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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  June 23, 2014 6:00am-7:01am EDT

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hello. i'm david eades with bbc world news. our top stories. seven years in jail for three al-jazeera journalist accused of spreading false news in egypt. the foreign minister gives her reaction to the verdict. >> vwe are deeply dismayed a sentence is imposed and a palled by the severely of it. u.s. secretary of state john kerry is in baghdad as he presses for a more collusive
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government. we're in brazil. it's the final group game. hello. thanks very much for being with us. guilty and sentenced to seven years each in jail. three journalists with the al-jazeera network are convicted of what prosecutors lame was their help for a terrorist organization. the case of has drawn outrage se last year when they were contained. speaking just a short time ago,
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australia's foreign minister expressed outrage and said she'll be seeking intervention including a pardon. >> the australian government is shocked at the verdict in the peter greste case. we are deeply dismayed by the fact a sentence has been imposed. we are a palled by the severely of it. it is hard to credit that the court in this case could have reached this conclusion. the australian government simply cannot understand it based on evidence presented in the case. peter greste is a world respected australian journalist. he was in egypt to report on a political situation. he was not there to support the muslim brother hood. >> julie bishop with me from the
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arabic services. julie also went on to say it's difficult for us to understand the new complexities of the this case given the muslim brother hood being declared as a terrorist organization. i suppose that from egyptian perspective is the way this is perceived. >> on the one hand there's international outrage on the verdict because peter greste and colleagues are well respected journalists. they have been doing their job as any other journalist would do at in egypt. on the other hand you find the narrative in egyptian media against al-jazeera coverage against trying to portray it as a conspiracy against egypt, siding with muslim brother hood. this is the complete split in how the case is viewed outside
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egypt and among the egyptian media. >> clearly the australians are among those that are going to push the president and new government hard to find intervention after that. what i suppose simply did not help the court's case in egypt was the manner in which the case was played out. the evidence made available and the way in which it was knocked down. >> yes. we have been following this from beginning speaking to lawyers in the case. everybody that has been following each session of this court was saying that it wasn't clear what this evidence was. they didn't see clear evidence incriminating journalists with the crimes they were accused of. >> they can appeal and one would assume they'll appeal. >> that's certain they will appeal. there's possibility they will be granted pardon by the newly
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elected president. >> it's difficult now to know where the ground will move. politics will come into play? >> with all pressures saying this is freedom of journalism and freedom of press, the egyptian government finds itself in a difficult situation because on one hand it is trying to present the idea that the muslim brother hood is a terrorist organization, aided by regional forces. this is the view that is expressed on all social media and most local media in egypt. on the other hand you find the pressures from outside egypt in support of peter and his colleagues fahmy and mohamed. now let's move onto the situation in syria. government and rebel groups have
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agreed to a truce in the refugee camp. a copy of the cease fire deal is seen by the bbc. it says the main entrances to the camp will be hoopen and bas services restored. 18,000 people are there. humanitarian groups say hundreds have simply starved to death. we have the reaction to the latest proposal. >> certainly we would welcome any truce which sees the resumption of full substantial and secure humanitarian access. of course this is syria, and it's an unstable place. >> let me put it another way. how confident are you then? we've had truces declared before haven't we? >> let's look back at the truce in mid january which led to aid getting into the camp as a
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result of the grievance on the 18th of january. they were able to deliver food. let's be realistic. we have delivered 25% of what people need nutritionally. it's a fraction of what needs to get to the camp. last time we were able to get some aid in. let's pray it hold this is time and we are able to rapidly expand on humanitarian programs in the long and short term. make no mistake, 18,000 civilians are suffering because of this conflict. they're trapped in the besieged refugee camp. we need urgently to have humanitarian access. >> let's hope this works. there's also suggestions there will be a security force of some sort to maintain order. does that bother you? >> what we need is security so that unarmed humanitarian
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workers can have access. we are the ones risking our lives to take aid into the camp. does it bother us p security in a place like this? of course it's a concern. we have risked our lives. 12 members of our staff have died in the conflict. 25 right now are detained. we know the price, insecurity amid operations will cost us. of course it bothers us. of course we're concerned. we are prepared to move in rapidly and get aid into the camp. that's what this desperate humanitarian crisis demands. american secretary of state john kerry has arrived in baghdad to push the prime minister to form a more inclusive government at this critical time. he's meeting leaders from the kurdish and sunni communities.
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the talks take place as isis makes further advancement. they now control much of the border with syria and jordan. isis has reportly taken the town of tal afar. that includes the military airport there. all this a day after taking the border town al qaim giving them control of the border. militants have take over the crossing with syria along with the crossing of jordan. the capture of these crossings could help isis transport weapons and other equipment to strategic ibattle grounds. we have this report from baghdad. >> iraqi troops engaging sunni militants on the front lines to the north of baghdad. here the army with help from
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militia has succeeded stopping militants pushing closer to the capital. in this video released by the army, the troops say they captured these weapons from the extremist group isis and other local insurgents that are clearly well armed. but in the western province, the militants have been making significant gains taking control of border crossing points leading to board and syria as well as a series of towns along the main highways. there are reports surrounding al hadthah which has a critical dam supplying baghdad and other areas of the country. >> they're destabilizing a country that could spill over into allies like jordan. they're engaged in wars in
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syria. in the vacuum created they could mass more arms, more resources. >> with the situation getting more desperate, the u.s. secretary of state john kerry flew to baghdad this morning to meet the country's top political leade leaders. mr. kerry wants to see a new government formed in baghdad, this to include new politicians also the minority sunni muslims to reunite the country against the extremists. with them now controlling large parts of iraq and syria, it seems they are carving out their own islamic state. here in mosul in northern iraq, they've been handing out copies of the ka ran. to push them out, the iraqi military which is week and short of sophisticated weapons needs as much help as they can get.
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pakistani police have fired tear gas to disperse supporters of the antigovernment in the capital. demonstrators gathered near the airport. authorities diverted his flight. he's calling for a peaceful revolution against the prime minister. the defense ministry says a soldier suspected of shooting dead five comrades has been captured. the the 22-year-old sergeant has been taken to the hospital after wounding himself in an apparent suicide attempt. he was cornered in the forest. he had been on the run since saturday night. stay with us here on bbc world news. not just football going on this week. big time here in london. we'll meet the man who's job it is to keep the courts in
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you're with bbc world news. i'm david eades. the latest headlines. three al-jazeera journalists accused of spreading false news in egypt have been sentenced to seven years in jail. australian's foreign minister says the government is shocked and can't understand the verdict based on the evidence. the u.s. secretary of state john kerry is in baghdad to press for more inclusive government. all this as isis fighters continue to make gains in the country. russia's president vladimir putin has voiced support for a ukrainian peace plan. he did say proposes can work if compromises are made with rebels.
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we see those in eastern ukraine against government forces. >> who are the fighters in eastern ukraine? we know some pro russian militants are ukrainian citizens, but not all of them. in the russian city, i meet this this man. by the internet he's recruiting russians to fight. kiev identified this group and its website as one of the main recruiting grounds for russian volunteers. >> translator: you can do good without using your fists. sometimes it's necessary to take up arms to protect those that need defending. we call it armed charity. >> the group says it was their volunteers who tried to seize donetsk airport last month. dozens of fighters were killed. more than 30 bodies were taken
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to russia. >> translator: our job isn't just dispatch volunteers and coordinate activities. it's our responsibility to bring them home whether dead or alive. >> the russian volunteer group says it gets no direct support from the government here. moscow has repeatedly denied sending troops and military hardware across the board. western governments maintain among the fighters in eastern ukraine, professionals which are funded, equipped and backed by russia. >> officially this is the only assistance russia has been providing the people of eastern ukraine. it's humanitarian. on the russian side of the border, refugees escape the violence get clothes, medicine and transport to temporary shelter. at a hospital nearby, many refugees told us they had
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relatives who staid behind to fight the ukrainian army. >> translator: i hope my son kills 2,000 of those kiev bandits. if he does, i'll build a statue to him. he'll be my hero. >> to these refugees, talk of peace plans is empty words. there's deep suspension here of kiev. they're counting on russia for protection. bbc news southern russia. let's go to business news. aaron has the very big deal. >> both sides claiming victory. champagne pouring last night. the verdict and triumph for ge
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boss. after weeks of negotiations, alstom has agreed to sell the energy business to ge. the french government exacted a heavy price, a 20% stake in the new joint venture. guarantees french workers and the sale of ge signaling business to alstom's clean building. strategic cli important power plant they'll remain under french government control. we'll have more on that throughout the day. coming up on "gmt" in an hour's time. u.s. prosecutor set to announce fines of up to $9 billion for the b mrnp for breag u.s. sanctions. they're thought to be charged of one. u.s. counter parts were warned a fine of this magnitude could destabilize the final european
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sector. we're going to examine those repercussions coming up. the japanese car maker is recalling 200 million vehicles around the world. last year it took back more than a million cars due to repairs. 13 models including the popular accord brand are thought to have been affected. sister company is also recalling some of those cars. explosive air bags, do not want that. follow me on twitter. that's it with business. more on "gmt" in an hour's time. >> england and australia i can't had a world cup before we started. gone. let's have more. brazil, the host, playing the final group game today. c we have more from the capital
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city of brazil. >> brazilia is ready for brazil. the 2014 world cup host are in town to play the final group game. as you expect, support for the home team has been phenomenal. this relatively quiet city has been taken over by flag waving fans all in yellow and green. performances have been far from spectacular. a win and a draw from the first it would have games means brazil are practically through to the next round. fans would like to see a more convincing performance. >> translator: the pressure is positive. i guess for these players we don't care about that pressure. we know what we have to do. pressure is part of football. if you don't like it, change professions. >> reporter: cameroon will be packing their bags after this game. it's been an expedition for this
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team which in 1990 tournament alike, the lions have been anything but in this competition. >> translator: unfortunately we don't have pressure on us. it's really unfortunate for us. the only important thing is put in a good performance. that's it. >> reporter: as they come to town, brazilia lay out the most vocal welcome. now it's up to them to live up to it. >> that's one big event. this is another that starts today. britain's andy murray will defend his men's single crown at wimbledon. are all the people behind the scenes who make sure everything runs smoothly? here's the head groundsman.
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>> it's a living, breathing surface. it's a constant battle for a keeper to keep it healthy as you possibly can a. >> i am the head groundsman. this will be my 20th tournament here as a groundsman. i started here from college. i started as a tee boy and worked to the top. in my industry this is one of the top jobs you can have. to continue to take courts forward, to be a part of the history with the rest of the team is honor. it's one of the jobs once you're here, you're here for life. it's nice to be a part of that. as you can see, it's the surface. we're down to playing height of 8 millimeters. this is our playing height. outside the playing season we bring that up to 13 millimeters. in summer it's eight.
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we're a clay base. it dries out and becomes firm. that's how we get the ball bounce. as you hear, that's a hard surface. the actual ingredient is soil and firmness. that gives us the game. my normal daily routine during the championship, i wake up at 5:00 in the morning, have a look at weather, get the early weather reports and decide whether covers need to come off. we start marking courts. most play until 9:00, 9:15. brush the courts, make sure they're nice and clean. look at hardness readings. i'm normally here by 10:30-11:00 every night. we took multiple rapemeeasureme morning. we're going through the process of putting water through each court to make sure we keep them
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near the magic number. you're always mindful of what can potentially go wrong. you constantly worry the whole championship. sometimes you wake up and you've had a dream it's day one of the championships and the baseline is worn before you start. after the morning after it's finished you can look back and think that's a successful championship. if players don't say anything, they're happy. they don't necessarily pat you on the back and say well done. if they don't say anything, we though they're happy. that's good enough for us. >> the fear is the course might be too dry for wimbledon. let me remind you of our main story this hour. three journalists with the al-jazeera tv net work have been sentenced to seven years each in the egyptian jail. the australian and egyptians mohammed fahmy and baher mohamed
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denied charges of spreading false news and following the muslim brother hood. the australian government has said they're shocked by the verdict. keeping a billion customers a year flying, means keeping seven billion transactions flowing. and when weather hits, it's data mayhem. but airlines running hp end-to-end solutions are always calm during a storm. so if your business deals with the unexpected, hp big data and cloud solutions make sure you always know what's coming - and are ready for it. make it matter.
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david eades with bbc world news. our top stories. seven years in jail for three journalists accused of spreading false news in egypt. australia's foreign minister says her government is shocked by the verdict. >> we are deeply dismayed by the fact that a sentence has been imposed. we are impalled by the severity of it. u.s. secretary of state john kerry has started talks in baghdad where he will ask maliki to form a more inclusive
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government. and can andy murray hold onto his wimbledon title? fans watch the advance of the men's single on center court. hello. thanks very much for being with us. three journalists with the al-jazeera network have been convicted and sentenced to seven years in jail for what egyptian prosecutors said was their help for a terrorist organization, the muslim brother hood. the case of peter greste from australian along with egyptians mohammed fahmy and baher mohamed has sparked outrage since they were detained last september. they were accused of spreading
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false news. the last minute appeal by the prime minister direct to the egyptian president failed. peter greste's brother mike expressed incomprehension. >> i don't know how the judge came to that decision. i'll be interested to hear his reasons for giving that verdict. doesn't make any sense. >> well following that verdict, al-jazeera english managing director has given this reaction. there is no justification whatsoever in this detention of our three colleagues for even one minute. that's how the statement went. there were numerous irregularities in addition to lack of evidence to stand up ill conceived allegations.
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there's one outcome now. for the verdict to be overturned and justice to be recognized by egy egypt. also given peter greste is an australian, the foreign minister is expressing outrage says she'll be looking for presidential pardon. >> the australian government is shocked at the verdict in the peter greste case. we are deeply dismayed by the fact that a sentence has been imposed and we are after palled -- are a palled by severity of it. it's hard to credit the court in this case could have reached this conclusion. the australian government simply cannot understand it based on evidence that was presented in the case. peter greste is a world
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respected australian journalist. he was in egypt to report on a political situation. he was not there to support the muslim brother hood. >> julie bishop there now. i want to take you to iraq. we have the american secretary of state john kerry who's arrived in baghdad and meeting nouri maliki the prime minister to push him to form a more inclusive government. some of the entourage there. these talks take place as sunni militants make further advancements. they control a lot of the border with syria and jordan. isis has taken the town of tal afar in the east including the military airport. that's a day after taking the border town of al qaim giving them control of the western
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border. further south, the officials say they have taken over crossing with syria and crossing with jordan further south there after government force simply pulled out. the capture of these crossings of course could help isis transport weapons and other equipment to strategic battlegrounds. our correspondent says the latest losses amount to a serious blow to the iraqi government. >> they've lost all crossing points now into syria. the only one into jordan also. that whole section is converse ily open to rebels. now isis which is present there can connect up across the syrian ones obviously with its fellows on the syrian side of the border. it's a very serious blow to the iraqi government. it's symbolic and important to have lost control of the border as well as strategically.
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as important of that is rebels are making substantial progress in undermining progress. they've seized a number of towns, negotiating surrenders in other areas. as you're saying tribal leaders say 90% of that province in iraq is almost entirely sunni is pretty much in rebel hands. where it's not the government forces are trying to apparently negotiate their way out. this would bring the rebels there already in western side of baghdad. it puts rebels in the position to think about launching the attack on west of baghdad itself. other news now. air strikes on military targets. the attacks hit nine targets in response to the killing of a teenage boy in the occupied
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golan heights. two other people including the boy's father were injured when a blast hit their vehicles. south korean defense ministry says a soldier suspected of shooting dead five of his colleagues has been captured. he has been taken to a hospital after wounding himself in what appears to be a suicide. he was captured in the forest close to the border. he's been on the run since saturday night. highest court in malaysia has dismissed the case of banning christians to refer to god using the word a alah. it argued it had been used this the bible for centuries. authorities said it was used by christians to confuse muslims.
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reports from eastern afghanistan say the taliban has released 30 professors and students kidnapped two weeks ago. the hostages were freed following mediation of the international committee of the red cross. the taliban spokesman confirm had the release but didn't say if a ransom had been paid. we speak to jeffrey in kabul for us. a story that brings considerable relief. >> absolutely. there were about two weeks of talks and mediation between the taliban on one side and the tribal leaders and staff on the other side. after about two weeks, taliban were sure that these people were actually professors and students of the university. they were not linked to the
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afghan government or candidate's campaign. they were finally released in an insecure area of the province. that's not far from the capital kabul. now they're in the center of the province being prepared to go home. >> when a spokesman for the taliban won't say if a ransom has been paid or not, is the understanding expectation thought likely that a ransom was paid? >> well the message we're getting from the taliban is that the professors were released with respect meaning that the taliban were sort of interrogating them for some time. to one of the professors, the bbc has spoken, said they were che treated in a good manner. it's difficult to say if ransom was paid or not.
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given the situation, there were professors and taliban watched closely by the afghan nation to see how they were basically dealing with important people such as professors. it's hard to say whether a ransom was paid or not. >> was this group of 30 in an area frankly where they shouldn't have been? >> well actually there was a group of 33 people who wanted to travel on the main highway. they were basically kidnapped four days before the elections. they were basically coming back too today their homes in kabul to spend their national holiday announced for the provincial run off. it's hard to say they were in the wrong place because they were on the main highway. they were stopped by a group of
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taliban. the highway between kabul, the capital and the south is quite sin insecure. we often receive treatment of the taliban like that. >> thank you. want to bring you up on the situation of the al-jazeera journalists sentenced to seven years in prison. the prime minister david cameron has been speaking. we have a quote by him. i'm completely a palled by the verdicts of the al-jazeera journalists. that's the comment from david cameron. stay with us here on bbc world news. we have a special report. in south africa authorities are coming up with a way to deal with the wave of tombstones. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why at liberty mutual insurance,
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you're with bbc world news. i'm david eades. these are the latest headlines. three al-jazeera journalists accused of spreading false news in egypt have been sentenced to seven years in jail. australia's foreign minister says she can't understand the government's verdict based on evidence. u.s. secretary of state john kerry is in baghdad to press further talks about ma. a bridge that's come to symbolize tensions in kosovo has been the center of violence. fire was set to police buildings of the north side of the bridge. here's our correspondent. >> the removal was meant to remove ethic tensions in kosovo.
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the bridge became the focus of discontent. on the south bank of the river in the divided town, there were burned cars and stones thrown at police. the officers replied with tear gas. >> there was a protest today organized on the south side of the bridge that generated some energy. there was concern that the local police had concern about their ability to contain it. they asked for support. >> a pile of rubble blocked the bridge on a ma jjority for thre year, a symbol of the self-declared independence and authority of government. when the blockade was removed last wednesday, it seemed to indicate a softening of attitudes following the agreement to normalize relations
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last year. the bridge was swiftly blocked again by flower pots and earth. a peace park said the authorities, outrage replied some al banyans in the south. the town remains divided as ever, a place of planting flowers can be provocation. bbc news. russia's president vladimir putin has voiced support for a ukrainian peace plan that he says the proposals can work if compromises are made with pro russian rebels. steve has been across the boarder in russia to meet fighters helping rebels in eastern ukraine against government forces. >> who are the fighters in eastern ukraine?
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we know that some of the pro russian militants are ukrainian citizens, but not all of them. in the russian city i meet uri. by the internet he's recruiting russians to fight in ukraine on the side of the militants. kiev has identified this group and its website as one of the main recruiting grounds from russian volunteers. >> translator: there's a saying you can't do good without using your fists. sometimes it's necessary to take up arms to protect those that need defending. we call it armed charity. >> the group says it was their volunteer who is tried to seize donetsk airport last month. dozens of fighters were killed. more than 30 bodies were taken to russia. >> translator: our job isn't just dispatch volunteers and
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coordinate activities. it's our responsibility too to bring them home whether they're dead or alive. >> the russian volunteer group says it gets no direct support from the government here. moscow has repeatedly denied sending troops and military hardware across the border. western governments maintain that among the fighters in eastern ukraine, they're funded, equipped and backed by russia. >> this is the only assistance russia has been providing the people of eastern ukraine and it's humanitarian. on the russian side of the border, refugees escaping the violence can get clothes and medicine and transport to temporary shelter. at a hospital nearby, many of these refugees told me they had relatives th s thas that stayed fight the army.
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>> translator: i hope my son kills 2,000 of those kiev bandits. if he does, i'll build a statue to him. he'll be my hero. >> to these refugees, talk of peace plans is empty words. there's deep suspicion of kiev. they're counting on russia for protection. bbc news, southern russia. a crime wave now that is shocking south africa. cemeteries are targeted for their south after granite, ma marble or bronze. one cemetery a day is vandal xized or hit thieves. alarms have been hitted to headstones. >> any unauthorized movement like that, it immediately triggers the alarm.
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this is triggered by the movement in a matter of seconds. this company installs micro transmitters on headstones. when there's an attempted theft, text messages are sent to mobile phones of the families of the deceased and the security company. >> granite, marble and bronze are very expensive commodities, expensive materials. they're found in abundance in isolated cemeteries. there's a market for removing them and forperhaps repolishing the names. there's a chance it ends up on someone's granite counter in a kitchen. >> according to authorities there's 30 cases of vandalism and theft per month.
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they say the security system is a step in the right direction. >> i am concerned on the vandali vandalism. >> to me any loss is not just to me personally but to the city, to the family. it's a shock that today that family. it's also a loss to heritage. >> in cemeteries across south africa vandalism and theft takes place. by in large the thieves are chasing this material, granite you see around here. families are concerned when they come to pay their respects to their loved ones. they believe they left them here to rest in peace. >> i don't need anyone coming to disturb them. we've seen a lot of times we've put flowers up. they break the vases and things like this. i mean you live once. when you're gone, at least leave
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them to rest. why vandalize a grave? >> this is what we found after criminals have raided a grave. with the introduction of tombstone technology, authorities are confident this type of crime won't be a cause for alarm in the future. bbc news in johannesburg. one of the biggest events is getting underway today. britain's andy murray is defending his men's single crown at wimbledon. looking ahead to action, here's bbc roy kelly. >> for the first time in his career, the talk up to the championships hasn't been about could he win wimbledon, it's now can he defend it? the pressure is as great though especially in the year of comparative form. so far in 2014 murray failed to reach a final. the grass courts in south london
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would be an ideal place to change that statistic. >> i believe if i play my best i'll give myself a chance of doing well here, put myself in a position to win the tournament. >> he's seeded three behind the powerhouse of joik vich and nadal. the spaniard won the french open two weeks ago and now attempting to transfer that clay talent to grass. >> i don't know whether or not i'll have good success there. few good days of practice held know retain how to play here on grass. >> there's only one person to beat in the women's draw. at 32 serena williams still has the hunger. >> a lot is something you can't go in the store and buy. you can't kind of go train to get it.
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i was born with it. i think it just grew. it started as a small maybe fire and grew into this amazing flame that is very difficult, nearly impossible to put out. >> the weather is looking good. british fans are hoping andy murray's name can be added. can it be murray mania once again? here's a funny thing. when the national football team is ranked in the world, bang bangladesh have never made it there. they have to support other times. we met one man who expresses support for his team.
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>> translator: when the football is on, everyone gets excited. there's a festive mood in the country. everybody goes to the market to buy flags and jerseys. i live on the edge of the town. everyone knows me as a big brazil fan. but some people think i'm crazy. i had a two story house i painted with colors of the brazilian flag. this year when i built my apartment block i painted in the colors of the brazilian team. i have liked brazil since i was a boy. i love the rhythm of the way they play football. it's like the rhythm of the summer dance. i know brazil football, but i've never been there. my whole family supports brazil. my son, my wife, my mother, all
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brazil supporters. they help me decorate our home in brazilian color when the world cup starts. at night we watch the match together with friends and family. we bring in a projector to watch on a big screen. we have food and celebrate every call of the match by dancing and shouting. >> now one memorable image of day 11 of the world cup. if you're a nigerian fan, a moment in history. first ever win in a world cup final. congratulations to them. should also say if you want more on the world cup, we have the very place for you. bbc sports website. catch the latest news, see which teams are making it through and
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aren't. germany 2 ghana 2. you can also join the discussion on twitter. look out for #bbc world cup. it's there quite a while. thanks for watching bbc world news. will you help us find a new house for you and your brother? ♪ ♪ ♪
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