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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  March 26, 2014 7:00am-8:01am EDT

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hello. i'm nik gowing with "bbc world news." our top stories, new satellite images in the search for missing flight mh 3 70. malaysia's transport minister says they show more than 120 objects in the area of the indian ocean. >> some objects were a meeter in length, others as much as 23 meters in length. some of the objects appear to be bright, possibly indicating solid material. the search for debris
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resumes as the weather improves. australia's prime minister commits to solve the riddle of the plane's disappearance. >> reporter: in perth the search has intensified and has been going on all day tore the missing plane. president obama starts his visit to belgium with a trip to the world war ii cemetery. why these lions have been killed by a copenhagen zoo. hello everyone. the air and sea search for the missing malaysian airliner has resumed after bad weather forced it to be abandoned for a day. a french satellite has provided
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new possible evidence of debris. two hours ago malaysia's transport minister showed some of the new images taken three days ago. 122 objects were identified in the southern indian ocean. he described these objects as objects of interest. the length varies from one meter to 23 meters in length or width. the search area 2000 kilometers off the western coast of australia has been narrowed down. it still covers tens of thousands of square nautical miles here in the southern indian ocean. a total of seven military and five civil maritime surveillance aircraft are involved. they're divided six and six into two sectors. among them, four slow-flying australian p3 orion planes which spotted objects earlier in the week. the united states 80 p8 pos sidon is there as well. so is the australian's success
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and china's supply ship sri long. this is a towed pinger system, weighing about 22 kilos. flown in by the u.s. navy. it usually tracks down u.s. military aircraft. it can locate signals up to a depth of 18,000 feet, 6,000 meters. the likely depth in the southern indian ocean is 10,000 to 13,000. but the pinger locater won't reach the search zone until april 30th. that's close to 30 days since the plane disappeared. it's also when the pinger battery pack on the black box runs out of power. let's go live to perth in western australia to my colleague sharanjit lay oh. >> reporter: the search intensified, resuming after a patch of bad weather yesterday.
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the focal point being about 2,500 kilometers southwest of where i stand here in central perth. of course, as you said, nik, we've been hearing a lot. a news conference from the acting malaysian transport minister who said new satellite images have been sent from airbus in france. they show a number of objects floating in the southern indian ocean. >> mic analyzed the images. in one area of the ocean measuring some 400 square kilometers were able to identify 122 potential objects. some objects were a meter in length. others were as much as 23 meters in length. some of the objects appeared to be bright, possibly indicating solid material. the objects were located approximately 2,557 kill onomet
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from perth. >> reporter: the united states navy p 8 poseidon patrol craft arrived in the region. jon donnison has more from perth. >> reporter: this is free mantle port just outside perth. it's here that some of the recovery operation is likely to be based. we have the "hma success" set up from here. that's at the search scene as well as several chinese ships. perth, already one of the most remote cities in the world, and the search area is some 2,500 from where we are now. we have a key bit of kit being flown in by the americans. something known as a towed ping locater. essentially that will be used to try to find the plane's missing black box flight recorder.
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what happens is a ship tows this through the water and it's able to pick up any pings or signals sent out by the black box. there are a few problems with that. one, the black box flight recorder is only able to send these pings out for about 30 days. that's the amount of battery life. we're already on day 18. there's a bit of time pressure. secondly, the black box may have been damaged so it may not be able to send out anything at all. thirdly, you can only use the ping locater when you have a pretty good idea exactly where the plane crashed. at the moment, we just don't know that. i think basically this recovery operation could take months if not years. >> reporter: the australian prime minister tony abbott has been paying tribute to the passengers and crew of the plane now presumed dead. >> the crash zone is about as
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close to nowhere as it's possible to be. it's closer to australian than to anywhere else. i want to thank all the nations involved in search activities, recovery activities, china, the united states, japan, korea and new zealand, and i want to commend the professionalism of all the personnel involved. >> so sharanjit, how quickly do you get information from the pearce base outside perth? or does it get channelled back to the malaysians? >> reporter: that's right, nik. i think the australians have been doing a very coordinated effort in making information available. you hear very regularly from the australian maritime safety authority. they issue press releases to the media.
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i was at the pearce air force base earlier today and i could hear all the planes taking off this morning. we know there are 12 planes involved in this search, five of them, in fact, civilian planes and six countries involved as well. it's a huge concerted effort by all these different countries, a big international effort, one of the biggest, in fact, in a situation like this. of course, the search going to be intensified. it was intensified today, intensified as well tomorrow. it's a very short window of opportunity. a lot of the weather forecasters are saying that the weather is due to get worse again later this week. the weather has improved today and as well they're going to look tomorrow. you remember, of course, yesterday the search was called off for some 24 hours because the weather was just so bad. there were 80 kilometer-per-hour gail force wind. that even led "success" to turn back. the focus is to try to find the
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missing plane and the objects being spotted by various satellites. >> sharanjit, those planes have a very long trip, at least four hours flying, then only two to 2 1/2 hours scanning. >> reporter: it's tough work. essentially they are scanning the waves. if you imagine the distance from here where i stand in central perth to the area they're looking for, someone said it's the distance from london to cairo if you can imagine in egypt. literally it's an effort getting there. and then you have to use the daylight to look for missing objects. it's crucial they look for them now. >> sharanjit lal, thank you from perth, australia. china is devoting a lot of resources to the search for the missing plane, also exerting diplomatic influence where it
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can. this is china's vice foreign minister arriving in kuala lumpur on wednesday. he's already met the prime minister and also the transportation minister and others involved in the operation for missing malaysian airliner. he wants to find out about the plane and help solve the mystery. china has' nor muss resources and six ships now in the southern indian ocean. let's go to the bbc's paul adams who joins me from kuala lumpur. the chinese taking a very close interest and probably not just because they've got so many victims on the airliner. >> reporter: they are probably as interested as anyone after the malaysians or including the malaysians themselves. one detects a kind of somewhat unspoken tension between the two countries, driven obviously by the scenes reported day after
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day in beijing with the relatives still very angry at what they regard as the failure of the malaysian authorities to keep them properly informed to the extent you hear people accusing the government here of simply lying. the word murderer has been bandied around and so forth. i think the two governments have delicate diplomacy to do to make sure they're both on the same page, that each side knows what the other knows and that these tensions which may be somewhat real and somewhat orchestrated in beijing, that those can be properly addressed. at the moment i think that is not happening, and that's probably why these two sets of officials feel the need to consult evermore closely. >> of course, paul, regionally china becoming far more assertive, not just on this incident, but in so many other areas as well including the south china sea, fascinating
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that the chinese are going to be part of this new working group on the airliner, bringing them around the table with american experts, british experts, other experts. it's going to be an interesting challenge there on how much will really be shared. >> very interesting. again, the malaysian government partly in response to these criticisms has said -- and the acting minister said today what other country haves been able to successfully bring 26 countries together in this way to conduct such a concerted search for the mek kaj of this plane. there was an interesting moment in terms of china's regional influence. i don't know whether the acting minister meant this as a pointed reference or not. he said in a world where countries bicker about rocks in the sea, that this international cooperation over mh370 was all the more remarkable. the countries that bicker most about rocks in the sea, what we
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hear about mostly, is china and japan. so there was a little reference to the fact that this is a region full of maritime rivalry which this search operation is somehow successfully managing to conquer. >> paul, thanks very much indeed for the latest from kuala lumpur. of course, you can catch up with so much on the bbc website, bbc.com. reports from the united states say three secret service agents responsible for protecting president obama were sent home from the netherlands. that's after going out for a night's drinking. one of them was reportedly found drunk and passed out in a hotel hallway. the hotel staff alerted the u.s. embassy in the hague after finding the agent unconscious on sunday morning. that was a day before mr. obama arrived in the country. president obama is now in belgium to meet the leaders of the european union and nato to
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discuss the crisis on ukraine and crimea. he's already taken a tour of the flander's field with king philippe and belgium prime minister elio di rupo. later there will be a meeting with nato leaders on crimea and russia. let's go to our europe correspondent matthew price who is there in brussels. matthew, the message being sent different than what it would have been three or four weeks ago. now russia has annexed crimea. and there's a focus of bringing together the european union, the nato countries. >> reporter: absolutely. this is a summit long in the planning. when it was first announced barack obama was coming here i and other colleagues in brussels wondered what they would be talking about. and it is clear that ukraine and the situation there is top of their agenda. i think possibly a couple of things to focus on. are they going to push in there discussions about increased
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trade links. there's a major trade deal they're looking to try and bind themselves together on. in those wider talks, are they going to push for greater sharing of energy resources which is obviously one of the key things which europe is now having to cast around for, bearing in mind the situation with russia. and secondly, in his chats -- in his talks with the nato secretary general, is barack obama going to continue to push for not just a greater nato numbers on the ground in eastern europe, but real tangible signs as the white house the putting it, that nato is supporting eastern european countries in the face of what they see as russian bell lidge rans. >> three days ago the supreme commander general breed love said he was very concerned about a very significant russian buildup around ukraine. how much are you getting in back channels about that meaning
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about political and perhaps military operations? >> reporter: nik, people are being very tight-lipped here. what we've seen in the last few weeks are commitments from the united states and britain, among others, to increase their personnel and indeed their aircraft on the ground in eastern european countries, especially the baltic states as part of the nato air patrol mission out there. there's also air whacks surve surveillance aircraft. that has already happened. it looks as though from the readouts we're getting from the white house and others that barack obama and others are quite keen to try and increase on that, so to put more nato resources into eastern europe to try to deal with what the baltic states and poland certainly believe is a growing threat from russia. >> the bbc's matthew price. our europe correspondent back with you later with details of
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what happens at nato and the european union with president obama. police say the car crash that killed "fast and furious" actor paul walker was caused by speed not mechanical failure. it is said they were doing up to 150 kilometers per hour. the porsche hit a pole, causing the car to burst into flames last november. stay with us here on "bbc world news." still to come, gwyneth paltrow announces she's splitting from coldplay front man chris martin after more than ten years of marriage. that's why i take my warfarin every day. but it looks like maybe we should ask your doctor about pradaxa. in a clinical trial, pradaxa® (dabigatran etexilate mesylate)... ...was proven superior to warfarin at reducing the risk of stroke. and unlike warfarin, with no regular blood tests or dietary restrictions. hey thanks for calling my doctor. sure.
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okay. just love this one. it's next to a park. [ man ] i love it. i love it, too. here's your new house. ♪ daddy! [ male announcer ] you're not just looking for a house. you're looking for a place for your life to happen. zillow. you're with "bbc world news" with me, nik gowing. i have the latest headlines. malaysia's transport minister says they've identified 122 objects of interest in the southern indian ocean. this is during the search for the missing malaysian airliner.
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some are more than 20 meters long. the images were recorded by a french satellite three days ago. they range in size up to 23 meters. the copenhagen zoo that gain ld worldwide notoriety for killing a young giraffe has now killed a 16-year-old male lion, lioness and two female cub. the zoo says the move was necessary after the arrival of a new male lion to renew the breeding stock. it says the resident lions would not have been strong enough to stand up to the new arrival. i'm joined now by liz tyson, the director of the captive animals protection society. what do you think of what has happened? >> we're appalled, but sadly not surprised. this is something which goes on
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across the zoo industry in europe. thousands of healthy animals are killed every year. we're pleased it has come to the public fore. it has sparked debate. >> of course, the giraffe killed controversy a few weeks ago was fed to these lions. >> it's ironic. there was the uproar following the death of marius and now the questions we're seeing is why didn't the zoo listen to us and people didn't want the animals to be killed. people can't understand why zoos are breeding healthy animals and putting them down. it's raising an awful lot of questions about the zoo industry more widely. >> what about this argument that the resident lions, and i'm coating, would not have been strong enough to stand up to the new arrival. >> zoos often put arguments forward to say they're encouraging natural behavior. this is what they're saying here, encouraging natural pride
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behavior. the male would naturally come in and kill the cubs. let's not pretend they're living in a natural virm. they can protect the animals by not mixing with them. it's picking and choosing. when they want to blame natural behavior for their actions, they do. yet animals in zoos do not live a natural life at all. >> let me quote from the press release from copenhagen zoo, a new male in a pride like the one introduced would kill all sexually immature young as well. >> well, that is potentially true. of course, these lions aren't in a natural pride and the zoos have a responsibility to care for the animals that they deliberately bring into the world. i also asks the question, where is this going to go in the future. animals are being bred, being killed. for what purpose is this being perp pet ated. >> liz tyson, thank you for
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joining us from northwest england. let's move forward with the business. maryam joins me. >> the chinese president xi jinping continues a state visit to france with expectations high for some big business deals. french officials are keen to see big commercial accords to cut into france's huge trade deficit with china. the president's visit is time to coincide with the 53 anniversary of diplomatic relations between france and china. more on this in the next few hours on "bbc world news." it's being described as the future of gaming. facebook has announced it's going to buy oculus, a california company that specializes in virtual reality products for around 2ds billion. the flagship product is a goggle-like immersive headset for video gaming. mark zuckerberg says this could
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change the way we work, play and communicate. we'll take a closer look at the goggles throughout the day here on "bbc world news." before i go, a quick look at the markets or not? let's take a look at the markets very quickly. in terms of european markets,ist has been a pretty good start to the day -- unfortunately we haven't got time to look at the markets. back to you. >> are they up or down? >> good day for european markets and asian topics. the suspense will have to wait. >> who needs a graphic when you can tell us. one of the highest profile marriages in the entertainment world is ending. oscar winning hollywood actress gwyneth paltrow and singer with coldplay are separating after ten years >> reporter: they confirmed their separation on the online blog goop. this is where she would normally post vegetarian recipes or exercise tips. here it was being used to announce the end of one of the
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most high profile marriages in the entertainment world. title conscious uncoupling decided they decided to split following a year of trying to save their relationship. it added they had come to the conclusion that they loved each other very much but would remain separate. gwyneth paltrow first met chris martin in october 2002, three weeks after the death of her father, director bruce paltrow. they married the following year in california and have two children, apple who is 9 and moses age 7. throughout their relationship they made a point of never walking down red carpets together or posing for joint photographs in an attempt to avoid being a public couple. the timing of the split is particularly tricky for chris martin. he's just started a series of live appearances and interviews to promote coldplay's new album "ghost stories" which is out in may. colin paterson, bbc news.
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the latest news is that the malaysian transport minister has shown satellite images in the search for the missing airliner mh370, satellite images from three days ago taken from a french satellite showing up to 122 objects of interest. more to come. stay with me with more details. this zoom lens is amazing. go and smell the roses!
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i'm nik gowing with "bbc world news." our top stories, the search for the missing malaysian airlines jet, more than 120 new objects of interest identified in the southern indian ocean. >> some objects were a meter. others as much as 23 meters in length. some of the objects appear to be bright,s tobly indicating solid material. >> the images came from a french satellite dated three days ago. some objects are as long as 23 meters.
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president obama starts his trip to belgium with a visit to a world war i cemetery. he's meeting with european union and nato leaders later to discuss the crisis in crimea and ukraine. why these lions have been killed by a copenhagen zoo. hello everyone. the malaysian transport minister has said that new satellite images have identified 122 objects of interest, as they put it, in one area of the southern intoian ocean. he said some objects in the search for the missing boeing 777 were small, as you can see here. one was as large as 23 meters. the satellite data is from three days ago.
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aircraft are returning to base after the air and sea operation resumed today. weather conditions in the southern indian oceans have improved. there were three separate search regions on wednesday shown here in purple. collectively they added up to 80,000 square kilometers and they've been split into east and west sectors. four countries are deployed p 3 orion aircraft to perth. in all six took part in today's search. america's high tech surveillance plane, the p 8 pos sidon along with a chinese illyushin. the hmas success and a chinese ice breaker are in an area to help with the search at sea level. that sach will incorporate this piece of equipment, the u.s. navy's towed pinger locater system. it weighs about 32 kilos and can locate signals at a depth of 6,000 meters. that's 18,000 feet, but it won't
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be in the search zone until april 5th at the earliest. search operations are based in perth in australia. our correspondent jon donnison is there. >> reporter: this is free mantle port just outside perth. it's here that at least some of the recovery operation is likely to be based. we have the "hmas success" set up here a few days ago. that's at the search scene as are a number of chinese ships. you're able to get a sense of how remote we are. perth already one of the most remote cities in the world and the search area is some 2,500 kilometers from where we are now.
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a towed ping locater will be used to try to find the plane's missing black box flight recorder. what happens is a ship tows this through the water and it's able to pick up any pings or signals sent out by the black box. there are a few problems with that. one, the black box flight recorder is only able to send these pings out for about 30 days. that's the amount of battery life. we're already on day 18. secondly, the black box may have been damaged so it may not be able to send out anything at all. thirdly, you can only use the ping locater when you have a pretty good idea exactly where the plane crashed. at the moment, we just don't know that. i think basically this recovery operation could take months if not years. while the investigation continues, the families of those on board the plane have been voicing their anger and frustration with the malaysian authorities in beijing. a press conference held by the chinese families has just
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finished. let's go live to bbc's john sudworth in beijing. what came through from that press briefing? >> reporter: well, it was a long briefing, nik, lasting well over three hours. this is a high level delegation sent from malaysia. the officials included an air force general, the malaysian ambassador to china, a malaysian airlines pilot answering questions from the relatives, a large part of the beginning of the meeting was taken up with trying to outline for the relatives of those on board the analysis that has led to this conclusion that the plane followed that southern tract and disappeared into the southern indian ocean. quite technical, they were shown graphs of the frequencies of the
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signals sent by the airliner as it made that journey. they were told about the doppler effect and how the difference between the frequencies received and the frequency center allowed the investigators to find vital clues about the direction of travel. but i have to say, although many listened patiently for a long time there were angry outbursts at times. the end of it all, one of the representatives from the families said he still did not accept that conclusion. the position remains the same. for many of the families here, until they see physical evidence, until they see a piece of wreckage, they will not accept that the plane is lost. >> john sudworth in beijing. thanks for the update from the hotel in beijing. meanwhile, what about the sat lied images taken by an airbus satellite three days ago. i'm joined by the bbc's andy moore. we have at least what has been
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produced by the malaysians, very difficult to see whether there or in full frame. what do you think they show? >> it's the most compelling evidence yet of a large debris field. i'm using that phrase. the transport minister was very careful not to use it. it certainly shows 122 potential objects over an area of about ten nautical miles across by ten nautical miles down, so a relatively limited area. some of the objects are fairly large. we heard of one 23 meters long. perhaps that's the one in the center of the northern box. we've heard reports and seen satellite images before of objects of a similar length in the same area. all this goes to suggest there is debris in the area, whether it's come from the missing plane we still have to wait to see. >> one of the critical things here, andy, is definition and the pixelation.
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do we know if this is a diluted version of what we can see. >> that's a very good question. it it may be the images they're working from have a much higher resolution. a lot depernds on the interpretation of these images. to my eyes some of those white specs could be waves breaking. you hope that the people who are interpreting them know what they're doing. but it's also the danger of positive re-enforcement, because we want to find something in that area and because we've devoted so many satellites and aircraft to that area that we are finding things. for example, an aircraft spotted some rope and blue object in the area today. >> that could have come from a ship. >> it could have come from anything at all. there is junk all around the world's oceans. because we're concentrating on this particular area, we may be finding what we're looking for. >> three days in the roaring 40s it could be tossed around, blown
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all over the place. it's hard to send a plane up looking for wreckage that was seen three days ago. >> the good news there, the currents and the drift are not moving very much. they put down buoys in the early days of this investigation. they show the currents are moving here and there, different directions in different areas, but there's not a broad sweep away from the area. the debris is moving around -- >> that's positive bit of information. >> it's very positive. all these satellite images are from approximately the same area. >> so is it possible from those satellite images to get precise coordinates, as if one is looking at a map on a laptop? >> absolutely. we saw precise latitude and longitude coordinates for that debris on the scene there. they've been matched with other cord nats for other debris. it's absolutely marked. we know where it was three days
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ago and we believe it's not too far away to date. >> andy, thanks very much indeed. i should say the malaysian transport minister described all these objects in the water as objects of interest with no confirmed connection to the missing airliner. now to the northwest united states where rescuers have located ten more bodies in the american state of washington after saturday's devastating landslide. that brings the death total in the small town of oso to 24. more than 100 people remain unaccounted for. david willis is there. >> reporter: little by little officials are getting a sense of what lies beneath the thick layer of mud that enveloped this picturesque corner of the american northwest on saturday. it's not a pretty picture. such was the speed and ferocity of the mudslide that it appears many in oso were unable to escape and ended up being buried alive.
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>> we did recover two additional fatalities today. that brings our fatality rate to 16. we have located another eight fatalities, however, we have not recovered those at this time. >> reporter: almost as troubling as the rising death toll, the revelation that a government scientist warned of a catastrophe of precisely this kind as long ago as 1999, yet still people were allowed to build homes here. officials insist that the mudslide was completely unforeseen and are suggesting that a small earthquake in the area a few days earlier could be to blame. as the death toll rises here, officials are warning that the rescue and recovery operation could be a long one. they've vowed to find all the victims but concede that could take weeks if not months. david willis, bbc news in washington state.
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other news at this hour, north korea has test fired what appears to be two medium range ballistic missiles fired from the east coast towards japan and landed in the sea. they were launched just hours after president obama met south korean and japanese leaders in the netherlands to discuss the threat from north korea's weapons program. pope francis accepted the resignation of the bishop of lindbergh, also known as the bling bishop. he had come under fire for his luxury lifestyle and' elaborate spending. he was relieved of his clerical duties last year. commenting on the decision, mr. elst said he'll simply find another job. reports from the united states say three secret service agents responsible for protecting president obama were sent home from the netherlands after going out for a night's drinking. one of them was reportedly found drunk and passed out in a hotel
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hallway. the hotel staff alerted the u.s. embassy in the hague after finding the agent unconscious on sunday morning. that was a day before mr. obama arrived in the country. president obama is now in belgium to meet the liters of the european union and nato to discuss the ukraine crisis and crimea. he earlier took a tour of the world war i flanders field. later he'll be meeting the eu and nato leaders to discuss the security situation beyond the eastern borders of nato and the european union. a major part of president obama's european trich has focused on ukraine after russia annexed crimea earlier this month. as ukraine has tried to reenforce their border, a unit of officer cadets was sent to the donetsk region.
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one of them was born in the area. with many people in the region supporting russia, maxim told the bbc they were far from welcome. >> translator: we came to reenforce the border. we're learning how to do it. our goal is not to fight with russia. we came here to train. that's it. people here are generally okay, but i can't understand why they want to kick us out. yesterday we spoke to them. they told us they don't want a war here. we didn't come here to fight. the locals are afraid for their lives. most of their fears are based on rumors. people write a lot about us on the internet now. we read it and just laugh. i feel really ashamed of the people from my region. i thought they would treat us well here. i'm disappointed. i am ukrainian and i serve the people of ukraine. the things which are going on in politics right now have nothing to do with me. >> stay with us here on "bbc
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world news." i'm nik gowing. still to come, amazing images from houston in texas, how this construction worker on the right here trapped in flames survived when the building collapsed. stay with us. and why these lions have been killed by a copenhagen zoo.
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you're with "bbc world news" with me, nik gowing. i have the latest headlines for you. malaysia's transport minister says they've identified 122 objects of interest in the south indian ocean which may be part of the search for the missing flight mh 370. the images were recorded by a french satellite three days ago. they range in size up to 23 meters long.
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a team of pakistani government negotiators has metal ban militants at an undisclosed location in northern pakistan. it's the first time representatives of the government of far waz sharif have met face-to-face in talks with the taliban. in recent weeks there have been meetings with representatives of the group. let's go live to islamabad and shah mile la jaffray. is this real progress? >> reporter: well, yes, it is progression because when the process was started and there were some attacks and people were receptive about it. so it is a big development that the government committee and taliban's political council are meeting face-to-face today at an undisclosed location northwest of pakistan. >> are you getting ever any information? there has been an on-off process involving representatives before this. do you get any information at
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all from either side? >> reporter: well, officially, it has not been disclosed. we suspect they are going to discuss release of prisoners and a ceasefire, extension of ceasefire, the ceasefire that the taliban put in place a few weeks ago initially in these talks. but last month the ttp released a list of demands, implementation of sharia all over the country and they wanted the government to withdrawal army from tribal areas and wanted the government to break its ties with america. >> now, finally, which group is being talked to? is it only the ttp, the tehreek-e-taliban. >> reporter: yes, at the moment it is only the ttp. it's an umbrella organization of some of the other militant
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groups. it is one of the main organizations, and at the moment the government is just talking to them. >> shah mile la jafry, thank you for updating me on the talks. let's go to the horn of africa where there's a new campaign against al qaeda and its allies. in some mole yeah ugandan troops are fighting al shabaab. our international development correspondent mark doyle is with them. >> reporter: africa is the new front line in the war against al qaeda. somali government troops are involved, too. they're tough fighters but sometimes lack discipline and are always short of equipment. without the ugandans the somali army wouldn't stand a chance. the ugandans are part of a 22,000-strong african force in somalia, paid for by the west to do a job western governments won't.
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as the armored column approaches the target town of corioli, al shabaab are ready. the soldiers i'm with know what's coming. there appears to be a fire fight happening about 100 meters in front of us, another african unit in front of us and they appear to be engaging across the bank, across the embankment and there's some fire coming back in this direction. some of that was coming in this direction bullets rain on the ugandans. this is the main shopping street in the town of corioli.
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an al shabaab sign board, the koran is the only path. after fighting his way into town, the general took control. >> what i'm sure is i have adequate manpower, over 1,500 manpower. they won't do it to us. they won't. >> reporter: the battle has taken its toll, but civilians suffer more. this woman's family was hit by a mortar round. she's the only surviving member. the attack was only part of a broader offensive against al shabaab across an area where 3 million people live. expect more civilian casualties and more refugees. the governor of the region thanked the ugandans for coming, but i put it to him that it was
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somalia's deep plan or tribal divisions that meant foreign help was needed to shore it up. >> for us, al shabaab, there are fighters who are going to make a suicide, who is going to teach how to make a suicide. this is from the fighters here. >> reporter: that's the tragedy of somalia, foreign troops dig in. foreign jihadists battle against them. the ugandans have made a significant military advance by reaching corioli, but they don't yet control the whole town. very soon the annual rains will come and these big machines of war will be bogged down. then al shabaab will surely regroup to fight, albeit in a more distant part of what often feels like an ungovernable country. >> mark doyle reporting from eastern somalia. let's go to denmark now
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where animal rights activists have condemned the country's main zoo for destroying four healthy lions. the zoo already attracted international attention form putting down a 2-year-old giraffe a few weeks ago. malcolm brav venn is in koeb hague en. >> reporter: the lions killed were the male on the left, two cubs next to him and mother walking behind. they were destroyed to make way for a new 3-year-old male arrival. despite appeals to other zoos, no homes could be found for the cubs. last month this 2-year-old giraffe was fed to the lions after being killed. despite worldwide outrage of the death, the zoo has not changed its policy which sees it cull about 30 animals a year. >> it would be unethical if we bread our animals in a way and let only our feelings judge, decide what to do with the animals instead of putting it on
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a scientific basis. if we don't ensure healthy population for the future, we will do a bad job and that's not fair. >> reporter: animal welfare groups which protested outside the zoo after marius's death have described as immoral the culling of the lions. one organization said the zoo is acting as god and should be boycotted until it starts respecting animals. the only consolation is that the lions car cusses were not dissected in public but are being used for scientific experiments. now, watch this. a construction worker in texas has had a very lucky remarkable mistake after being rescued from baurning building. amateur video captured the scene. >> reporter: he's escaped to the top ledge. in the building opposite they can't believe what they're seeing. >> oh god, oh god, oh god.
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>> reporter: the winds fanned the rooftop fire which is getting closer. >> oh, my god. >> reporter: rescue workers brought the ladder toward him. the fire started as workmen were welding on the roof. a glass window pane just misses him. >> oh, jesus. >> reporter: the high-rise building was under construction in the montrose district of houston, texas. all this began with a small blaze. it was another difficult decision. >> they need to move that truck up. oh, my god. >> reporter: the heat was intense, the danger palpable. >> i think we probably should be going. >> reporter: the winds were gusting at 20 miles an hour. >> oh, thank jesus, thank you god. >> reporter: 200 firefighters fought the blaze, people in neighboring buildings were evacuated. for this man, there was more to
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come. oh, my god. [ screams ] >> reporter: he was carried away over the tops of the trees to safety. >> they got him. everyone was amazed. >> i think it's time form us to go. >> they were thankful the drama ended with no one even injured. >> time for me to go as well. grab a canada dry ginger ale. real ginger. real taste. real ahhh
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