in berlin say this is really the main area where the temperatures are well above normal for this time of year however it is set to change you can see all this cloud in the shallows down across the southwest this is a system working its way into the west
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a med so that will bring some cooler air and. right is also system working its way across the northwest of europe and at the same time another ever low pressure working its way through western and central areas of russia said that will certainly bring the temperature down as we go from shoes day into wednesday so just 16 degrees celsius there in moscow meanwhile 25 in london on the wednesday 31 in paris and the same across in balin some nice sunshine of course across the central and eastern end of the mediterranean now that same system which is pushing through the west a med that will also just trails and work its way through morocco and also on towards algeria so we could see some clouds sunny would even want to coastal 10 inches and already affected you can see there 29 in algiers on wednesday. 67. promise for one. but
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disaster for another. the bled to the establishment of a jewish homeland at the expense of the palestinians. the story of the british declaration that changed the middle east for seeds of discord on al-jazeera. we're going to one of the top stories here. u.s. president donald trump says he's willing to consider meeting his iranian counterpart house on rouhani if the circumstances are right he made a statement as the g. 7 summit wrapped up in periods frog's. china calls for calm in its ongoing trade
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war with the u.s. after markets in asia closed down the force triggered by conflicting messages from president trump on the matter at the g 7. and brazil has accepted the g 7 offer of $20000000.00 to help tackle ongoing fires in the amazon and the president said an international alliance to save the rain forest would be a form of colonizing. us president donald trump says he discussed the kashmir dispute with india's prime minister on the sidelines of the g. 7 summit there's been anger in indian administered kashmir since new delhi revoked its semi autonomous status earlier this month trump had offered to mediate between india and pakistan but he's now backtracked on that and the render modi said no mediator is a needed to solve the crisis. of. all issues between india and pakistan our bilateral and that's why we don't trouble other countries. and i'm confident india and pakistan before 1970 can discuss problems between ourselves and resolve them.
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but addressing his nation earlier pakistan's prime minister imran khan expressed frustration that he had been unable to reach an agreement with india. i attempted a political dialogue with the new year and see to them you take one step forward and i'll walk 2 steps towards you and the problem that we have with kashmir we can attempt to solve it but from the beginning we've had issues when they've awaited him to talk to them about kashmir they would find new problems and they would find opportunities to accuse pakistan of some kind of terrorism. and indian administered kashmir protest as have killed the driver of what they thought was a military truck the restrictions in kashmir which are now entering the 4th week it made it difficult for people to make a living as jimmy reports distrait. this should be a happy time his family's apple crop is looking good this season and will be ready
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for harvesting at september but the region's lockdown has made it hard to get supplies and laborers from outside are being told to stay out there but you know. i've got to get the liberal side push me the government told them to go home best insights we can get because the markets a shot rice vegetables we can't even get meat for ourselves because everything is shut. that's affecting people with small businesses especially in farming who are worried the restrictions on communication and movement in their hard work will be thrown away. it's a situation that's common throughout the kashmir valley most businesses think shut in srinagar carpet sellers have already stocked up for both the tourist and wedding season this month but few have had any sales in weeks so many employees want here. freedom. house boat hotels and da lakes sit
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empty. and with only local people riding a few of the gondolas many boat men are fishing to pass the time and catch a meal just before the restrictions earlier this month the government order tourists to leave the area taking with them one vital piece of the region's economy but it's not the 1st time kashmiris have suffered from work and businesses being shut down has it do. we know by the. abo and or economy they have abundant their work the mill their tourism season everything is at stake but they know there to be an existence their culture and the atlanta. i would think is at stake. but doesn't know if he'll be allowed to transport his crop to market or find enough trucks to do so but he'll continue tending his fields because for many here culture
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and pride are more important than business and money says jimmy i'll just be an district indeed administered kashmir. sudan's sovereign council has declared a state of emergency in port sudan where fighting between 2 rival communities has killed at least 37 people 200 others have been injured in the dispute between. a new human morgan has more from. sudan sovereign council which was forming just last week and which has pledged to prioritize peace in its 1st 6 months of the transitional period has declared a state of emergency in the city of port sudan now this follows days of ethnic clashes between members of the beni army and the new but tribes and we understand from people in port sudan that it started as a verbal quarrel between members of the opposing tribes which eventually turned violent and activists are telling us that the tensions are so high that people from opposing tribes cannot be hospitalized in the same hospitals due to concerns of
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outbreak of war violence sudan suffering council also dismissed the acting state governor who was appointed by the transitional military council following the ousting of longtime president i'm going to be here in april they've also dismissed the head of security the sovereign council had sent a delegation to try to mediate between the 2 tribes but so far that has been unsuccessful which lead to the collaboration of a state of emergency and activists are saying that they are worried that this tribal conflict this ethnic tension which has been going on for a few months now will escalate in the coming weeks if no solution is provided by the sovereign council israel appears to be massing troops on its borders with lebanon and syria these tanks were spotted it one of the borders israel has carried out strikes against iranian backed groups in lebanon iraq and syria in the past few days lebanon's president described it as israeli aggression and quote a declaration of war. his brother has promised to retaliate and iran says it will support the lebanese group in any action against israel so how to has more from the
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lebanese capital beirut. oh oh oh hezbollah is burying its dead in its stronghold in southern beirut 2 of its fighters were killed in israeli airstrikes in neighboring syria on sunday night the lebanese armed group is promising retaliation it has told israel to be ready for a response its leader has an astronomer also threatened to shoot down any drone that violates lebanon's airspace after what he said was an attack by israeli drones in hezbollah's area of control in the lebanese capital hours earlier. if we remain silent on this breach it will create a very dangerous road for lebanon on repeating what is going on in iraq now. in iraq the iranian backed popular mobilization forces are blaming israel for a series of unexplained attacks on their bases and positions in recent weeks the
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latest was on sunday night close to iraq's border with syria which killed a number of fighters u.s. officials and israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu have hinted at possible israeli involvement in those strikes israel it seems has opened a new front. and. really saying they're ready to open war on 3 fronts beirut damascus and back that we can't ignore the political side however which the upcoming israeli elections the israeli army says its airstrikes in syria stopped an attack by iran's revolutionary guards it released surveillance footage of what it said were members of the guards preparing a drone strike against israel israel has repeatedly hit what it says were iranian targets in syria over the years it wants to prevent iran from gaining a foothold and influence across the region but in the past few days it is believed to have operated in. 3 neighboring countries lebanon syria and iraq nothing apple
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did say he gave the security forces a free hand to act in many a rino as against and every state has lost says the drone attack which damaged its media office violated the 2006 cease fire and changed the rules of engagement but at the same time the group is believed to have given israel a chance not to escalate tensions. as well as messages to the terror war telling the israelis any war will be costly and we are not alone so think twice iran's promise to support any action has to take so i guess israel which doesn't seem to be backing down it is believed to be behind strikes on a position belonging to a palestinian faction allied to iran along its border with syria early on monday there is a real danger of further attacks by either side could escalate to war so there are people that. saudi arabia is denying that yemen's hooty rebels attacked a military target and its capital riyadh with drones on sunday the who said they
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also fired tend to missiles towards a saudi led coalition has been fighting the who sees in yemen for the past 4 years an investigation by the reuters news agency says the u.s. central intelligence agency does not spy on the government of the united arab emirates something critics say is a dangerous blind spot in washington's global monitoring report quotes former cia agents with one calling the agency's failure to adapt to the us political and military ambitions a dereliction of duty it also says the lack of you a monitoring puts the gulf nation on a very small list of countries where the cia conducts a hands off approach. has played a role in numerous regional and international issues including yemen libya and the blockade of qatar glenn kahl is a former cia officer he says you'd be surprised if the united states is no longer paying attention to the u.s. . i am also. skeptical that we draw
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about drawing too large a conclusion that the cia or the u.s. intelligence community is not paying attention to the u.a.e. the cia is one of the few intelligence services with global capability and interests no one can debate whether that should be the case or not but that's the truth and since the u.a.e. is a critical player in the middle east and beyond libya the security the salient right now i would be surprised i wouldn't really believe that the u.s. is ignoring the u.a.e. in just over half an hour john ging the u.s. state of oklahoma is due to decide whether pharmaceutical john johnson and johnson should be held liable in a $17000000000.00 lawsuit it alleges that its marketing practices fueled the opioid epidemic of flooding the market with painkiller as is the 1st case to go to trial to fastens of lawsuits filed by state and local governments against opioid
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manufacturers and distributors i point overdoses have become a nationwide epidemic came in the lives of tens of thousands of americans every year in oklahoma more than 6000 people have died since the year 2000 nationwide to 130 people die every day from opioid overdoses according to the u.s. department of health and human services around 40 percent of the cases involve drugs that were prescribed by a doctor and again had joins me now from the city of norman just outside oklahoma city so the case that you've been keeping an eye on is is presumed very important in that context isn't it. it is this is a bellwether test case if you like because there are so many of the pending cases across the country just one judge listen to the evidence over a 7 week trial authorities from oklahoma are basically saying that johnson and johnson flooded the market with what they say was marketed as
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a miracle pill while not warning people about the addictive nature of these painkillers johnson and johnson for their part say that no laws were broken all the drugs were approved by the food and drug administration agency in this country but you've got arguments being made here like when the trial 1st started one lawyer for oklahoma said if you oversupply people will die and as you said 6000 people over the past 2 decades have died in oklahoma alone in 2017 according to the percent of a disease control almost 50000 people died nationwide this is something that is a blight in communities across the country so if the judge rules in oklahoma's favor that could mean you'll see something similar to the big tobacco agreements in the late ninety's where so-called big pharma just settles with these states before the course is that the cases even come to court so all eyes are watching this very closely in about 30 minutes the judge will read a statement having heard 7 weeks of evidence from both sides and what about the
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that the that the cat the habit of prescribing these and we mention that to in many cases people die when and that has been prescribed by by doctors is anyone investigating that side of the story. well i have to say last summer we were here we were here when the trial started i met a mother outside it lost a 21 year old son he was prescribed painkillers after getting off a sporting injury when that prescription right out he'd become addicted he found it on the black market and that is so often the case across the entire country people are given these drugs they don't understand the addictive nature and then they die so there is a lot at stake for so many people and this pending decision and again i thank you very much indeed. a quick reminder the headlines for you u.s. president donald trump says he's willing to consider meeting his iranian counterpart hasan rouhani if the circumstances are right he made the statement on
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the final day of the g. 7 summit in berates france which you know if the circumstances were correct toward the right i would certainly agree to that but in the meantime. they have to be good players you understand with me. and they can do what they were saying they're going to do because if they do that they're going to be met with really very violent force which kept no choice so i think they're going to be good china is calling for calm in its ongoing trade war with the u.s. after markets in asia closed shop down before was triggered by conflicting messages from president trump on the matter at the g. 7 trump initially said he wished he'd imposed higher tariffs on china on friday but he then said trade talks with china would resume very shortly. brazil has accepted the offer of $20000000.00 from g 7 countries to help tackle ongoing fires in the amazon but president joy in both scenarios said an international alliance to save
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the rain forest would be a form of colonization. the president of the democratic republic of congo felix she said cady has named a new government most members from former president joseph kabila as party she's ok he defeated a candidate officially backed by kabila in last december's long delayed election but critics say the result was rigged in a secret deal between and she sick 80 something both men deny. israel appears to be massing troops on its borders with lebanon and syria these tanks were spotted at one of the borders israel has carried out asterix against iranian backed groups in 3 different countries in the past few days lebanon iraq and syria lebanon's president described it as israeli aggression and a declaration of war in the next half hour a judge in the u.s. state of oklahoma is due to rule whether pharmaceutical giant johnson and johnson should be held liable in a $17000000000.00 lawsuit it edges that its marketing practices fueled the opioid
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epidemic by flooding the market with painkillers there's the headlines the stream is up next more news for you after that thanks for watching by for. welcome to the stream my family ok a group of atomic scientists walls of the world stands at 2 minutes to midnight that's their way of showing how close the world is to nuclear war can actually nuclear activists stop the doomsday clock send off thoughts through twitter.
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the recent test of a u.s. missile has heightened alarm among anti nuclear activists that a reckless new arms race threatens humankind the launch of the modified tomahawk missile on august the 18th came just 2 weeks after the u.s. formally withdrew from a missile treaty with russia that was after 32 years but the actions of other countries are also fought with risk analysts say that a recent radioactive explosion in north of russia is a sign that more sco is developing new weapons that can evade a missile defense and differences between nuclear armed india and pakistan over kashmir have jangled nerves across south asia what can activists do to convince the world leaders to abandon the bomb for more we're joined today by cicely thompson william c. is executive director at beyond the bar that's a grassroots campaign to prevent nuclear or from geneva we have betrayed fin
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executive director of the international campaign to abolish nuclear weapons or i can the campaign i won the nobel peace prize in 2017 and actually of renai it is a founding member of india's coalition for nuclear disarmament and peace he joins us from new delhi and everybody it is really good to have you here this is not a conversation is on top of the headlines right now but many of our own like community feel that it should be take tristen for instance tristen guy yet here's how she feels we should start a conversation have a look. people today are facing so many existential crises and it's really hard to ask them to focus on just one but at the end of the day nuclear weapons and already are not just one issue it will cripple our climate as a single nuclear exchange will put us into a clear winner and one person gets to make that decision so to me that's just the entity this is of democracy but the problem is that these issues don't get talked
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about enough there's such a lack of awareness that that's really the only barrier to getting people involved no matter how old they are bitches if you found that there's a lack of awareness with your work as you're trying to engage people around the world to be aware of where our nuclear arms are what danger they may pose to us yes i mean i do think that there's a lack of awareness but it's not really surprising given us so many issues right now that requires our attention and the fact is that most people do not want nuclear as are they know they're bad thing or the mushroom cloud so i think it's really it's more my license the biggest problem is that people feel disempowered people feel like they can't really affect this issue and i think that's the biggest misunderstanding right now on this issue so see i'm just looking here at the estimated global nuclear warhead in that tray and looking at the countries you have them united states the u.k. france israel pakistan russia india china north korea now should we look at this
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map and be terrified. yes i think we should be i think that it's healthy for humanity to understand the risk that we're facing with nuclear weapons and looking at the hot spots that we find in the world there are nuclear weapons and almost all of them so i absolutely think that we should be terrified but i think we also should turn that into action and i think as as beatrice noted the trial and is that people don't know that they can have a voice they don't know that they can play a role in changing the system actually you know very well about what it means to have a voice you have been campaigning for a new country someone meant for so long we really appreciate your veteran voice in our conversation let me share with me some of the recent comments we've had as we set about doing the show this is most in baba he says nuclear weapons of course mass destruction like in japan have a shame that a sucking paradoxically that can be a weapon of peace also especially when both countries a nuclear armed your response to that and nuclear weapons and start us from going
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to war well this is the old story about deterrence and the fact that if there is supposed to have worked. and deterrence is based on busy the idea generate the extreme fear if you want a simple a simple simple one sentence definition of security through nuclear deterrence it goes like this it's the it rational belief that charitable fear will somehow always ensure that your enemy will behave the way you want although you can never fully control the circumstances which will determine your enemy's behavior it's ridiculous in fact the reason why i say is that with so many reasons number one there is a logic of what is supposed to be a deterrent so you can buy those or hold it and that is that it's enough to have what's called a 2nd strike capacity. that is to say if you're
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a boy that uses those you have enough to get back and get what you want. but how does this explain what is up with since not just 40 but and that is this is the norm was it look at enough weapons to blow up the world many times that is looking at change just looking back at this map here you notice a circle at 6000 nuclear weapons and more than 600 russians got more than 6 of why would you need more than 6000 children on a one or 2 petrushka head. i mean i think this is really goes to the point of the whole issue that this idea that threatening to mass murder civilians is somehow acceptable i mean of course you can always get people to do what you want by threatening terrible things with terrible consequences like bullies do but it's not sustainable it's not going to last and the consequences of nuclear war are so unimaginable so unspeakable that it's not going to be worth it in the end and that's very hard to to prove the absence of something we've also seen nuclear arms
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those go to war to each other we've seen really kill situations like very recently and you know pakistan where we have these huge tension we've seen the military concert there escalate and nuclear weapons could be useful and i think also i want to really know just settling i can hold tight one minute says he's going to go ahead and you come in 2nd and i think one of the really critical factors here and beatrice you laid the groundwork for this is that people feel as though this is such an overwhelming existential threat that they just psychologically they just shut down right they don't know how to address it they don't know how to deal with it and so they just turn to other issues and there are so many other issues today to choose from that it's very easy to not pay attention to this one because in reality on a day to day basis this isn't affecting people until it does right and then it's catastrophic and it's too late so i think from our perspective when we look at how we get folks to engage in nuclear advocacy we talk about ok you're. issue whatever
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it is that really drives that passion in your heart whether it's immigration or in climate change or women's rights today is women's equality day and so we know that there are these huge movements working on all these other issues ok those things are going to be negatively impacted should we have a nuclear catastrophe and it is part of the broader progressive space to say we need to protect all of that work by preventing nuclear war. yes i was just going to say taking a virtuous this point the most likely use of nuclear weapons is not that one side because their weapons are suddenly decide ok we're going to use that against the other the danger comes when there's a conventional conflict and that's why the india pakistan situation is so dangerous because we've had conventional pumpers and what happens once a lot of the nation is that there's always the possibility of what's called an escalation dynamic that is just a 2 sided start off by saying we're not going to use weapons reach a position where they get to thinking that maybe the other side is going to use it
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they're primed for that and tensions escalate so they may have started up and not wanting to use it but they need to position when it becomes very serious and in practice in the 1999 conflict between india and pakistan both sides prepared to use it the 2nd point which is all question about the terence with just one point is that they just said very correctly that this is a counterfactual how do you explain something that has not happened. let me just right at the point actually i'm just doing this as well because i committed i was i wanted to be part of this conversation here this is fun i.c.j. from my says nukes keep everyone accountable but it is a tricky thing suffering government should have them not unstable countries i think we're witnessing right now at fs what change what countries may be stable and unstable i say no more purchases go ahead time and this is the thing right i mean we think that some people are responsible enough to have these weapons and it's ok
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if they have it but others will be really dangerous and i think that's a really dangerous way to look at the issue because if some people have it others who are always going to have it and who is responsible is extremely subjective today and i think that what really does it also talked about was that this is an issue of that so connect to other issues this is really about power the people have made nuclear power to do something special like it's a technical issue has not it's about power and on. and primitive and there are some countries that have taken the power to dominate the rest of the world and say that you have to listen to us or to do what we want and this is the nuclear moment as a sort of like a justice movement about making it will everyone has the same right nobody should live under the script no they don't have the power and all has the right no one is better to nuclear arms to the how the biggest arsenals russian you know slaves are clearly not the most responsible government at the moment basis to make such a great point is something that dan so let's online actually talk to us about he's described himself as
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a child of the atomic age this is what he says he has just got a new talk about being part of the nuclear disarmament news and it's got a way too technical the general public doesn't cope well with shades of gray let me remind you like i am back to the 980 s. some of the huge protests that happened a movement on is the nuclear freeze and you can see how engaged the public was around the world at the time. the time has come and they have come to speak of many things from bologna and italy and beatrice nebraska at a gala japan and east harlem in new york city. a great in gathering of people. some to demonstrate. some to make a beginning. some to challenge. some nonviolently to bear witness. but sharing a simple idea. the madness of.
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ceci there was so much anything back at that time people would genuinely thinking about how do i stop this how do i stop has how can we do it and progress wasn't how do you reinvigorate the movement for today well i think what we have right now is a reinvigorated movement around creating positive change and in general but it's very diffuse right we have women's march and we have the sunrays movement and the work that they're doing on climate change i think it is imperative that nuclear activists are integrating into these broader movements and really showing that this is an issue that doesn't stand alone i think with we're finally at a point where society is beginning to see that all of these issues are interrelated because our system is fundamentally broken and so we need to address them through a system change together. that i had was that you know i yes i think. when you talked about the nuclear freeze movement always remember that the and you
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knew your moments in europe where even more progress in the united states that talked about nuclear freeze in europe and the e.n.d. your opinion is not about. go free zone. but europe which of course is but strong the other point with celebrex i think is very very important what is the lesson that we can learn from these remarkable moments in the united states and in europe and in japan of the seventy's and eighty's and that is that cannot be the basis for a very long struggle right. you know there was shit there that i'm not gave rise to a great sense of mobilization we have to connect the and can you just are going to invest just lets us at this we have to connect it to positive notions of justice and i suggest that for example 2 things have been mentioned earlier which have betty but important because these 2 things that actually affect the existence of humanity which is that the ecological devastation and the question of. nuclear
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weapons and the answer connected with sternness which is very important we live in a world which for the 1st time in human history there is no global scarcity of resources and yet over 2 and a half 1000000000 people do not have basic needs and you have the most incredible inequalities of wealth and power which i understand which of course undermines democracy and follows so i think these 3 things have to be connected and you have young people connected with the ecological movement you have others are very much concerned about poverty and so on and we have to connect these and we have to go beyond the national framework you have to develop and promote a sense of internationalism even this force as you have to start at the national. look good i want to build on that because i think here in the u.s. we have a very unique situation compared to the global movement on this issue and i think one of the things that really has been accused is that people are terrified of
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donald trump having his finger on the button right and so the fight in many ways has become let's get donald trump's finger off the button and i think about a distraction from the actual situation which is that the system is broken and we just a symptom of it has his ability to start a nuclear war if he wakes up in the middle of the night and wants to new current gains as recently happened. that is really just a symptom of a system that absolutely is broken and there is no reason that one person should have the sole authority to launch a nuclear weapon just because they feel like let me share some of the ways if you actually connecting with people just reminding them about this this is your guy they should be on the bomb on twitter saying this guy has sold our t. to launch a nuclear strike grimace and then one more back here which is derrick johnson who is the chief executive of global 0 and he this graphic here can try to get us all killed in a nuclear war yes red yes but in blue that is disturbing and
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then i also want to bring in one of our community who was talking about who has responsibility which countries have responsibility and kathleen here feels a responsibility should be at the u.s. is feet have a listen have a look. as much as north korea has to come synonymous with nuclear crisis i believe that it's imperative for the united states to become a leader in the global anti-nuclear movement being the 1st and only country to have used nuclear weapons new case of hiroshima and nagasaki so as we continue to advocate for nuclear disarmament in countries like north korea who have an estimated 20 to 30 nuclear weapons compared to our roughly 6000 united states was awol responsibility to lead by example to honor its treatments and to
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resist stiring into another arms race as we're seeing play out with russia today. bettas you pick up on that as an international organization it takes everybody but the idea of the us you broke it you fix it for losses i think it's i mean obviously the united states and russia are the biggest nuclear armed states they have the biggest arsenals but i do think that we need to stop focusing on just some countries because again those people in the hall it's out of our hands how am i supposed to empower trump or putin they don't listen to me and i think that one of the things that we've been working on is to get all the governments in the world to take steps and take action and make commitments of this because if you think about it other issues if you want to fight racism it's not just a problem of cook you can it's a form of everyone it's about the inappropriate jokes about our prejudice it is about all the structures in society and the structures of this wouldn't grow up and as well our banks keep investing in nuclear weapons producers our universities are
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involved in the new weapons research for example we are governments in europe are exercising with nuclear weapons together with the united states for example there are so many more parts to the problem so i really think that we all have to take a stand if you are not against nuclear weapons you are part of the problem everyone let's be practical now gas because when the last little 3rd of the show so let's talk about what people can do to talk about rebuilding this nuclear disarmament movement this is just come in live. audience have been watching you speak and discuss this world leaders meet regularly for various discussions but that hasn't brought an end to the production of nuclear weapons i think a new form of diplomacy should be taken because one day it might lead to war there's very destructive action pick up on that a new kind of diplomacy to. one thing of course which is very important the treaty for the prohibition of due to vaccines yeah and i agree with bitterness that we have to cut non-nuclear weapon states to come together which they ought to actually
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promote and sign and get into for this because what they're saying that it simply is that you nuclear weapon states are criminals and we say that you're criminals and that we're going to seek to delete the list of lies and i think that's bloody secondly in countries like india and south asia the 2 nuclear weapon states india and pakistan. are not going to move nuclear weapons he put pressure on them of course we talk about the consolidation of the result but you've got a country like bucking the dish which is criticizing. and you've got countries like uneasy about the fact because if there is an exchange between india and pakistan it's going to affect all of them so in many ways you have to work around so if for example the poem that they should government which is criticize how the foreign minister was but there should be a south there isn't do you so what structure you follow the ball going example. so you can stay and it becomes
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a well it's not the it's on and we need these kinds of actions that we need what i do support to get across to you and i just it's that yes you what they said yeah but we're not just leaving it to you and not just you get to the movement within the united states we're going to salute the rise of course. your comment on that you don't go as long as you have all other new governments it's not equally shared but they're all crooks and this idea of responsible new leaders is an oxymoron and we have to get that across and i think this is so important that you can see he's given me what's behind that so i think i want i want to say as organizer and campaigner that's based here in the us that the global work is so critical and our work is really focused a massively on us policy but we are invigorated and we have an energy at the local and state level that is thanks to so much of this global work so i think one that that's really critical but i do think that here in the us we're at a moment where
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a no 1st use policy is within striking distance we have legislation in both the house and the senate we have present a candidate elizabeth warren sponsoring the senate legislation the topic being discussed on the presidential campaign trail we're at a moment where people are scared that donald trump has his finger on the button they recognise that something needs to be done and we have actual pieces of legislation that will move us forward to a place where we will be in a better position to continue advocating for an end for you know a ban of nuclear weapons so i think that we need. seize this moment here in the u.s. and take the opportunity that we can over the next year in order to push for no 1st use the public is in support of this policy whole after poll has shown that the public supports no 1st use that they think in many cases of that's what we already have they are flabbergasted that it would be allowed for our government to start a nuclear war so we need to take advantage of that momentum and move forward with
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with pushing for that legislation so i guess one of the things as we've been talking is that this is about very positive conversation also quite a negative one as well i'm going to bring this negativity from the online community and then wrap it up with some positivity because that's me dog 68 here at least once every day since about the age of 11 i have thought that one day an all out nuclear war will be started by accident politicians are never going to give nuclear weapons up however well organized protests that is the negativity but for the positivity let me take you back to 2017 where the treaty in the prohibition of nuclear weapons was adopted that united nations i want you to see the joy in this announcement have a look. trading on the prohibition of nuclear weapons has been good to. have you do you feel you. just feel you know why
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thank you thank you. thank you. thank you. brad treasure looking happy that was your big head in the way of a better. that was a great eye but where are we now i mean the dreams i quote says 2 minutes to midnight but in terms of new thinking practically about building this this movement momentum we're all way. well i think that the negative comment there really is completely wrong because people can influence this i mean that's how we change the world that's how we got human rights treaties that how we are same sex marriage that's how we got the geneva conventions you know that's how we banned chemical biological weapons in this is not just the precedence of countries just suddenly
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come up with a good idea and do it because they're nice about it i mean politicians change when the public change in the public demands it so really this is an issue where the public actually has all the power and we really we can do so many things we are right now are working to get this treated under the force to really come to jamaican mode more of a burden for the new ground states to how can they want to get rid of it when in the public doesn't like it when it gives them a lot of disadvantages in international relations and that's what we're building so right now we have about 70 countries that signed this treaty and we're working to get more more to the majority of states in the world and then just start going local in the grabs and i think that the go on the wrong doing amazing job right now we're working at this or any level of the things i don't have a tape of beatrice then who is actually saying that it is possible to get rid of nuclear weapons you also heard from action of a nayak and also 70 times. at chine you cannot because we're at the end of the show
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but i thank you for all of your thoughts and your input jane this conversation just proving how important that nuclear weapons having them around the world and maybe seeing how we get rid of them is still a top issue for us as global citizens thank you get to being with us thank you on like community for being with us as well as the one always at a j. street take everybody. violence and discrimination are all too familiar to many women in india
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a reality too often reinforced by bollywood. but its leading star is throwing his weight behind the cause. of egypt out there julie and using his celebrity to advocate for gender equality. the snake charmers on a con witness. on alleges eda. the latest news as it breaks each week that passes angering creases and in the 5 minute government grows deeper. with details cover each month i was once known as the cold the fitting in venezuela and that's why people are not used to the situation. from around the world. it's been over a decade since morphia had seen had grander with a machine that played. for the nomadic jacka tries survival is about reaching their destination goals if we don't hurry on never
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be able to go to the top of the storm we follow the mongolian herdsmen on a treacherous migration. is dangerous to the ice is it then as they strive to preserve their traditional way of life a little bit longer sometimes luser cattle in the dark there was a cold war because of the storm risking it all mongolian on al-jazeera. hello norm taylor none of the top stories on our 0 g. 7 summit has wrapped up in france after 3 days of talks between the leaders of 7 of the world's richest and most influential nations and there's at least the hope of a breakthrough in relations between the united states and iran u.s.
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president donald trump said he would meet iran's president under the right circumstances but the has more from barrett's the prospect of a meeting between the u.s. new raney and presidents was an unlikely outcome with the g. 7 in berates but as the summit came to an end its host the french president suggested talks between donald trump and hassan rouhani were possible. at some point there has to be a meeting between the iranian president and the us president i hope that in the next few weeks this meeting will take place france plays a role along with the other partners who signed the iran deal trump who pulled the u.s. out of the 2015 iran nuclear deal last year and imposed sanctions said he was open to diplomacy we're looking for nuclear weapons globalist dick missiles and a longer period of time very simple we can have it done in a very short period of time. and i really believe that iran can be
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a great nation i'd like to see that happen the development came one day after the unexpected arrival of the iranian foreign minister in berates just odds are if was invited by the french president who'd been asked by some g 7 leaders to mediate in the crisis. trust conciliatory tone has also extended to trade he said beijing and washington could begin talks to resolve the tariffs dispute going into this summit a man or mackerel said he wanted to use it to make progress on deescalating tensions over iran and trade help tackle the amazon rain forest fires and kill divisions using multilateral cooperation at the end of the 3 day meeting it seems the french president has succeeded on several fronts they were unresolved issues though the u.k.'s prime minister boris johnson received only a vague promise of a future trade accord with the u.s. and was no nearer to a deal on breaks it with the european union i think it's the job of everybody in
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parliament to get this thing done that is what the people want i also think by the way it would offer instant partners on the other side of the channel what they want they want this thing done they want they want it over last year trump refused to sign the final g 7 statement this year has scrapped it replacing it with a one page summary of the meeting so with no commitments in writing the challenge will be to. leaders to act promises they have made such a partner al-jazeera spirits'. china is calling for calm in its ongoing trade war with the u.s. after markets in asia closed shop it down before was triggered by conflicting messages from president trump on the matter at the g 7 trump initially said he wished he'd impose higher tariffs on china on friday but he then said trade talks with china would resume very shortly brazil has accepted the offer of 20000000 dollars from the g 7 countries to help tackle ongoing fires in the amazon the
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president said or an international alliance to save the rain forest would be a form of colonize ation the president of the democratic republic of congo felix she said katie has named a new government most members are from former president joseph kabila as party to security defeated a candidate officially backed by kabila in the last december's long delayed election the critics say the result was rigged in a secret deal between kabila and she said something both men deny. israel appears to be massing troops on its border with lebanon and syria these tanks were spotted at one of the borders israel has carried out air strikes against iranian backed groups in 3 different countries in the past few days lebanon iraq and syria a judge in the u.s. state of oklahoma is about to rule whether pharmaceutical giant johnson and johnson should be held liable in a $17000000000.00 lawsuit alleges that its marketing practices fueled the opioid epidemic by flooding the market with painkillers out for seeds of discord is next
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to hit the controversial founding of the state of israel more news for you after the bye for now. and on the field oh ok.
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i. was 9 was. was. was. i. the voice to david ben-gurion declaring the establishment of the state of israel in maine 1948. the balfour declaration was a letter sent by british foreign secretary arthur balfour to
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a member of the british house of lords child on the 2nd of november 1917. this letter sent to a leading figure in the british jewish community 100 years ago had repercussions which even its authors cannot have imagined. whatever its real intentions it went on to have a profound impact on the middle east and its people. and its effects still resonates across the region today. in 1914 these soldiers were fighting on the battlefields of europe in the 1st world war the allies britain france and russia fought the central powers of germany
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austria-hungary and the ottoman empire for 4 years but the land and sea war was not the only battleground. muscle was also being flexed behind closed doors as allies conspired how to redraw mao to their own advantage when the conflict eventually ceased. sir mark sykes for the british and french. for the french plotted how to divide the arab lands of the ottoman empire assuming it would finally fall. the agreement clancy quickly to divide it into french and british spheres of influence france taking most of the levant southern anatolia and the area while the british extended their control over the southern levant expanding eastwards to baghdad. and all the
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now and between the gulf and the french territory. historic palestine then still part of the ottoman empire was a bone of contention and would be put under international administration. that. day but to. do. that falls. in. their. eyes. as. the men. or. that down. for you. was of that all of them. with your to have for out can be when i came.
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to russia i think the british felt that there had not been enough government involvement in concluding the states because agreement with the french and the process they had not really protected their interests well enough for a post world war era in which the british empire would continue to seek to be a dominant force in european affairs and so really officials across whitehall including mark sykes and self felt it was a bad deal. have ilja go. at it in the future america have a uni on of your neck or does that mean and you hold your own. reference the one your home your new shoot fearful of the walker people of well an article in the have been many who are living. and i many and i mean i look at that before and it's of huge significance that when they're making these
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discussions jews and so on is not discussed jews were not to feature in the new coffee at the middle east which was to be based on the idea of the arab nation. zionism was the movement supporting the reestablishment of a jewish homeland in the area defined as the historic land of israel. the movement was active in early 20th century london especially because of the persecution of jews in russia and eastern europe. theodore heard so had found a design a movement in the late 1900 century but jewish people in western europe had not rushed to support it because they were integrating quite successfully into society zionists believed that all jews should someday returned to. that country one of the problems was that palestine belong to the ottoman empire and the ottoman empire was
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not clear that it wanted massive jewish immigration into palestine and the british government offered to let jews move unimpeded in great numbers into uganda if they wished. but in any event it really didn't happen and it didn't happen because a majority of scientists felt that hurtful was selling them out and that the only place for jews to move back to were at least conscious zionist jews to move back to was palestine in this i think britain began to look at the zionist movement as a possible partner in justifying a rita goshi a sions of their agreement with the french you see for britain simply to claim territory against what they'd already concluded in the green that with france could create diplomatic problems for the british but if they were to make a claim to palestine not out of self interest but in order to advance
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a great historic ideal of the restoration of the jewish people to the legal homeland that this could justify an adjustment of the terms of the sites because. in a way that the french would accept the british wanted some have and more and more increasingly they felt that the jews held the key to winning the war. and so they had to figure out how to bribe the jews to support them. sir mark sykes had succeeded in drawing the line he wanted from acre in the west to kirkuk in the east but for some in government this was not enough. the british were using the jewish national movement to secure palestine for themselves is this is what high vitamin is really good. defiant to open ears of 10 downing street in the foreign office in the colonial office and it's paving the way
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towards that critical decision in november of 1917 as i think you can direct you can draw a direct connection between britain's sudden ignore legitimate of zionism and idea at ideal. and what they were dissatisfied with in the term of the psychs pico. fights was a chemistry lecturer in manchester who had become a prominent member of the british zionist movement he was politically well connected and rub shoulders with senior figures in government so high in vitamin was russian by birth he was a chemist. and then he joined the zionist movement. he climbed in the zionist movement he moved to great britain before the war well before the war maybe 10 years before the war began he was not before the war very well known in the
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english zionist movement he was pretty well known in the world zionist federation but he was by no means the most visible zionist when world war one began in great britain. invites many to roots in his memoirs about having been introduced to a british government minister herbert samuel. samuel was jewish but vitamine was apparently concerned that he might be anti finest. however herbert samual turned out to be extremely receptive to vitamin and went on to write an official memo in 1950 setting out a number of different possibilities for palestine and the jewish people. and was. so. health minister. for homework and mandela through the number. of us who were caught up with the car and for us the
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and. the last time have been alamy. who wear a one year hoodie. on america's most. brit on the cut up with africa. sure but there's still a philosophy in badminton tell how to help them a lot them a lot and what fear really a hoodie. that we briefed on the year for last year. but then you suddenly had the leader who the commonwealth yannick a on but he didn't find willing ears in whitehall or the colonial office for schemes that involved the establishment of a jewish state in palestine britain was really concerned with 2 things by the time
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that the 1st world war had broken out they wanted to with the war 1st and foremost this was an imperative for the survival of britain and its empire and secondly they wanted to ensure that coming out of the war victorious that their empire would benefit from the victory so at this stage high in vitamin and herbert samuels ideas about the rights of the jews to resettle in palestine. did not find much sympathy in the corridors of power in london. disappointed fights munro to a friend asking whether there wasn't at least a discussion to be had about what he called the chance for the jewish people. i realize of course he went on we cannot claim anything we are much too atomized for it's. what the debate did do however was to throw together fights man the russian jewish immigrants searching for a homeland and refuge from persecution with herbert samuel and lord rothschild for
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members of the british jewish elite established in society and part of the political and capitalist class. so it isn't for the most part of course all of the community was actually in the minority but certainly most of all within the jewish elite because it threatened the notion of them as 100 percent committed members of british society and this was complete and that for somebody like edwin montague to become secretary of state for india for him zionism is his worst nightmare the idea that jews are not satisfied simply with being citizens of britain or other countries around the world they're always longing to go back to the land of israel for him he wanted to demonstrate that the jews of britain were 1st and foremost british it's important to remember
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that for people like rothschild zionism and actually been a threat you see the elite in british jewellery had fought for generations to gain acceptance in british society it was only with the arrival of disraeli and that i can century the jews entered parliament and could rise to become prime minister and for people of. so high finance or banking interests the really lete of the jewish community in britain their struggle to demonstrate their place in british society the zionism with its claims that jews were a people apart and should be a nationalist movement to their own right or another with their early lamba a army. and even a corrupt. how could you hold. all of that i would be when he.
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meant get 50 i wouldn't really be the old the field but i would be everyman german general up there and i do have to shear a lot and know i must lean a bit of time even for my honey brand of beer and damaeus of bosh who will live in a south. the the if mark mr you have to say you are x. a vitamin vien. in much of the love in your mind of the. ability to keep the interest ability to your. vitamin. the fim. vitamin that makes the difference and i think he was probably unique in his ability to persuade the leading british figures that the jews were in fact a vast sub to raney and influence which they were not. that all jews were zionists
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which was far from the truth and that therefore the big key to winning jewish support was to offer them palestine vitamin talked up the degree to which the jewish community supported zionism in order to get his message across to the government. but for the british it seemed to be about self interest about winning the war recognizing zionism would be close to lean to gaining global juice the poor it objective and which should start its future arresting so the british motives for supporting zionism when we can boil it down to 2 elements of british self interest at that time not an emotional interest in scientists or a love of jews and the jewish plight and the desire for a return of the jews to the holy land no for very specific self interests matters
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of policy they were 1st of all all of the british government agreed that they wanted to mobilize behind britain and the allies this idea of jewish power in the world. they were like all of the different policy elites in the war believers in the notion that jews have tremendous influence in the corridors of power around the globe if the british government appeared to support zionism they would win over world jewry to their side and all that entailed the british were convinced that zionism was really at the center of the jewish heart. in may 916 sir mark sykes had agreed to his to quit deal with the french psychs picone would form the basis of the future carve up of the old ottoman empire. so he immediately turned his attention to palestine still part of the ottoman empire
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and how to use dynasty ambitions to outmaneuver the french. formal contact between the british government and the zionists followed he immediately phoned herbert samuel and told him about the plan and herbert samuel then phoned him vitamin and vitamin brought with him in a home sokolow this meeting took place on the 11th of april $916.00 it took place at moses castors house in maida vale. and gaster wrote in his diary afterwards how proud he was that this meeting which he thought was the most important meeting that had ever taken place in the history of zionism had taken place at his house. mark sykes the other had a i was she thought some of my gust of llano were counted one must stand the jelly hadia bust but then. rise one who only in the north
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who were in the fight and. the most discussed it very quickly understands that sykes is looking to gain support from suppose it jewish power in the world and gets to works with this idea and manipulates this to consolidate sykes's interest in science and we see actually the british government becomes very close already nazi 16 of issuing a public declaration of support for zionism there in the end this doesn't happen that year the planned sikes got herbert samuels to pass on to the zionist leaders involved joint british french administration of palestine and a charter guaranteeing british support for zion ism. but his idea was rejected. they didn't want an anglo-french condominium in palestine they wanted the british to protect them not
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the french and that's because they thought that the french always sort of converted their colonized people into becoming frenchmen and what they wanted was to remain as self conscious jews and they thought that the british would leave them alone and let them do that and mushy hell to live in begun by big circle of we were hurrying to share a blue team. the world via him wanted the berryman not you need convincing goddamn where you did that has got a point to it at them it would get them but the hollywood the who you deem know you to name him remember bomber tomorrow matter. you know it then. is. bolstered by their newfound credibility the british zionists thought
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about making specific demands after the sykes meeting but events soon overtook them . on the 6th of december 1916 british prime minister asquith resigned. in the change of government arthur balfour became foreign secretary under prime minister david lloyd george. lloyd george. as the half awake i walked away from us back recently was iraq. december. and i'll. be here with that see a year to some tea and one or obama. side but. it's a completely. your own to the people of st. well for all was of rather philosophical bent and i think
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he wanted to think in theological terms he wanted to think in historical terms. and it was with that frame of mind i think that he approached the whole question seriously at the fall of. sarina. i would have a back and moderate minutes of actual sex because i received as there was a lot of comic lord george. i mean a commandment came out but a. while before those of us towards him. you know i mean it was a moment and he and i could i mean david lloyd george. balfour and all of those who supported the perfect question within the british government we can absolutely
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categorize as being riven with anti semitic thinking and not only that but the thinking behind the balfour declaration that drove them to the balfour declaration was from this anti semitic thought the idea of jewish power of jewish that he said this and of a unified jewish attachment to zionism above all else. whatever its basis the relationship between the british zionists and the government would continue to grow throughout the 1917. leading to the declaration that would change the face of the middle east and ultimately determine the destinies of 2 different peoples.
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rewind returns with a new series. and dates on the best account is a documentary. to. remind continues with the last try secret army of the cia so it's fun to $75.00 believe in the same way that the and sisters did living in the forest in the jungle and it seems like they're abandoned by everybody on al-jazeera. i remember the 1st time i walked into the newsroom and it felt like being in the general assembly of the united nations because it was so many nationalities. just that we all come from different places but it's one that gives us gives us the ability to identify the people who claim the other side of the world but we can understand what it's like to have a different perspective and i think that is a strength for al-jazeera. the ultranationalist marks connected with one of the
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world's worst humanitarian crisis we doe as in my gretsch joining with the military to impose a deadly political agenda we have to flow to our nation what has happened to the engine that's one of the biggest stains on the country as a whole. religion this is a politic me and mark an unholy alliance on all jews earring. hello i'm lauren taylor in london the top stories on our 0 u.s. president on trump says he's willing to consider a meeting his iranian counterpart has on rouhani if the circumstances are right he made the statement on the final day of the g. 7 summit in a beer it's in front of them or you know them if the circumstances were correct
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toward the road i would certainly agree to that but in the meantime. they have to be good players you want to stay with me and they can't do what they were saying they're going to do because if they do that they're going to be met with really very violent force we have no choice so i think they're going to be good china is calling for calm minutes ongoing trade war with the u.s. after markets in asia closed sharply down before was triggered by conflicting messages from president trump on the matter at the g. 7 trump initially said he wished he'd impose higher tariffs on china on friday but he then said trade talks with china would resume very shortly. brazil has accepted the offer of $20000000.00 from the g 7 countries to help tackle ongoing fires in the amazon the president said an international alliance to save the rain forest would be a form of colonize ation a judge in the u.s.
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state of oklahoma has found the pharmaceutical giant johnson and johnson liable in a lawsuit claiming it helped fuel the opioid epidemic in edges that its marketing practices fueled the opioid epidemic by flooding the market with painkillers but the final damages figure of $572000000.00 was far lower than the state of oklahoma was hoping for the president of the democratic republic of congo felix security has named a new government most members are from former president joseph kabila as party to see katie defeated a candidate officially backed by kabila in last december's long delayed election but critics say the result was rigged in a secret deal between kerry and she security something both men deny. israel appears to be massing troops on its borders with lebanon and syria these tanks were spotted it one of the borders israel has carried out as strikes against iranian backed groups in 3 different countries in the past few days lebanon iraq and syria lebanon's president described it as israeli aggression and
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a declaration of war i back with a full news hour after the 2nd half of balfour seeds of discord scene of it after. the 1st world war pitted britain france and russia against germany austria-hungary and the ottoman empire the british in the shape of the diplomats or mark sykes were determined to divide autumn in territory in a way that best suited them once the war was over for their own strategic interests . by 917 the war was shifting in the allies favor and in the middle east the british were moving through sinai towards the borders of historic palestine.
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further north the russian revolution in february 1917 cast doubt on russia's continued involvement in the war. as britain and france tried to outmaneuver one another the british zionist movement took on increasing political importance. sikes wants to get back in touch with scientists and think about how to incorporate zionism in british planning for palestine. and at this moment we see a hugely important meeting taking place in the home of most disgusting maida vale in february 17th and this is the point in which sykes mates for the 1st time haim fight sman in the home circle of. another time in this in which it's discussed what the zionists are looking for and the british interest in zionism so he had to bring the zionists along without divulging what were the
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secret agreements that britain and france had come to with regard to palestine which was that they would jointly administer parts of palestine at this meeting for the british government was sykes and herbert samuel he was there on the other side there were. vitamin and sokolow and there was moses gaster and he brought a couple of his allies because he realised that vitamin was beginning to push him out of the way the other very important figure was james rothschild who attended this meeting. at the meeting it became clear to sykes that vitamin not gaster was the most important zionist. this is also the moment where
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most of the cast is dislodged. sykes's part on the french side pico hadn't liked best guessed it been insistent that there should be a jewish state and nothing less coming into being after the war and peace. clearly wanted scientists who were much more willing to compromise with the interests of the great powers and the bison was certainly happy to fit that bill. the meetings between the zionists and the government seemed to give momentum to the idea of british support for a jewish homeland in palestine and their potential role in its administration. but the secret agreements between britain and france which formed the basis of the future division of the ottoman empire planned to put palestine under international administration any change would have to be negotiated with france. niamh so-called of emerged as the man to talk to the french and horse look at where the.
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story are a. bit with you should he give. me a circle oh became the acknowledged lead diplomat for zionism and all the accounts say that he had an extremely sort of elegant bearing and wore very fine clothing and that his manners were polished and polite and smooth silky smooth so that he could talk. on an equal basis with the representatives of the german kaiser or the british government or whatever so the day after the meeting. between sykes and the zionist leaders sykes brought sokol to meet the
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french diplomat pekoe what sikes wanted was for suckle. to a persuade pekoe that zionism must be taken seriously that zionism really was the key to winning the war. and that the zionists would only help the allies win the war if britain was the main power in palestine not france for 2 adults because they didn't put it that. so-called off without fast. walk was. put out for that core i reckon. reve don't like you which i don't like but it's you and also mossad. there's not a kid of say course
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a record of that they are home but not on their degree of me tell you we the 3 of them and sykes nuff saw in a circle of you know what a w and a no our friends are or your mother had this you can associate my more or less and british cabinet or that often not the situation of france so we were at before. bill cabin at the english they all look in already different so we into a lot of cities it's hard to know how much influence sykes ultimately had over british policy making he was given more prominence in british policy making around the middle east during the war years than he ever deserved he was a relatively ill educated inexperienced man whose only connection to the ottoman world had been as a tourist. so for this man to be playing such a role in the holes of power over deciding british policy towards the near east seems to us today to be anomalous indeed ridiculous. regardless of psych's
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role things continue to progress for the zionists and in june 1917 british foreign secretary arthur balfour asked high in vitamin to present his demands as a declaration and promise to try and persuade his government to adopt its. the leading zionist form the political committee and drafted their demands and then submitted them to the british government. this original document was one of the 1st drafts written at the imperial hotel in london on the 17th of july 1917. it also introduced a new term and concept the national home of the jewish people. so in the initial side this drafting of the declaration. there were protests most saw its leaders to knock them so cool off that there is no mention of the
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terminology of a jewish state that is said that talking about a national home. this is a trial of what the side of trying to achieve and so close response. was that we mustn't go too far we have to take small steps we have to go with what is acceptable to the british government at this time and then slowly slowly we can advance our cause once we had this in hand. and if you look at what i wanted the only knowledge i had been could be. certain elements how come that i understood them though them suckle or less of a kind of there was from a sucks for what are. the author of thing. on the 18th of september 1917 there was a meeting of the british war cabinet the foreign secretary arthur balfour was
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absent. the secretary of state for india edwin montague who was jewish strongly disagreed with the declaration. he was opposed to zionism and said i deny that palestine is today associated with the jews or properly be regarded as a fit place for them to live montague thought a french to clear ration for porting zionism in june 1017 was anti semitic and negotiated changes to the british version as it went through several drafts. serious doubt about the outcome less them. clear out that only want. more out of the last live here with. alice charlotte adam assessment of corker c s c. yes good clean feel. got to be.
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there on the whole. she would look forward to her both to see if your move she got most who your. daughter is but your. people gonna. do you then bill through. the difficult push well resentment of you. a few days later secretary of state for war vi counts milner and the jewish politician philip magnus sent a modified version to the cabinet it incorporated some of montague's changes. including the caviar that quote nothing shall be done that might prejudice the rights and political status enjoyed by such jews who are fully contented with their existing nationality and citizenship.
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drafting especially by a board millner that appeared by september was closer to the language that would eventually be adopted in november of 1917 namely speaking not about palestine as a whole. but. a some sort of presence in palestine and we have of the jews which is quite different cannot call can we add bill for it how money for. nothing. only their national. a literary if. their and look at all in national home. but no not the national home and i would not the national yanni what i'm calling leo would be fearful of the in. the committed zionists wanted to ensure the
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declaration was clear that the whole of historic palestine would be a national homeland exclusively for the jewish people. the latest draft was sent to high invites men who in turn center to the zionist movement in the united states for their feedback. there was some consultation you know during the summer of 1917 with the united states and in the early drafts there. the imprint of the zionist elements in britain would have referred to palestine in its entirety as being for some sort of jewish and the v. and those elements were modified before the drafting was finalized another key part of the terminology that emerged out of the drafting was
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in some british redrafting where sort of for the jewish people it was written the jewish race eventually this was taken out but i think it's very revealing that british officials wanted to use this kind of terminology because after all this was how they understood the jews of the world as being a racial group when that world it tremendous power and also could be inspired all together as one unit behind the cause of scientism supported by britain and the allies it's striking that the existing arab people in the region were not named at all they're simply called the quote existing non jewish communities in palestine the 3 points but. so you know we're going to do all that but at this point you know ma'am. the. bar owners are. you know good it was. you know.
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opportunity. by october 19th 17 the final draft of the balfour declaration was ready and waiting only british government final approval. there was a rumor that germany was about to issue a similar declaration supporting the rights of the jews in palestine. when belfer he rushed to get his final draft discussed at the cabinet meeting on the 31st of october 1919. so when we think about the centenary of the balfour declaration everyone considers 2nd of november 19th 17 as the moment of the day creation itself but it was actually agreed to by the british cabinet on the 31st of october and this was a hugely significant meeting and in the minutes of that meeting balfour ri it's
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rates the principle reasons for supporting zionism and highlights it's expected propaganda effects amongst jews around the world particularly in the united states and in russia the argument was was put forward most strongly by lord balfour at the meeting of october 31st and what he argued was that issuing this declaration would be extremely helpful for the british in solidifying the support of the united states and also in countering propaganda from germany the critical thing to remember about british diplomatic pronouncements is that what one individual says does not represent the views of the government as a whole and you will find many different points of view among british officials in the years 1701800 and right into the early years of the mandate but the british
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were very clear that they had not promised statehood to the zionist movement they had no interest in doing so the british did not support jewish nationalism they did not support arab nationalism they supported british imperialism but this is also the meeting where lord curzon. it was a member of the walk happened it disquiet about the possible effects of supporting zionism on the palestinian arab population and the palestinian opposition is completely disregarded lord curzon wrote a paper to the cabinet asking what was quote to become of the people of this country. there were over half a 1000000 syrian arabs a mixed community with arab hebrew canaanite greek egyptian and possibly crusaders blood they and their forefathers of occupied the country for the best part of 1500 years they own the soil they profess the mohammedan faith they will not be content
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either to be exposed prieta of jewish immigrants or to act merely is he was of wood and drawers of water to the latter. but his prescient remarks fell on deaf ears it's like who tells highlights where at the end of the workout that it's meeting dr it's a boy as though they've witnessed the birth of the agreement to create jewish national home as a baby in the middle east. the final draft of the balfour declaration was 67 words long. his majesty's government view with favor the establishment in palestine of a national home for the jewish people and will use their best endeavors to facilitate the achievement of this object it being clearly understood nothing shall be done which may prejudice the civil and religious rights of existing non jewish
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communities in palestine or the rights and political status enjoyed by jews in any other country. i should be grateful if you would bring this declaration to the knowledge of the zionist federation you all sincerely are for james balfour. in terms of international law it really has very little standing in international law you know treaties between nations have significance. but governments after an issue policy statements statements of intention about what they plan to do and those really don't have any standing. as a matter of of law for britain this was. suppose you would say a statement of its intention as to what it would do if it were to take over
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belostoma which of course it had not yet done as of november of 1917 it's going to go to whether you like that. stuff. to come i'm sure of britannia if. it be so though because your mind. show yaf were only 2 years after the declaration a church leader in jerusalem wrote to british prime minister lloyd george about jews in palestine trying to control holy sites. lloyd george's office had said that high invites men didn't want to do anything affecting the rights of arabs it said he simply wanted to be involved in a council to help provide refuge to jews russia and eastern europe. this exchange suggested that britain felt it had not promised a jewish state but simply
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a place for them to live alongside the arabs. when the league of nations set out the british mandate. palestine in 1923 it made britain responsible for implementing the balfour declaration. as a result jewish immigration to palestine increased as did arab opposition to it expressed in a series of palestinian protests against britain in the 1920 s. they understood the people of palestine to be muslims and christians but did not imagine that they would constitute a national community that would seek national independence and after the war very quickly when it becomes clear that palestinian arab nationalists immobilizing against zionism. the british government a quick to see a major problem the balfour declaration had put in train a series of events that began to signal its deep flaws arab descent built to the 3
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year revolt between 193619398 was a nationalist uprising against the british administration demanding arab independence and the end of jewish immigration it was in the pill commission of 1937 that the british 1st recognized that instead of balancing communities they had certain motion a rivalry between incompatible national jewish and palestinian arabs. and it was at that point that they tried to solve the problem by dividing palestine into 2 states arab and jewish through a partition plan and i think there you have the 1st recognition or admission from british officials of the failure of the balfour declaration. in may $939.00 the british government published a policy document on powers time called a white paper it abandoned the partitioning of palestine into 2 states and called instead for an independent palestine in which arabs and jews would share government
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. it limited jewish immigration to $75000.00 for 5 years and said that the arab majority should determine future immigration levels. it's also said that balfour had not meant to create a jewish state at the expense of the arabs any more than the mcmahon has same correspondent 24 years before had promised an arab state to shareef hossain of mecca but the white paper met opposition and was dropped. the british government a quick to see a major problem but there's no way that they can back away from support for zionism because this becomes the basis for their justification for being in the holy land their commitment to supporting the movement in the balfour declaration which becomes in shrines in international law in the terms of the mandate for palestine so the british are stuck with zionism they didn't believe that scientists wanted
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independent jewish state hood and after the war became very clear that actually the vast majority of scientists didn't only want statehood they expected it. i think if we're trying to assess whether or not britain's policy towards zionism in the 1st world war served british interests or not the 1st thing we have to appreciate is the key reason they supported saddam was based on an incorrect idea they believed that they could mobilize something that they saw as jewish power around the world behind their light course so 1st of all that was entirely wrong and didn't happen because the jewish power is fake its force. in september 1939 german expansionism led to the 2nd world war over 60000000 people died including between 5 and 6000000 jews the majority in nazi concentration camps. the british mandate ended at midnight on the 14th
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of may 1948 and immediately the formation of the state of israel was announced justified by the terms of the balfour declaration issued 31 years before. while israelis celebrated the birth of their nation 700000 palestinians were forced into camps and exile a family done a lot of you not just with your needs are going to be done you know they're coming . for palestinians the balfour declaration represents the moment an imperial power promised their land the way to another people. this is the. whether the regime was complete. that's why they hold bell for responsible for their expulsion displacement and occupation.
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hello there we're back to all the west and cool weather across the southeast of australia. a little bit of cloud just clean coastal areas that is going to be bringing with it one or 2 showers setting on trees they are all the cloud and hope out with the child's there shall be pushing through but look at the weather conditions in perth just sitting off the coast 22 degrees celsius the high on
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choose it but by wednesday up to 28 degrees that is quite a few degrees above average for this time of year about 7 degrees above the average meanwhile the cloud is set to continue to push through the great by bringing those cloudy skies and showers into adelaide and melbourne 13 degrees celsius at best but pretty nice embrace been with a high of 24 then we head across tools new zealand so we've got mostly clear skies into christ church for the next couple of days want to say clear skies i mean sunshine with the clouds it should actually be wet maybe. but that again is a clearing picture as we head off into wednesday temperature at about 14 degrees celsius plenty of rain there pushing through much of central and western japan is the seasonal rains for this time of year but they really are quite heavy and becoming very widespread as we head into wednesday in fact some locations into western areas of home she could see as much as to germany to me while cloudy skies in seoul with a high that on wednesday a 28 degrees. think
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of some of the biggest companies in the world today coastal big tech with algorithms and the more that we use them. what out of we. we're in the midst of a great race and big tech companies are on the chase and are rising on a wealth of information and we are. in the 2nd term a 5 part series ali re-examined where the corporations are all about. power of victory on. al-jazeera. and this is the al-jazeera news hour live from london coming up the g. 7 summit wraps up with president back home hopeful has created the conditions for
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the u.s. and iranian president's to meet. in the amazon and prompt a global outcry but new data shows far more fires are burning across central africa . a judge in oklahoma finds the drug maker johnson and johnson liable for feuding the state's opioid epidemic. and 2 days after never had i mean became mexico's 12 journalists be killed this year the government is criticized for failing to protect the media. but the 7 summit in france has wrapped up with hopes of a breakthrough on relations between the united states and iran the french president says he's hopeful event has created the conditions for a historic meeting between the presidents of the u.s. and iran within weeks something both leaders say they're open to there was also
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progress in washington's dispute with france over taxing the profits of u.s. technology companies and at a climate change meeting that u.s. president donald trump didn't attend and he does agreed to set up a $20000000.00 fund to help a muslim countries fight fires there and talk about the reports from beirut's. the meeting between the u.s. no rainy and president's was an unlikely outcome with the g. 7 in pierrots but as the summit came to an end its host the french president suggested talks between donald trump and hassan rouhani were possible. at some point there has to be a meeting between the iranian president and the us president i hope that in the next few weeks this meeting will take place france plays a role along with the other partners who signed the iran deal trump who pulled the u.s. out of the 2015 iran nuclear deal last year and imposed sanctions said he was open to diplomacy we're looking for no nuclear weapons no ballistic missiles and
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a longer period of time very simple we can have it done in a very short period of time. and i really believe that iran can be a great nation i'd like to see that happen the development came one day after the unexpected arrival of the iranian foreign minister in berates just odds are brief was invited by the french president who'd been asked by some g 7 leaders to mediate in the crisis. trust conciliatory tone was also extended to trade he said beijing and washington could begin talks to resolve the tariffs dispute going into this summit a man or crawl said he wanted to use it to make progress on the escalating tensions over iran and trade help tackle the amazon rain forest fires and kill divisions using multilateral cooperation at the end of the 3 day meeting it seems the french president has succeeded on several fronts they were unresolved issues though the
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u.k.'s prime minister boris johnson received only a vague promise of a future trade accord with the us and was no nearer to a deal on breaks it with the european union i think it's the job of everybody in parliament to get this thing done that is what the people want i also think by the way it would offer instant partners on the other side of the channel what they want they want this thing done they want they want it over last year trump refused to sign the final g 7 statement this year has scrapped it replacing it with a one page summary of the meeting so with no commitments in writing the challenge will be to compel leaders to act on the focal promises they have made such a butler al-jazeera spirits'. stock markets across asia closed shop down earlier on fears about the china a u.s. trade war sparked partly by trump's conflicting statements at the g. 7 tokyo's benchmark nikkei index plunged by more than 2 percent and china's currency they run dropped to an 11 year no one point during the summit donald trump
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said he wished he'd imposed higher tariffs on china on friday but he then said trade talks with china would resume very shortly prompting european and u.s. shaz to climb trump is already looking ahead to the next g. 7 summit which is used take place in the united states in 2020 the us president suggested the annual meeting could be held at one of his own properties a trump golf resort in miami and he brushed off suggestions he'd be using his public position a private financial gain. $50.00 to $70.00 units that each delegation became its own. though again it could have been a lot of they could have gotten sort of growth here would be good coverage so we're thinking about it they love the location of the hotel of the also like the fact that is the base of the airport to get. to miami so it's
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a great very. is an associate professor in international relations at university college london he joins me live via skype from krakow thank you for being with us so to go back to the issue of iran and the summit to trumper saying that he would be open to meeting president has on rouhani but if the circumstances were right how likely do think that meeting is to go ahead in the end. well thank you for inviting me so i think his his language is this really very interesting that so when when the americans pull their. or. the concord with ready or are part of their discussion was that iran was or was funding international terrorism so that that sort of comment is no dispute it gets so you know i think trump trump likes to make these statements and this nothingness possibility of. that meeting here but the real question is has any of the americans demonstrably.
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and if there are you know is that many evidence of them wanting to kind of negotiate around these issues but what about the issue of china i mean there's been a shift from trump he was calling the chinese president a great leader and only after a few days according to an enemy and what haven't we read into that change of tone . so i think i think this is you know. the classic trump playbook he he he tries to sow confusion around all these issues whether it's iran or the writs china. certainly has been getting lots of domestic pushback from you know some of the major corporations who really dislike this. this kind of possibility of an actual rocketry or so there's been a lot of pressure that same time is he's deflected the comments from the roots were quite sarcastic and to a little. thinks he's going to continue its power the pressure muslims.
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he didn't actually attend the the meeting of the crucial discussion on climate in biodiversity which was happening at the g 7 even though the amazon and so on was going to be part of that what do you make of that absence from the meeting or i think i think she means shocking but not surprising. so. you know i think the optics are pretty cool and if you have. the presence of the u.s. not being physically present for an international issue concerning the whole world it sends a really strong signal or thinks or. and it's me but except that the things kind of short term economic growth is more important than a long term sustainable economic. to do in the last year so just you know overall good i mean that has been overall apparently what seemed like a conciliatory tone at this meeting is that
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a fair assessment or is it that they've avoided highlighting differences by doing away with that final statement the one that last year had to trump insiders at this time they just didn't have a statement at the end of it was that it was that a kind of mechanism to hide the differences would you think overall the tone is more conciliatory you know i think i think it's unlikely since our insistence the 1st time in 44 years of that happening that they have to agree on a communique. so it's you know it's a good kind of devoid of strategy but it's great to me the g. 7 is this right and it's divided along the lines of the u.s. versus or else across the most of these issues more deborah have thank you very much indeed for joining us. during the g. 7 tensions between the french and brazilian it is over the amazon wildfires got personal after french president emmanuel mccormack used his brazilian counterpart of failing to deal with the fires shareable sonora hit back endorsing
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a social media post which insulted my cause wife. basically the bull said some extra in the early disrespectful things about my wife what can i say it's sad it's sad but it's out of all for him and for the president people i think the president woman must be ashamed to reduce about the president i think that presidents were great people must be ashamed to see these behavior they expect presidents to behave well towards others. it was an hour says the idea of creating an international alliance to save the amazon rain forest would be treating brazil like a colony of the brazilian president question the intentions of his french counterpart in his efforts to help preserve them isn't there brazil's environment minister has welcomed the g 7 offer of 20000000 dollars to help fight the fire as a correspondent daniel and joins us live from port a menu in northwest brazil you've just flown over the region what would you say. we saw that most of the fires certainly around your state capital port au way are
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now out there we did see a few fires still burning but what we did see was massive devastation great swathes of black charged vegetation in the jungle as well as the devastation that was wrought beforehand in the last few years which is now going to light brown color. thousands and thousands of hectares destroyed to make way for soya plantations for cattle rearing so that was very evidence yes i say that and this is this was a hit in the round this particular area but the fires are still burning in other parts of the amazon away from the state capital of wrongdoing. and the minute she's been deployed there how effective are they likely to be. what they've come here initially to be all. together to try and try to work out exactly where they will be net their best needed there have been some of their transport planes with
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a large a c 130 is spraying water on some of the affected areas but in general this military is still there still to be the ploy they're gathering they're trying to work out where they should be sent so there is a bit of an operation going on there as much for the media i think as was probably anything else in our it was a military man and he sees the military as a solution so many of the country's problems so he sent the military in response to that international condemnation that we heard about to show that he. doing something that brazil itself can deal with the problems rather than relying on the the help being offered by other countries many countries certainly and they were going around south america have offered their help even coming from places like venezuela which is a story telling me over of bojo balsa now it all the only help i know that he's accepted so far is from his long standing friend in israel israel is sending some some help but so far he hasn't accepted that help from any other country. thank you very much indeed. brazil tops the list of countries with the world's highest rate
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of deforestation critics say on regulated cotton burning practices have contributed to the scale of fires raging across dam isn't true state of much a grosso one of the hardest hit areas to risible reports. this place may now look like a golf course but it was once a muzzle and in jungle. is located in the state of mind a little sore in the center of brazil decades of deforestation have bade this a profitable area for agribusiness and that's why the recent fires affecting the amazones are not surprising to people like blue another sun dos. every year there are fires but the situation is worse now because of climate change and the president he basically tells people to go and cut down trees and nothing will happen to them the data we have here shows the heat and it can be verified whether it's a fire he compares the maps of 2018 with what is happening this year millions of
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trees gone with the help of sea source and fire. the map shows us where the fires are we travel for 4 hours and arrive at one of the places that highlighted in parts of the amazon the burned areas have increased by 83 percent in just the past year fires are natural at this time of the year because of the dry weather the hate and the wind but environmentalists say that the sharp increase seen this year is due to farmers setting the forest alight to clear the land for pastures the problem is that in many cases those fires get out of control brazilian law says that landowners can only cut down 20 percent of the trees in their property but that's rarely enforced catalogs not his real name is a small farmer in the area he's afraid to show his face president who has repeatedly said he wants to open up the amazon for business cattle says that has
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encouraged people to burn more trees fall out of his dollars or so there are no controls nobody is watching what people are doing both so not all says he wants development and this is what development may bring there is no limits to ambition it is. everyone wants more. deeper in the forest it's not difficult to find cut down trees hidden in the woods hiding from the satellites it's the 1st step to conquer new territories and extend the agricultural front here for cattle and crops the government insists the situation is no worse than previous years but satellite imagery shows something different and that's why countries like germany and norway have halted all payments to the amazon fund accusing the government of failing to protect the environment but enough of i.d.s. has lived in this area his whole life he has been struggling to find a middle ground between preservation and development with. the simplistic
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speech of the president that he is attacking n.g.o.s he is attacking families from here they want to take resources from n.g.o.s because we publish the truth he says we are attacking the country we can all work together for preservation and development somebody needs to explain to the government we are not the enemy government control is the only way to prevent the destruction of what is left of amazonia but what worries many here is that they claim the central government is purposely looking away there is a war. that madoff saw all the attention is on amazon right now but there are currently more fires reported to be burning in central and southern africa than in there wasn't now so says 70 percent of the active fires in the world are in africa at satellite data shows fires raging through large parts of angola and the democratic republic of congo especially as far east as madagascar a large number is believed to be due to slash and burn practices by farmers but has
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been compounded by shorter rainy seasons where alex orange don is a data scientist and drought specialist who focuses on african agricultural trends he says the lack of rain in the region in the past 3 years is having a huge impact. the real issue is that the impact of these brush fires is getting worse if you look at a lot of parts of sunny arid parts of the african continent particularly the west african said hello this used to be a regular occurrence during the dry season and when the rains would come around there would allow for grasslands to grow again but unfortunately we are seeing a very significant increase and variability of rainfall it's making the rainy season very volatile and less predictable coming up on the news hour a state of emergency is declared in the port of sudan as into tribal fighting kills dozens.
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now a landmark ruling and john chin the u.s. state of oklahoma has found the pharmaceutical giant johnson and johnson liable in a $17000000000.00 nor suit which accused it a few ning the opioid epidemic at an edge that the drug maker deceptively marketed painkillers and flooded the market with them the judge ordered it to pay damages of $572000000.00 is the 1st case to go to trial out of thousands of lawsuits filed by state and local governments against opioid manufacturers and distributors shares in the company rose 5 percent following the decision. today judge bachmann has affirmed our position that johnson and johnson motivated by greed and avarice is responsible for the opioid after damage in our state johnson and johnson will finally be held accountable for thousands of deaths and addiction caused by their
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activities the company used pseudo science and misleading information that downplay the risks of opioids. leading to the worst manmade public nuisance our state in this country has ever seen. or if you're going to overdoses have become a nationwide epidemic claiming the lives of tens of thousands of americans every year in oklahoma more than 6000 people have died since the year 2000 nationwide more than 130 people die every day from opioid overdoses according to the u.s. department of health and human services around 40 percent of the cases involve drugs that were prescribed by a doctor on the gallagher joins or 9 from the court in norman just outside oklahoma city so randy why is this particular case so important. well this was widely seen as a test case the 1st of its kind in which is state took on
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a pharmaceutical giant and as we just found out last hour or so what i've just been talking to local officials there want doctor who runs a treatment plan they can everyone who is seeing this as a huge victory they didn't get the $17000000000.00 they wanted they got $572000000.00 that's enough money to treatment centers in this state for one year nevertheless if you take into account what the pharmaceutical companies settled before this case even came to being that gives oklahoma almost a $1000000000.00 to treat people and even some of the legal team representing this state had lost children to this opioid epidemic so it was a very personal thing for the state but it's not so much about the money that was awarded to oklahoma it's about the message of this sending to the entire nation remember there are at least 2000 other cases pending against big pharmaceutical firms and the message sent out from this small courthouse today was pretty clear big pharmaceutical companies are playing
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a role in contributing towards the opioid crisis and they may well have to get their checkbooks out across the entire nation for their part johnson and johnson say this was not their fault they're blaming the food and drug administration for approving these drugs they're going to appeal which will make this thing even lengthy but in oklahoma this is being seen as a day that takes on goliath case and this state as you know you say that johnson and johnson to appeal i mean presumably that for the drug companies and in some ways these large sums of money sound big for them actually that they can settle around him easily. i mean honestly if the c.e.o. of johnson and johnson was here right now we could probably write a check immediately it's a small change for these big companies but again it's the message it sends they defended themselves over the over the 7 week trial but they also heard from experts in this state that have seen babies born with addictions because the mothers were taking these. opioid sainthood from parents who lost children this is
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a deeply personal thing not just to the state of oklahoma but to people across this entire country this is something that has affected socio economic backgrounds of all kinds in rural areas and also in cities but the message from this courtroom and from this judge today was pretty unequivocal and it could potentially change the relationship between big pharmaceutical companies and the 50 states who are now going after them to some kind of compensation and you've got to thank you very much indeed. government on is that the founder of shatterproof a nonprofit organization dedicated to ending the devastation addiction causes families he also served as an expert witness in the johnson and johnson case he joins us now on skype from new york thank you for being with us i mean i understand that you lost your own son to addiction what's your reaction to this that it well like mary thank you for having me and. like many there's just no question that. there needs to be justice for ready those who lost their lives but also it's really
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important to get the funding needed to help those who are struggling today with addiction. that this judgment as we just heard will say that will set a platform and they should force elements in other states to make sure that states have the money to help those people that are very quickly there and do you mind telling us how your son started taking what was the context it's. my son started busy. started taking prescription painkillers when he was in high school yet really we had a sports injury and she excuse me a sports injury in that it just grew from there like so many so it to get what have you found works best when i say this knowing that the companies that make has been disturbed is it is one side of it but but what about the the kind of treatment and the help side what you what have you found of the most effective programs. sure well for those ready addicted to opioids. clearly taking one of the 3 f.d.a.
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approved medications won't change that being offered one of the 3 f.d.a. approved medications and being explaining how they can help busy you has clearly shown. it's clearly shown one of the better ways. to provide the opportunity for someone to live a happy and healthy life but we've published a year and a half ago 8 principles of care medication being one of those but there's other there's other aspects of care in addition to medication that are really really important and one of those is making sure that a patient is being diagnosed not to use the word who are currently addiction but also mental health busy issues and physical it seems another key component is making sure that patient treatment is patient centered that the patient is continually being monitored and having treatment adjusted based on how well the
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patient is doing and there's other units we did in principle that won't go through and now you can find out about our website but the real thing is to bring ready addiction treatment into our health care system just like any other 2 seeds without any shame without any stigma without any discrimination like any other and just to think that the way this was missed that the way this case went was was the way to do it to me is quite an unusual case sent to me about your kind of input into joining the cold case sure my input was less of. me not less was not about who did what wrong that's not my expertise my expertise is on the. list of. the list of abatement programs for updating the issue ready to help people in the state of oklahoma were ready addicted it was my expertise to go ahead. and
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provide a ride in my opinion that was where i meant it really made sense and that's that's my expertise and that's what i do day in and day out. and i believe that the data plan that was put together i testified to the fact that i thought it was very well justified and. should be there for the state state or for the people of the state on government all thank you very much indeed to me appreciate you taking the time to talk to senators here my pleasure thanks for having. sovereign council has declared a state of emergency in port c. done fighting between 2 rival communities has killed at least 37 people well than 200 others have been injured in the dispute between the benny and they're a new better have a morgan has more from cotton. so dan so frank council which was swarming just last week and which has pledged to prioritize peace in its 1st 6 months of the transitional period has declared a state of emergency in the city of port sudan now this follows days of ethnic
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clashes between members of the bed and the new but tribes and we understand from people in 4th sudan that it started as a verbal quarrel between members of the opposing tribes which eventually turned violent and activists are telling us that the tensions are so high that people from opposing tribes cannot be hospitalized in the same hospitals due to concerns of outbreak of war violence sudan suffering council also dismissed the acting state governor who was appointed by the transitional military council following the ousting of longtime president i'm going to be here in april they've also dismissed the head of security the sovereign council had sent a delegation to try to mediate between the 2 tribes but so far that has been unsuccessful which lead to the collaboration of a state of emergency and activists are saying that they are worried that this tribal conflict this ethnic tension which has been going on for a few months now will escalate in the coming weeks if no solution is provided by the sovereign council. 8 months after president finney security took office the
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democratic republic of congo finally has a new government but less than a 3rd of the $65.00 ministers are from his direction for change party the rest are from former president joseph kabila is party sick a defeated candidate officially backed by katrina in last december's long delayed election but critics say the result was rigged in a secret deal between kabila and she said katie that involved officially stepping down but maintaining control something both men deny. so to come this hour now jazeera venezuelans saying the crisis at home and left stranded as ecuador imposes new visa restrictions. and israel sends tanks and troops to its borders with lebanon and syria after carrying out ass trikes in both countries.
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and though there we've got this many heat wave across central areas of europe of sunday and london 33.3 degrees celsius the hottest on holiday ever recorded but we have a cloud around and also some rain but let's look 1st of all at those temperatures across this particular region so as we go through tuesday 35 celsius in paris 32 in london and 33 in berlin say this is really the main area where the temperatures are well above normal for this time of year however it is set to change you can see all this cloud in the shallows down across the southwest this is a system working its way into the west a med so that will bring some cooler air and certainly some fat and as a say so right is also system working its way across the northwest of europe and at the same time another ever low pressure working its way through more western and central areas of russia that will certainly bring the temperature down as we go from tuesday into wednesday so just 16 degrees celsius there in moscow meanwhile 25 in london on the wednesday 31 in paris. and the same across in balance of my
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sunshine of course across the central and eastern end of the mediterranean now that same system which is pushing through the west a med that will also just trails and work its way through morocco and also on towards algeria so we could see some clouds that he would even want to coastal shot damage isn't already affected you can see that $29.00 in algiers on weapons day. over 100 years ago britain and france made a secret deal to divide the middle east between them now we can draw him in the 2nd episode we explore the lasting effects of this agreement that there is a regional set to sikes because it's at those borders were drawn without consulting the people who have to live with the. psychs pekoe lines in the sand on elm disease. in the next episode of techno the
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team travels to the heart of the amazon. where we are now should be grateful to investigate illegal gold mining mercury has a very unique characteristic of finding the gold for a miner it's almost like magic and the technology being used to expose its devastating impact and so what we end up doing is imaging the forest in very high fidelity stream. techno on al-jazeera. and one of the top stories here now there are u.s. president donald trump says he's willing to consider meeting with his iranian counterpart a son ronnie if the circumstances are right he made the statement as the g.
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7 summit wrapped up and be a rich friends. brazil has accepted the g 7 offer of $20000000.00 to help tackle ongoing fires in the amazon but president joya both sonars said an international alliance to save the rain forest could be a form of colonize ation. and a judge in the u.s. state of oklahoma has found pharmaceutical john johnson and johnson liable for the opioid epidemic in the state which has killed thousands. new visa rules barring venezuelans from entering ecuador freely and now in effect thousands of venezuelan migrants trying to make it over the border from colombia in the hours before the restrictions came into effect at least 4000000 venezuelans have fled in recent years escaping the political and economic crisis chile and peru have also restricted their intake of migrants christian human has more from. acquittals border with colombia. i'm on the ecuador side of the border with and this is the
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1st state in which when it's leyland's are being required to hold a special visa to get into this country up until midnight before this little bit later went into effect absolutely thousands of families lose babies pregnant women elderly people trying to get in russia to get a process of water before this regulation we need to effect as many as 10500 b. are told when really just one day when the border is. back to empty and we see hundreds of people behind me on the colombian side being told that they cannot get through they need to tell us that they are not going to let that stop the they will not return to that its way like that they will use the illegal crossings if necessary to get to do these or they need to pay also because it is. hard to work because we lose the average salary now when we say that is it less than 2 as dollars ecuador the un says that it will not make it exceptional so they cannot take any more migrants that they are saturated that their own citizens do not have
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enough work and show to be there is willing to be trapped now on the colombian side of the border with there are already more than a 1000000. mexico's being criticized for failing to protect journalists and activists in a new united nations report xico is one of the most dangerous places in the world to be a journalist with 12 murdered this year alone. qantas going to marry her was the latest to be killed he was found stabbed to death at his home on saturday $153.00 journalists have been killed in the country since 2000 xico his murder rate is now at its highest levels ever recorded with 17000 people killed during the 1st half of this year and has more now from mexico city. there's a war on press freedom playing out on the streets of mexico and. a sharp increase in violence nationwide over the past 2 years has also meant an increase in attacks against journalists. the death of nabby how to me of mexico state over the weekend
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brings the total number of journalists killed this year to at least 10 hundreds turned out to attend his funeral. on august 3rd another journalist death also drew media attention this time it was soliciting ovaries a newspaper reporter from the state of a cruise before being gunned down soliciting a received death threats at his home you know i want someone to do something and i want them to leave may and my children alone i don't want anything else he was everything to me and now he's gone what else do they want to was one of the 3 journalists killed in mexico in the same week. the continued killings of journalists has sparked protests in vera cruz currently one of the most dangerous states in the country for media professionals. we want to those responsible for lacerating journalism in vera cruz to be captured the ones who harms another family
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we are journalists but also citizens by hurting or killing a journalist it ends up affecting a family célestin it wasn't rolled in a government program that aims to provide protection for journalists and human rights defenders a recent report by the united nations however says the mexican government has to step up its commitment toward the protection of freedom of expression. we are calling for a national campaign to prove the visibility of journalists and human rights defenders led by the president. more than $900.00 journalists and human rights workers are currently enrolled in the government's protection mechanism program mexico ranks among the world's most dangerous countries for journalists more than $150.00 have been killed since the year 2000 despite the establishment of the protection mechanism for human rights defenders and journalists in 2012 attacks against press freedom have continued unabated but it up in mexico city and now that hooks in is the mexican representative for the committee to protect journalists and
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he's worked as a journalist in mexico he joins us live from mexico city thank you for being with us can you tell us a little bit more about the latest journalist it to be held in mexico and what he was looking into. thank you for having me so maybe can is kind of i mean you know it was a 42 year old reporter from that were hugo that's a small town not too far from mexico city and he was the founder and editor of a small website called up summit only of those who did and he divided this time into being reporting on serious news stories such as the crash of a how to crop for about a month ago and extortions lie to police as well as stories on cooking and recipes and ordering through their home and social issues so he was a bit of a mixed bag as a reporter so is it your impression that he put some noses out of joint and upset the wrong people it's very possible from what we were able to find out maybe we'll have some several threats against him including in the past your mom's
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funeral mechanism which was mentioned in that report just now actually approached him last year and this year but they never managed to incorporate him for reasons we still don't entirely understand and as far as we know he had also had conflicts with local authorities so it's very possible that the threats made come from there and 753 journalists can kill since 2006 children an extraordinary figure do you see any kind of progress on this issue well honestly the situations only gotten worse in the last few years 2017 was the worst year down 2018 and now 2019 is probably likely to become the bentleys here in modern history for mexican reporters and in terms of not only the violence we also get 2 or 3 reports every day everything from threats to equipment they have to online harassment campaigns and we're waiting for a response from the federal government which unfortunately has not materialized so what kind of things would do you think would help i mean if i guess and impression
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people can get away with it is part is part of the problem isn't it. impunity is the number one factor that keeps fueling these crimes and the mexican government should 1st and foremost focus on 2 areas one of them being the strengthening of the protection mechanism which is suffering from lack of staff to let money but the other thing is that they should improve their law enforcement efforts and really get a few convictions even if you know we're just a handful because really the case is upwards of mexican reporters remain unpunished so when you were generous what kind of things did you do to avoid the risks well there are always you know there's always areas where you know that you're going to be exposed to extreme risk you have to me a few times a few years ago you try to activate your support network to make sure that your editors know where you are at all times you make sure that you know if possible a way out if some kind of dangerous situation might present itself but it's also a matter of realizing that in some areas of mexico you're really at the mercy of armed actors and most of the time especially for reporters you know they're they
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can go and they can even there's not much of a problem but reporters like navy they live among the same people threaten them and they're under a constant threat and that's actually where we still really have an answer on how to prevent these friends and al but hoatson thank you very much indeed for taking the time to talk just thank you thank you for having me it's what appears to be massing troops on its borders with lebanon and syria these tanks were spotted at one of the border as israel has carried out air strikes against iranian backed groups in lebanon iraq and syria in the past few days lebanon's president described it as israeli aggression and a declaration of war. if allah has promised to retaliate and iran says it will support the lebanese group in any action against israel and a hunter has more from the lebanese capital beirut. the. hezbollah is burying its dead in its stronghold in southern beirut 2 of its fighters were
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killed in israeli airstrikes in neighboring syria on sunday night the lebanese armed group is promising retaliation it has told israel to be ready for a response its leader has in a stronger also threatened to shoot down any drone that violates lebanon's airspace after what he said was an attack by israeli drones in hezbollah's area of control in the lebanese capital hours earlier. if we remain silent on this breach it will create a very dangerous road for lebanon on repeating what is going on in iraq now. in iraq the iranian backed popular mobilization forces are blaming israel for a series of unexplained attacks on their bases and positions in recent weeks the latest was on sunday night close to iraq's border with syria which killed a number of fighters u.s. officials and israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu have hinted at possible israeli involvement in those strikes israel it seems has opened
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a new front. and. he's really saying they're ready to open war on 3 fronts beirut damascus and back that we can't ignore the political side however which the upcoming israeli elections the israeli army says its air strikes in syria stopped an attack by iran's revolutionary guards it released surveillance footage of what it said were members of the guards preparing a drone strike against israel israel has repeatedly hit what it says were iranian targets in syria over the years it wants to prevent iran from gaining a foothold and influence across the region but in the past few days it is believed to have operated in 3 neighboring. trees lebanon syria and iraq nothing apple did say he gave his security forces a free hand to act in many a rino as against an enemy state. law says the drone attack which damaged its media office violated the 2006 cease fire and changed the rules of engagement but at the
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same time the group is believed to have given israel a chance not to escalate tensions. as well as messages to the terror war telling the israelis any war will be costly and we are not alone so think twice iran's promise to support any action has takes against israel which doesn't seem to be backing down it is believed to be behind strikes on a position belonging to a palestinian faction allied to iran along lebanon's porter with syria early on monday there is a real danger of further attacks by either side could escalate to war so there are people that saudi arabia is denying that yemen's hooty rebels have attacked a military target in its capital riyadh with drones on sunday that said they also fired 10 ballistic missiles towards jews and a saudi led coalition has been fighting the fifty's in yemen for the past 4 years and investigation by the reuters news agency says the u.s.
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central intelligence agency does not spy on the government of the united arab emirates something critics say is a dangerous blind spot in washington's global monitoring report quotes former cia agents with one calling the agency's failure to adapt to the us political and military ambitions a dereliction of duty it also says the lack of you a monitoring puts the gulf nation a very small list of countries where the cia conducts a hands off approach the u.s. has played a role in numerous regional and international issues including yemen libya and the blockade of qatar there is a former u.s. ambassador to the united arab emirates and joins us now from washington thanks for being with us on this cia story that is of released why do you think the cia would not be spying on the u.s. . well that story was very misleading in some respects of course the united states does not spy on the internal politics of the united arab
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emirates the ruling families that kind of thing there are dozens of countries around the world where we don't get involved in spying on their internal politics and maneuverings. however of course the united states takes an interest in what the united united arab emirates might be doing in other countries with which we have friendly relations i could mention qatar i could mention tunisia i could mention libya number of countries where we obviously pay attention to what the united arab emirates does and sometimes we might disagree with it and we collect intelligence on what they're doing so so this one this isn't it wasn't you know it's that it would be a dereliction of duty somehow because of that because it doesn't recognize their kind of ordering military and political ambitions. she won't you think oh no. yeah that's nonsense that's like saying that it's
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a dereliction of duty for the united states not to pay attention to. the what's going on in the u.k. parliament in maneuverings toward breck's it. there are just way too many issues around the world and we have to focus our intelligence assets were you really need the help and. learning internal secrets of the united arab emirates ruling families is not one of them so i mean how do you think this plays into the what looks like a bit like a dispute between us and saudi arabia and them to how to handle yemen i mean that that this report suggests that actually the difference is that they want to spy on the u.a.e. but they do spy on saudi arabia where you think that's right. well i think the truth is that we have had to take an interest in the internal politics of saudi arabia among other things an american journalist was killed
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and our intelligence agencies believe that some senior people in the saudi. government were behind it and responsible for it. but if you're talking about yemen which i think there are there is a really important issue involved in terms of the gradual disengagement of the united arab emirates from its very close alliance with saudi arabia in dealing with the problem of yemen it's not so much that the 2 governments are in conflict certainly the u.a.e. would like to see. the legitimate internationally recognized government which is allied with saudi arabia have some kind of victory over those these that are close to iran but for the united arab emirates the main issue is something else the main
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issue is that cities along the southern coast in particular and cities along the sea lanes in the in the red sea cities like aden and. that these cities are in the hands of people with whom the u.a.e. has influence and one of the things it's done over time is build up influence with militias from the southern tribes and from people in the city of aden and as a result it has close relations in what's called this southern transitional council and that has some separatist tendencies but that's because the u.a.e. strategic interest is much more in the sea lanes and much less in terms of the internal politics around some of the areas in the north and the west and the central part of yemen david not carefully s.m.'s into the u.a.e.
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thank you very much indeed for your time to talk to us thank you you're welcome still ahead this news out. in the shopian district. where people's livelihoods are at risk balling the lockout imposed by the government in new delhi . and the un. government to work vigorously to ease simmering s. no religious tensions. business updates brought to you by qatar airways going places together.
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business updates brought to you by qatar airways going places together. u.s. president says he discussed the kashmir dispute with india's prime minister on the
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sidelines of the g. 7 summit has been anger in indian administered kashmir since new delhi revoked his semi autonomous status this month trumpet offered to mediate between india and pakistan but he's now backtracked on that addressing his nation prime minister imran khan expressed frustration that he had been unable to reach an agreement with india. i attempted a political dialogue with the new year and see to them you take one step forward and i'll walk 2 steps towards you and the problem that we have with kashmir we can attempt to solve it but from the beginning we've had issues when they've awaited him to talk to them about kashmir they would find new problems and they would find opportunities to accuse pakistan of some kind of terrorism. restrictions in kashmir which are now entering their 4th week and made it difficult for people to make a living as jimmy reports district. this should be a happy time his family's apple crop is looking good this season and will be ready
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for harvesting at september but the region's lockdown has made it hard to get supplies and laborers from outside are being told to stay out there but you know. i've got to get the liberal side push me the government told them to go home best insights we can get because the markets a shot rice vegetables we can't even get meat for us says because everything is shut. that's affecting people with small businesses especially in farming where worried the restrictions on communication and movement means they're hard work will be thrown away. it's a situation that's common throughout the kashmir valley most businesses think shut in srinagar carpet sellers have already stocked up for both the tourist and wedding season this month but few have had any sales in weeks so many employees want here. freedom when we. houseboat hotels and famous doll lake sit
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empty. and with only local people riding a few of the gondolas many boat men are fishing to pass the time and catch a meal just before the restrictions earlier this month the government order tourists to leave the area taking with them one vital piece of the region's economy but it's not the 1st time kashmiris have suffered from work and businesses being shut down has it do. we know by the. abo and or the gone they have abandoned their work the mill their tourism season everything is at stake but they know there to be an existence their culture and be atlanta. i would stay. but doesn't know if he'll be allowed to transport his crop to market or find enough trucks to do so but he'll continue tending his fields because for many here culture
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and pride are more important than business and money says jimmy i'll just be in district indeed administered kashmir. the un special rapporteur on religious freedom says political leadership is not doing enough to deal with religious tensions but often and as reports now from columbus. immoderate shafi is struggling to cope she says her world turned upside down after her husband was arrested earlier this year it happened at a time of heightened tension shortly after muslim fighters launched attacks in and around sri lanka's capital colombo on easter sunday the family says he's a rest as part of an orchestrated campaign i didn't have my job i i don't have a place to stay and so less my children out and i'm going to school i had to face all these problems and. i have to play interventions for them for those problems
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has been less than eager i have to look after the legal aspect of my husband she doesn't want to show her face because she says the family has received threats her husband who is a doctor has been accused of master allays ition of seeing him these women. he was arrested in a case that police admit had no basis he has since been released on bail. the scandal followed weeks of and it was dim sentiment after the easter attacks which targeted churches and killing more than $250.00 people it also led to a spate of anti muslim violence targeting homes and businesses these events were on the agenda of the un special rapporteur on religious freedom during his levon day visit here. pre-emptive response is something everyone notes and then there are many cases in which either because of mismatch of the of the police available and the mobs in question that some of these mobs wearable to rampage on addressing the
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media on monday shahid said he had heard complaints of double standards by law enforcement authorities and about the failure of the state to protect people against hate crimes groups like the buddhist power force or border violence seem to have been accused of carrying out organized violence against the muslim community a charge. we have never spoken against the muslims in an organized manner. the political scene on every occasion spoke against muslim terrorism that has no connection to the ordinary muslim community. referring to the recent violence the un special rapporteur says sri lanka's government must do more to protect minorities in order to challenge extremism and create inclusion. you know rule of law very well protected very rule of law is not protected then then the vehicle communities are vulnerable to attacks and the majority feels that they can exploit
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that space to the to their advantage shahid says reforming the education system to teach respect for all religions is important showing its lankan should work towards creating a common identity beyond religion and race given the country's violent past motion lankans are likely to agree if politicians will let them in their finance. a deal to form a new government in italy is looking close after the democratic party indicated it had dropped its veto on just to pick on to serving another term as prime minister has been in talks with the 5 star movement since the collapse of 5 stars coalition government with the right wing league party keen to avoid early elections which could hand power to leader. astronauts have been making room at the international space station to allow an unmanned russian vessel to dock
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and all the capsule was moved to a different docking bay in an effort to make it easier for the russian soyuz amas 14 to land the vessel harrying a humanoid robot had to abort its attempt on saturday after and countering problems targeting the docking port another time tory mate on tuesday. that's a familiar on television news hour more news in a moment. a new perspective can change the world. for one chin is ian what began as
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a hobby has grown into a caution own way of life. teaching the next generation to strive for a higher level. and in so instilling in his country a sense of freedom and strength. new heights my chin is yeah on al jazeera. al jazeera. it's. where every. explores prominent figures of the 20th century and how life will remains influenced
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the course of history was the cuban revolution communist no way feel castro is a feudal eastern not a communist custer wanted his country che wanted international revolution became a point when the relationship came to an end the icons of revolution who changed the course of latin american politics. and fidel castro face to face on al-jazeera . this is the opportunity to understand the very different way where there. is a we don't leave. the g. 7 summit wraps up with president michael hopeful he has created the conditions for the u.s. and iranian president to meet. in
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our intake this is al jazeera live from london also coming up. on the amazon prime to global outcry but new data shows far more fires are burning across central africa. a judge in oklahoma finds the drug maker johnson and johnson liable for fueling the state's hope your doctor demick plus. i'm says camille in the philippian district if indeed and mr kashmir were people's livelihoods are at risk following the lockdown imposed by the government in new delhi. her g. 7 summit has wrapped up in france softer 3 days of talks between the leaders of 7 of the world's richest and most influential nations and there's at least the hope of a breakthrough on relations between the united states and iran u.s. president donald trump said he would meet iran's president under the right circumstances to diffuse months of tensions between the 2 countries but talk about what has more from the seaside town of beer its which hosted the g 7 the prospect
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of a meeting between the u.s. new raney and presidents was an unlikely outcome with the g. 7 in berates but as the summit came to an end its host the french president suggested talks between donald trump and hassan rouhani were possible. at some point there has to be a meeting between the iranian president and the us president i hope that in the next few weeks this meeting will take place france plays a role along with the other partners who signed the iran deal trump who pulled the u.s. out of the 2015 iran nuclear deal last year and imposed sanctions said he was open to diplomacy we're looking for no nuclear weapons no ballistic missiles and a longer period of time very simple we can have it done in a very short period of time. and i really believe that iran can be a great nation i'd like to see that happen the development came one day after the
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unexpected arrival of the iranian foreign minister in berates just odds of reef was invited by the french president who'd been asked by some g 7 leaders to mediate in the crisis. trumps conciliatory tone was also extended to trade he said beijing and washington could begin talks to resolve the tariffs dispute going into this summit a man or mackerel said he wanted to use it to make progress on deescalating tensions over iran and trade help tackle the amazon rain forest fires and kill divisions using multilateral cooperation at the end of the 3 day meeting it seems the french president has succeeded on several fronts they were unresolved issues though the u.k.'s prime minister boris johnson received only a vague promise of a future trade accord with the us and was no nearer to a deal on breaks it with the european union i think it's the job of everybody in parliament to get this thing done that is what the people want i also think by the
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way it would offer instant partners on the other side of the channel what they want they want this thing done they want they want it over the last year trump refused to sign the final g 7 statement this year has scrapped it replacing it with a one page summary of the meeting so with no commitments in writing the challenge will be to compel leaders to act on the focal promises they have made such a butler al-jazeera spirits'. stock markets across asia closed sharply down earlier on fears about the china u.s. trade war spot partly by trump's conflicting statements of the g. 7 to his benchmark nikkei index plunged more than 2 percent and china's currency the yuan dropped to an 11 year low and one point during the summit donald trump said he wished he'd impose higher tariffs on china on friday but he then said trade talks with china would resume very shortly from to european and u.s. shaz to climb during the g. 7 tensions between the french and brazilian leaders over the amazon while faas got
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personal after french president in one year mark or accused his brazilian counterpart of failing to deal with a fire as john abell sonera hit back indorsing a social media post which insulted michael's wife the bill said some extra in the disrespectful feelings about my wife what can i say it's it's sad but it's out of all for him and for the president people i think the president woman must be ashamed to reduce about the president i think that residents were great people must be ashamed to see this behavior they expect presidents to behave well towards others for sonora says the idea of creating an international alliance to save the amazon rain forest would be treating brazil like a colony. the brazilian president questioned the intentions of his french counterpart in his efforts to help preserve the amazon and brazil's environment minister has welcomed the g 7 g $20000000.00 to help fight the fires and i'm now
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has more from pennsylvania in northwest present. several 100 was illian military personnel have been deployed here to their own dawn your state capital port the way all we've seen some of the c 130 planes flying in which are being used to spray water on the affected area critics have said that this was a ploy by president also not all to appease some of the foreign criticism of his failure to act in dealing with the forest fires throughout the amazon he is a former military man who sees the military as a solution to many of the country's problems he said the military out to help i with the fires not so far accepted help from any other country that's been offering assistance to help them as far as we know israel at this stage who is sending some expertise there to help with the fires you know most of us he said it's begun raining we've had the 1st downpours of the rainy season which many in this region certainly feel is putting an end to the crises certainly as far as this year goes
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so they will so that will the city go some way to putting out the last of the forest fires in this particular region we flew over this area earlier this morning in a small plane to see what damage had been done most of the fires it must be said were out but the evidence of the devastation the fire of course was evident great back black sways of burnt vegetation throughout this particular area and also evidence of much devastation done in previous years now cattle farms soya plantations cutting a huge swathe through this part of the amazon. brazil tops the list of countries with the world's highest rate of deforestation critics say on regulate and cut and burn practices have contributed to the scale of fires raging across the amazon misstate of much of grocer one of the hardest hit areas tourism board for. this place may now look like a golf course but it was once a muzzle and in jungle. located in the state of mind
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a little sore in the center of brazil decades of deforestation have bade this a profitable area for agribusiness and that's why the recent fires affecting the amazones are not surprising to people like blue another sun dos. every year there are fires but the situation is worse now because of climate change and the president he basically tells people to go and cut down trees and nothing will happen to them the data we have here shows the heat and it can be verified whether it's a fire he compares the maps of 2018 with what is happening this year millions of trees gone with the help of sea source and fire. the map shows us where the fires are we travelled for 4 hours and arrived at one of the places that highlighted in parts of the amazon the burned areas have increased by 83 percent in just the past year fires are natural at this time of the year because of the dry
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weather the hate and the wind but environmentalists say that the sharp increase seen this year is due to farmers setting the forests allied to clear the land for pastures the problem is that in many cases those fires get out of control the brazilian law says that landowners can only cut down 20 percent of the trees in their property but that's rarely enforced catalogs not his real name is a small farmer in the area he's afraid to show his face president who has repeatedly said he wants to open up the amazon for business. catulus says that has encouraged people to burn more trees for the fiscal is us there are no controls nobody is watching what people are doing both or not or says he wants development and this is what development may bring there is no limits to ambition and it everyone wants more. deeper in the forest it's not difficult to find cut down
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trees hidden in the woods hiding from the satellites it's the 1st step to conquer new territories and extend the agricultural front here for cattle and crops the government insists the situation is no worse than previous years but satellite imagery shows something different and that's why countries like germany and norway have halted all payments to the amazon fund at using the government of failing to protect the environment but enough of i.d.s. has lived in this area his whole life he has been struggling to find a middle ground between preservation and development. the simplistic speech of the president that he is attacking n.g.o.s he is attacking families from here they want to take resources from n.g.o.s because we publish the truth he says we are attacking the country we can all work together for preservation and development somebody needs to explain to the government we are not the enemy government control is the only way to prevent the destruction of what is left of
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amazonia but what worries many here is that they claim the central government is purposely looking away. that madoff saw. well all attention is on them as now but there are currently more fires reported to be burning in central and southern africa than in the amazon and nasa says 70 percent of the active fires in the world are in africa it satellite data shows fires raging through large parts of angola and the democratic republic of congo and spawning as far east as madagascar the large number is believed to be due to slash and burn practices by farmers has been compounded by shorter rainy seasons alex ornstein is a data scientist and drop specialist who focuses on african agricultural trends he says the lack of rain in the region in the past 3 years does have a huge impact the real issue is that the impact of these brush fires is getting worse if you look at
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a lot of parts of sunny arid parts of the african continent particularly the west african said hello this used to be a regular occurrence during the dry season and when the rains would come around. there would allow for grasslands to grow again but unfortunately we are seeing a very significant increase in the variability of rainfall it's making the rainy seasons very volatile less predictable. and judge in the u.s. state of oklahoma has found the pharmaceutical john johnson and johnson liable in a massive lawsuit which accused it a few ling the opioid epidemic internet that the drug maker deceptively marketed painkillers and flooded the market with them the judge ordered it to pay damages of $572000000.00 is the 1st case to go to trial after thousands of lawsuits filed by state and local governments against opioid manufacturers and distributors shares in
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the company rose 5 percent following the decision. if you order overdoses of become a nationwide epidemic claiming the lives of tens of thousands of americans every year in oklahoma more than 6000 people have died since the year 2000 nationwide or 130 people die every day from opioid overdoses that's according to the u.s. department of health and human services around 40 percent of the cases involve drugs that were prescribed by a doctor. joins us live from the court in norman just outside of him a city and why is this being seen as a. well this was in many ways a test case there are thousands of other pending cases 2000 and load in the state of ohio so this ruling doesn't give oklahoma the money they wanted they wanted 17.2 $1000000000.00 they got $572000000000.00 but the figures don't really matter here is the message it sends to the pharmaceutical companies the judge was fairly
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unequivocal in blaming johnson and johnson for their role in fueling in a crisis that in this state alone has claimed more than 6000 lives in the last 20 years or so so it's being very closely watched across the country with thousands of other pending cases by both the pharmaceutical companies and those who work on the front lines of treating people one of the lawyers for oklahoma actually lost his firstborn son to addiction give a very emotional press conference in which he said we can get help to other kids like this so this was a very deeply personal issue for many people here in the state of oklahoma and sends a pretty strong message out to all the other pending cases so what does happen next . well johnson and johnson already say they will appeal the decision they say they broke no laws they were given the go ahead by the u.s. government to put these pills on the market but that really doesn't matter at the moment because all these are the pending cases this is set
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a precedent the precedent being the judge was fairly unequivocal gave a very short statement blaming big pharma as it's called here for playing a role in a crisis touched every socio economic background in this country i met a chief of police in a city outside of boston who told me he'd lost 4 of his officers of lost children to this epidemic so the relationship between big promise it will firms the various states now suing may have fundamentally changed because this does. the test case it does set a precedent those pharmaceutical companies now may very well be worried you may see something like we saw in the late ninety's when big tobacco settled with something like 47 states so johnson and johnson will appeal but the future now for big promise if you will companies may be very different and again i thank you very much . more to come in creating as tensions rise once again in manaus rakhine state the unofficial army is taking on the government. understands and continues to
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ban brazil's neighbors also suffering from massive wildfires. hello there we're back to all the west and cool weather across the southeast of australia 5 he's in a satellite little bit of cloud just says coastal areas that is going to be bringing with it one or 2 showers sunday on tuesday or on the cloud and hope out with the child's there shall be pushing through but look at the weather conditions in perth are just sitting off the coast 22 degrees celsius the high on choose it but by wednesday up to 28 degrees that is quite a few degrees above average for this time of year about 7 degrees above the average meanwhile the cloud is set to continue to push through the great by bringing those katty skies and showers into adelaide and melbourne 13 degrees celsius at best but
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pretty nice in brisbane with a high of 24 then we head across tools new zealand so we've got mostly clear skies into christ church for the next couple of days want to say clear skies i mean sunshine with the clouds it should actually be wet maybe some. day but that again is a clearing picture as we head off into wednesday temperature at about 14 degrees celsius plenty of rain there pushing through much of central and western japan is the seasonal rains for this time of year but they really are quite heavy and becoming very widespread as we head into wednesday in fact some are located. sions into western areas of honshu could see as much as 2 germany meters of rain meanwhile cloudy skies in seoul with a high that on wednesday of 28 degrees. think of some of the biggest companies in the world today all of them big tech with algorithms at their core the move that we used to want out of we produce we're in the midst of a great race for dot and big tech companies are on the chase empires are rising on
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a while for preparation and other commodities in the sector from a 5 part series ali re-examined where the corporations are color bars. like american power of victory just. going around to the top stories here as era u.s. president donald trump says he's willing to consider meeting his iranian counterpart house on rouhani if the circumstances are right made the statement as the g. 7 summit wrapped up in periods from. a judge in the u.s. state of oklahoma has found pharmaceutical josh johnson and johnson liable for the
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opioid epidemic in the state which has killed thousands. and brazil has accepted the g 70 for of 20000000 dollars to help tackle ongoing files in the amazon and the president. said an international alliance to save the rain forest would be a form of colonize ation. mobility is also under threat from rapidly spreading far as at least a 1000000 hectares of burnt with a far as doubling in size since thursday destroying villages and vos tropical forests president evo morales is now welcoming international aid but critics say the government has been far too slow to act. on his will. wildfires are burning beyond brazil's amazon in neighboring bolivia farmlands forests and entire villages in its amazon region have also been destroyed as the fires grow the country is now welcoming international aid president ever moralez
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was reluctant at 1st saying bolivia had the resources to handle the emergency but he has since changed his mind let's have all together i work on the support of the presidents of parg white she lay in spain we welcome any cooperation since wednesday we began managing our response the development bank of latin america says it will donate about half a $1000000.00 a barrel. in the region of cheeky tonia families including mothers carrying their children evacuate their village hoping the flames will spare their homes they packed a few bags knowing everything may burn to the ground but where were the fires are moving toward the community this is a risk they're facing especially children and women who can't run when the fire gets too close was the wildfires have led to protests critics say bolivia's government was slow to respond the government's policies they say have contributed to the problem illegal deforestation is on the rise and fires are
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commonly said by farmers to clear land for cattle and crops just like just that is what has been done has been done too late so much land has been destroyed how will this affect the world legislation that allows farmers to burn land needs to be repealed those who approved the legislation need to be punished thank you livi as military has been called in adding to a response team of nearly 2000 firefighters. 2 months before the election president morale is has about to suspend his campaign for a least a week to focus on the fires. as bolivia welcomes international help many fear to much environmental damage has already been done katia lopez of the young al-jazeera. new visa rules barring venezuelans from entering ecuador freely and now in effect found venezuelan migrants trying to make it over the border from colombia
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in the hours before the restrictions started at least $4000000.00 venezuelans a fled in recent years escaping the political and economic crisis this year in human has more from to come on board with colombia. i'm on the ecuador side of the border with and this is the 1st state each with its wayland's are being required to hold a special visa to get into this country up until midnight before this little bit later went into effect it's absolutely thousands of families toddlers babies pregnant women elderly people trying to get in rushing to get across the border before this regulation we need to effect as many as 10500 when it's really just one day when the border is practically empty and we see hundreds of people behind me on the colombian side being told that they cannot get through we need to tell us that they are not going to let that stop the they will not return to that this way let that they will use the illegal crossings if necessary to get to do these or they
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need to pay also the dollars. margin for venezuela the average salary now in minnesota is at less than 2 as dollars ecuador though says that it will not make it exceptions they cannot take anymore migrants that they are saturated that their own citizens do not have enough work and show that there is willing to be trapped now on the colombian side of the border with there are already more than a 1000000. police in kashmir say protest says have killed the driver of what they thought was a military truck restrictions in kashmir which are now entering the 4th week that made it difficult for people to make a living. this should be a happy time his family's apple crop is looking good this season and will be ready for harvesting at september but the region's lockdown has made it hard to get supplies and laborers from outside are being told to stay out there but you know.
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i've got to get the liberal side push me the government told them to go home best insights we can get because the markets a shot rice vegetables we can't even get meat for ourselves because everything is shut. that's affecting people with small businesses especially in farming who are worried the restrictions on communication and movement means their hard work will be thrown away. it's a situation that's common throughout the kashmir valley most businesses think shut in srinagar carpet sellers have already stocked up for both the tourist and wedding season this month but few have had any sales in weeks so many employers want to hear. them when we can we. house boat hotels and famous doll lake sit empty and with only local people riding a few of the gondolas many boat men are fishing to pass the time and catch
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a meal just before the restrictions earlier this month the government order tourists to leave the area taking with them one vital piece of the region's economy but it's not the 1st time kashmiris have suffered from work and businesses being shut down has it do. we know by the. abo and or take on they have abundant that work the mill. their tourism the uproot season everything is that stick but they know there to be an existence their culture and be atlanta. i would convince her to stay. but doesn't know if he'll be allowed to transport his crop to market or find enough trucks to do so but he'll continue tending his fields because for many here culture and pride are more important than business and money there's jimmy all al-jazeera shopian district indeed administered kashmir. while they were doing
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a crisis in manama has captured the attention of the world the ethnic people have also been fighting for recognition and rights in rakhine state in 2009 they founded an armed group called the army and as diana karim reports there's been a spike in violence in the past few months was at the end of 2018 fighting between ethnic arcano army in the me i'm army in rakhine state escalated and it's continued this year the latest outbreak earlier this year when it was reported more than 20 people were killed from both sides. the ethnic are kaante people are fighting for greater autonomy for me i'm our central government the region was called our calm before it was renamed rakhine state this in the same state that saw a violent meum army crackdown against the muslim minority 2 years ago prompting a mass exodus across the border into bangladesh they are con army is based in
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trains in neighboring catchin state. go to fight is we want equality and self-determination this is a starting point policy from our organization we want to be able to have all american states future. thousands have fled the violence into neighboring chin state living in camps for the internally displaced over the last 3 years more females have started to join the our kind army ranks after losing family members and land in fighting the comedy i've never seen a situation like this before i feel very sad and i want to help as much as i can for the displaced people the our con army deputy commander feels the struggle of his people is overlooked because of the plight of the rich he refers to them as been gali a term used by the medium our government and army the remainder consider this derogatory as they've lived in may mar for generations. with their program was bengalis iraq i stayed quiet attention and sympathy for them and want to back the
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world please look at what happened to our. first 2 were also in the same situation like the bengali the peace process to achieve a cease fire with all armed ethnic groups led by the head of mi a mars government on science to chief has stalled she faces increased political pressure for progress as the peace talks were a campaign promise when she was elected in 2015 with the recent violence peace appears to still be well out of reach and that could have consequences for the general election early next year. diana karen alger. an investigation by the roaches news agency says the u.s. central intelligence agency does not spy on the government of the united arab emirates something critics say is a dangerous blind spot in washington's global monitoring report quotes former cia agents with one calling the agency's failure to adapt to the u.s. political and military ambitions
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a dereliction of duty it also says the lack of you a monitoring puts the gulf nation in a very small list of countries where the cia conducts a hands off approach the u.a.e. has played a role in numerous regional and international issues including yemen libya and the blockade of qatar david mack is a former u.s. ambassador to the united arab emirates he says saudi arabian interests and the u.s. are diverging in some areas it's not so much that the 2 governments are in conflict certainly the u.a.e. would like to see. the legitimate internationally recognized government which is allied with saudi arabia have some kind of victory over the whole thing is that are close to iran but for the united arab emirates the main issue is something else the main issue is that cities all along the southern coast in particular and cities along the sea lanes in the in the red sea cities like
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aden and. that these cities are in the hands of people with whom the u.a.e. has employed astronauts have been making room at the international space station to allow an unmanned russian vessel to dock another capsule was moved to a different docking bay in an effort to make it easier for the russian soyuz m s 14 to land the vessel carrying a humanoid robot on board had to bolt its attempt on saturday offering countering problems targeting the docking port another attempt will be made on tuesday. quite a mind of the headlines u.s. president donald trump says he's willing to consider meeting his iranian counterpart house on rouhani if the circumstances are right he made the statement on the final day of the g.
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7 summit in beirut it's frons. if the circumstances were correct toward the right i would certainly agree to that but in the meantime. they have to be good players you understand with that we and they can't do what they were saying they're going to do because if they do that they're going to be met with really very violent force we have no choice so i think they're going to be good china is calling for calm in its ongoing trade war with the u.s. often markets in asia close shop it down before was triggered by conflicting messages from president trump on the matter at the g. 7 trump initially said he wished he'd imposed higher tariffs on china on friday but he then said trade talks with china would resume very shortly brazil has accepted the offer of 20000000 dollars from the g 7 countries to help tackle ongoing fires in the amazon and the president also narrow said an international alliance to save the rain forest would be a form of colonize ation in a landmark ruling
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a judge in the u.s. state of oklahoma has found a pharmaceutical john johnson and johnson liable in a $17000000000.00 lawsuit which accused it a few name the opioid epidemic the judge ordered it to pay damages of 5 $172000000.00 far lower than the state of oklahoma was hoping for johnson and johnson motivated by greed and avarice is responsible for the opioid ready after damage. johnson and johnson with barley be held accountable for thousands of deaths and addiction caused by their activities. barring venezuelans from freely entering ecuador now in effect thousands of his writing migrants tried to make it over the border from colombia before the restrictions came in at least 4000000 venezuelans are fled the political and economic crisis in recent years chile and peru have also restricted the intake of migrants.
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big tech is up next and. after that buy from them.
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think of some of the biggest companies in the world today there's who amazon microsoft facebook which are all of them big tech with algorithms at that. one more than just uses or customers will these businesses would generate is a data they need us to like them for them to be indispensable because the more that we use them the more data we produce and where in the midst of a great race the dot and big tech companies are on the chase.
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for the past 3 years academics nichol dri analysts have been investigating a phenomenon they call datta colonialism. while the scales in context may have changed they say colonialism same underlying functions of empire building extraction and appropriation remain the new langue grab going on there's not land that's being grabbed it's us it's human life the acquisition the construction of data valuable data for corporate use out of the flow of life that's the language going on and that's why the work is the only work does justice to that let's think for instance of all the and use her license agreements or the terms of use that we read whenever we sign up for a new social media platform if we think about the process of being asked to agree to something that we cannot even understand and signing away certain rights signing
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away our property in this act i think it's a very interesting we're not for one moment saying. colonialism today with data in both the same horrific level of violence that was involved in the beginnings of colonialism. but saying that the core of historic colonus and was the force to involve people in a massive new system a new order a new organization of the world economy in the history of kuoni listen we've had different empires times of course we can think of this kranish empire the british empire i think we would say at this point in history in terms of data colonialism we have 2 centers of power and we have the united states on one side and china in the other and of course we know the american corporations very well in terms of google facebook amazon maybe we don't know the chinese corporations very well because their reach is just beginning to expand. beyond china so far china has been
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kind of like an internal colony but we are starting to see how these corporations how the infrastructure developed in trying out is starting to expand to 2 different parts of the world including asia and africa. but china's biggest private company while way technology has africa has been a coal miner so it's countries like south africa nigeria kenya which is where now had delivered some of the biggest most rapidly growing telecom. has studied the wild way of hearing. their building products for example that are suited to the african market the cheapest mobile phone that you can get in various african markets it's a chinese phone so you will not for a moment but if you looked on one to both of the site and they are building relationships with governments they are providing infrastructure so while we has
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provided a lot of infrastructure for. surveillance in kenya and i see team kenya to work in every country with its developed by the people somewhere in the middle and that's really useful for governments here so we advise you know on that government data centers on the economy and services or anything else we can share those experiences from around the world the nice thing is of course it provides benefits of people connected to our business so that generating revenue for us as well but the other piece of the chinese influence is the surreptitious one there's a lot of questions about data collection with technology that's coming in from china and in some ways it's the other side of the korean right there's a whole lot of data that's being taken out from african countries and from african citizens to be kept handled used by people who are not necessarily responsible for answerable to african people so while it is not. access people's data or cell
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data so i don't think that we are the kind of company. that are benefitting off people's data but the only data that we're using is just to improve our products themselves such as using artificial intelligence our smartphones in our network equipment so it can in improve be faster there are skeptics who would question adam's assertion after almost speak to companies do exploit use a dart or in some way however even if while way doesn't do it there are other chinese operations in africa that collect and make extensive use of people's data. here in nairobi the dominance of chinese tech is undeniable from telecommunication lines to satellite networks right down to the planes in people's hands and the apps on those fights chinese companies have this market and much of the data it produces in its cross transients holdings for instance sells to over 40 percent of the mobile market in sub-saharan africa it's fun someone to the brand names techno i
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tell and in phoenix but its strategy doesn't end with the hardware data driven apps like the music streaming service do play and digital payment platform pompei add to a growing repository of data on african uses and can help boost money making opportunities for transition when you think about digital partners and i think any i think the thing that gets lost is that the primary objective it was about money was fundamentally about using power using culture using all these kinds of tools to impose one society in another society is still the 1st society could make money off of that where you define corner as a map that then you really start to see the residences in china has been investing in africa many parts of asia for 2030 years very systematically is never pretended that the earth is doing anything other than expanding its economic interests it has not you. civilizing rhetoric because it doesn't need to let's
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contrast that for the moment with a company like microsoft which talks about democratizing ai or facebook that is concerned to give as it were connection. a privilege for some of the rich and powerful it needs to be something that everyone shares. ready facebook has made a big push to present itself as a benevolent force to get people online since 2013 the company has been leading a giant project called internet dot all sort of gateway to the world wide web for those with poor connectivity. the app that serves as the portal to facebook's version of the internet is called free basics and it's been launched in at least 60 countries more than half of them in africa the idea is to provide access to select sites without data charges in effect it's a stripped down version of the internet that has one very important component
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guaranteed connection with facebook and guaranteed possibilities of data extraction which is why despite the company's slick marketing not everyone is convinced that this is an entirely selfless exercise non-jury cimbali is a leading to do rights advocate i think what's most interesting in the what i'll call techno politics is the rush to connect the unconnected and the rush to retain the connected in very specific platforms a lot of these actors will do anything and everything to make sure at some point or other these users go through their platforms because it's all about the data it's all about how much data can i get about people's of arkansas ads so that you know concrete predictive things to keep them hooked into what i'm able to offer and therefore the world will keep churning there's no way that a lot of these tech companies would be able to behave in their home countries the way they behave in the developing world there is no way that you would be able to roll out a project as big as free basics without some kind of check or balance with some
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without some kind of ethic or. there was no effort through even say this is what this means this is how this will work for you and that is really telling of what they think that african people want and or need from the internet projects that are largely in this case. emerging from a silicon valley or western america centric approach to connecting and connected really deeply steeped in the same condescending ways of doing development so this notion that give them something that is better than nothing i mean why would anyone not want that data calling us from is framed in terms of a civilizational mission when people are connected we can accomplish some pretty amazing things just like historical colonialism was framed as well in terms of bringing progress bringing something that is good and beneficial for humanity we can get closer to the people that we care about we can get access to jobs and
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opportunities and i do our participation is expected and our petition pretty soon we are told it's for our own good meanwhile all of this extraction and capturing of the you know is kind of happening in the background without us realizing the true consequences ready the facebook free basics model which is basically about expanding for facebook the demain of data extraction across the world at a time when demand for facebook is beginning to fall amongst younger people in particular in the so-called west. is very interesting just as in historic colonialism the apparent weakness of the colonized populations that lack of weapons their lack of certain results is the lack of an economic structure suggested to the colonizers that they need to be colonized they need to have whatever the colonial system would offer them to bind them in. free basics is just one of facebook's many
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initiatives across africa. facebook's latest push here in kenya is called express why 5 companies teamed up with local its next service providers to in-store why 5 hotspots like here in the mass i town of eagle are on the outskirts of nairobi. jerry nimble c.e.o. is a hairdresser who signed up as of into facebook's express why. he gets a commission on every dot a bundle he sells his customers say they look like they do his 1st book because even myself i use it and they find their bundle keep the cheaper. compared to other networks you get the 1st round of the 1100 in biz for free yeah. right. yes they do they find it cheaper to fund it and then the doctors don't express why fi has been an undeniable success here it is made web access cheap of the people living in underserved locations then there are so many people living i don't want
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to connect at the. however for those studying the activities of facebook and other big tech companies in kenya it's impossible to ignore the huge potential for da to money. last year facebook was pushed to admit that it added its own software to the wife i access points that enabled non facebook data such as customer names and phone numbers to directly flow to the corporation while facebook says the purpose of the software is to ensure that hotspots functioning well there's no clarity on just how much additional data is being collected and how that's being used a lot of these companies aren't african they're not even based in kenya in africa forget kenya or longer so what is a kenyan citizens of birth to do an american company uses their data ourselves their data markets it you know as a product and without their consent without their ability to intervene to appeal to a court system that's kind of the gray area that we're falling into it a lot of these big you know tech companies. facebook isn't the only big tech
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company playing the connectivity card here in cannes last year alpha that the parent company who's most famous brand is google signed a deal with telecom kenya to quote connect the unconnected using billings. billings loon is a path breaking project that's been 8 years in the making and the idea is deceptively simple use high altitude balloons to provide internet connectivity in remote and hard to reach parts of the world kenya is where luna is making its commercial debut i spoke with charles merida he doesn't represent loon but it's more well known sister company google google's mission from the get go was to really get a lot of the africans who are offline online and to make sure they get online in are more affordable and have better conduct content as well as relevance and the mission around noon is to ensure that we are able to deliver connectivity to the
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most remote part of the continent and around the world so i am proud to say that here in kenya is the 1st commercial agreement between noon our sister company and tell kenya we're in. to be seen is what standards of. accountability there will be where that mean that people are restricted to only using google esque sites for instance that remains to be question what data will be collected in the process of connecting people i put some of these questions to charles he made it clear he couldn't say much more about learning after all he doesn't work for that company he did tell me this though about google's approach to darkly. so what we do at google is we ensure that we have employed a user trust that is something that's really important and that users understand exactly what we're doing with the data about we have on them we also ensure that they're able to manage and control so transparency ability to manage and control the data that we have on our users is really critical and when it's so transparent
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people get to enjoy the magic of google just uses a lot of positive p.r. speak especially when it comes to discussing matters relating to data that doesn't come as a big surprise because data ownership access privacy is an incredibly sensitive legal and political issue across the world governments and regulators have been looking at their data laws more and more seriously but perhaps the most widely publicized is the european union's general data protection regulation otherwise known as g.d.p. which set a global benchmark for strengthening individual rights are the personal data that's really the discrepancy that we're seeing here is that western governments western societies have more space to keep these companies in check and to force them to abide by their local social standards and countries in other parts of the world and that's where the corner is a label really starts to become evident there is not enough space for ordinary
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african citizens to push their governments on these issues there is not enough space for us to actually demand. different standard of treatment in july has a point just take a look at the state of data regulation around the world and you'll see how stark the imbalances are cording to a study by the law firm d.l.a. piper north america or australia much of europe and china have what they would classify as heavy will robust regulation for many countries across africa regulation ranges from moderate to 0 the kenyan government says they're working on it but the speed at which they are developing policies is being outstripped by the speed at which private players are revolutionizing telecoms and internet connectivity i don't think there's anything particularly wrong with private sector actors taking the lead role if especially again they have the resources and the wherewithal to be able to do this the question is where are state in this game to
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keep them in check because of the narrative around how any and all digital development is a positive or a net positive asking critical questions is almost seen as being an enemy of progress and therefore the risk is your people in the community will miss out so because of that nuanced and problematic notion being created very few politicians and by extension government actors want to step up to the plate to play this game proactively. which come to think of our daughter as being with us ready to be extracted like oil can be extracted from the earth i certainly used to think of my daughter that way before i began doing research and interviews for this episode but i've since come to realize that our lives locations family members our preferences our dislikes all of this is a really dark and to create algorithms that can convert every single human being into a collection of bits that money can be made off of so this myth that the somehow
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the oil or they call it the day to exhaust naturally within a switch is naturally there to be used by corporations it happens for their profit is certain. credibly important myth to say there's nothing we can do about this this is the way things are but go back 203040 years this was not the way things were we need to hold on to that to remember it to pass on the memory of that. in order to show that this remains the myth of the digital or the colonial project so we're not just talking about the big players facebook google amazon in china by do tencent cetera the social quantifications sector is a larger industry sector that's composed of the big players as well as alternative hard wired manufacturers software developers all of this platform interpret new words as well as data analytics firms and data brokers so all together they.
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constitute the. sector that provides the infrastructure for making this extraction possible structure of data from our human social life we are the bodies producing the data but we're not necessarily the ones who benefit from that so at stake here is people's ideas people's dreams people's hopes people's frustrations being used to sell things back to them where do we actually get our money back we're not saying no attack in africa we're not saying you know just jump over africa as you're thinking about and i internet it's it has done a lot of really good things in africa it's made a lot of connections possible that were not possible even 510 years ago the question is how do you mitigate the harm how do you make sure that you protect the good and you corral the bad the model that we have now isn't doing that i think we should be bored enough and brave enough to go back to the drawing board and challenge ourselves to think differently about this model is there a better way of doing this thing is there
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a more humane way of doing this connectivity thing that we're trying to do through all of these corporations. technology is neither positive and negative or neutral it will always of the intrinsic motivation that exists in a community where it's being deployed one practical tip that i've found very useful is to keep myself informed and bring in as much critical thought and questioning of when we are told you know technology x. is the solution and is the disrupt. you know to question how we were arrived at that conclusion supporting actors who are making their day to day lives to ask these things is one way to also keep making sure your views your concerns are represented and you know not to give into the fear we can still figure out how to
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heal the society technology could help with that but it's dead teaching us that we and we need to go back to the basics of how we form societies how we find consensus and how we quite exist in this world children who are now 5 years or younger growing up with toys which are in private robots. algorithmically programmed which operate by tracking everything they do and playing back to them in forms that help the child grow everything they say we don't know what happens to that data but it will be probably impossible in about 10 years' time to say to the child who is now by that stage a grown up adult you can live in a world without being tracked algorithmically at every moment of your life it's therefore very important we start in a sense speaking the truth to a very new type of power that is walking the face of the i think it's easy to forget you know a time even before all of our lives were ruled in
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a certain sense but all of these for acknowledging and yet when i talk to young people. encouraged by the sense that they really don't think all of this. and they are actually less deterministic that i am when i think about technology and when i hear them talk about their changing perceptions towards facebook toward social media how they're becoming more critical of it and how they're becoming more . literate consumers in terms of reading the terms of service in terms of trying to make sense to start mccauley the mystic way which i think that gives me hope. that people can become more active consumers. participants think that it's really important for us as we're thinking about the issues that they're pushing teacher to challenges the technology presents to remember that human beings this and human nature is very it's very true and it's very repetitive
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we've actually been here before with other forms of communications technology we think about radio and the role that radio played for example in the 2nd world war when you think about the launch of television and beam of the fears around advertising in the fields around how. change society but these are all conversations that have actually happened in the past and so for me the big lesson is let's learn from what has already happened in the past let's not be afraid to look back there's nothing. so radically different about internet technology that human beings haven't. before. player law. or luck. the luck was.
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the load was. utterly loaded. the low flow for. violence and discrimination are all too familiar to many women in india a reality too often reinforced by bollywood. but its leading star is throwing his weight behind the cause. and using his celebrity to advocate for
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gender equality. to snakes on a constant witness. leading the tree. 1st substance the world is addicted to now at the center of a global trade war. it's latex in its purest form found in tires phones toothbrushes satellites or mattresses it is an essential element in daily life and so deep in the ivorian forest goes from tree to tree scarring them for the precious liquid trump is imposing $200000000000.00 in tariffs on china the world's largest manufacturer of rubber goods china in response imposes tariffs on synthetic rubber the west produces while in the short term this is bad for african producers in the long run some hope the continent could benefit from this trade war but aware of the
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global trade war and despite falling prices. calls rubber white gold at least for now. in afghanistan and the taliban is renowned for its violent repression of women now a new deal with the u.s. could see the group return to power one o one a student just to gates the afghan women who paid the price for pace on al-jazeera . this is al-jazeera. hello i'm rob matheson and this is the news hour live from doha coming up in the next 60 minutes as another g. 7 summit is comes to a close as this year's host paved the way for
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a thaw in relations between the u.s. and iran. not just the amazon fires raging across africa prompt calls for more to be done to scrap the practice of slashing and burning. a judge in oklahoma finds the drug maker johnson and johnson guilty of fueling the state's opioid epidemic. in the shopian district of indeed and mr kashmir where people's livelihoods are at risk following the lockdown imposed by the government in new delhi. the g. 7 summit in france has ended with hopes of a breakthrough in relations between the united states and iran funds president emanuel mccraw says he's hopeful the event has created the conditions for the historic meeting between the presidents of the u.s.
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and iran within weeks both leaders say that they're open to that there was also progress in washington's dispute with france over tax in the profits of u.s. technology companies and at a climate change meeting that u.s. president donald trump did not attend leaders agree to set up a $20000000.00 fund to help fight fires in the amazon reports from below it's. the prospect of a meeting between the u.s. president was not i'm likely outcome of the g. 7 in berates but is the summit came to a different president suggested talks between donald trump and hassan rouhani was possible. at some point there has to be a meeting between the iranian president and the us president i hope that in the next few weeks this meeting will take place france plays a role along with the other partners who signed the iran deal trump who pulled the u.s. out of the 2015 iran nuclear deal last year and imposed sanctions said he was open
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to diplomacy we're looking for no nuclear weapons no ballistic missiles and a longer period of time very simple we can have it done in a very short period of time. and i really believe that iran can be a great nation i'd like to see that happen the development came one day after the unexpected arrival of the iranian foreign minister in berates jihads our reef was invited by the french president who had been asked by some g 7 leaders to mediate in the crisis. trust conciliatory tone has also extended to trade he said beijing and washington could begin talks to resolve the tariffs dispute going into this summit a man or mackerel said he wanted to use it to make progress on the escalating tensions over iran and trade help tackle the amazon rain forest fires and kill divisions using multilateral cooperation at the end of the 3 day meeting it seems the french
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president has succeeded on several fronts there were unresolved issues though the u.k.'s prime minister boris johnson received only a vague promise of a future trade accord with the u.s. and was no nearer to a deal on breaks it with the european union i think it's the job of everybody in parliament to get this thing done making it what the people want i also think by the way it's what our friends and partners on the other side of the channel what they want they want this thing done they want they want it over last year trump refused to sign the final g 7 statement this year has scrapped it replacing it with a one page summary of the meeting so with no commitments in writing the challenge will be to. pelly just acts on the promises they have made. al-jazeera. stock markets across asia close sharply down on monday on fears about the china u.s. trade war sparked partly by trump's conflicting statements that the g 7 tokyo's benchmark
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nikkei index plunged by more than 2 percent while china's currency the yuan dropped to an 11 year low at one point during the summer donald trump said he'd wished he'd imposed higher tariffs on china on friday but he then said trade talks with china would resume shortly prompting european and u.s. shares to climb trumps already looking ahead to the next to g. 7 summit which is due to take place in the united states in 2020 the us president suggested the annual meeting could be held at one of his own properties at trump golf resort in miami and he brushed off suggestions it be using his public position for private financial gain. it has buildings that have $50.00 to $70.00 acres so each delegation could have become its own. but there is though a geisha they have the ability. to build a sort of grocery a big great car for just so we're thinking about it they love the location of the
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hotel and the also like the fact that it's like they said they get bored with the game in miami. miami so it's great every carbon dog is an international affairs analyst and he's principal of r.c. communications it's an international consulting firm his joining us live from washington thank you very much indeed for your time sir to those of us watching the summit from the outside the tones appear to be somewhat subdued compared to previous years what's your take on what's been going on in the dynamics of this. well i think that subdued tone that you are perceiving is exactly right and i think it's due to 2 reasons one is and we've known this i think this is donald trump's 3rd g 7 he does not like these multilateral meetings where he has to be the master of the deal with other world leaders that don't answer to him and that's nothing new but the 2nd dynamic that i think made this g 7
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a little more subdued is that last year a many of the other world leaders were thinking about how to accomplish their individual country's goals and the multilateral goals within the framework of what donald trump was doing in his america 1st policy this year i get the sense that a lot of them are adding an element to waiting it out because as you know we are well under way for the 2020 alexion seem united states and i think particularly china iran and to some extent north korea they realize that it might be best to wait this out to see of donald trump is going to get reelected to see who they're going to be dealing with in just a little over a year so i think that's why there was kind of this muted subdued tone to the g. 7 this year ok let me just deal with some of those specifics you've been talking about let's start with iran it looked as though that president. was really putting forward the suggestion that the possibility could happen that there
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would be a meeting between the u.s. and iranian presidents do you think he's doing this more from a position of hope rather than expectation. honestly think he's doing it from a position of desperation just because on the one hand it's totally possible that the u.s. president donald trump would meet with the iranian president because he went to the demilitarized zone and met with chairman kim jong un in north korea so anything's possible but he also knows that it was a really weird dynamic in the press conference today because you have president kroll talking about the ways that they were trying to strengthen the deal as it remained without the u.s. while the president united states was standing beside him justifying why the u.s. got out of it because he was such a bad deal so i think menu mccraw is trying to salvage as much as he came in with the multilateral world relations with iran to salvage as much as possible with the
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u.s. not being in there on deal covered up we appreciate your time and your thoughts thank you very much indeed for joining us. the tensions between the french and brazilian leaders over the warmers in wildfires got personal after french president emmanuel macron accused his brazilian counterpart of failing to deal with the fires i had a ball so now to head back endorsing a social media post which insulted knuckles wife. said some extraordinarily disrespectful feelings about my wife what can i say it's sad it's sad but it's not above all for him and for the president people i think the president woman must be ashamed to reduce about the president i think that residents were great people must be ashamed to see these behavior they expect presidents to behave well towards others well sinatra says the idea of creating an international alliance to save the amazon rain forest will be treating his country like a colony the brazilian president questioned the intentions of his french counterpart
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is efforts to help preserve the amazon but his environment minister has welcomed the g $70.00 offer of 20000000 dollars to help fight the fires critics say unregulated cut and burning practices have contributed to the scale of fires raging across the amazon there is about reports from the state of mato grosso one of the hardest hit areas. this place may now look like a goal of course but it was once a muscle jungle. located in the state of mind a little fall in the center of brazil decades of deforestation have this a profitable area for agribusiness and that's why the recent fires affecting the amazones are not surprising to people like blue another us. every year there are fires but the situation is worse now because of climate change and the president he basically tells people to go and cut down trees and nothing will happen to them the
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data we have here shows the heat and it can be verified whether it's a fire he compares the maps of 2018 with what is happening this year. millions of trees gone with the help of c. source and fire. the map shows us where the fires are we traveled for 4 hours and arrived at one of the places that highlighted in parts of the amazon the burned areas have increased by 83 percent in just the past year fires are natural at this time of the year because of the dry weather the hate and the wind but environmentalists say that the sharp increase seen this year is due to farmers setting the forest allied to clear the land for pastures the problem is that in many cases those fires get out of control brazilian law says that landowners can only cut down 20 percent of the trees in their property but that's rarely enforced catalogues not his real name is a small farmer in the area he's afraid to show his face president jade also nat'l
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has repeatedly said he wants to open up the amazon for business cattle says that has encouraged people to burn more trees for the full scale is us so there are no controls nobody is watching what people are doing both on autos says he wants to relevant and this is what development may bring there is no limits to ambush and it is everyone wants more. deeper in the forest it's not difficult to find cut down trees hidden in the woods hiding from the satellites it's the 1st step to conquer new territories and extend the agricultural frontier for cattle and crops the government insists the situation is no worse than previous years but satellite imagery shows something different and that's why countries like germany and norway have halted all payments to the amazon fund accusing the government of failing to protect the environment but enough of i.d.s. has lived in this area his whole life he has been struggling to find
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a middle ground between preservation and development here's a link. this implies tic speech of the president that he is attacking n.g.o.s he is attacking families from here they want to take resources from n.g.o.s because we publish the truth he says we are attacking the country we can all work together for preservation and development somebody needs to explain to the government we are not the enemy government control is the only way to prevent the destruction of what is left of amazonia but what worries many here is that they claim the central government is purposely looking away. with all the attention is on the amazon right now but there are currently more fires reported to be burning in central and southern africa than in the amazon nasa says 70 percent of the active fires in the world are in africa it satellite data shows fires raging through large parts of angola and the democratic republic of
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congo and spawning as far east as madagascar farmers are being blamed for the problems being compounded by shorter rainy seasons alex ornstein is a data scientist and a drug specialist who focuses on african nagra cultural trends in says the region used to have up to 6 months of rain but the lack of rain in the past 10 years is having a huge impact. the real issue is that the impact of these brush is getting worse if you look at a lot of parts of semi arid parts of the african continent particularly the west african said hello this used to be a regular occurrence during the dry season and when the rains would come around there would allow for grasslands to grow again but unfortunately we are seeing a very significant increase in variability of rainfall it's making the rainy seasons very volatile and less predictable in 1951 a lot of parts of the west african so how enjoyed
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a 6 month rainy season today over the past few years is a 3 month rainy season sometimes even only 2 months so we have a much longer drive period in which more fires can happen and a much shorter rainy period the west african so how as in many respects sort of ground 0 for the impacts of climate change and these hurting communities depend on pasture to feed their animals and their livelihoods and when we have a situation where there is a brushfire that wipes out your pasture and you have to wait 67 months for the rains to come this creates a serious problem and results in the loss of a lot of animals and while herders may oftentimes be the ones who feel these effects 1st they really occupy a critical pillar of food security in the region so voters feel at 1st but everyone else feels that not long after. plenty more ahead in the news including venezuelans fleeing the crisis at home left stranded as ecuador imposes new visa restrictions
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plus it's considered one of the most dangerous countries in the world for journalists as 12 a killed this year so far. a judge in the u.s. state of oklahoma has found pharmaceutical giant johnson and johnson helped fuel the opioid epidemic there the state's lawyers argued that the drug maker deceptively marketed painkillers and flooded the market with them the judge ordered johnson and johnson to pay damages of $572000000.00 johnson and johnson says it's going to appeal today judge bachmann has affirmed our position that johnson and johnson motivated by greed and avarice is responsible for the opioid epidemic in our state johnson and johnson will finally be held accountable for
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thousands of deaths and addiction caused by their activities the company used pseudo science and misleading information that downplayed the risks of opioids. leading to the worst manmade public nuisance our state in this country has ever seen. let's go live to head to gallacher now in norman oklahoma and the what does this ruling mean for the state. well it means a great deal as soon as the judge made his declaration if you like which only lasted for a few minutes i talked to one health expert here works on the front lines of treating people with addiction and he said this was a huge victory for them but they took on a goliath and they want to say she did not get anywhere near the amount of money they wanted they wanted 17200000000 dollars they got $572000000.00 enough to fund the programs here for the next year but what's more important about what happened
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here today is not so much the money that was awarded to the state of oklahoma but the message it sends out to the entire country in ohio alone there are 2000 pending court cases due to take place in all thousands of others across the country so this may very well fundamentally change the relationship between big pharma as it's known here in the u.s. and the states that are looking for some kind of compensation because the judge here was very unequivocal in blaming johnson and johnson and they're all fueling an opioid crisis claimed more than 6000 lives in this state alone over the past 20 years and that is you're saying this is this case wasn't just restricted to oklahoma was that i mean this was really being watched very closely right across the united states because of the cases that could come to court. you know i mean the opioid crisis in this country is claiming 130 lives a day in 2017 alone the scent of disease control say it claimed almost 50000 lives
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it's not untouched anyone's lives this goes across all socio economic backgrounds one of the lawyers for oklahoma lost his firstborn son to addiction so for many people this was very very personal indeed now of course johnson and john. and say they will appeal the decision they say no laws were broken they went along with everything they were supposed to do but now fundamentally the relationship between big pharmaceutical companies who produce these painkillers and the states and the courts that will make the decision has fundamentally changed and if another thank you very much indeed opioid overdoses have become as i was saying a nationwide epidemic claiming the lives of tens of thousands of americans every year in oklahoma more than 6000 people have died since the year 2000 nationwide more than 130 people die every day from opioid overdoses according to the u.s. department of health and human services 40 percent of the cases involve drugs that were prescribed by a doctor for more on this we're going to be joined by elizabeth birch is
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a professor of law at the university of georgia she's also the author of the book mass tort deals backroom bargaining in multi district litigation thank you very much indeed for joining us on all dizzy or one of the things that i gathered from what i'm doing was telling is that this isn't just restricted only to the manufacturers this is about the testing process is this is about the doctors who prescribe it how on a nationwide level do you monitor and control something like that well i mean that's a really tough question and certainly oklahoma has laid out an abatement plan that they hope will work at the hope will work for them but the big question is what's going to happen on a bigger scale and what can we expect to see nationwide in terms of johnson and johnson saying that they're going to appeal this case what impact does that have on the ruling and one that the timing of any resulting legislation or changes that
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might come as a result of this. well right now johnson and johnson has asked the judge to stay his decision pending their appeal which means that they wouldn't have to pay anything or take any sort of affirmative steps until the appellate court has ruled and either up held his verdict or made a decision to the contrary in terms of the money that johnson and johnson has been ordered to pay it is significantly less than the amount that was originally aust for what do we read into the fight that it is such a lower figure well you know that's interesting to me as well the state asked as you mentioned for over $17000000000.00 they only ended up getting 570 $2000000.00 but again judge bought one emphasize that that's just for one year's worth of abatement and the other interesting thing about that is that johnson and johnson is the only one who is paying for that entire year of abatement
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even though it's for the cost of abatement for the entire state $1.00 of the things that judge bachmann mentioned is that if there needs to be more money in the future that perhaps the state legislature needs to take some sort of action one of the things that stood out to me and i'd be interested to get your view on this is that as we mentioned before 40 percent of the nationwide cases involve drugs that were prescribed by a doctor do you think that there is a reason to start investigating the relationships that doctors have with pharmaceutical sales sales men and women. well i mean there's certainly been some evidence during the course of the oklahoma trial that has raised some eyebrows with specific marketing to doctors even when there's been some evidence of over a proposed overprescribing so i think that that's part of the bigger picture is to take a look at the relationship between the way the pharmaceutical company actually markets
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their product directly to the doctors and the sort of perks that doctors are getting it is a bit of birds as professor of law at the university of georgia we appreciate your time on thank you very much thank you thanks for having me. hundreds of venezuelan margarets have been protesting at the ecuador colombia border demanding they be allowed into ecuador that was stranded after new visa controls went into effect on monday and it's in human reports from talk on. monday morning at the entrance to immigration at the ecuador colombia border. 12 hours earlier more than 10000 venezuelans had managed to enter ecuador with their identity documents before midnight deadline went into effect requiring them to hold a valid consular visa but hundreds more arrived too late for the. families being told that they must go back because they missed the midnight deadline. thousands who did get in the majority with no food and almost no money
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spent a freezing night outdoors hoping that the day break they'd receive a helping hand. that is when the once opened its doors to so many migrants from all over the world all we ask is they have solidarity with us in our time needs. but those were different times ecuador has already received more than $300000.00 venezuelans and says it can no longer absorb more migrants now it is demanding they pay $50.00 for a visa a fortune for the average venezuelan who's monthly salary has plunged to $2.00. jonathan mendis his wife and 3 small children made it into ecuador just in time hitchhiking for more than 2 weeks with no money and i think. we try to make the children think that this is an adventure that they're able to travel night and day . jonathan goes to see if the u.n.h.c.r.
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can give them food before continuing on to peru which he knows they will be stopped because they don't have the required visa to enter but they feel lucky to at least have got this far behind us is the colombia border and we've seen at least 200. stopped not allowed to come into ecuador because they no longer have the right papers but many of them have told us that they have no intention of returning to venezuela that if they can't come into ecuador legally they'll try other methods like illegal crossings for example the river that you see here that separates colombia from ecuador. we will increase police vigilance along the border to ensure that illegal immigration does not take place but as he spoke we spotted 2 undocumented venezuelans bypassing immigration altogether. thousands more heading south the lucky ones like these. others will continue walking as they have for weeks hoping to find any they can to help
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them survive. mexico is being criticized for failing to protect journalists and activists in a new united nations report that mexico is one of the most dangerous places in the world to be a journalist with 12 murdered this year alone there with condorcet a meal was the latest to be killed he was found stabbed to death at his home on saturday $153.00 journalists have been killed in the country since 2000 mexico's murder rate is now at its highest levels ever recorded with 17000 people killed during the 1st half of this year running out of powell has more now from mexico city. there's a war on press freedom playing out on the streets of mexico. the sharp increase in violence nationwide over the past 2 years has also meant an increase in attacks
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against journalists. the death of nabby how to me of mexico state over the weekend brings the total number of journalists killed this year to at least 10 hundreds turned out to attend his funeral. on august 3rd another journalist out also drew media attention this time it was soliciting ovaries a newspaper reporter from the state of it accuse before being gunned down soliciting a received death threats at his home you know it you know i want someone to do something and i want them to leave me and my children alone i don't want anything else he was everything to me and now he's gone what else do they want solicitor was one of the 3 journalists killed in mexico in the same week. the continued killings of journalists has sparked protests in vera cruz currently one of the most dangerous states in the country for media professionals. we want those responsible for lacerating journalism in better crews to be captured the ones who harms another
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family we are journalists but also citizens by hurting or killing a journalist it ends up affecting a family célestin it wasn't rolled in a government program that aims to provide protection for journalists and human rights defenders a recent report by the united nations however says the mexican government has to step up its commitment toward the protection of freedom of expression. and we are calling for a national campaign to prove the visibility of journalists and human rights defenders led by the president. more than $900.00 journalists and human rights workers are currently enrolled in the government's protection mechanism program mexico ranks among the world's most dangerous countries for journalists more than $150.00 have been killed since the year 2000 despite the establishment of the protection mechanism for human rights defenders and journalists in 2012 attacks against press freedom have continued unabated but it up in mexico city and
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joins us live on skype from mexico city in mexico she's the director of article 19 mexico and central america article 19 works in mexico to monitor attacks on freedom of expression including violence against journalists thank you very much indeed for being with us where are the greatest risks to journalists and human rights activists coming from. well it's important to say that from then 2500 aggressions that we documented sex any of it together again had 048 percent game from day agents of the state and this is really related to the 99 percent of impunity that we're leaving related to journalists aggressions the state on investigating itself and that what meets this type of aggressiveness and the confidence aggressive 2nd certainly that we believe that it without the fight against impunity then want to be as piece of fire gets your release here in mexico
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water efforts have been made to try to bring actions on behalf of say the relatives the families of those who have been killed and what's been the result if actions have been taken against as you say the state in many cases. well unfortunately that we have institutions that supposed to protect journalists we have the mechanism of protection and that element of his mom protection and better on the present your office to fight against crime seconds freedom of expression however these efforts cut and being that i think that results. you need to level it's on the books 90 percent of the cases and we don't have one case where they elect will after have being prosecuted we do not have to do the meaning a mention in either case is actually very interesting in the case of neat recently journeys that west you know because he was giving voice to all of those in
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their community and he actually westray didn't enjoy these year we made an overly we say that he have been threatened by the music. and no one investigate that threat and now he's being killed and these kind of cases and come every month every 3 weeks every week every single day in article 19 we don't commit the new aggressions i get a chair at journeys and no one is doing anything unfortunately that mayor that make mechanism up production is not going to meet the needs self with the local authorities and that was then you know precedence how do people in mexico regard journalists one can understand from what you're saying the way that the state and other actors may have a view on the work of journalists but in terms of the people themselves what do they think of reporters who are trying to tell the stories. well that's
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a very quick question because. actually the crimes against freedom of expression here in mexico are very complex and they're said actual now at the from the state that bounce. journalists and when there are guys crime or wet with actually the power so these creates i think wars between this society and journalists that believes that many times when the journalists killed even the government justify the killing of them they generally speaking in about plays with but people in about moment and that creates they want to follow up a very very interest important investigation for example the nikkei says different cases in but after moves the 1st thing that the government come up and say that when that journalist is killed is that he was bound to up on person and that that creates impunity because there's no investigation in between and that's
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the reason that the government gives in order to justify the order and so they investigate and doesn't need to have really intensive reasoning motivations related to the work that the journey's was doing so here really is very interesting because what the government tried to do is to try to kill the messenger in order to get the message and to send the messages of silence to all their elders and them islands that we being here in mexico has led to a complete. the worse i'm on the society and journalists on the case of the navy it is very exceptional because it is the 1st case where all the community all the all the. people from the society that he was even boys to came out on the street and say we need justice and these crimes should not get don't leap unity but the
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most of the cases society do not go out and ask for justice and the us thank you very much indeed for your time. thank you very much there are still ahead and al jazeera the state of emergency has been declared in the city of course of down to tribal fighting leaves 17 people dead. hello there we have the heat back in place across much of texas and he divisor is in place but to the east of there it is all about this massive cloud that you can save in all just. we have thunderstorms in the forecast ready for the next couple days it's a very unsettled picture hold away from texas the southeast the mid atlantic and op into the northeast you also notice into central count at canada ontario we have this area of low pressure so that will work its way gradually eastwards taking the rain with it but also the cooler air so for those winnipeg minneapolis just 20
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celsius on wednesday meanwhile into d.c. we go to friday warm day 28 celsius but we could see the scattered thunderstorms why the unsettled much of the caribbean but really we're focusing very much of this this is tropical storm dorian monday and tuesday it's on his way west was it should be heading across the less antilles and certainly having very close to barbados and then it will continue to push into these warm waters in the eastern caribbean since he had off into wednesday it could even develop into her a come but we're going to keep a very close eye on the strength of this storm but it produced some very heavy amounts of rain in study by wednesday it's heading towards pressure ecosystem huge concerns here because obviously what we're looking at is flooding rains we could see some flash floods and certainly mudslides and landslides so we'll continue to keep you well updated. for the nomadic jacka tribe survival is about reaching their destination
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a little if we don't hurry will never be able to get the top up in the storm we follow the mongolian herdsmen on a treacherous migration. can trace dangerous the ices of them as they strive to preserve their traditional way of life into the legendary sometimes luser cattle there will die of cold war because of the storm risking it all mongolia on al-jazeera. a nation where corruption is endemic embroiled in a battle to hold the power. as this radical transformation. i mean if you look shedding light on the remaining pressing for change and the unconventional methods to eliminate corruption remain people on al-jazeera.
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you're watching a reminder of our top stories this new u.s. president donald trump says he's willing to consider meeting his iranian counterpart. if the circumstances are right they made this statement as the g. 7 summit wraps up and gets in front's international leaders of the g. 7 summit of place $20000000.00 to tackle the imus and followers followers but presidents have also not it was said an international alliance to save the rain forest would be a form of colonize ation. a judge in the u.s. state of oklahoma has found pharmaceutical giant johnson and johnson helped fuel an opioid epidemic there which has left thousands dead hero to the company to pay
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$572000000.00 in damages the company says it will appeal. u.s. president donald trump has discussed the kashmir dispute with india's prime minister on the sidelines of the g. 7 summit jump out over to mediate after pakistan condemned new delhi's decision to revoke indeed administered kashmir semi a tone of the status of this month there's now backtracked on that. problem is. that. we were back. up. but it was. not under modi maintains no international mediators and needed to solve the crisis in kashmir. all issues between india and pakistan are bilateral and that's why we don't trouble other countries over these issues and i'm confident india and pakistan who will be
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full 947 can discuss problems between ourselves and resolve them pakistan's prime minister them around can use an address to the nation to express his frustration with india. the united nations they defied all the un security council resolutions that we need to stay lord they win against their own supreme court high court's decision those who are the founding fathers like gandhi and nehru they win against the promises made by prime minister nearer to the people of kashmir they also went against this secure constitution which says that endures for everyone and the creation of pakistan is wrong they ended that secularism on the 5th of august they seem to miss it shang that endears for hindus only and everyone else is a 2nd class citizen. to reports from pakistan's capital islamabad. the bugger danny brown minister had been speaking to a nation for the 1st time since the major crisis could read india he had already said they're done by larger forum war dead after india there won't articulate the 7
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day and why later the major disagreement between india and buggered on nor not just them like a game and are no words or good or dorian is true including the dispute on kashmir would be scared by larger needs over an n.p.r.'s prime minister now then there are more did go or the us president said he would run in good dog to bugger song and that they're going to buy lead to an issue that they're norgaard head and buggers on the bugger johnny prime minister insisting that this was an international dispute and that the ideology is borrowed by the artist as a branch of what he calls the but the are generous the party was hell bent on discriminating against a minority and making india a hindu state only go as far as progress on is concerned there is no forum left for by larger dogs red india the buggers on the prime minister making. their mark
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saying that they would no more room for unilaterally all forms of dialogue to that country and silva who has more from new delhi. indian officials have a reason to be pleased with was president trump said today earlier you said the situation in kashmir is explosive and that he would like me to do something when it came to the disputes between india and pakistan the kidding he didn't say any such thing in fact he seemed more in line with the indian point of view and that has always been again he reiterated by prime minister movies today in his opening remarks that all disputes between india and pakistan are bilateral issues and that they would be told by likely however interesting the president from also said the stage speaks to pakistan and i'm sure they'll do good things to get on paraphrasing that but it's still clear what doesn't trump meant when he said that the. india is not talking to box on the prime minister has said that. they are done talking with india so what did president mean is that something we don't know how did president
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trump the prime minister talk about perhaps india pakistan for talks all the other way around that at the moment is on president also said the prime minister told him there's a situation in the did i missed this on the control of the white on the ground some restrictions have indeed been eased many continue to be in the to be in the valley there are still restrictions on freedom of movement and connectivity continues to be a problem. well those restrictions in kashmir are now entering their 4th week have made it difficult for people to make a living as a male reports from the shopping district. this should be a happy time his family's apple crop is looking good this season and will be ready for harvesting in september but the region's lockdown has made it hard to get supplies and laborers from outside are being told to stay out there but. are you going to believe. me the government told them to go home best insights we can get
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because the markets a shot rice vegetables we can't even get meat for us says because everything is shut. that's affecting people with small businesses especially in farming who are worried the restrictions on communication and movement into their hard work will be thrown away. it's a situation that's common throughout the kashmir valley most businesses think shut in srinagar carpet sellers have already stocked up for both the tourist and wedding season this month but few have had any sales in weeks so many employees want to hear their families who have made them. houseboat hotels and bemis da lake sit empty. and with only local people riding a few of the gondolas many boat men are fishing to pass the time and catch a meal just before the restrictions earlier this month the government order
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tourists to leave the area taking with them one vital piece of the region's economy but it's not the 1st time kashmiris have suffered from work and businesses being shut down has it do. we know but the goals. and he's gone they have abundant they had work the mill their duties and the uproot season everything is at stake but they know that to be at existence their culture and be at landscape and would stay. doesn't know if he'll be allowed to transport his crop to market or find enough trucks to do so but he'll continue tending his fields because for many here culture and pride are more important than business and money says jamil al-jazeera shopian districts indeed administered kashmir. and investigation by the reuters news agency
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says the u.s. central intelligence agency does not spy in the government of the united arab emirates something critics say is a dangerous blind spot in washington's global monitoring report quotes former cia agents with one calling the agency's failure to adapt to the u.a.e. as political and military ambitions dereliction of duty it also says the lack of monitoring puts the emirates on a very small list of countries with the cia conducts a hands off approach the u.a.e. has played a role in numerous regional and international issues including the conflicts in yemen and libya and the blockade of qatar david mack is a former u.s. ambassador to the united arab emirates he says saudi arabia and u.a.e. interests are diverging in some areas. it's not so much that the 2 governments are in conflict certainly the u.a.e. would like to see. the legitimate internationally recognized government which is allied with saudi arabia have some kind of victory over those these that are close
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to iran but for the united arab emirates the main issue is something else the main issue is that cities along the southern coast in particular and cities along the sea lanes in the in the red sea cities like aden and. that these cities are in the hands of people with whom the u.a.e. has influence. iran says it's deployed its most sophisticated warship to provide security for its vessels in the gulf of aden one of the busiest shipping routes in the world separately iran says it sold the oil on board a tanker detained by british forces in gibraltar last month didn't say who bought the crude oil because more from to han. iran has sent this new destroyer to the gulf of aden now this could be a routine navy deployment where one military vessel is sent to relieve another one
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of its duty but the fact that it has been announced that this is a new destroyer we did france capabilities has led to speculation about the route of the ukrainian oil tanker. now it's thought that that vessel could be heading down the su is canal and then could receive a military escort back to iran now the context for this is that when the vessel was seized by the authorities in gibraltar and was about to be released the united states asked for it to be seized now that didn't happen and iran wanted to united states against seizing that best of the aid in international waters and warned of serious consequences we also know that the united states has put together this naval coalition that it says is to protect the freedom of navigation in the strait of her most in the gulf on the other side of the arabian peninsula now the united kingdom grain and the strait you are a part of that so iran may be thinking that if this vest of this oil tanker has a military escort it will act as
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a deterrent because trying to intercept that or sees that could result in a confrontation or a wider conflict and this could serve as a deterrent but for now iran says the oil on that vessel has been sold and the owner of the oil will decide where it heads to next still ahead an al-jazeera why israel is sending tanks and troops to its borders with lebanon and syria. u.n. experts condemns the sri lankan government's response to the easter bomb.
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oh and. israel appears to be
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massing troops on its borders with lebanon and syria that follows a warning by prime minister benjamin netanyahu against iranian by groups in the region. lebanon's president michel aoun has called the israeli drone strikes against his country and acts of war the lebanese group is promising to retaliate against israel action. it supports xina hodder has more from beirut. hezbollah is burying its dead in its stronghold in southern beirut 2 of its fighters were killed in israeli air strikes in neighboring syria on sunday night the lebanese armed group is promising retaliation it has told israel to be ready for a response its leader has in a stronger also threatened to shoot down any drone that violates lebanon's airspace after what he said was an attack by israeli drones in hezbollah's area of control
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in the lebanese capital hours earlier. if we remain silent on this breach it will create a very dangerous road for lebanon on repeating what is going on in iraq now. in iraq the iranian backed popular mobilization forces are blaming israel for a series of unexplained attacks on their bases and positions in recent weeks the latest was on sunday night close to iraq's border with syria which killed a number of fighters u.s. officials and israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu have hinted at possible israeli involvement in those strikes israel it seems has opened a new front. and. he's really saying they're ready to open war on 3 fronts beirut damascus and back that we can't ignore the political side however which the upcoming israeli elections the israeli army says its air strikes in syria stopped an attack by iran's revolutionary guards it released surveillance footage of what it said were members of the guards preparing
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a drone strike against israel israel has repeatedly hit what it says were iranian targets in syria over the years it wants to prevent iran from gaining a foothold. influence across the region but in the past few days it is believed to have operated in 3 neighboring countries lebanon syria and iraq nothing apple did say he gave the security forces a free hand to act in many a rino as against an enemy state has been lost says the drone attack which damaged its media office violated the 2006 cease fire and changed the rules of engagement but at the same time the group is believed to have given israel a chance not to escalate tensions. the messages to the terror war. israelis any war will be costly and we are not alone think twice iran promised to support any action hezbollah takes against israel which doesn't seem to be backing down it is believed to be behind strikes on a position belonging to
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a palestinian faction allied to run along lebanon supported with syria early on monday there is a real danger of further attacks by either side could escalate to a war zone of beirut so dan sullivan council has declared a state of emergency in port sudan fighting between 2 rival communities has killed at least 17 people about morgan's been following events from khartoum. sudan sovereign council which was sworn in just last week and which has pledged to prioritize peace in its 1st 6 months of the transitional period has declared a state of emergency in the city of port sudan now this follows days of ethnic clashes between members of the and the new but tribes and we understand from people in port sudan that it started as a verbal quarrel between members of the opposing tribes which eventually turned violent the authorities say at least 17 people have been killed and dozens others have been wounded and are now hospitalized and activists are telling us that the tensions are so high that people from opposing tribes cannot be hospitalized in the
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same hospitals due to concerns of outbreak of war violence sudan suffering council also dismissed the acting state governor who was appointed by the transitional military council following the ousting of longtime president i'm going to be here in april they've also dismissed the head of security the sovereign council had sent a delegation to try to mediate between the 2 tribes but so far that has been unsuccessful which lead to declination of a state of emergency and activists are saying that they are worried that this tribal conflict this ethnic tension which has been going on for a few months now will escalate in the coming weeks if no solution is provided by the sovereign council the un special rapporteur on religious freedoms has accused sri lanka's political leadership of not doing enough to deal with religious tensions fernandes reports from colombo. immoderate shafi is struggling to cope she says her world turned upside down after her husband was arrested earlier this year it happened at
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a time of heightened tension shortly after muslim fighters launched attacks in and around sri lanka's capital colombo on easter sunday the family says he's a rest as part of an orchestrated campaign i didn't have my job i i don't have a place to stay and so less my children are and i'm going to school i had to face all these problems and. i have to play interventions for them for those problems as well as the need to have to look after the legal aspect of my husband she doesn't want to show her face because she says the family has received threats her husband who is a doctor has been accused of master a lazy sion of seeing him these women he was arrested in a case that police admit had no basis he has since been released on bail. the scandal followed weeks of and it was dim sentiment after the easter attacks which targeted churches and killing more than $250.00 people. it also led to
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a spate of anti muslim violence targeting homes and businesses these events were on the agenda of the un special rapporteur on religious freedom during his 11 day visit here lack of preemptive response is something everyone notes and then there are many cases in which either because of mismatch of the of the police available and the mobs in question that some of these mobs wearable to rampage on addressing the media on monday shahid said he had heard complaints of double standards by law enforcement authorities and about the failure of the state to protect people against hate crimes groups like the buddhist power force or sina have been accused of carrying out organized violence against the muslim community a charge. because it occurred we have never spoken against the muslims in an organized manner to put about us you know on every occasion spoke against muslim
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terrorism that has no connection to the ordinary muslim community. referring to the recent violence the un special rapporteur says sri lanka's government must do more to protect minorities in order to challenge extremism and create inclusion. you know rule of law protected well rule of law is not protected then then the vehicle communities are vulnerable to attacks and the majority feels that they can exploit that space to the to the advantage shahid says reforming the education system to teach respect for all religions is important showing it says she lankans should work towards creating a common identity beyond religion and race given the country's violent past moshe lankans are likely to agree if politicians will let them in their finance 0 colombo u.s. prosecutors say a man charged with killing 11 people in a pittsburgh synagogue should face the death penalty of. convicted prosecutors say
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robert bowers shooting was intentional and he showed no remorse the massacre of the senate dog was the deadliest attack ever on jewish americans in the united states the 46 year old father in the wash up was gathered for the sabbath service in october last year that said from iraq matheson for this news i'll be back in a moment with more than a. september on al-jazeera up to gears of war and famine al-jazeera looks at the dramatic
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transformation emerging to the inspirational stories of full diversity p.o.b. israel elections can benjamin netanyahu form a majority and sometimes another time listening post to 6 the world's media how they operate and the stories they cover do not succeed in 1000 is in president dissent see join us for live coverage as to his units a documentary that examines the worst atrocities committed during the war in libya . september on al-jazeera. over 100 years ago britain and france made a secret deal to divide the middle east between them now we can draw him in the 2nd episode we explore the lasting effects of this agreement if there is a original set to 6 because it's at those borders were drawn without consulting the people who have to live with it. sykes people lines in the sand on
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jersey. on county because this week we check the pulse of the global economy that age of populist governments is the independence of central banks comes under threat and the unintended consequences of trumps trade all plus the i.m.f. warns on the missteps of brigs it on trade me counting the cost just 0. i really believe the rain can be a great nation but they can't have new. hopes for a breakthrough in tensions between the united states and iran as the g. 7 summit comes to an end.
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i'm not mothers and this is all just here on live from doha also coming up a judge in oklahoma finds the drug maker johnson and johnson guilty of fueling the state's opioid epidemic. not just the fires raging across africa prompt calls for more to be done to scrap the practice of slashing and burning plus . camille in the shopian district if indeed administered kashmir where people's livelihoods are at risk falling the last doubt imposed by the government in new delhi. french president emanuel mccraw appears to have paved the way for a diplomatic solution to the standoff between washington and tehran over the 2050 nuclear deal the us president donald trump says he would meet his it rainin counterpart under the right circumstances to diffuse months of tensions between the
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2 countries tasha wraps up what's been happening on the final day of the summit. the prospect of a meeting between us who were a new president was not an likely outcome of the g 7 in berates but as the summit came to an end its host the french president suggested talks between donald trump and hassan rouhani were possible. at some point there has to be a meeting between the iranian president and the us president i hope that in the next few weeks this meeting will take place france plays a role along with the other partners who signed the iran deal trump who pulled the u.s. out of the 2015 iran nuclear deal last year and imposed sanctions said he was open to diplomacy we're looking for nuclear weapons globalist missiles and a longer period of time very simple we can have it done in a very short period of time. and i really believe that iran can be
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a great nation i'd like to see that happen the development came one day after the unexpected arrival of the iranian foreign minister in berates jihads are reef was invited by the french president who'd been asked by some g 7 leaders to mediate in the crisis. trust conciliatory tone was also extended to trade he said beijing and washington could begin talks to resolve the tariffs dispute going into this summit a man or mackerel said he wanted to use it to make progress on the escalating tensions over iran and trade help tackle the amazon rain forest fires and kill divisions using multilateral cooperation at the end of the 3 day meeting it seems the french president has succeeded on several fronts there were unresolved issues though the u.k.'s prime minister boris johnson received only a vague promise of a future trade accord with the u.s. and was no nearer to a deal on breaks it with the european union i think it's the job of everybody in
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parliament to get this thing done that is what the people want i also think by the way it's what our friends and partners on the other side of the channel want they want they want this thing done they want they want it over last year trump refused to sign the final g 7 statement this year has scrapped it replacing it with a one page summary of the meeting so with no commitments in writing the challenge will be to. compel leaders to acts on the promises they have made. al-jazeera. stock markets across asia close sharply down on monday on fears about the china u.s. trade war sparked partly by trump's conflicting statements that the g 7 tokyo's benchmark nikkei index plunged by more than 2 percent while china's currency the yuan dropped to an 11 year low one point during this summit donald trump said he'd wished he'd impose higher tower of sunshine on friday he then said trade talks with china would resume shortly from to european and u.s.
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shares to climb. well tom is already looking ahead to the next g. 7 summit which is due to take place in the united states in 2020 the u.s. president suggested the i know meeting could be held at one of his own properties trump golf resort in miami and he brushed off suggestions he'd be using his public position for private financial gain. it has buildings that have $50.00 to $70.00 units that each delegation can determine its own. with the allegations that they have the wrong. building so the press here great coverage is so good about it they love the location of the hotel and the also like the fact that it's like they said the airport in. miami so great every other climate change meeting in the u.s. president donald trump did not attend leaders agreed to set up a $20000000.00 fund to help fight fires in the amazon and tensions between the
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french and brazilian leaders over the wildfires has got personal that emanuel nako accused his brazilian counterparts of failing to deal with the situation jaya both scenario hit back indorsing a social media post which insulted micron's wife. has said some extraordinarily disrespectful feelings about my wife what can i say it's sad it's sad but it's not above all for him and for the president people i think that president woman must be ashamed to reduce about the president i think that residents were great people must be ashamed to see these behavior they expect presidents to behave well towards others also not oh says the idea of creating an international alliance to save the amazon rain forest will be like treating his country like a colony the brazilian president questioned the intentions of his french counterpart in his efforts to help preserve the amazon but his environment minister has welcomed the g 7 offer of 20 $1000000.00 to help fight the fires and the has
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more now from port au vale in northwest brazil. several 100 was illian military personnel have been deployed here to their own door in your state capital port to whale we've seen some of the c. 130 planes flying in which have been used to spray water on the affected area critics have said that this was a ploy by president also not all to appease some of the foreign criticism of his failure to act in dealing with the forest fires throughout the amazon he is a former military man who sees the military as a solution to many of the country's problems he said the military out to help with the fire has not so far accepted help from any other country that's been offering assistance apart from this far as we know israel at this stage who is sending some expertise to help with the fires you know most of us he said it's become rain we've had the 1st downpours of the rainy season which many in this region certainly feel
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is putting an end to the crisis certainly as far as this year goes so they will. so that will the city go some way to putting out the last of the forest fires in this particular region we flew over this area earlier this morning in a small plane to see what damage had been done most of the fires it must be said were out but the evidence of the devastation the fire of course was evident great back blocks ways of burnt vegetation throughout this particular area and also evidence of much devastation done in previous years now cattle farms soya plantations cutting a huge swathe through this part of the amazon a judge in the u.s. state of oklahoma has found pharmaceutical giant johnson and johnson helped fuel the opioid epidemic there the state's lawyers argued that the drug maker deceptively marketed painkillers and flooded the market with them the judge ordered johnson and johnson to pay damages of $572000000.00 the company says it will appeal
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. today judge bachmann has affirmed our position that johnson and johnson motivated by greed and avarice is responsible for the opioid ready epidemic in our state johnson and johnson will finally be held accountable for thousands of deaths and addiction caused by their activities the company's pseudo science and misleading information that downplay the risks of opioids. leading to the worst manmade public nuisance our state in this country has ever seen and it has more from norman oklahoma. where the state of oklahoma wanted $17200000000.00 from johnson and johnson they got nowhere near that amount of money but the message this case sends to the entire country is the important takeaway from this 1st case is being seen as
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a potential precedent what it means for those tackling the opioid crisis on the front lines is they can fund their treatment programs for the next year but there are thousands of other pending cases across the country 2000 alone in the state of ohio and this case was being part of it watched very closely by both the pharmaceutical companies and those that have been suffering from this opioid crisis that claims 130 lives a day so now the relationship between pharmaceutical companies and all the states in this country may have fundamentally changed they may now be more likely to settle before these cases come to trial and get the money out there that's needed to treat this opioid epidemic so it was a very important 1st case a huge victory for oklahoma one of the official said they took on goliath and they won and the judge in this case was fairly unequivocal in johnson and johnson's role he said they fuel the opioid crisis they affected lee took part in killing people in this state and that may fundamentally change that relationship forever elizabeth
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birch is a professor of law at the university of georgia she says the court case and the issues it's revealed are far from resolved. right now johnson and johnson has asked the judge to stay his decision pending their appeal which means that they wouldn't have to pay anything or take any sort of affirmative steps until the appellate court has ruled and either up held his verdict or made a decision to the contrary the state asked for over $17000000000.00 they only ended up getting $572000000.00 but again judge bachmann emphasize that that's just for one year's worth of abatement and the other interesting thing about that is that johnson and johnson is the only one who is paying for that entire year of abatement even though it's for the cost of abatement for the entire state one of the things that judge bachmann mentioned is that if there they need to be more money in the future that perhaps the state legislature needs to take some sort of action there's
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certainly been some evidence during the course of the oklahoma trial that has raised some eyebrows with specific marketing to doctors even when there's been some evidence of overprescribing so i think that that's part of the bigger picture is to take a look at the relationship between the way the pharmaceutical company actually markets their product directly to the doctors and the sort of perks that doctors are getting and still ahead and all just dying to tell another journalist is killed in mexico as the u.n. has better protection of reporters. or u.n. experts condemns this so long can the government's response to the easter bomb attacks. and the we have a few more shots it's got a thunderstorms across southern sections of china quite
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a massive cloud in the last few hours it looks a little bit worse than it is in terms of the rain the ricks that you can see from this but it is quite widespread again across these areas in the south are going to get some more rain hong kong. it will be what a few on shoes day and then it should actually clear as we head to wednesday when it does the time which is going to shoot up to 36 celsius feeling very hot meanwhile the rain is farther to the north so shanghai are all the wet day on wednesday with a high of 31 whole said very unsettled for the next few days across the northern philippines and then to pick up some fairly hefty amounts of rain it's a disturbance they watching which is actually to the east of the philippines and is going to track over towards the west you can see it will clearly here on the satellites meanwhile to the south you've got more rain showers across much of borneo in fact as we go through choose to into wednesday those rains really sink in south was for the 1st time in a long time quite a bit of rain it's will central and southern sections of sumatra so again we'll see those the rain showers with those scattered thunderstorms in the afternoon hours and the monsoon rains are actually pushing it
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a bit further to the northwest again we've got more rain in the 4 cars as we head into choose day on wednesday for new delhi time which is in the mid thirty's celsius so a pretty couple of what days ahead. sponsored countdown and. over 100 years ago britain and france made a secret deal to divide the middle east between them now we can draw in the 2nd episode we explore the last a new fence of disagreement there is a regional set to 6 because it's at those borders were drawn without consulting the people to add to that with the. psychs pekoe lines in the sand on elm disease.
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you're watching or does it i'm a reminder of our top stories this hour. u.s. president donald trump says he's willing to consider meeting his iranian counterpart rouhani if the circumstances are right he made this statement as the g. 7 summit wrapped up in france. a judge in the u.s. state of oklahoma has found pharmaceutical giant johnson and johnson helped fuel an opioid epidemic which is killed thousands of people the company has been ordered to pay $572000000.00 in damages it says it will appeal. the leaders of the g. 7 summit of pledged $20000000.00 to tackle the amazon forest fires but brazilian president jet of also now says an international alliance to save the rain forest would be a form of colonization. all the attention is on the amazon right now but there are
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currently more fires reported to be burning in central and southern africa than in the amazon nasa says 70 percent of the active fires in the world are in africa it's satellite data shows fires raging through large parts of i'm gola and the democratic republic of congo and spending as far east as madagascar farmers are being blamed but the problem is being compounded by shorter rainy seasons alexander steyn is a data scientist and drug specialist who focuses on african agricultural trends he says the region used to have up to 6 months of rain but the lack of rain in the past 3 years is having a huge impact. the real issue is that the impact of these brush fires is getting worse if you look at a lot of parts of semi arid parts of the african continent particularly the west african said hello this used to be a regular occurrence during the dry season and when the rains would come around there would allow for grasslands to grow again but unfortunately we are seeing
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a very significant increase in variability of rainfall it's making the rainy seasons very volatile and less predictable in 1951 a lot of parts of the west african so how enjoyed a 6 month rainy season today over the past few years is a 3 month rainy season sometimes even only 2 months so we have a much longer dry period in which more fires can happen and a much shorter rainy period the west african somehow as in many respects sort of ground 0 for the impacts of climate change and is hurting communities depend on pasture to feed their animals and their livelihoods and when we have a situation where there is a brushfire that wipes out your pasture and you have to wait 67 months for the rains to come this creates a serious problem and results in the loss of a lot of animals and while herders may oftentimes be the ones who feel these effects 1st they really occupy
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a critical pillar of food security in the region so voters feel at 1st but everyone else feels that not long after. u.s. president donald trump has discussed the kashmir dispute with india's prime minister on the sidelines of the g. 7 summit trump had offered to mediate after pakistan condemned new delhi's decision to revoke indeed a men's minister's kashmir's semi atoll in the status of this month but he's not backtracked. well we hope that. the problem is. that. they were back and that they will be able to do something. about it right. now under modi maintains the crisis in kashmir is a regional disputes and that international mediation is needed. by. all issues between india and pakistan are bilateral and that's why we don't trouble other countries over these issues and i'm confident india and pakistan who will be
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full 947 can discuss problems between ourselves and resolve them. the restrictions in kashmir now entering their 4th week have made it difficult for people to make a living. reports from the shopian district. this should be a happy time his family's apple crop is looking good this season and will be ready for harvesting in september but the region's lockdown has made it hard to get supplies and laborers from outside are being told to stay out there but you know. i got to the liberal side push me the government told them to go home pesticides we can't get because the markets a shot rice vegetables we can't even get meat for ourselves because everything is shut. that's affecting people with small businesses especially in farming who are worried the restrictions on communication and movement their hard work will be
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thrown away. it's a situation that's common throughout the kashmir valley that most business is staying shut in srinagar carpet sellers are already stocked up for both the tourist and wedding season this month but few have had any sales in weeks so many employers want to hear. them when we. houseboat hotels and famous doll lake sit empty and with only local people riding a few of the gondolas many boat men are fishing to pass the time and catch a meal just before the restrictions earlier this month the government order tourists to leave the area taking with them one vital piece of the region's economy but it's not the 1st time kashmiris have suffered from work and businesses being shut down has it do. we know by. and or take on. what they know their
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tourism season everything is at stake but they know that the existence. landscape elwood is at stake. but doesn't know if he'll be allowed to transport his crop to market or find enough trucks to do so but he'll continue tending his fields because for many here culture and pride are more important than business and money says jimmy i'll just be in districts indeed administered kashmir. and investigation where the reuters news agency says the u.s. central intelligence agency does not spy on the government of the united arab emirates something critics say is a dangerous blind spot in washington's global monitoring the report quotes former cia agents with one calling the agency's failure to adapt to the u.a.e. as political and military ambitions dereliction of duty it also says the lack of
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monitoring puts the emirates on a very small list of countries where the cia conducts a hands off approach the u.a.e. has played a role in numerous regional and international issues including the blockade of qatar as well as the conflicts in libya and yemen well david mack is a former u.s. ambassador to the united arab emirates he says saudi arabia and u.a.e. interests are diverging in some areas it's not so much that the 2 governments are in conflict certainly the u.a.e. would like to see. the legitimate internationally recognized government which is allied with saudi arabia have some kind of victory over those these that are close to iran but for the united arab emirates the main issue is something else the main issue is that cities along the southern coast in particular and cities along the sea lanes in the in the red sea cities like aden
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and. that these cities are in the hands of people with whom the u.a.e. has influence. so the arabia is denying reports of a hootie drone attack on the capital riyadh the rebels in yemen say the drone crossed the border and attacked a military target on sunday the who he said that fired 10 but listed missiles towards the saudi border city orgies on a study that coalition has been fighting the who these in yemen for the past 4 years israel appears to be massing troops in its borders with lebanon and syria these tanks were spotted at one of the borders israel has carried out air strikes against iranian backed groups in lebanon iraq and syria in the past few days lebanon's president described it as israeli aggression and a declaration of war u.s. prosecutors say a man charged with killing 11 people in a pittsburgh synagogue should face the death penalty if convicted prosecutors say
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robert bowers shooting was intentional and he showed no remorse the massacre at the synagogue was the deadliest attack ever on jewish americans in the united states the 46 year old fart in washington has gathered for the sabbath service told her last year bowers has pleaded not guilty to a 63 count indictment and he's awaiting trial. the death of another journalist in mexico brings the number killed there to at least 10 so far this year and a new u.n. report is criticizing the government for failing to protect reporters and activists . has more from mexico city. there's a war on press freedom playing out on the streets of mexico. a sharp increase in violence nationwide over the past 2 years has also meant increase in attacks against journalists. the death of nabby how to me of mexico state over the weekend
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brings the total number of journalists killed this year to at least 10 hundreds turned out to attend his funeral. on august 3rd another journalist out also drew media attention this time it was soliciting ovaries a newspaper reporter from the state of it accuse before being gunned down soliciting a received death threats at his home you know i want someone to do something and i want them to leave me in my children alone i don't want anything else he was everything to me and now he's gone what else do they want solicitor was one of the 3 journalists killed in mexico in the same week the continued killings of journalists has sparked protests in vera cruz currently one of the most dangerous states in the country for media professionals because it kept doing a lot of sponsors we want to those responsible for lacerating journalism in veracruz to be captured the ones who harms another family we are journalists but also citizens by hurting or killing a journalist it ends up affecting
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a family. célestin it wasn't rolled in a government program that aims to provide protection for journalists and human rights defenders a recent report by the united nations however says the mexican government has to step up its commitment toward the protection of freedom of expression. and we are calling for a national campaign to prove the visibility of journalists and human rights defenders led by the president. more than $900.00 journalists and human rights workers are currently enrolled in the government's protection mechanism program mexico ranks among the world's most dangerous countries for journalists more than $150.00 have been killed since the year 2000 despite the establishment of the protection mechanism for human rights defenders and journalists in 2012 attacks against press freedom have continued unabated but it up in mexico city a deal to form a new government in italy is looking closer after the democratic party indicated it
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had dropped its veto on giuseppe contains serving another term as prime minister called it resigned last week ending a coalition between the 5 star movement and the right wing legal party the democratic party is keen to avoid any elections which could hand more power to league leader not himself we need the un special rapporteur on religious freedoms has accused sri lanka's political leadership of not doing enough to deal with religious tensions in elfin and there's reports from colombo. immoderate shafi is struggling to cope she says her world turned upside down after her husband was arrested earlier this year it happened at a time of heightened tension shortly after muslim fighters launched attacks in and around sri lanka's capital colombo on easter sunday the family says he's a rest as part of an orchestrated campaign i didn't have my job i i don't have a place to stay and so less my children are and i'm going to school i had to face
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all these problems and. i have to play interventions for them for those problems as well as the needle and to look after the legal aspect of my husband she doesn't want to show her face because she says the family has received threats her husband who's a doctor has been accused of master a lazy sion of seeing him these women he was arrested in a case that police admit had no basis he has since been released on bail the scandal followed weeks of and it was dim sentiment after the easter attacks which targeted churches and killing more than $250.00 people. it also led to a spate of and it was in violence targeting homes and businesses these events were on the agenda of the un special rapporteur on religious freedom during his 11 day visit here lack of preemptive response is something everyone nords and then there are many cases in which either because of mismatch of the of the police available
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and the mobs in question that some of these mobs were about to rampage on addressing the media on monday shahid said he had heard complaints of double standards by law enforcement authorities and about the failure of the state to protect people against hate crimes groups like the buddhist power force or border violence ciena have been accused of carrying out organized violence against the muslim community a charge its c.e.o. . opposite of what we have never spoken against the muslims in an organized manner the bit about us you know on every occasion spoke against muslim terrorism that has no connection to the ordinary muslim community. referring to the recent violence the un special rapporteur says sri lanka's government must do more to protect minorities in order to challenge extremism and create inclusion. you know rule of law well protected well rule of law is not protected then then the vehicle
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communities are vulnerable to attacks and the majority feels they can exploit that space to the up to the advantage shahid says reforming the education system to teach respect for all religions is important showing it says sri lankans should work toward creating a common identity beyond religion and race given the country's violent past more sure lankans are likely to agree if politicians will let them in their finance jazeera colombo. this is all it is either of these of the top stories u.s. president donald trump says he's willing to consider meeting his aronian counterparts haasan rouhani if the circumstances are right he made the statement as the g 7 the right summit wraps up in billets fronts late is that the sun let's have
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pledged $20000000.00 to tackle the amazon forest fires bugs prison president jack both sonata says an international alliance to save the rain forest would be a form of colonization. china is calling for calm and it's only going trade war with the u.s. markets in asia closed shop they down the fall was triggered by conflicting messages from president trump on the matter of the g. 7 combination he said he wished he'd imposed hired tat ups and china on friday but he then said trade talks with china would resume very shortly and judge in the u.s. state of oklahoma has found pharmaceutical giant johnson and johnson helped fuel an opioid epidemic which has killed thousands of people the company has been ordered to pay $572000000.00 in damages it says it will appeal today judge bachmann has affirmed our position that johnson and johnson motivated by greed and avarice is responsible for the opioid ready epidemic in our state
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johnson and johnson will finally be held accountable for thousands of deaths and addiction caused by their activities the company used pseudo science and misleading information that downplayed the risks of opioids. leading to the worst manmade public nuisance our state in this country has ever seen pakistan's leader says he'll go to any lengths over the issue of indian administered kashmir and is made an address to the nation criticizing new delhi his decision to revoke the region's autonomy earlier indian prime minister narendra modi said no foreign mediation between india and pakistan is needed israel appears to be massing troops on its borders with lebanon and syria these tanks were spotted at one of the borders israel has carried out air strikes against iranian backed groups in lebanon iraq and syria in the past few days lebanon's president has described it as israeli
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aggression and a declaration of war and those are the headlines the news continues here on al-jazeera after inside story life and. 3 attacks in 3 countries israel is said to have hit targets linked to iran in syria in lebanon and in iraq so why is benjamin netanyahu escalating tension with terror on will iran respond and if so how this is inside story. thanks. thanks.
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thanks thanks. hello i'm denis welcome to inside story now israel is being blamed for a string of attacks against iranian allied forces in 3 countries over the weekend and that's raised tensions across the middle east early on monday 3 israeli airstrikes reportedly hit a base belonging to a palestinian group in lebanon in the town of khowst saya right on the border with syria now those attacks came a day after 2 israeli drones calls damage in the capital beirut one of them hit a building which howls the media office of the iranian backed hezbollah in the city's southern suburbs another israeli drone exploded in the air in the same area . well israeli forces also carried out drone attacks in iraq and in syria israel did not respond to the accusations that it's
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a soft killed at least one fighter from iraq's popular mobilisation forces but benjamin netanyahu says the operation in damascus which triggered syrian anti-aircraft fire was to prevent a drone attack on israel by iran. if someone rises up to q you kill him 1st in a complicated operation revealed that iran dispatched a special unit off to syria to kill israelis on the golan heights with explosive drugs i'd like to emphasize this was an initiative of iran and we prevented serious attacks that we will expose any attempt by iran to attack us and any iranian effort to hide behind excuses we will not tolerate a aggressions against israel from any country in the region any country that allows its territory to be used for aggression against israel will face the consequences and i repeat the country will face the consequences well israel's actions triggered
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threats of retaliation from both iran and hezbollah and iranian government spokesman described the attacks as shameless violations of sovereignty and said they'll be a response as well as leader calls and a very dangerous development and. enough is enough we will never allow israeli aircraft to attack lebanon or a target in lebanon on the israeli side will never feel safe that israeli drones that are coming to lebanon are not coming here to collect information they are suicidal drones that aim at killing us from now on we will face the israeli drones when they arrive in lebanon skies we will crush them we will drop them. right time to introduce our guest now from tel aviv we have seth france menu's middle east analyst for the job. recent post in tehran mohammad marandi is any iranian political analyst and professor at the university of tehran in london sami
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hamdi editor in chief of the national interests journal welcome to your theft let me start with you in tel aviv so the frequency of israeli attacks are increasing increasing their widening in scope over the weekend without talking about 3 different countries multiple axes of conflict what is benjamin netanyahu up to what's the objective or i think 1st of all we have to be clear that some of these strikes are a legend but israel has taken responsibility for what's happened in syria and i think that obviously israel is trying to show that it's not just hollow rhetoric and mean when israel says that iran cannot threaten israel from syria that it must not intrench there that israel is watching and that when iran in forces iranian proxies are staging drones or rockets especially very close to israel's cease fire lines then they may face some sort of action from israel and i think that's clear
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and israel has been doing that over the last several years right and this is saying with yousef i mean this is clearly mr security trying to burnish his credentials of course he's got an election in just a few weeks in september how does this play with the israeli public do they feel that this increased rebuffs ness if you like using airstrikes makes them safer. i don't think this is playing deeply to the elections i mean israel has admitted that it carried out more than a 1000 air strikes in the last several years so i think that you know netanyahu is the well known in israel would last 10 years he's managed the conflict very well i think for most people's perspective most israelis know him if they object to certain aspects of netanyahu as rule it certainly is not usually the security issues so i think he is trusted and i think especially his kind of size on the world stage in terms of working with the russians and other others like the united
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states is something that most israelis feel comfortable or certain percentage in terms of the security aspect and also the most of the israeli political parties agree on the security aspect they all agree the iran is a threat to israel all right coming to terror on and mohammad marandi mohammed the central allegation by benjamin netanyahu is that this at least some of these strikes were preemptive in nature in that they were to thwart what he says was a planned attack by either iran or its allies on occupied golan heights using drones armed with missiles. well i think it's universally recognized that netanyahu is a very dishonest politician even though many politicians are dishonest but he is exceptional among them this whole claim that the netanyahu constantly makes about attacking iran in positions is nonsense if there have been no iranian soldiers
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killed in syria the recent or at any time in the past couple of years there was only one occasion well 2 occasions but one occasion where recently like a couple of years ago they struck an airbase where 70 iranians were working were murdered by the israelis and another instance which was before that but i won't get into that but the point is that you cannot hide in iran people's deaths because their friends and family will immediately put them on. on the internet their pictures just like the 2 lebanese hezbollah members who were murdered the other night there their pictures came out immediately there is nothing to hide so when the israelis claim that they're constantly as hiking iranian positions that's nonsense if they if they have evidence give the names of the people who were killed pictures of the iranian soldiers it's not something very difficult to access but having at the reason why they do this is because that this rare these constantly
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strike syrian government positions but they want to find some sort of justification for these illegal acts these violations of syrian sovereignty in this raid these are upset they've been supporting isis and al-qaeda on their border we know from the interview given on your own t.v. network by the former head of mossad the relationship that existed with al qaida on the syrian border we know what this year the israelis were doing right every time the syrian government was pushing back on these groups on the golan on the golan heights the israelis would attack syrian government positions right ok but what we now see is an escalation where. all right let's leave it there and take that to sammy because we've got 2 competing narratives haven't we essentially as ever in the region but one thing that i think most people will be able to agree upon and that is that tension has now ratcheted up significantly there are fears of a wider conflict how far would you say those fears justified. i think 1st of all we
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have to remember that every time there is an israeli election coming up there is always an uptick in violence whether that's blasting the palestinians with strikes or whether it is blasting another common threat netanyahu survives because he tells the israelis that there is a common threat and he's not too far from the truth this is the language of the occupier at the end of the day that we took people's land and they will want it back so we have to make sure that we stick together in order to push them away over the iranians are a threat what i think is this is not new this is not the beginning this is the beginning this is part of the war that is ongoing under the covers while trump and the iranians have this staring match over who blinks 1st over the sanctions so because the reason trump doesn't want to go to war with the iranians is because he's aware that the iranians have proxies in syria iraq lebanon they are misled me and he's aware that if he goes to let me interrupt you and ask you then do you believe that what we what they're saying that is a manifestation of the bigger conflict if you like and that potentially between the united states and iran with the white house offering almost complete support for
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benjamin netanyahu and his campaign for reelection. a statement he supported the air strikes i do believe this is part of the bigger picture the u.a.e. and the israelis met not too long ago i think last week where they were discussing it's well known that the u.a.e. and the saudis are very worried that trump is now hesitating to go to war with iran and the reason he's hesitating is because the iranians have power cards the iranians have militias in iraq they have militias in syria they have militias in lebanon all who are ready to fight for the sake of the iranian cause for the israelis and the u.a.e. to convince trying to go to war with the iranians they need to weaken these particular proxies and this is why i believe that israelis bombing these particular targets is a bid in which to try to weaken those iranian proxies and give trump that appetite a war that he is actually losing because he is really see iran as a threat as do you eat as to the saudis by the way i'm not talking a more perspective i'm not saying one is right or one is wrong we're talking about an occupier on one side and
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a sectarian nationalist agenda on the other side. the u.a.e. and saudi and israel believe that iran is one of the biggest threats and iran has outplayed the americans in iraq and outplayed the americans in the other areas and the like so israel with the election coming up with netanyahu is suffering with political damage domestically corruption allegations and the like he wants to unite israel as a common threat and the u.a.e. wants to convince trump to go to war with iran and we've decided to do that by targeting iran all right mohammed coming back to you central to everybody who opposes iran at the moment central to their accusations against terror on is the desire to spread the revolution which was clearly stated in 1979 and furthermore. dollars statement that the iranian government is seeking to establish what he called a crescent of shear influence throughout the middle east i mean isn't that the core problem which is why tehran is facing so many issues confronting its neighbors and
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of course united states. no i think that's the narrative that they and like to create after all the central cause in our region is the palestinian issue palestinians are almost universally sunny and that have the iranians have been a post of our tide in palestine since the since before the revolution so it's not sectarian or for example in the case of bosnia when the boss is were being massacred and decimated the only country that really went to the aid of the pot boson's and helped save the country where the iranians of bosnia was a sunny country or when isis attacked at or below the kurdish part of iraq even though iran was not happy with mr bott as ani but iran immediately sent troops in to protect the city and that for vented from falling it was about to fall there sunny kurdish. so i think that this is
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a narrative that the saudis the israelis the americans have a vested interested interest in promoting the reason why iran is powerful is not because it has proxies across the region but because it has allies across the region whether in iraq or syria these are not mercenaries or in lebanon or yemen or elsewhere these are not mercenaries these are people who are treated as iran's allies whereas what the united states and the saudis do is they give checks they give out money to their people they don't have any they don't support any popular causes they support saudi arabia the emirates which are both on the decline in both have failed in mine and are declining regimes in my opinion so the united states the problem that the united states has is that it is defending its israel to the hilt and netanyahu like trump is the worst possible
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face. of the israeli regime because he is he is so explicitly racist that even mainstream democratic candidates in the united states her write in races ok. for the united sleds go to tell of eve now and seth is it your understanding then the benjamin netanyahu. a would like a direct conflict with iran or b. does he understand the riskiness of the gamble that he's taking in so far it tensions are now so increased and it also increases the risk of miscalculation. i don't think that anyone in israel wants another conflict i mean israelis have lived with conflict for 70 years and they are aware of for instance of hezbollah's rocket threats of more than 100000 rockets that is says can reach all of israel i don't think that iran wants a conflict the americans on a conflict either the region has been through many years
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a vicious conflict against isis and the genocide it carried out so no one really wants a conflict but i think that you know israel has its national security interests and it has said that it doesn't want well listed missiles being transferred to his bolo or precision guidance or draw i think israel's been quite clear on that so i don't think israel if you look at netanyahu is record since he came to power in fact there have not been large numbers of conflict and the main interest of the government of israel is to protect its civility serve the country's economically successful right sammy we've heard from the leader of hezbollah following the 2 drones that a claim to have come from israel that there will be retaliate. and those rather claimed that the cease fire arrangement set out in the u.n. security council resolution that actually put an end to the 2006 conflict is now being broken and he said that this cannot be tolerated again do you expect
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hezbollah or at least to mount some sort of retaliation that could take the region closer to all out conflict. i think set is right when he says that nobody actually wants conflict in the region the reason being is this at the end of the day israelis don't want to fight with their own forces against the iranians like i said earlier i think this is part of trying to get trump to do the fighting instead trunk doesn't want to do the fighting so he doesn't want to do the fighting you either don't want to do the fighting the iranians are happy they're expanding all of this chaos and the like helps them to continue expanding once upon a time they were only within their borders then they oh and 980 they had the war with saddam and since then they've been pushing forward backing groups with their cultural offices and the like in iraq in syria in lebanon and yemen in other words the status quo suits them they don't want to go to war either so no party actually wants to go to war or rather no party wants to use their own troops to go to war everybody wants to cause the u.s. to do the fighting and trance policy is clear the u.s.
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troops will not do the fighting so i don't think lebanon or hezbollah will necessarily retaliate i think they were learned to know to use the rhetoric has been a slow use the rhetoric all to boost their own particular support but it's important to understand something here we should not talk about israel or indeed agendas in the region as if they are legitimate agendas when israel is talking about preserving its security it's doing so at the expense of an entire population this is not israel innocently sitting by and saying you know what guys we came here very nicely we're living and we're all want to be friends and therefore. us israel took an entire populations that had one justice to one less than the right israel took some of the population and is trying to defend it this is the reality of what's taken is defending an illegitimate occupation and this is why it is always under threat right now we are in a situation where we know that iran is struggling it's struggling it's under this campaign of maximum pressure where it is being starved of any access to revenue
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iran really can't even contemplate can it entering into another costly kind of conflict wouldn't it be advisable therefore for the iranian authorities to perhaps dial down to perhaps withdraw to parts ask its allies and its proxies to be a good little bit quiet right now given the harsh reality on the ground. well the harsh reality on the ground is that the saudis and them are ati's with american support carrying out genocide in yemen the harsh reality is the israeli regime is bombing iraq he's bombing the syrians and they've attempted an assassin the assassination yesterday in lebanon so it's not as if things are quiet is this really regime that is carrying out aggression and the reason why so many people in this region see you iran as a friend is because they see no one else supporting their cars like the
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palestinians in gaza like the people in yemen and lebanon and in the case of iraq when we see that thousands of american troops are in the country yet they allowed drones to strike iranian iraqi forces iraqi forces that fought isis then obviously the sentiment in iraq is going to turn further against the united states of western think tanks in western media constantly pro-trade the united states and israel as a for that protect in this in this story and they somehow think that the rest of the world automatically assumes the same whereas the people who are on the ground see things as they exactly opposite so as long as israeli regime carries out strikes then it has to expect a response and i believe that say it has nasser alone will definitely retaliate against israelis because he said he will do so the only thing that prevents israeli rid the regime in israel from aggression is the fear of retaliation if the israeli
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regime concludes that they can strike with impunity then they will do so but i think that it's very important to keep in mind the what your previous said correctly and that is that the united states does not want to war in iran doesn't want to war in iran of course has seen the failure of the maximum pressure campaign despite the hardship that the americans have been trying to impose on ordinary iranians and they have made life difficult for women and children and i think the. probably proud of their actions like they are and you live year in syria and yemen and venezuela and everywhere else in iraq and afghanistan where they've created so much devastation but in the case of iran it's failed the currency has stabilized actually strengthened in the past few months the economy has leveled out or i think the americans have failed and that's why they began a new campaign for try to begin taking tankers but the iranians do not want to initiate conflict the americans know that the iranians do not want to do so but the run into will not allow the americans to carry out an attack on the country without
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being ok all right our top point do so all right israelis want to learn the hard way they will seth coming back to you then. what we've heard is that all players to this potential conflicts are unwilling to enter into a conflict nobody really wants a fight but i can't help but think that this is it an exceedingly risky. policy to pursue on the part of benjamin netanyahu as i said earlier the risk of there being a miscalculation mohamed is of the impression that hezbollah will indeed retaliate is this something that the israeli public before they get they get ready to vote because i understand he's netanyahu is running neck and neck in this particular race as well is this something that is going to secure him the votes that he needs to have a significant victory in the election i don't thing it relates their election
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because i think that the main competitor against that you know the former chief of staff when he gets in his generals or share the same consensus in terms of israel's national security and all the more aware some of them probably for against groups like hezbollah or. these groups that are supported by iran they know exactly where the threat is and look last year for instance in february in may there was an iranian. drawn flown from syria into israeli air space there was rockets fired near the golan so this isn't a question of retaliation this is an ongoing kind of simmering conflict and you're right in there could be for instance a miscalculation by one side or another they could spiral out of control hopefully that will not happen and certainly iran hopefully will understand the message in terms of its allies in terms of taking israel's seriously or i've got to give the final word to you sami if you can be really brief please because we are running out
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of time but give us a just what you think is the significance of the fact that these are weapons depos in iraq have now been targeted in many saying that these have been struck by israeli airstrikes i don't think it affects iran's capabilities much iran doesn't just rely on the fact i mean one had made a very valid point when he says that iran governs by ideology has an arsenal of believes in iran's ideology headed amitie believes in iran's ideology it's not like checks coming out of any of they give it to islam or whoever and then they betray them later on and this is the issue here iran is it promotes the grassroots movement i'm not saying this is a good thing but this is the reason that they have been able to dominate this is why the americans launched the hearts and minds because they realize that no matter how much they batter the share populations in iraq or indeed in in syria or the like it just seemed to make iran stronger because iran seemed to be that resistance in the face of american aggression the reality is you have 2 very competing good genders in the region israel and iran both are detrimental to the region and both
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are now trying to fight each other under a simmering conflict without it going into an all out war none of them want to all out war everybody wants the u.s. to do the fighting where the u.s. is refusing right to do the fighting and this is what we have skirmishes all right sami hamdi in london thank you very much indeed mohammad marandi in tehran thank you and seth front's been in tel aviv thank you all very much indeed and as ever thank you. for watching the show you can see it again any time you like by going to the web site al jazeera dot com should you want more discussion you can go to our facebook page at facebook dot com forward slash a.j. inside story and there's always the twitters fair. at a.j. inside story i'm dennis for me of the whole team here and if i found out.
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after years of you and found a dramatic transformation is emerging. al-jazeera goes on a journey with 4 diverse ethiopian. to tell inspirational stories and immerse us intimately into them months i was forced to principals and teachers instance i was sometimes right. my ethiopian coming soon on al-jazeera. this is a dialogue that you decide not to have children to say that it's what the stake is really human survival everyone has a voice but i'll start with our community because of course this is
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a debate and it's a heated one this is a little beige and literally be able to do a ph d. and ideally join the global conversation with people i think if only they knew what is happening to we were muslims they will be with us and they will be outraged on al-jazeera i really felt liberated as a journalist the muslim brothers are going to the truth doesn't lie with us that's what this job the. 67 war that spawned promise for one people. but disaster for another. the blair to the establishment of the jewish homeland at the expense of the palestinians. the story of the british declaration that changed the middle east bound for seeds of discord on al-jazeera. this is a really fabulous news for one of the best i've ever worked in there is
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a unique sense of bonding where everybody teams in. something i feel every time i get on the chair every time i interview someone. often working round the clock to make sure that we bring events as i currently as possible to the few that's what people expect of us and that's what i think we really do well. about as an indoor how the top stories on al-jazeera the u.s. president donald trump says he would meet his iranian counterpart under the right circumstances to diffuse months of tensions between the 2 countries and writes up what's been happening on the final day of the g.
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7 summit the prospect of a meeting between of us and reigning presidents was not i'm likely outcome of the g. 7 in berates but as the summit came to an end its host the french president suggested talks between donald trump and hassan rouhani were possible. at some point there has to be a meeting between the iranian president and the us president i hope that in the next few weeks this meeting will take place france plays a role along with the other partners who signed the iran deal trump who pulled the u.s. out of the 2015 iran nuclear deal last year and imposed sanctions said he was open to diplomacy we're looking for nuclear weapons globalist missiles and a longer period of time very simple we can have it done in a very short period of time. and i really believe that iran can be a great nation i'd like to see that happen the development came one day after the
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unexpected arrival of the iranian foreign minister in berates jeffard sorry for his invited by the french president who'd been asked by some g 7 leaders to mediate in the crisis. trust conciliatory tone was also extended to trade he said beijing and washington could begin talks to resolve the tariffs dispute going into this summit a man or mackerel said he wanted to use it to make progress on the escalating tensions over iran and trade to help tackle the amazon rain forest fires and kill divisions using multilateral cooperation at the end of the 3 day meeting it seems the french president has succeeded on several fronts they were unresolved issues though the u.k.'s prime minister boris johnson received only a vague promise of a future trade accord with the u.s. and was no nearer to a deal on breaks it with the european union i think it's the job of everybody in parliament to get this thing done what the people want by the way it's what our
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friends and partners on the other side of the channel want they want they want this thing done they want they want it over last year trump refused to sign the final g 7 statement this year has scrapped it replacing it with a one page summary of the meeting so with no commitments in writing the challenge will be to. pelly just acts on the promises they have made. al-jazeera. leaders at the g. 7 summit have pledged $20000000.00 to tackle the amazon forest fires but brazilian president jabil so not all says an international alliance to save the rainforest would be a form of colonization also natural has sent the military to help fight the fires in one donia state critics say his government has been too slow to react china is calling for calm and its ongoing trade war with the u.s. after markets in asia closed sharply down before was triggered by conflicting messages from president trump on the matter at the g. 7 trump initially said he'd wished he'd imposed higher tariffs on china on friday
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but he then said trade talks with china would resume very shortly a judge in the u.s. state of oklahoma has found pharmaceutical giant johnson and johnson helped fuel an opioid epidemic which is killed thousands of people the company has been ordered to pay 570 $2000000.00 in damages over its aggressive marketing of addictive painkillers it says it will appeal. pakistan's leader says he'll go to any lengths over the issue of indian administered kashmir is made an address to the nation criticizing new delhi his decision to revoke the autonomy of the region earlier indian prime minister narendra modi said no foreign mediation between india and pakistan is needed israel appears to be massing troops on its borders with lebanon and syria these tanks were spotted at one of the borders israel has carried out air strikes against iranian backed groups in lebanon iraq and syria in the past few
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days lebanon's president has described it as israeli aggression and a declaration of war those are the headlines the news continues here on al-jazeera pick up lines in this. between november 915 and mean 1916 britain and france agreed a secret deal for dividing the ottoman empire the european allies when the 1st
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world war and so. now we can draw on. a young british politician sir mark sykes and the french lawyer turned diplomat. to borders that best suited their own interests the psychs pekoe agreement. it's cut across a separate deal the british had already made with sharif a saint of mecca to support him in creating. hashemites arab kingdom in return for his leading an arab revolt against autumn in. the south of anatolia eastern turkey and the syrian coast down to beirut were put under direct french control while basra and baghdad were placed under direct british control. mosul and damascus were under french protection and called area a the rest of mesopotamia and the southern levant were put under british protection and called
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area being. jerusalem was designated as an international zone. but soon after the deal was struck some voices in london began expressing dissatisfaction with what britain had to queens in the secret negotiations. as a roofer and. or somewhat off the battery. what war can just see their figure as general paul could have had but a fuckwit you were fleeing into the moment and they're given a no i'm not but not of us you could have or where are you going after. a man with a what have you who do year before think well if we cannot have palestina my government was suddenly not allow britain to control my government would take the same view cyprus and could not agree over the future of palestine when they did
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their deal at the end of $950.00 and they agreed it would have an international ministration but neither side light as a as an outcome and the british didn't like him back to killer because it left the east bank of the su is canal exposed to an administration that could be governed by who knows who. so the british immediately start to think of a way to get round the sites pito agreement so the fact psychs almost immediately before the ink of france for short because signature is dry. talking to the zionists. the zionist movement grew up in the late 19th century with the ultimate aim of establishing a jewish homeland in palestine. the jewish lobby was growing in britain and the british government took its aim seriously. the british might also use the port for the jews to persuade the american government which included several jewish figures
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to join the war or. other factors may also have been at play the zionist movement itself and its leader high invites. were political zionists and there ain't from the very beginning the ultimate aim was an independent jewish state in palestine there in these early days they didn't say that because if you've only evoked hostility to their project paper the effect of their own wish. would have not studied. and i for one see you be formal had. a 5th also you know john your whole year or 2 in an aggrieved and you're going to would feel see you dr shroff and both on. amount of eric or not but they'll make we'll know there's
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a sawyer fee for last year and no hope for us being in france in the last minute because i've met his likes before the very bottom of in your. i want to push ahead of you new year to start off but if i knew how to fix. on the 2nd of november 19th 17 the british foreign secretary there are 3 ball for to the leading jewish figure walter roth's child to say that his government feud with favor the establishment in palestine of a national home for the jewish people and would use their best endeavors to facilitate the achievement of this project. a month before the balfour declaration the new bolshevik government in russia following the revolution had made public the details of the site's pekoe agreement as it sought to distance itself from decisions made by its star asst predecessors.
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grocer bought for a product. for cutler a feller can have more idea only a limited i barely hear. her or her. father had. to fuck up. to fuck up i live in the hack. i sure all believe. that who care at that lee step a lawyer or a star matilda shore star all the revelation from the russians came while the hashemites were fighting alongside the british in the levant so they realised the british were playing a double game. their british also recognised france's right to determine the future of large parts of the area that should be for same had expected to control. for
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that some sort of profit of some of them of after i shop i did forget that keep. in the in the homeland yeah so. if you are are going to show what if you ask alice and feel about the bust of the other girl upon their lives so that. it will be a phase or certainty about on top and not her here alone it's up to you here a little more for your community. here for the. unit and as along the a c. other. case that i was a marine corps that like. like if. you was you know much about it it also had a lot of help or short but we have. the louder. in 1917 the allies made significant military gains on several fronts. the
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british pushed into iraq and general edmund allonby led the forces that ultimately ousted the ottomans from palestine. but alan beast continued advance towards damascus caused the french serious alarm he had expected to have complete control of the levant under the terms of the psychs pekoe agreement. with mana done. on his own the accompanying manipulation and island be in a lessee tristrem meet. with money so small is only a key desire may only need a sheep or live song to the filming of it their own damned topa maybe yes i called the minister says that cos they speak oh keeper may of course said did you have a. survey did their media listen or.
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allonby and the hashemites. took the syrian capital on the 30th of september 1918 and within a week prince feisal been interesting had announced establishment of an arab constitutional government in damascus. it was. our. yeah if that's next week or the family on sex because i'm howard with you just see if a photo of bon with you will see a look at an ass oh my i just i do comedy have got to find your own for you. the 1st world war ended in stages with the ottomans agreeing to an armistice on the 30th of october and germany on the 11th of november $1800.00. troops entered istanbul and the time appeared right to implement the sykes pekoe
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agreement. but the british appear to be having 2nd thoughts as they sought to claim a larger share of ottoman arab territory in the region. the british prime minister david lloyd george met his french counterpart george came on seoul in london on the 4th of december 1900. 80 s. over. the office said. the sacrifices are great. for us right now the sacrifice of all perhaps than any office as your joint empire is no more but that was due to your sacrifices mr prime minister and for those we are most grateful you will take some tea weakness. and know we will have to settle our claims of the end of peace talks
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we have a fault of those claims. you would like perhaps that we modify our. we had our own most. you shall have it. and something else other stuff. you shall have that too. fancy can you read to you from before of course you know a lot more the whole of you know i'm on the news of a lot of and i was. going to be done but a funny thing about the most solemn oath and mecarbil going also with us i had laughing as i luckily for us and for our luck for most of them and i was to be had in just a while there and most nights because in fact. the signs of the psychs pekoe agreements being superseded began to emerge at the start of the peace negotiations in paris in january 1900.
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victorious allies were about to impose harsh conditions on the bank wished and the british and french to decide which of the conflicting promises they had made during the war would be implemented. they don't did this my marlowe. views are very negotiates you know complex i think they would be about there are all this and i bet you eat your best or they that a comedian casual summers or. they are fed a day some days they have sound is really does not sound i've. said been in these were bennett fancy in. the know but and has a more of a when you can a minute dorie. that hell if. then why is
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it out that a one year. for. all of us. now and. one. in april 1924 main allies britain france italy and japan met at the san remo conference they created 3 entities mesopotamia syria and palestine. the french forced faith out of damascus and took complete control of syria britain took mesopotamia and palestine including jerusalem which had been under international administration under the terms of. really it's a river we should be talking about if we want to say what does the modern middle east look like and the striking thing is this if britain had been concerned to
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preserve relations with france right to this to go she asian right through this process they failed because the french looked at sites because they looked to the baptists and they realized that they got much less inseparable than they had been promised by the british in sight fico we overlook these things but in a sense i think that saves vico reflects a failure of trying to negotiate a happy resolution of british and french territorial ambitions in the middle east britain came up with war and the french never forgave them. france had insisted on mosul in the. but had san remo they conceded it to britain despite the fact that it was known to be rich in oil. in the coup of turpin more command of us was the tar for several ships on the libya and the most old saw is our prayers on that turkish but for the i'm company. keo.
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not if. it is. fronts more territory in the in the south along this is of the old become the iraq syria it got more that it got 25 percent of any oil that would be produced from mosul even though that was going to be developed as a british concern. on the international stage the league of nations now created a series of mandates it placed some new arab territories under the supervision of the british and french a kind of occupation in disguise that equal vender the lash of that s.s. if they did. a limb on the us and if you need to 1st. pass. the. 10
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mil in the course a says it to 10. that there. when there is a b b c said that say that you saw us man that they encourage the figure of course a year of burning. the british and the french did overcome their differences in their carve up of the middle east and agreed on concrete borders in december 1920. a joint french british committee was set up to deal with the matter. with her do it. while staying or and as a friend seeing what in the is kelly i'm sure i don't often. see my dad who bought him a career locally and learnt to animal we were i don't have that in america.
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as well as dividing up the region into 3 new entities and implementing the mandate system britain and france further split the territories they now controlled. the french divided syria into 5 states including greater lebanon. generals have a pharmacy and i was offered to go because year for a few german neither of my need be afraid of my math uk. foreign min. so if you were there it would be much for your. son our own you have now coming out of 4. syria was divided into the streets of damascus aleppo the alawite state and mount
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druze. lebanon would become a republic 6 years later. though he didn't know that the. well at the crossing knew what i know that they are i don't physically forget about friends and us and they would be different and you have. well there's the middle i thought of the british colonial office organized the cairo conference in 1921 hosted by the new colonial secretary winston churchill it drew another important line within the british area of influence separating the land east of the river jordan from palestine. churchill came to this brief without any preexisting ideas on the future of the middle east he was in a sense moving as quickly as events were to try and put in place administered
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administrative structures that could prove effective in securing britain's interests at least cost to the exchequer i mean there had been some. proposals which simply from the zionist organization which were pushing for a palestine being defined in much more extensive terms to include the east bank of the jordan as well but in the end jordan and palestine ended up being under the same british mandate as you know at the end of the 1st world war and then we simply had an ordering council that has stopped. if you like it's 1st main in 1922. when the house of might failed in their bid to establish an independent arab kingdom the cairo conference created trans-jordan wish to read hussein's elder son as emir. iraq was created in mesopotamia with his teens younger son face some as king. had been
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a commander in the arab revolt and was the deposed king of syria. if you look at their arms territorial definitions that day there were zones and visit inside speak that cuts across it. but the actual bamboo has to be truong i suppose for iraq after sykes pico the 1st wall would have been shortly after iraq being created in 1920 was the younger french convention of december 1920. in istanbul capital of the former ottoman empire. a turk successfully resisted foreign attempts to define the turkish speaking lands he led the turkish war of independence and repelled the greeks italians french and armenians. to turkey united the country and didn't you turkish republic was proclaimed in october 1923 make.
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steady progress evolved is that. the teak. they were shown on these that sob and space. in their eyes is there any god. does not sound concept that if we also. see any it really bob doesn't that doesn't measure or get a good day was it doesn't that. the syrian revolution in 1936 finally brought about a french accent and unified the country. by the end of 1946 iraq lebanon jordan and syria had all gained independence. british and french forces left but now there are sometimes differing views as to
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whether the borders the 2 powers true we see the root cause of the problems the arab world has experienced since it's very hard to blame. regional problems in the 20th century on the ways in which the borders were drawn the the most you can say if there is a original set to sikes pico is that those borders were drawn without consulting the people who have to live with them and for never securing the buy in of those directly involved the borders with themselves to prove unstable have a calm to well i don't know some trickery initially state there i mean there would be a commute in the form. of a welcome home let me of a 100. come if a month how well. a company in here my job but yeah. if i did the us and with a coffee for
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a lot of money i would have to add that out of the us what i'd been more we don't want us that is if tenet what that as a scandal and more all the wrong mon. you don't want to know him then said the. lead and you saw it there are a bad boss at the island. was there this scene so in a been at war cerny and want to know that i did it because he had lost it. in part 2 we'll ask whether the superpowers of the 21st century have ignored lessons in the week looks like speak home and start to create more division and boundaries in the middle east than ever before. perception is validation we believe what we see but in one life time
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we cannot see everything but we will lie on experiences of others and the legacies of previous generations. at that testimony if we let you know very little . with this documentaries that open your eyes on al-jazeera. the ultranationalist marks connected with one of the world's worst humanitarian crisis we doe as in my grant joining with the military to impose a deadly political agenda we have to protect our nation what has happened to the engine that's one of the biggest stains on the country as a whole. this is not religion this is the politics me and mark an unholy alliance on al-jazeera. it's my privilege to name al-jazeera english the broadcaster of the
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year the cartels are fighting each other and we've been told that we can feel yes these are just in the street it's been a help to refugees since over 700. here some of the very rules of the fund all the things that could be put the. 0 into the. recipients of the mule kristen's called the cost of the year. in doha the top stories on al-jazeera the u.s. president donald trump says he's willing to consider meeting his iranian counterpart rouhani if the circumstances are right he made the statement as the g 7 the summit wrapped up and get its fronts trump says the meeting could happen in the
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coming weeks. i don't know the gentleman i think that i think i know i'm a little bit just by watching over the last number of years what's happened tell you one thing is great negotiators but he i think he's going to want to meet i think iran wants to get this situation straightened out their economy is tanked entirely the sanctions are absolutely hurting them horribly i don't want to see that i don't want to see that they're great people i don't want to see that but we can't let them have a nuclear weapon can't let it happen so i think that there's a really good chance that we would meet the leaders of the g. 7 summit of plus $20000000.00 to tackle the amazon forest fires but brazilian president jenna both sinatras says an international alliance to save the rain forest would be a form of colonization also noddle has sent the military to help fight the fires and run down the instinct. china is calling for calm and it's ongoing trade war with the u.s. markets in asia closed sharply down the fall was triggered by conflicting messages
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from president trump on the matter that the g 7 on friday tom said he wished he'd impose higher tariffs on china but he then said trade talks with china would resume shortly a judge in the u.s. state of oklahoma has found pharmaceutical giant johnson and johnson helped fuel an opioid up a democrat which has killed thousands of people the company's been ordered to pay $572000000.00 in damages over its aggressive marketing of addictive painkillers it says it will appeal pakistan's leader says he'll go to any lengths over the issue of indian administered kashmir is made an address busy to the nation criticizing new delhi's decision to revoke the autonomy of the region or indian prime minister narendra modi said no fall in mediation between india and pakistan is needed. israel appears to be amassing troops in its borders with lebanon and syria as well as carried out airstrikes against iranian backed groups in lebanon iraq and syria in the past few days lebanon's president has described it as
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a declaration of war those are the headlines the news continues here on al-jazeera after 6 pekoe lines in the sand bar for now.
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the league of nations mandate for palestine. it stated that the allied powers had agreed that the mandate to be responsible for establishing quote a national home for the jewish people. would. see you know your body. as your. comment there would be a look at what the year would be before the. from manhattan must learn the skill
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would be. just some them feely lilian would be philistine we're. going to a little beautiful as the men. men or rope minerals your mother cause. i think that sign is diplomacy he was brilliant and in a way manipulating. british feel and ties semitic. feelings at the same time because this fantasy of presenting the jews in america as the key to whether or not america would participant in the war and by presenting exaggerating the power of the jews worldwide. in the coming years palestinians would fight several campaigns from demanding independence from britain to trying to stem the tide of jewish immigration to
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palestine. the movement culminated in the revolt of 1936 which took the form of strikes and armed resistance. data from a lot of build. up the latine man assured. of the brittany were lit on a. warm her cool miata be yeah i love it as the and bad i should. one tackle my local out of the philistine. summer list i'm not officially who beautiful steam of the comes and what got him there the law to be another can because i mean the seine out of it i will be able to time it a moment well of the either now to look at our blog of the run and how to. where in all get double of your reply me you must feel about the idea of uni and the
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british crush this revolt the zionists weren't strong enough at the time they didn't have the military capability. the british brutally put down the arab revolt and it's arguable and i would argue that palestine wasn't lost the 94748 it was lost in the late 1930 s. when britain would put down so far only the arab revolt and destroyed all palestinian military capability. the british mandate in palestine and did on the 14th of may 1948 as it ended david ben-gurion declared the establishment of a jewish state to be known as israel. the same day the armies of 5 arab states moved into the former british mandate the 1948 arab israeli war lasted
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almost a year the 1st of several subsequent major border conflicts. is really settlements beyond its recognized borders have also continued israel's expansion. to a total from the going to allow him. to do this very little matter but war mum look at the cyrillic very clear let it wash woman out of your own be a lot of talk not a lot of them. any hossam heather said are fairly young but the amount of rain given a bit. how ticket has been amended as though he were. going to get one i could be further don't need your dirty history been learned yet the militia were unified has a nother martyr the leaning on has been made so and blew all who do not a lot of them worked on the liver looked upon if i had a cigar supply. the
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balance of power has remained in its wheels favor in 1967 it expanded its borders in the 6 day war to include the west bank the gaza strip the sinai peninsula and the golan heights usually only comes meat illicit meat elf was told in a sort of really you would be. feed there till the. used one of them talked about. a seriousness that he must not but on were how the kernel cause. is to turn out that my unified doesn't have the flu or be able could such a critical cursed medical bill but. let's look at other and john mccain was the healer climate bill is a philistine here but the fool could well with the early obama and then most of my 1000000000 dollar. to be workers of you were one lemme tell you that one at the end
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all of it was the me with all those really you are those people in israel today like president revealing who call for a bi national state they ask they insist. on. civil rights for the palestinians and human rights for the palestinians equality for the palestinians in terms of economic social and cultural issues etc but not political. that these days will remain the state where jews would have the upper hand politically speaking and that by national state would be open to jewish immigration but not the palestinian immigration i mean what kind of the state is going to be it is going to be as i say the south african state without the south african solution. like palestine iraq has also been affected by the legacy looks like speaker. in
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2003 a u.s. led coalition declared war on iraq believing it to possess weapons of mass destruction and aiming to oust president saddam hussein. however the coalition did in taba clear recovery plan for a post saddam iraq and secretary and ethnic arrest seriously destabilize the country. go back to. the invasion of other areas that were there were intermingled sure so he lived in the same areas they were. in fact in the early years of. iraq insists that never there were 2 groups. but the sledgehammer smashed the society. or. did manage to
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instigate a conflict once the conflict starts there's a predictable cycle of violence that takes place i come i think primarily with 3 main object. the 1st is to support the administrator of. jerry brahma. in what he is doing in this transitional period for iraq. if you look at the history of modern iraq since 2003 you might say that no leader has come through who's been able to settle iraq and govern with the consent of enough of the majority to bring iraq to a stable condition and to political security and of that of the latter uk bubble headed for a couple of the had what i ate jelly but emma you solve or have erratically and
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that here will listen. well it's the rob i know you iraqi limit movie but they're glad i can win at x.m. in many you're not really. the call my letters i was when it said she i was and for . all i hear and i will use in the me she has the will i have in the letter i want to go while that the 5th element of min that she's. out of the heart of that he doesn't have any key and can attest to that even with philly. he a limb. after he and been home just what any small. when my dad bought a market where the. bottom share with
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a 2 commander to the. iraqi resistance to the u.s. occupation increased as did sectarian killings the country fell deeper into chaos causing some americans to call for the division of iraq it was almost as though they hadn't studied the lessons of the post periods. so failed to convert our. new. tool a them with a by the. by the valley so for timely i started seeing how to start of. the start at the top he led a cli as a b. o. . that. here was that
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area. sunni leaders in iraq began to warn against the intervention of neighboring shiite iran into internal affairs of their country. they feared a sectarian war which would lead the country into a spiral of violence and arguably make division the only option. why d.m.v. . kind of here on my idea to iraq we're here to for. what diamond. throw winge and if you only use a 1000000 but i thought he has such an ear when brady are. here why they leave the house. if it's not part of fear. ab initio.
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was seen. so for what he did what he. did why. did you hear all of that is. what i suggest you. when i sat down with that ship bellows i want to get them all one has it all one under the one him it so will hold. what amounts to so little if you don't want to but that's the deal boys yes what's that for a man to feel being a billet i don't like you to bury it so it was that they were more in the. has haven't yet it all to democracy that all how muted to feeling there were to see that at all the mochas you need that i hope and those they let me have this to us so that the horde. the kurds managed to achieve autonomy in the kurdistan region of iraq in 2005. their political leadership is now pushing for a referendum on independence which could mean drawing new borders within iraq.
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and it is true that the grokking kurds are quite happy. where they are in their own. enclave as it were but the united states continues to look for iraq which is integrity and not divided into 3 talking it. and then 2 i. mean. that we've been. helped. in. of that can. feel like to have a. model. but sex pekoe say akun. become. the threat of division has also emerged in modern syria.
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the syrian revolution began in march 27th the government of president bashar assad responded by a fierce war against all opposition with far reaching consequences. it represents a major challenge facing the international community and 2016. the situation in syria was exacerbated by the intervention of both russia and iran and their support for the assad government against the rebels. as many i mean about of the. iranian people and you have to do muslims sure you have to sort of look like you. were mad at the fact a strategy said let the far north. korea you know where i mean death for analysis and no he in your own among the new fools. she has is that
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them buttons pushed one of them going to come to you of them or it was another in the holocaust and that would have dr lee the milat or in gone an associate well be in class and me what he would get in my business that eastwood and me are by the thing you know and there are some who got m.b.e. how good it is to what i'm being on as a particular individual could win him oakum i just really mckown him what will be able to record e.g. all that he had already sauce that suja just. let out of a taxi. the un stopped publishing the death toll in syria in 2014 and the numbers are now thought to be much higher than official figures. when russia answered the conflict on the side of the assad government in september 25th when it began bombing opposition held areas and has become a major player in the ongoing crisis. arose he added we don't know whom and chose
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a shrub's. carbonell and how for that any and the whole. so we have had to ask at the end will see my hero you can. be fooled by the. missile and the you know what the doctor. had the journey. the sharia the rio what. a russian intervention which is to guard russian interests in their own just our own ally that russian intervention makes russia or stay close so has to be brought into the talking that
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needs to proceed as does iran with hizbollah as a proxy in syria and as does the european interest in the form of the flow of refugees from syria into europe the interest of the europeans in the stable near east the middle east and america in that row also of global stability with a particular interest on top of that in the security of israel. the international community is still trying to bring the parties together to find a solution to the syrian crisis but we don't want to divide the state dividing the country this is part of the debates way whenever it's up to the syrians. now on the question of whether the country will be as of an order of divided or not. it seems to me that it is already divided in a very real way with the elements in the christians and the other is occupying
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a certain amount of territory and the sunni majority occupying the others and i am . not very hopeful in syria would be a. re put back together again. where in the study about the rush not know if you have sort of walked the heart of heart out of the methadone is still earn. my. men. out of the city and about in the we use in the above are less sure the mission and no. rules or look at being the only he. has asserted that only a need to stand then. when the ballot had. the conflict in syria has become increasingly sectarian it has caused internal
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displacement of hundreds of thousands of people and the international exodus of refugees on an unprecedented scale in the modern world. some think that a form of such a ration is the only solution. is a set of the young do insects vehicle a minimum cold only i should do while i sit on that dual hazel's actor and no and no. technology to slip back as a passenger. it could be added. to the care we did close to being we shot at the mouth about it but the phone with us so we are doing well i hope and i will if luck will fit any i figure there near me. and i'm at that the at the head of mccann my one was. than back not only more heidi was about off out and about if you did any. of that scene. because i could end up with a corn dolly will solve the and if you did really get that. the outbreak had
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a lab in the back of the. larry any las. we hear about the. america i don't even really. i think that. controls the country might shoot better the interest of israel because he will be sort of the legitimized ruler. after such a civil war after such carnage the worst scenario is that this integration of the net of the of the country into uncontrollable 5th domes as it were now so i think that $11.00 syria complete with a regime that is not particularly illegitimate in the eyes of the international community is something that would suit i think the current role is of israel. to islamic state of iraq and the levant isis has also complicated the situation in
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syria and has proclaimed the creation of the state in parts of syria and iraq. while american planes were bombing the i saw in syria he also enabled kurdish groups to take control of certain areas of northern syria in october 25th teen and proclaim a kurdish province there. this could be seen as encouraging the idea of a federal division of syria as well as causing alarm bells for neighboring countries. in syria they are trying to get some kind of contact with the help of russia the united states and. iranian regime and account on like has been lost in the one on a defacto have been taught where internationally they may not be recognized but defacto they will operate all of that and continue to talk at all create kinds of
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problems in the region. in mid. 15 there were armed clashes in turkey between the government of friendship are 21 and the p.k. case. the kurdish p.k. key founded in 1978 once a political entity of its own independent. in there has been a model put this on and on. just the middle feet intifada of the. tiny. intifada. i had the home and there will. be lot of the. north. of us me a feeling med that is her with her knee and. out. be doing me and. yet the how. hard done is show. no human can
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know and you will hear from them is better model. has it into father mother tongue language as a being or offer she language in schools the is a legitimate demand and it could be expressed in the critic society so i don't see any advantage of the math and logic of. demand for any kind of autonomy even if it was there it is going to be ph a case demands and we're not in place to debate or negotiate that kind of autonomy with on the be hopeful of all of us or towards. the ultimate legacy of the psychs pekoe agreement was to establish the rights of outside powers and interests to intervene and influence the politics of the middle east. the sense of instability and constant conflict it has engendered seems even more complex to
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address now than it was a 100 years ago. hello there we have the heat back in place across much of texas where he devised place that is so that it is all about this massive cloud that you can save in not just fabric or showers and we have thunderstorms in the forecast where you thought next couple days it's a very unsettled picture all the way from texas the southeast the mid atlantic and op into the north. also notice into central current canada ontario we have this
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area of low pressure so that will work its way gradually eastwards taking the rain with it but also the cooler air so for those winnipeg. hello there we have the heat back in place across much of texas that he devised was in place but to the east of there it is all about this massive cloud that you can save in all just because we have thunderstorms in the forecast for you the next couple days it's a very unsettled picture holdaway from texas the southeast the mid atlantic and op into the northeast you also notice into central count at canada on terry we have this area of low pressure so that will work its way gradually eastwards taking the rain with it but also the cooler air so for those winnipeg.
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hello there we have the heat back in place across much of texas that he devised was in place but to the east of there it is all about this massive cloud that you can save in all just because we have thunderstorms in the forecast for you the next couple days it's a very unsettled picture hold away from texas the southeast the mid atlantic and into the northeast you also notice into central count at canada on terry we have this area of low pressure so that will work its way gradually eastwood's taking the rain with it but also the cooler air so for those winnipeg. hello there we have the heat back in place across much of texas that he devised was in place but to the east of there it is all about this massive cloud that you can save in all just because we have thunderstorms in the forecast for you the next couple days it's a very unsettled picture hold away from texas the south the. yes the mid atlantic and op into the northeast also notice into central current canada on terry we have
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this area of low pressure so that will work its way gradually eastwards taking the rain with it but also the cooler air so for those winnipeg. hello there we have the heat back in place across much of texas that he devised was in place but to the east of there it is all about this massive cloud that you can save and all just because we have thunderstorms in the forecast for you the next couple days it's a very unsettled picture hold away from texas the southeast the mid atlantic and op into the northeast you also notice into central count at canada on terry we have this area of low pressure so that will work its way gradually eastwood's taking the rain with it but also the cooler air so for those winnipeg.
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hello there we have the heat back in place across much of texas that he devised was in place but to the east of there it is all about this massive cloud that you can see been all just cloud because we have thunderstorms in the forecast for you the next couple days it's a very unsettled picture hold away from texas the southeast the mid atlantic and op into the northeast you also notice into central count at canada ontario we have this area of low pressure so that will work its way gradually eastwards taking the rain with it but also the cooler air so for those winnipeg. hello there we have the heat back in place across much of texas that he devised was in place but to the east of there it is all about this massive cloud that you can save and all just because we have thunderstorms in the forecast for you the next couple days it's a variance. picture holdaway from texas the southeast the mid atlantic and op into
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the northeast you also notice into central current canada on terry we have this area of low pressure so that will work its way gradually eastwood's taking the rain with it but also the cooler air so for those winnipeg. hello there we have the heat back in place across much of texas that he devised was in place but to the east of there it is all about this massive cloud that you can save in all just because we have thunderstorms in the forecast for you the next couple days it's a very unsettled picture hold away from texas the southeast the mid atlantic and into the northeast you also notice into central count at canada ontario we have this area of low pressure so that will work its way gradually eastwards taking the rain with it but also the cooler air so for those winnipeg.
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hello there we have the heat back in place across much of texas that he devised was in place but to the east of there it is all about this massive cloud that you can save in all just because we have thunderstorms in the forecast for you the next couple days it's a very unsettled picture holdaway from texas the southeast the mid atlantic and op into the northeast you also notice into central count at canada ontario we have this area of low pressure so that will work its way gradually eastwood's taking the rain with it but also the cooler air so for those winnipeg.