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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  March 10, 2014 7:00am-8:01am EDT

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hello. i'm geeta guru-murthy with "bbc world news". our top stories. malaysia says it is sharing biometric details of passports with china and america. a new blood test in america could predict the yon set of alzheimer's. a deal with iran could be reached in months. how a robot is helping to teach young children with autism.
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hello. the search for a missing malaysia airlines jet is continuing into its third day. well, this is a picture of the plane on an earlier flight. but a couple of days ago, 239 people were on board the plane en route from beijing to kuala lumpa. an earlier possible sighting of a life raft has proved to be unfounded. the malaysian government is sharing intelligence with the americans and chinese after two
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pass worts were stolen to board the flight. jennifer, we had a news conference earlier in malaysia. a couple of new details. the government saying they are sharing biometrics and visual information with other governments. the search seems to have very little new detail to add. >> indeed, they have. but what we have gotten is we have spoken to the malaysian police and they have confirmed that they have identified one of the two passengers that got on board the flight with stolen european passports. they have not revealed his information but said he is not malaysian. as far as we know they are no closer to understanding what caused the plane to vanish.
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it is intriguing malaysian officials and raises a lot of questions about airport security. but does that really have anything to do with the vanishing of this plane? it's still not known. stolen passports could also point to illegal immigrants coming through as opposed to terrorism. they are widening their scope and widening their search area and not rule out any possibilities from terrorism to technical failure. >> on the question of the stolen passports, questions being raised how many checks were carried out through interpol after the date of 9/11. what information is there about the plane's location? it seems bizarre in this day in age that a plane can disappear
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radar when so many people are monitoring these things. >> you're right. none in which they seem to be able to shed much light on. we know the plane left kuala lumpur. two hours into the flight they lost contact. that was between malaysia and vietnam. that's where they were initially looking. now they have military radar records that indicate that the airplane may have been trying to turn back to kuala lumpur. if that was the case a distress signal should have been sent out. in this instance, nothing was. they don't know where the aircrafts that gone. although there are multiple reports of sightings of debris,
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they say at the present time they have found in evidence of the wreckage. which is frustrating for family members still waiting to find out what happened to their loved ones on board. >> the passenger's relatives, one spoke to journalists. >> well, from the chinese side, they have felt quite neglected by their own officials and leaders. the families have been met by the prime minister. his wife sending condolences immediately. you have them separated away from the media. they are now put if a hotel close by to the area but not
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disclosed to journalists so their identities and their privacy can be kept from the prying eyes of cameras. families do appreciate that. what they want is information. they are concerned, angry and frustrated. they are offering to fly them to vietnam or kuala lumpur. they don't know where the aircraft has landed. they're not sure why they should be staying in vietnam for that matter. >> can't imagine the distress going there. thanks so much indeed. well, bbc has been on board one of the search flights. thanks very much for joining us. just tell us what you have been doing, where you've been, what have you seen?
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>> i spent three hours aboard. the malaysian airlines might have gone missing. we couldn't see anything. i could see authorities trying to track down any evidence at all of the missing airplane. we went and we were circling around the area. it's a vast area. 400 square kilometers, which is a really, really big area. the airport is not equipped to look good in the area. we spent 20 minutes there and had to head back to the base. >> why did you have to head back to the base after 20 minutes? is that because of fuel? is the search visual?
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radar. technically how are they doing this search? >> well, we had to head back because of the fuel problem, as you had earlier. they used an old airplane which is actually transformed airplane. it's not equipped for investigation, especially for things under the sea. they use radar and some other equipment. but i think they lack the resources to actually go and look farther down to find anything that can-can point to the missing location of the airplane. >> do you know why wide the radar covers, how deep under the water they can detect anything? >> it is 400 square kilometers, which is really, really huge.
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obviously from the airplane you can only see the surface. they are talking about deploying more ships. it includes two naval ships. they are all looking for any possible things. >> we'll be getting pictures in the next few moments. thank you. other news today, and pressure is growing on ukraine's enter eupl government as it strengthens its grips on crimea. a rally is taking place in moscow to support the crimean people deciding their own future. the ousted president viktor yanukovych is expected to speak tomorrow in the southern russian
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city. it will be his first public statement in more than a week. not all ethnic regions want to leave ukraine. >> the military buildup pushes on. law and order has broken down. road blocks are everywhere to prevent the illegal revolution coming here. at times they're friendly enough. today we're told to film from a far. and then they want us out. it feels tense as one comes over to assert his authority. go now, he commands. >> we have just been ordered to drive away from the check points. you can see there's a very jumpy atmosphere back there. it's another sign kiev simply lost control of crimea.
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they say protecting the interest of the russian popular here. >> it's a situation that he and his family want to leave behind. after some last minute packing they're moving today from crimea to kiev to escape the dangers here. they are ethnic russians from sevastopol but fear what they say. >> what is happening here is occupation. it shouldn't be in such a way. >> do you think they are under threat? >> i think they are safe. >> where does that come from, do
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you think, do you think? >> from television. from propaganda. the russian federation is a bunch of criminals. there is extremely high level of corruption in russia. there are no human rights. i want to be here in ukraine to build a new country where people respect the law. where people respect each other and where the government respect the people. >> they are simply caught up in this crisis. many others warmly welcome russia. but this is a family that feels forced to escape crimea's dissent into chaos. >> a blood test can-can accurately predict the yon set of alzheimer's disease. if confirmed this could be a significant step in treating
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dementia. tell us how this works. >> they look to patients already diagnosed. when they look for the same 10 fats in people they could tell three years ahead of time who would get alzheimer's or mild cognitive impairment and who would remain healthy. >> they can only tell three years ahead. they are hoping to tell further? >> because this is so early research. they will look further and further back in time. seven years ahead of time, ten years ahead of time. the day you are diagnosed your brain has been decaying upwards
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of 15 years. >> is this linked with how much fat i'm eat something but they are very specific chemicals. >> there is some research about diet. it is all the things we already know are good for us, plenty of fruits and vegetables. it's just the different ratios. >> very early days as well this research, isn't it? >> it is. it's very early days. only done in a few groups of people. >> thanks very much indeed. >> a deal on its nuclear program could be reached within months.
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lyse doucet is traveling with catherine ashton. outline the americans always seem to be the big players in negotiating with iran. how big does europe feature from the viewpoint of iranians? >> you have to remember catherine ashton played an absolutely vital role in the landmark deal last november. so she is at the heart of the negotiations. crucial historic negotiations between iran and the rest of the international community. but, yes, so when she comes here, some iranians said our problem is not brussells. our problem is with washington. many people here are skeptical.
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when people ask the question, is it really possible for iran and world powers to conclude a long-term nuclear deal, which they are hoping, cautiously hoping they been do by the end of july, they say that the main obstacle is not just the hard liners here in iran but the hard liners as they put it in the united states. those that still deeply distrust. he said iran does not seek nuclear weapons. the west wants more prove of that. they raise concerns about the military aspects of iran's nuclear program. and those issues will be on the table when the nuclear talks resume again in just days's time in vienna.
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>> stay with us here on "bbc world news". much more to come. a big business deal in the world of bananas. ♪ some come here to build something stronger. others come to build something faster... something safer... something greener. something the whole world can share. people come to boeing to do many different things. but it's always about the very thing we do best. ♪
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feed it with scotts starter food for new grass. this is "bbc world news". i'm geeta guru-murthy with the latest headlines. malaysia says it is sharing biometric details on passengers from the missing plane with america and china. a new blood test in america could accurately predict the yon set of alzheimer's. now, day six of the oscar pistorius murder trial is under way in pretoria. the court has been hearing evidence from reeva steenkamp's postmortem report. the path ols says he hath cal issues of the publishing of graphic details in his
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testimony. oscar pistorius is on trial for intentionally killing his girlfriend over a year ago. he denies the charges. nomsa joins me with the latest. we have not been able to talk of the evidence. what has happened in court as far as we know, nomsa? >> the pathologist started giving evidence of the graphic details of reeva steenkamp's juniors. while he was doing that we saw oscar pistorius becoming physically ill in court. and court was adjourned for a short while. after that, when court was back in session his lawyer was asked if mr. pistorius would be okay for the court to continue. >> i'm so sorry. we have lost the line there obviously to pretoria. but i think as we two the gist
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there of what nomsa was saying. oscar pistorius was somewhat unwell whilst listening to the autopsy report. he was vomiting in court. the judge asked if he was okay to continue? his lawyer responded that he wants to proceed. of course we can't broadcast any of the details of the autopsy. it is just not appropriate for public hearing at this time. out of due respect to reeva steenkamp and her family. much more to come. aaron is right here with all the business news. very big news you've got for us today. >> yeah. absolutely. you just mentioned the word vomit. not very nice. i went to the zoo yesterday and watched a big gorilla vomit. >> aaron? >> i'm telling you the truth. that's what happened at the zoo yesterday. big bananas. hello, even.
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chiquita is combining with fyffes to create the world's biggest banana company. it is expected to sell 160 million boxes of bananas more than any other rival. it would bring $4.6 billion in annual reserves. they don't just do bananas, no. pineapple, melons, fresh salads. it will be listed on the new york stock exchange but domiciled in ireland. we will have more on "gmt". washing bananas. look at that. taking a united stance on immigration reform. we have a special report coming up on the "world business
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report". also, the british government has pledged an extra 45 million pounds. that's $75 million on developing the so-called internet of things technology. it doubles the funds available on technology firms that work on everyday devices. well, basically they can communicate over the internet. what are we talking about? what about a house that tweets you if you have left your iron on or if you need to pick up some milk. just what we need. tweet me. i'll tweet you back. @bbcaaron. you're still looking at me in disgust. >> my house would be tweeting me a lot. >> chaos. >> well, of course we already
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have robots that can vacuum our houses. houses that will be tweeting soon. could they be used to cook our food or teach our children? ricky has been finding out how this sort of technology is benefiting children with special needs. >> hello. >> meet casper. he might look a bit unusual, but this humanoid robot is helping young children living with autism. for kids with autism, sometimes even the simplest thing like nothing when someone is happy or sad can be a big challenge. the condition can also make it difficult for them to play with other kids. 4-year-old byron gets to play with casper every week. >> shall we say hello to casper.
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>> let's play together. >> kids with autism like the robot's simple features and repetitive phrases. >> it doesn't matter what you say or what casper says or how you do it. it's always exactly the same expression, exactly the same sound every single time. in the last six months, teachers here have noticed improvement in the way some of the children communicate. and now researchers are working hard to further develop casper. >> engineers at the university of hartfordshire are using the technology to bring these to life. they're using a 3d printer to create plastic body parts. >> later this year, 20 new robots will be given out to students and schools all over the uk.
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>> well, an intriguing thought, isn't it? what lies ahead of us. we're just going to catch up with all the top stories in a couple of momentsment police told the bbc they have identified one of two men who boarded the missing malaysia airlines flight. (vo) you are a business pro. seeker of the sublime. you can separate runway ridiculousness... from fashion that flies off the shelves. and you...rent from national.
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i'm geeta guru-murthy with "bbc world news". our top stories. malaysian police identified one of the two passengers who boarded the missing plane with stolen passports. oscar pistorius trial not broadcasting the details of the postmortem report on reeva steenkamp. iran nuclear deal could be reached within months. an astronaut from japan takes over control from his russian colleague.
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hello. malaysian police have told the bbc they have identified one of two men who boarded the missing malaysia airlines flight with stolen passports. police say they cannot reveal his identity. they have confirmed the man is not malaysian. this is a picture of the plane on an earlier flight. well, this time 239 people are aboard the aircraft as it traveled from beijing to kuala lumpa. in the latest developments, an earlier possible sighting of a life raft off the vietnamese
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coast proved to be unfounded. the malaysian government is sharing intelligence with both the americans and chinese over the two stolen passports used to board the flight. well, the latest news conference, they explained just how they are sharing that intelligence. >> i have been linking up with the intelligence agencies, met with u.s. intelligence yesterday. both biometric, background information and visuals. this information is being digested by the relevant agencies. i do not want information to be revealed today to effect the ongoing investigation. >> the acting transport minister.
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jennifer, just tell us what's going on there at the moment and what do we know about the identity of these two men who used the stolen passports? >> reporter: well, right now we're in the press conference room where journalists are getting ready. you can see there are lots of media. most of them international. especially the chinese here. because more than half of the passengers on board were from china. there's intense international interest in this story. but the information that's coming out of this room has not been satisfying the journal its. if we can pan over here all the journalists here waiting for the press conference to happen. part of the frustration is that, as you heard from the acting transport minister, they're not willing to give out any information until they can double-check and make sure it is concrete. which is why you have such
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reports about the life raft or sightings, spottings of debris. then the malaysian authorities coming here to deny these stories. that's why they told people to avoid speculation and be patient. the scale is so massive. at this point in time they don't have any further details about the whereabouts of aircraft nh 370. >> they know the identity of at least one of the people who used a passport that has since been found to be stolen. >> indeed. malaysian police have told the bbc that they have identified one of the two passengers that got on with the stolen passport. but they have not given us any more details other than to say that he is not malaysian. malaysian officials have been very cautious about revealing much information. but also this is just one of
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many areas where they are looking into about the pockets. do the two passengers have anything to do with the disappearance of the aircraft? that is still unresolved at this point. we don't know. but that is certainly raising a lot of questions. one in which we hope officials would tell us soon. >> thanks very much for now. well, over half of the 239 passengers on board were chinese. our beijing correspondent jonathan sudworth sent us this report from a hotel where relatives await anxiously for news of their loved ones. >> reporter: this is the hotel a short drive from the beijing airport where the family members of the 154 chinese citizens have been brought. the mood inside probably a mix of deep greeting and mounting frustration. malaysian airlines have offered to fly two members from each
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family to kuala lumpa to be closer to the search effort. it is almost impossible to make a decision given the complete absence of information. the government still describing the whereabouts of flight 370 as a mystery. we understand that some family members do not have chinese passports. so they would face that bureaucratic hurdle before being able to get on a plane. to say there is intense media interest would be an understatement. these are just some gathered outside the room here where the family members are being briefed. they have been happy speaking to the press over what they describe as a lack of communication. there is so little information to give them at the moment. it is an intently difficult time in the glare of the media spotlight with far more
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questions than there are answers. and all the time knowing they are probably beginning a grieving process for loved ones unlikely to come down. >> john sudworth in beijing. when that press conference starts, we will take you to it straight away. a deal on its nuclear program could be reached within months. he made the comment after talks with catherine ash thopb, the most senior official to visit in six years. lyse doucet is traveling with her. >> reporter: iran has waited a long time. six years for europe's top diplomat to visit. catherine ashton's visit is headline news for iranian media. it was important to get every
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detail right to building a new relationship between iran and europe. shareef and ashton know each other well. they have been negotiating for months in europe. with the landmark deal they reached last year on iran's nuclear program runs out in july. >> the time is short. the gaps are wide. the distrust is still deep. are you worried they may not succeed? >> iran is determined to reach an agreement. iran finds it in its own interests to make sure there are no ambiguities about iran's intentions because we have no intention to seek nuclear weapons. >> iran is clearly establishing better working relationships with many countries in the west. ashton's visit will strengthen further. as the negotiations go on the talks made it more difficult the.
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humamadi has been no prison five times. europe's top diplomat wants to engage on these issues too. >> we have come to establish for ourselves a situation here in terms of the potential for the relationship. but we also recognize that that relationship is in many ways i iran demonstrates it is clearly looking for a different realm. >> iranians have suffered under international sanctions for years. the limited nuclear deal brought some hope. many wanted a relationship with the west but not convinced it will happen. lyse doucet, bbc news, tehran. the sixth day of the oscar pistorius murder trial is under way in pretoria. the court decided to ban live details from reeva steenkamp's
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postmortem report. he said he has ethical issues over the publishing of graphic details in his trial. oscar pistorius is on trial for killing his girlfriend just over a year ago. nomsa, what can we say about what has happened today? >> reporter: well, the only thing that we can say that was in order from the judge who who said it's not allowed live reporting or live broadcasting of the evidence that has now been delivered by the state pathologist. no one is allowed to broadcast that or even tweet. no blogs. no social media. basically giving graphic details about the injuries reeva
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steenkamp has sustained. and we have seen oscar pistorius becoming physically ill in court. there was an adjournment because of that. he was asked after that adjournment if he would be able to continue with today's proceedings. but his lawyers basically told the court if he was going to change anything he would have asked the court not to continue. but because nothing is going to change, oscar has asked for the evidence to continue being delivered in court. >> and what reasons have been given as to why this should not be broadcast? >> the reason i says so is the dignity of the deceased will not be respected, and her family. he basically had some ethical problems about broadcasting these details. and there was arguments of the defense attorney saying it was
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not in the public interest to give out the details of reeva steenkamp's injuries. >> thank you. pressure is growing on ukraine's enter eupl government as moscow strengthens its grip on crimea. in less than a week, the southern region holds a referendum on whether to join the russian federation. rallies are taking place in donetsk, eastern cue crain and moscow. the ousted president viktor yanukovych is expected to speak tomorrow. >> i think definitely. this invitation by president obama to the interim prime minister here are very clear show of support for the interim government and proof of the fact that united states and much of the international community do see the government here in kiev
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as a legitimate one, at least until elections later on in may. so therefore saying we're supporting ukraine repeated i suppose that idea that moscow is committing an act of aggression in crimea. and the position of the international community led by the united states that russian troops need to withdraw back to their bases. we haven't seen any sign of that. no real sign that pressure is having an impact. we have seen president putin say in a phone call with the british prime minister and with the german leader talking about the fact that an international contact group is a possibility. talking about the fact at least he will discuss that possibility with his foreign minister. so a suggestion that perhaps it could be possible to bring russia and ukraine to a formal negotiation process, talks which might be the very first step
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towards talking a way out of this process. meanwhile, things moving very quickly. we have seen a report from the pro russian leader saying there will be moves already so introduce the ruble there. obviously very disturbing times for people in kiev. >> stay with us. more more to come. i spoke with frank gardner about malaysia's announcement that it is sharing intense with america and china. scott: okay, neighbors, here's the top-drawer skinny. scotts wraps each seed in a brilliant water smart plus coating, that feeds, protects, and holds in moisture to make growing thicker, healthier grass easier.
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-hit the beach in florida. -and a reunion in seattle. we can afford to take more trips this year. [man] when hotels have unsold rooms, they use hotwire to fill them. [woman] so we got our 4-star hotels... for half price. ♪ h-o-t-w-i-r-e ♪ hotwire.com this is "bbc world news". i'm geeta guru-murthy with the latest headlines for you. police in malaysia say they have identified one of the two men
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who boarded the missing plane with stolen passports. malaysia says it is sharing biometric details with intelligence agencies in america and china. women, let's get more on our top stories. frank, are you getting any steer at all on what's happening here? >> well, they are keeping a very open mind on it. it raises question marks. it's not completely unusual. if you look at the statistics, interpol say they have on their database 40 million stolen passports, or cases of 40 million. in the last year, a billion times people have boarded planes or on gone through airport security without that list being checked. it's not entirely surprising that a couple of people will have that. of course the malaysians and everybody involved is rightly
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very interested to know who those people were, why they had stolen passports, where they were going. what were they doing? great they have identified one of them. really interested to know who he or she is. because the original holders of the passports in italy and austria reported them. but that didn't get us far of the gate. it should have flashed up a warning immediately. malaysia is not alone in this. national border agencies don't actually do this check. interpol is saying now is the time. >> but why on earth don't they? >> they do other checks. i think people -- maybe it's just one thing too many for people. it takes time. probably slow down passport lines. that's a very good question. >> the big priority is to people
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getting on board with a gun or explosives. obviously anything to do with airline hijacking, piracy, criminality, terrorism, the u.s. has a massive interest in. the fbi very involved in this. they have the technology, the database. one of the things the americans have done is to scan their detectors to see if there was any sign of a flash over the gulf of thailand at the time the plane was flying and there wasn't. >> also, how unusual to be giving these resultsment a lot of sharing goes on. >> i think this is one of the huge tragedies that tran sends national borders. there's already been quite a lot of tension between china and vietnam, for example. the south china sea, maritime
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rights and so on. yet that is put to one side while there is this massive search. the relatives need to find out urgently what has happened to this plane. >> can i ask you very quickly, is it possible that we don't have the information from satellites or wherever as to what happened to this plane? >> it is surprising that it is taking this long, definitely. the black box will appear. i think they will find it. it may take a bit of time. >> unfortunately we have to stop. i have many more questions. in other news today, a group of greek orthodox nuns released three months after being kidnapped by syrian rebels. they have arrived in damascus.
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they said they were tired but had been mostly well treated by their captors. the syrian government would free about 150 women and child prisoners in exchange. international court of justice in the hague on competing claims of genocide by croatia and serbia. serbia filed a counterclaim over the expulsion of 230,000 serbs. obstetric fistula occurs in complications of childbirth.
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just to warn you, there are graphic details in the report. >> here in rural central uganda the nearest hospital is around two hours away. that's partly why most women in this community give birth at home and some lose their babies as a result. >> this is your brother? >> yes. >> like sulaina, she was 16 when she went into labor here. after three days she was finally taken to hospital. she gave birth to a little girl who died soon after delivery. selena tells me she was cursed and that's why her baby died. it also caused a rupture in her bladder which causes her to leak urine constantly. a condition known as obstetric
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fistula. for some their bowels are affected too making them doubly incontinent. >> she has a fistula. she has a hole in her bladder. >> reporter: for two weeks doctors from providing free fistula surgery. it usually costs $700. >> how are you? >> i'm fine. you are? >> translator: i was lively before. now i can't mix with people. when i pass someone, they tell me i stink. even when i take a bath, the smell doesn't leave me. so i just stay at home. >> reporter: to raise awareness, the missionaries travel to villages and talk about family planning and giving birth safely. most of the women here today will have given birth at home with a birthing attendant. often older women with little or no experience. they are saying save enough money to get them to hospital so she can give birth safely.
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that could be the difference of life and death for the woman and her unborn child. >> the morning of sulaina's surgery and she's nervous. the hope is they will train ugandan doctors here so eventually take over. >> we do four camps a year. we have a local surgeon here who is able to do the simple fistulas. and so she's starting to take them on. but unfortunately not as much surgery happens. >> sulaina's operation has been a success. after a short recovery time, her mother hopes she can go back to school and get her life back. but many more women are left waiting, facing a lifetime of rejection, shame and humiliation.
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now if you have seen the film "gravity," this piece might ripping a bill. koichi is the first japanese astronaut to take up the post. in a ceremony by ground control. >> reporter: he is used to making history. he was one of three astronauts to take the first were olympic torch into space. but now during a live ceremony, which was beamed down to colleagues back on earth he was made the new commander of the international space station, the first japanese astronaut to take up the role. >> i am humbled to assume the command of the suspicion station. to the entire team of 38, congratulations on the amazing accomplishment.
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we have unforgettable memories together. we will continue to keep the operations safe, efficient and fun, as you guys led us to do so. have a safe return. we'll catch you back on the planet in a couple months. thank you. >> reporter: the man stepping down is oleg, who congratulated the new boss. he will travel back to earth leaving koichi in charge of a $100 billion research laboratory which flies 420 kilometers above earth. by taking over command, koichi has signed his name into history. and no doubt made his nation very proud. >> amazing pictures still. just to remind you, our top story of course this yon going crisis search for a missing malaysian airlines jet. the search continues.
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we're waiting for a news conference in fact, to begin, which you can find on bbc news as soon as it begins. malaysia is sharing intelligence with the americans and chinese. it has found two stolen passports. they have identified one of the passengers. this is "bbc world news". i'm geeta guru-murthy. thanks for watching. usiness pro. seeker of the sublime. you can separate runway ridiculousness... from fashion that flies off the shelves. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. and only national is ranked highest in car rental customer satisfaction by j.d. power. (natalie) ooooh, i like your style. (vo) so do we, business pro. so do we. go national. go like a pro. to build something smarter. ♪ some come here to build something stronger. others come to build something faster... something safer...
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oh! [ gasping ] oh, my head. mm, time travel without a capsule, that's a killer! oh! still, at least we made it. earth, 21st century, by the looks of it. talk about lucky. that wasn't luck, that was me. hold it still! don't move! hold it still! i'm telling you, it's broken, it hasn't worked for years! that's because you didn't have me. martha, grab hold! now! jack: the moral is, if you're going to get stuck at the end of the universe,

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