Skip to main content

tv   BBC World News  BBC America  May 27, 2014 6:00am-7:01am EDT

6:00 am
he low. i'm raj esh hmirchandani, our tp stories, after election games by anti immigration parties, the leader of the french far right demands an end to some of the eu's most high profile policies. >> translator: our objective is to block all ideas and projects that are anti europe and against our objectives. also this hour, ukraine's government says it's recaptured donetsk airport killing many of
6:01 am
the pro-russian separatists seized the base. on the first full day of office, modi holds landmark talks with his pakistani counterpart. actor tom cruise talks to us about growing up with dyslexia and landing a helicopter in london's trafalgar square. thanks for joining us. remote, incomprehensible and in need of urgent reform, some of the words being used to describe the european union. calls are growing for a fundamental rethink following sweeping gains for anti immigration parties. france and italy have already called for a change in emphasis towards economic growth and jobs. within the past hour, one of the
6:02 am
big winners in the weekend's polls, the leader of the national front says she wants to junk some of the eu's most high profile policies including freedom of movement. >> translator: our objective has been clear, it has no hidden agenda. it explains the solidity of our conviction. it was a patriotic project every d day, exposed the french people the question of europe which is a national, true, genuine national project for the french and that is the basis for the next election. that was marian lieu pen. let's speak with matthew price in brussels expressing the
6:03 am
challenge facing the leaders. she is flexing her muscles, she has a mandate and an agenda, doesn't she? >> absolutely. it's important to listen to what she's saying because, of course, she does represent a sizable chunk of the french electorate. france is one of the key countries in the european union. i suspect her influence, she talked in her press conference of blocking eu legislation when it's passing through the parliament here in brussels. bear in mind she's got 25 or so meps in that parliament, a parliament of 751. you have to remember the bulk of the meps in that parliament are pro european, pro eu. so there isn't going to be a sudden, a massive euro skeptic surge in the parliament itself which will stop eu legislation dead in its tracks. nevertheless, where her influence i think will be felt is in french domestic politics.
6:04 am
we're already seeing signs that the french president is starting to talk about the need possibly to address some of the concerns that the voters have expressed in this election with regards to brussels' relationship with paris. because of that, because french is such an important country in the eu, you would assume, therefore, when you've got people like the french coming to brussels and indeed the british, david cameron in britain under equal pressure from the anti-european party there, when you've got two leaders of two such important leaders in the eu coming to summit meetings in brussels expressing concern about the powers of brussels, it's bound to have an impact on the agenda. >> there is going to be a meeting of european leaders later on today in brussels. what do you think they're going to be making of this bold statement and the new reality in
6:05 am
europe? >> well, to them it will be an illustration of the fact that there are large numbers of the electorate who are concerned about the way in which the european union is working. specifically on the issue of i'm griggs and not just in france and britain, but also in denmark and a handful of other countries. that said, also do remember, as i said, the bulk of people who voted in this election -- turnout was at 43%, discount that for a second, they have said they are supporting pro european union parties. there's not going to be a panic. it's precisely why this summit was called ahead of the election results to analyze these results and see, well, what do the members face, the government, heads of state in government. what priorities do they want to set the european commission and parliament in the coming five years, and presumably one of the priorities will be how do we reconnect with these parts of
6:06 am
the disillusioned electorate. >> matthew price in brussels. plenty more on the aftermath of the european elections later in the program. if you want more now, go to bbcworldnews.com.com/vote2014. there you'll find live updates and correspondents across europe. reports from ukraine say government forces have retaken control of donetsk airport following 24 hours of fighting there. we've had no i understand dent confirmation of that. the pro-russian separatists are telling us that at least 50 rebels have been killed in donetsk. the ukrainian government deployed helicopter gun ships and fighter jets in operations to retake the city's airport. to talk about the situation in ukraine we are joined by kiev from our correspondent david stern. slightly different numbers coming out in terms of the death
6:07 am
toll. it e certainly seems like this was a bloody episode in this crisis. >> reporter: yes, that's exactly right. a very bloody episode. it's not over yet. we have been getting various numbers as you say. we were confirmed or we had our confirmations from the pro-russian separatists at least or around 30 of their gunmen were killed yesterday. now we're hearing from the russian agency that the self-proclaimed prime minister is saying around 50. it's difficult to say. what we can say is this was one of the fierce is it battles if not the beefiercest battle so f. we saw fighter jets and helicopters used yesterday. of course, the government says they are in control of the airport. we haven't been able to confirm that. if they have managed to take it back, it is a victory which we have say there haven't been very many for them lately. this also marks perhaps an
6:08 am
escalation or a stepping up on the part against the pro-russian separatists which we haven't been seeing up until now. >> david stern in kiev, thanks for updating us. historic talks taking place in delhi. mr. sharif was in delhi to attend mr. modi's inall ration on monday. talks lasted just 40 minutes. relation haves taken a nosedive in recent years, especially after the terror attack in mumbai in 2008 in which 166 people were killed. a short while ago i spoke with our correspondent in delhi. >> this meeting has actually been perceived as a big chunk before it was announced. mr. sharif accepted mr. modi's invitation to be part of the swearing-in ceremony.
6:09 am
many say this is a very progressive move from the government which incidentally this is the first day in office today. on the first day in office, mr. modi has been meeting the pakistani prime minister. now looking at the past few years, relations between india and pakistan have not really been cordial. ever since the mumbai attacks happened about seven years ago. of course, both sides have not come out with the details of the meeting, what are the issues which may be discussed. it is widely discussed they may be talking about trade, may also be focusing on border security because security has been a big concern on both sides. mr. modi's invitation to mr. sharif carries a lot of significance because the bjp has had a tough stance, vis-a-vis pakistan over the years. that is probably how mr. modi is
6:10 am
also perceived in pakistan. in the 2002 anti-muslim riots happened, mr. modi was the provinceal chief minister. another story we've been following is the mystery around the disappearance of malaysian flight 370, 239 people on board. satellite data has been released which may or may not give a new clue to its final hours. this is just some of more than 45 pages of raw data made public by the malaysian authorities and the british satellite firm inmar. it's reams and reams that have been used to calculate that that flight, flight 370, crashed somewhere in the southern indian ocean. some of the relatives of those
6:11 am
own board want independent experts to reexamine this data to check that they agree with its conclusions. let's just remind you of what we know so far. the latest information confirms that flight 370 took off from kuala lumpur bound for beijing at 0041, 12:41 a.m. on the 8th of march. we know that at 1:07 local time the boeing system's location system set the jet's final data. the plane continued to send basic signals called handshakes every hour to a satellite over the indian ocean, and then this data confirms that the final signal was a partial handshake at 08:19 local time. that led investigators to conclude that the plane ended its journey somewhere at sea off australia. we know a seabed search for that missing plane has been on going in waters far west of perth, hundreds of miles off perth. so far it's turned up nothing.
6:12 am
chris yates is an aviation analyst. he joined me a little earlier. i asked him what he thought this newly released raw data might reveal. >> as you intimated, rajesh, the data is raw in its form. that means that what we've got is a series of effectively acknowledgments upon receipt of interrogation from ground, the aircraft is flying. we have timing signals which of themselves don't give any data except that they show the distance between the satellite and the aircraft itself, and they show frequency deviations. i think it's the frequency deviations that will be of interest to most people insomuch as those frequency deviations give an indication as to the
6:13 am
course of the aircraft in flight. that in a nutshell is the information we've been given so far. >> a lot of the detail here, just glancing through earlier today, seems to tally with the timeline that we already have of when the plane was last in contact with authorities and with the satellite. so do you think relatives are going to get any comfort from this? >> i think it's doubtful. i think there's been quite a clammer obviously for the release of this data. it's a piece in the jigsaw puzzle which is the mystery of mh370. in and of itself, the data is just a bunch of numbers on a piece of paper, or pieces of paper in this case. but the data still has to be analyzed. i think the survivors'
6:14 am
relatives -- the relatives of those who lost their lives would look toward i understand dent analysis of that data to determine whether it supports the inmar sat suggestion that the aircraft turned south and ended up in the southern indian ocean. >> that was aviation analyst chris yates speaking the me a short while ago. updating you on the coup in thailand. military authorities arrested a former government minister a leading member of the party of yingluck shinawatra. he had been in hiding since last week. he was arrested in bangkok where he had been briefing journalists. the military says it had already released some of the former colleagues including former prime minister yingluck shinawatra. stay with us here on bbc world news. still to come, actor tom cruise talks about growing up with dyslexia and landing a
6:15 am
helicopter in london's trafalgar square. [ salesman ] congrats on the new car. [ woman ] thanks. the dealership reviews on cars.com made it easy, but... [ man ] we thought it might be a little more tense. you miss the drama? yeah. [ technician ] ask him whatever you want. okay. ♪ do you think my sister's prettier than me? ♪ [ laughs ] [ male announcer ] research, price, find. only cars.com helps you get the right car without all the drama.
6:16 am
of a beach escape. funny, there was no mention of hail in the weather report. go & smell the roses.
6:17 am
this is "bbc world news," and these ro the latest headlines. after dramatic gains in eu elections, marion lapen says she wants an end to some of the eu's most high profile policies. the ukrainian government says it's recaptured donetsk airport. gunfire can still be heard from the perimeter. aaron is here with all the business news. take it away. >> capitalism or how to rejig capitalism as we know it. certainly some of the biggest names in business are gathering today in london to try and make sense of just what our capitalist system has turned into. the ceo of the conference of inclusive capitalism, they
6:18 am
together hold one-third of the world's investable assets. here is a question, though, many have been asking. he's also speaking there, prince charles. here is a question many people are asking, what is bad capitalism? in the years since the financial crisis began we've brought you and i've told you stories of bankers rigging rates, tax avoidance and companies not caring about the supply chain. take bangladesh, the factory collapse there. how do you go about changing the practice of bad capitalism, that's something we'll talk about on gmt. we'll go live to our reporter live at the conference. sony has signed a partnership in china to manufacture and sell play station consoles on the mainland. the deal was formed with shanghai oriental pearl gives sony access to an estimated, listen to this, 500 million
6:19 am
gamers in china. it's important i say because there had been a ban on gaming consoles made in china since 2000 from outside, of course. big move. here it is. the battle of the airports. who heads up the most international passengers passing through those airports every year. recently it has been a two-horse race between london's heathrow and dubai's international airport. the numbers have just been released not too long ago coming out of dubai. it shows that, yes, london still holds that top spot, but it is very close indeed. i'll have more on that one as well in gmt. i can't leave you hanging. for the month of april, heathrow has 6.2 million passengers, 50,000 more than dubai. lots going on. you can tweet me '6@bbcaaron. all back to you. we know aaron is a star, but even he is eclipsed by hollywood
6:20 am
a lister tom cruise who has been asking to land a helicopter here in the middle of london in trafalgar square. that's exactly what happened in his film "edge of tomorrow." the bbc's sunny nugent went to meet mr. cruise and his co-star emily blunt. >> you do know what's happening to me. >> what happened to you happened to me. >> you picked emily for the role. >> i wanted to work with her for a long time. >> what about her that you thought. >> action, intelligent. >> stunning, beauty, incredible wit. >> how did you do that? >> come on. >> come find me when you wake up! >> at the moment when you're doing a plank on your hands, was that really you?
6:21 am
>> hell of a story -- >> we were trying to figure tout best way to introduce the character. we were all out having sush she, one of the other members said, em, show doug the yoga move you can do. >> i remember doug looking at me and saying, that's it. >> the opening scene is incredible. trafalgar square. it's real, isn't it? >> yes. >> take me through what happened? >> i went, i would love to land a helicopter in trafalgar square. this works into the story, right, guys? >> you wanted a fly a helicopter in trafalgar square. >> yes, i did, for years. >> you flew the helicopter? >> no, no. >> you like it here. >> i love it here. i love it. love the brits. >> do your best british accent. >> you do it.
6:22 am
let's hear your american. >> oh, my god, tom, yes. >> you do a mean american accent. >> do peyton. >> i do valley girl. i just so can't wait to see your "mission impossible." it's going to be so great. >> any time we were there, we would be in the car and would be like, bring peyton. >> we'd call this character peyton. >> there is a peyton reference in the film. >> i put that in. amadeus is trying to make her laugh during the scene. we did things to make each other laugh. they would make me do the les grossman dance in suit. >> from "tropic thunder." >> i also like to push him over
6:23 am
in the suit. once you're down, you're like a turtle. it takes three people to get you back up. we'd be doing stuff where we're kneeling and i'd tip him over. as he's falling he would go don't, don't. >> video footage of that? >> there's plenty of that. >> lovely to meet you. >> thank you. >> thank you. now turning to egypt. voting is continuing on the second and final day of presidential elections there. the former head of the army, abdul fatah el sissi is up against one challenger, ham deed sabah hi. the bbc's shim ma khalil reports. >> reporter: sniffing around for explosives. in the last few months bombings across the country have been a part of egypt's new reality. these dogs will be instrumental in any rescue missions to come.
6:24 am
this is just one of many training sessions going on here at the police academy with new tactics to face the unstable security situation. the massive campus is where future policemen and women spend four years of their lives preparing to face the challenge of keeping the streets of egypt safe. they tell me they're excited about graduating soon and despite the danger and on going violence, they want to be there for their country. for decades the police force has been seen as a sign of repression, ruling the streets with a tight and frightening grip. they were all but gone after the 2011 uprising. now that they're back, the fear is they're also back to their old ways. this man says police heavy handedness have been even worse. he was arrested outside mosque during a protest, taken to a police station and beaten for nine hours. for his safety we're not
6:25 am
identifying him. >> translator: they accused me of being a member of the muslim brotherhood. i said i'm not. one punched me in the chest. they tied 34e to a pillar and kept hitting me until i fell on the floor. >> reporter: there's been a heavy crackdown on protesters with a new law that prohibits demonstration without permission. critics have described the state of human rights in egypt as abysmal. the head of the economy disagrees and says police have been working really hard trying to bring safety back to the streets. >> translator: there are no angels on earth, there are bound to be mistakes. these mistakes are being blown out of proportion. we don't cover them up. these are unstable times. you see the bombings and the innocent people who die. there needs to be a balance between bringing security back and the issue of human rights.
6:26 am
>> reporter: this balance will not be easy. when they leave the academy, these recruits will face many challenges. one of them is to change the notorious image of the police force. >> sharma khalil reporting from cairo. plenty more here on "bbc world news." stay with us. to angie's listnkful for bringing us together. find out why more than two million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. ♪ show 'em the curve. it's beautiful. it's more than that... ...it's perfect. introducing curved ultra high definition television from samsung.
6:27 am
6:28 am
♪ (woman) this place has got really good chocolate shakes. (growls) (man) that's a good look for you. (woman) that was fun. (man) yeah. (man) let me help you out with the.. (woman)...oh no, i got it. (man) you sure? (woman) just pop the trunk. (man vo) i may not know where the road will lead, but... i'm sure my subaru will get me there. (announcer) love. it's what makes a subaru, a subaru. oh john don't wallow john iin ice cream.s over. i'm not wallowing in ice cream. it's the new dannon oikos greek frozen yogurt. half the fat of regular ice cream. it's so irresistibly thick and creamy!
6:29 am
didn't expect you to be enjoying yourself so soon! couldn't resist, mmm! it's such a good source of protein too! no, i'm talking about this john, already?! that was mine. hi mom. hi sweety. try the new dannon oikos greek frozen yogurt. ♪ dannon. ♪ oh-oh, oh, oh, la, la-la, la-la, la-la ♪ ♪ na-na-na, na-na-na-na-na some things just go together, like auto and home insurance.
6:30 am
bundle them together at progressive, and you save big on both. ♪ oh, oh-oh, oh, oh hey, it's me! [ whistles ] and there's my dog! [gasps] there's my steps! i should stop talking. perfectly paired savings. now, that's progressive. you're with "bbc world news." our top stories this hour, after big election gains by anti integration parties, the leader of the french far right demands an end to some of the eu's most high profile policies. >> translator: our objective is to block all ideas and projects that are anti euro and against our objectives. also, ukraine's government says it has recaptured donetsk airport killing many of the pro-russian separatists that
6:31 am
have seized the base. nigeria's highest ranking army officer says he knows the location of the 200 kidnapped school girls but won't run the risk of intervening. >> we know where they are, but we will not tell you. just leave us alone. we are working. we will get the girls back. india's new prime minister, modi holds talks with his pakistani counterpart. we ask whether a thawing of relations is under way. hello there, thanks very much for watching. remote, incomprehensible and in need of urgent reform. those are some of the words being used to describe the european union in the past couple of days. calls are growing now for fundamental rethink of its
6:32 am
institutions following those sweeping gains of anti integration parties in the weekend's elections. france and italy have already called for change of emphasis on the economy to boost growth and jobs. one of the big winners was the leader of the french national front marine he pen. she says she wants to junk some of the eu's most high profile policies including freedom of movement and common currency. >> translator: we have been clear, no hidden agenda. it explains the solidity of our convictions. it was a patriotic project every day we exposed the french people the question of europe which is a national, true, genuine national project for the french and that would be the basis for the next elections.
6:33 am
>> a short while ago i spoke to our correspondent in brussels, matthew price. i put to him that marine le pen seems to be flexing her muscles and has a mandate and agenda. >> reporter: absolutely. it's important to listen to what she's says. she represents a sizable chunk of the french electorate. france is one of the key countries in the european union. she talked in her press conference of blocking eu legislation when it's passing through the parliament here in brussels. bear in mind that she's got some 25 or so meps in that parliament and it's a parliament of 751. she's not going to be able to do it on her own. you have to remember the bulk of the meps in that parliament are pro european, pro eu. so there isn't going to be a sudden, a massive euroskeptic surge in the parliament itself which will stop eu legislation dead in its tracks.
6:34 am
nevertheless where her influence i think will be felt is in french domestic policy. we're already seeing signs that the french president is starting to talk about the need possibly to address some of the concerns that the voters have expressed in this election with regards to brussels' relationship with paris. because of that, because france is such an important country in the eu, you would assume, therefore, when you've got people like the french coming to brussels into important summits and indeed the british, david cameron in britain under equal pressure from the anti european, anti european u kipp party there coming to summit meetings in brussels expressing concern about the powers of brussels, it's bound to have an impact on the agenda. >> we'll have morton aftermath of the european elections later in the program. if you want more now, you can check out the bbc website.
6:35 am
go to bbc.com/vote2014. this you'll find live updates and the latest comments from our correspondents across europe. now, officials in ukraine say government forces have retaken control of donetsk airport following 24 hours of fighting there. we've had no independent confirmation of that. pro-russian separatists say at least 50 rebels were killed on monday in fighting in the eastern city of donetsk. the ukrainian government deployed helicopter gun ships and fighter jets in operation to retake the city's airport. our correspondent mark lowen visited the place that has come under attack. >> reporter: you can see the aftermath of that intense fire fight around the airport yesterday. this truck completely burned out, the windows full of bullet holes. around the base of the truck, we can't show you because it's too
6:36 am
graphic, there are body parts we've seen and a lot of blood, but also a lot of debris from the fighting that took place yesterday. now, we've been here this morning where there have been some gunshots that have running out from the airport, but not the same intensity that there was yesterday. there was spore raddic gunfire coming from inside the airport compound. we understand that the ukrainian troops are largely in control of the airport base, but it seems that there was some kind of clear-out operation to try to flush out the last elements of rebel control from the airport, clearly kiev determined ha the airport does not fall to the insurgents or the terrorists, as they put it, because it would really give the separatist groups here a real advantage in trying to access this region. of course, there's the crimea factor as well, that back in february when pro-russian insurgents launched their
6:37 am
incursion of crimea which led to the annexation of moscow a month later. when they took the airport, that was the first key installation they took control of. the ukrainian government very determined to clamp down on that. petro poroshenko elected now, gave a speech yesterday saying he would not negotiate with terrorists as he put it. the anti terror operation should be over with in a matter of a few hours rather than a few months. clearly you see the impact of that in this area around donetsk airport. >> that's mark lowen reporting there. let me take you to nigeria where the military has said for the first time that it knows where those 200-plus school girls are being held, the ones taken by boka haram. the teenagers were driven away at gunpoint from the boarding school in the town of chib bach. they've been the focus of a campaign around the world with the slogan "bring back our girls."
6:38 am
will roth reports. >> reporter: we know where they are is the message for the military, desperate news for the parents of the girls. locating them is one thing. getting them out safely will be even harder. nigeria's official says we cannot -- >> we know where they are. we cannot tell you. just leave us alone. we are working. we will get the girls back. >> reporter: the bbc learned that reserntly a negotiated deal was almost reached to set 50 of the girls free in exchange, 100 boka haram members were to be released from detention. at the 11th hour, the government pulled out. >> it's been six weeks since the girls were abducted. all along there have been people that thought rather than use military force, it would be preferable to negotiate their relief. there have been calls for religious leaders to play a more
6:39 am
active role in mediation. >> these girls are not only hostages, but they exist as human shield for the insurgents. when the insurgents and the girls are in the cross hair and you cannot fire any shot at the insurgents without getting at the girls. >> really what you're saying, to get them out, negotiation would work, but use of force is more likely to lead to at least some of them dieing. >> the insurgents will not listen to government officials. they will not listen to security personnel. they are most likely to listen to islamic religious leaders in northern nigeria. >> with the girls still missing in the attacks of civilians on going, christians and muslims can do little else but pray. after prayers this muslim scholar told me his niese was killed last week by boka haram, a fourth year medical student, she was pulled out of a car and
6:40 am
shot dead. >> what crime has she committed? >> how do you feel when boka haram speak out against girls and women getting an education? >> that is why we believe that this cannot be an islamic state. it has to be an islamic movement. islam encourages knowledge. >> reporter: they keep praying for peace. since the girls were seized, more than 450 have been killed in bach attacks. the call to bring back the girls alive will continue. will ross, bbc news, abuja. let me take you to delhi now. historic talks between the newly elected prime minister far wren da modi and mr. sharif. relations between india and
6:41 am
pakistan have been taking a nosedive, especially since the terror attack in mumbai in 2008 in which 166 people were killed. no details have been given about what the two men have been talking about. with me to talk about more of this is dr. rude rick chowdhury from kings college in london. there has got to be great symbolism in this. these are not exactly friendly nations, hostile nations. >> i think it's a hugely welcome initiative on the part of the new prime minister, not only because it's unprecedented. i think for two points. one is -- and i think as har as f far wren da modi is concern, this prime minister whose approach is personality driven. i believe he will not be placing his foreign policy imperatives on institutions, but rather will take control of what he thinks is one of the most important relations in the neighborhood.
6:42 am
>> they didn't really go for that brand of personality politics as well. modi is saying i'm the man, i'm in charge. >> very much so. i think singh tried very hard. he did not have the kind of mandate that modi has in dealing with the neighborhood as such. the hope is that the 50 minutes that both prime ministers spent this morning in new delhi, they would institutes a crisis mechanism structure in dealing with each other in the future. the hope is they will appoint a back channel dialogue like in 2004 and 2008 where the talks were ab brutally and brutally stopped because of the mumbai terror attacks. >> on the reason mr. modi chose to go to pakistan, the whole campaign was dogged by these accusations that mr. modi was anti muslim. do you think there's an element of symbolism as well. >> there is an element of symbolism, but also domestic
6:43 am
politics and come pumgs from his initiatives. i have no doubt whatsoever this will give the impetus, cautious we need to be in terms of what will this result in terms of substantive outcomes. i think it's a good start to give discussions around trade and to the mumbai terror court trials within pakistan. >> sounds like you're quite optimistic about mr. modi's premiership and also this relationsh relationship. >> certainly in terms of a relationship. given the mandate mr. modi has, the moral responsibility now lies on him to take this foreign policy direction forward. this is a party that has criticized the congress party over the last ten years for not going far enough. now the moral imperative remains on far render modi's food steps given he has a much larger mandate that they had in the last ten yoors. >> thanks very much. >> thank you. stay with us here on "bbc
6:44 am
world news." still to come, pope francis compares the sexual abuse of children to devil worship and vows a zero tolerance approach. is japan losing its appetite for sumo wrestling. why foreign competition is pushing out the home grown talent. woo-hoo, bomb that cherry lip through the doggy door or it's pittsville, brah. it's never too late to learn a foreign language! go and smell the roses!
6:45 am
there are cameras,, police, guards...ds us. but who looks after us online, where we spend more than 200 billion dollars a year. american express can help protect you. with intelligent security that learns your spending patterns,
6:46 am
and can alert you instantly to an unusual charge. so you can be a member of a more secure world. this is what membership is. this is what membership does.
6:47 am
the pope compared it to devil worship. he spoke to reporters after visiting the middle east. he played down the possibility of helping to bring peace between the veillies and palestinians. jeremy bowen was on board and sent this report. >> reporter: well, the pope is back here at the vatican in rome after his middle east tour. i think he can look back on what happened and be pretty satisfied with what he did. he's probably, i suspect, somewhat widser about the complications of a very difficult situation which he has now inserted himself in by inviting the palestinian president and israeli counterpart here to rome for a meeting of prayer. he tried i think to dampen expectations when he was talking to us journalists on the plane coming back from tel aviv saying that the meeting was about prayer.
6:48 am
it wasn't about mediation, that he wasn't qualified to be some kind of new diplomatic envoy. whether he wants to or not, by opening his mouth, by getting involved, he has become something of a player in that situation, not least because there's no diplomatic process going on at the moment and, therefore, i think people are looking for some kind of new idea. now, while he was talking to the journalists on the plane he also dealt with a few specific issues concern the catholic church. on the subject of the sex scandals which have caused enormous damage to catholicism, he said that the abuse of children, the abuse of children by priests specifically was as bad as a satanic ritual, conducted a black mask. >> translator: it's a horrible crime. we know it is a terrible crime under any circumstances, but i'm interested in the church because
6:49 am
a priest who does this the betrays the body of the lord. a priest needs to lead children to sanctity and children trust them. instead of leading them to sanctity, he abuses them and this is terrible. ly make a comparison, it is like a satanic mass. >> reporter: the secular people may say pedophilia is a lot worse than a black mass, but for a pope, a religious leader to compare anything to the worship of the devil is for him strong language. >> jeremy bowen reporting. i want to take you back to one of our top stories, of the more than 200 girls kidnapped by boka haram in nigeria six weeks ago. now the country's highest ranking army officer says he knows the location of the girls but won't run the risk of intervening. what do you think the reaction is going to be or what is the
6:50 am
reaction in nigeria to this latest statement that the army knows where the girls are? >> rajesh, this statement is coming from the highest ranking military officer in nigeria. many people will see this ideally as a genuine statement with authenticity, but the problem is the nigerian government and the military, the way they have been dealing with the whole boka haram situation and the abduction of the girls in particular, we will start experiencing many nigerians will be skeptical about this statement and will consider it part of the on going statement coming out from different government officials and security agencies across the country. >> rather than giving relatives hope, they've just become cynical about any pronouncements coming out from the authorities. >> definitely. remember, the military in the past, two days after the
6:51 am
abduction of the girls, they say, yeah, we managed to rescue more than 90% of them, but it turned out to be untrue, and they had to retract that statement after a complaint from families and local authorities. i don't think many nigerians will -- they all really hope this is true. if it is true, it will be good news for nigerians, particularly the families and relatives of those girls. i think many nigerians are skeptical about this statement. >> even if it is true, though, the army officer is saying he won't run the risk of intervening because it's too dangerous. what do you make of that? >> definitely i think that is true because the militants are holding these girls as human shieldless and they are holding them -- trying to use them to get what they want. remember this statement came out hours after the bbc learned that there was a deal that was meant to get these girls released, but
6:52 am
the government pulled out at the 11th hour which means that the militants are unhappy with what the government did. i think that will definitely put the lives of these girls in danger. they're already in danger, but this latest action from the government would put them in more risk i think. >> and what an ordeal for the families. it must be just unbearable for them. >> definitely for the families and relatives. we heard one parent -- one of the mothers had already lost her life because of high blood failure definitely because of what happened. so i think they are still waiting, and what they want, the government should do whatever is possible to get these girls, whether through negotiation or through whatever means. i think the only option the government has at the moment is, for example, whether to use
6:53 am
negotiation with the militants or to use force. we all know the possibilities and the danger associated with using force. >> the army has been reminding us today. thanks very much. can it really be possible? sumo wrestling losing its charm for the japanese? it is, after all, a very hard life. most japanese people no longer want to commit to it. more and more recruits are foreigners from o mongolia, hawaii, bulgaria or russia. rupert wingfield-hayes reports from tokyo. >> reporter: nothing about sumo smod dern. these are the same moves they've been doing here for hundreds of years. however comic it may look. this is hard. the temperature is just above freezing, but the sweat glistens
6:54 am
off the wrestlers' bodies. this 19-year-old has come here to train from hawaii. the man shouting at him is his uncle, once a grand champion. he's one of the most famous sumo wrestlers in japan. anyone who thinks sumo is just two fat men pushing each other around would be very wrong. >> the training is not only tough physically, but it's also tough mentally. if you don't have it up here -- you have to be mentally tough, also. it's not just the strength. it's not just the body. you have to think that you can do it, you have to get that mentality that you can push harder and strive more. >> reporter: fewer and fewer young men in japan want to push hard and strive more on the hard
6:55 am
packed clay. sumo has existed for well over 1,000 years. now japan's most iconic sport is in deep trouble. revenues are falling, audiences are falling and there aren't simply that many young men who want to take on this gruelling existence. after training, it's time to cook. chenko is the stew they eat to keep their weight up. they have to eat a lot. when he came here 25 years ago, sumo was dominated by japanese wrestlers. now all the top wrestlers are foreign. >> never seen a japanese grand champion in over ten years now. >> that's a problem? >> it's a problem i think. the wrestlers from outside is
6:56 am
more hungry than the japanese wrestler. that's the point. that's it. >> reporter: sumo is not so much a sport as a priesthood. this life requires a level of commitment few young japanese men are now willing to make. rupert wingfield-hayes, bbc news in tokyo. >> fascinating insight into the culture of sumo there. i want to finish by bringing you some extraordinary cute pictures. a little cute alert. these come from australia. five rare white tiger cubs unveiled at a zoo in the mountains. they look like cuddly toy z there. the zookeeper says the cubs were born last month. he says it's unusual for such a large number of white tigers to be delivered alive and healthy in a single litter. he says the good health of the tigers is due to the fact that they live in a big open air zoo located in the austrian
6:57 am
mountains where the animals are roam freely. the tragedy, of course, is white tigers are so rare that they're now found exclusively in captivity. they still know a good piece of meat when they can spell it. don't forget you can message me, follow me on twitter. thanks very much for watching. and now angie's list is revolutionizing local service again. you can easily buy and schedule services from top-rated providers. conveniently stay up to date on progress. and effortlessly turn your photos into finished projects with our snapfix app. visit angieslist.com today. ♪ ♪ ♪fame, makes a man take things over♪ ♪fame, lets him loose, hard to swallow♪
6:58 am
♪fame, puts you there where things are hollow♪ the evolution of luxury continues. the next generation 2015 escalade. ♪fame of a beach escape. funny, there was no mention of hail in the weather report. go & smell the roses.
6:59 am
7:00 am
you're watching gmt on bbc news. i'm tim willcox. the bloodity talks, dozen separatists are killed in the eastern city of donetsk. 11 weeks after mh370 disappears, malaysia releases raw satellite data. is it enough for the relatives? sglit's only data. it's nothing. only data cannot lead to the conclusion, to the ending. r

89 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on