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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  July 11, 2014 6:00am-7:01am EDT

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hello. i'm tim wilcox with bbc world news. our top stories. john kerry warns afghanistan's future hangs in the balance as he flies in close to the election. >> we have high hopes the questions about the election can and will be resolved quickly. 100 pialestinians are
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reported killed. germany says the expulsion of the cia top official was inevitable after the latest spying allegation. hello. the u.s. secretary of state john kerry has arrived in afghanistan where he'll meet both candidates of the disputed election. he's warned the future of the country hangs in the balance. he's met one of the candidate who is now says he supports an extensive order of the polls. the report shows he won 56% of the report. here's what he had to say a short time ago. >> our commitment is to insure the election process is
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integrity of afghanistan in the world would believe it. we believe in the most extensive process possible to restore faith. from day one, our commitment has been inclusive government, government that can represent all and serve every citizen in the manner that every man deserves from the constitution. >> mr. kerry will meet his rival abdullah abdullah. he claimed victory in the runoff election last month also. preliminary results show him second with 43% of the vote. that might change when the finals come out in a couple weeks time. we explain what influence john kerry would bring to negotiations. >> you have to remember there's
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still 30,000 troops on the ground. the afghan national security forces are heavily funded by the americans as well as members of the international community. the afghan national security forces cost $1.4 million, most fed by the americans. politicians in afghanistan understand the future is tide to the relationship and help from washington. there's no doubt about that. that being said, abdullah abdullah has made a number of fresh demands. for example he's saying 8.1 million voters did not take part in the second round of election. he believes 5.5 million so far. he warns mr. kerry and the united nations here to reinspect votes from 11,000 ballot boxes,
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more than half the votes. the u.n. envoy here said that his suggestion is at least 8,000 ballot boxes should be respected. that's about 3 million votes. there's still quite a number of disputes to be resolved. more importantly mr. kerry would have to create a climate of trust where they could sit and work together. he's meeting president karzai who's another crucial personality in terms of finding a possible solution to this problem. as we speak, supporters of both candidates are putting up the posters of both candidates across the country and calling them the elected presidents of afghanistan. they have indeed confused the ordinary afghans. this deadlock has brought businesses to a stand still, created a lot of concern among ordinary people across the
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country. the death of two palestinians in the israeli air raid in gaza has brought the total number killed to 100 in four days. another five were killed overnight when a three story house was flattened. more rockets have been fired in the last few hours. no israelis have been killed since the conflict began. three seriously injured in the southern pakistani city. rockets are fired into northern israel for the first time. they're trying to figure out who was behind the attack a. tony blair on a visit to jerusalem says he's extremely worried about what's happening in gaza. >> the situation now is escalating and not deescalating. i think we need as a matter of
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urgency, short term arrangements and agreements that do allow us genuinely to de-escalate the situation and bring a form of calm. i don't think that will work unless there's a term put in place to resolve this further long time solution. i think it's going to be difficult to create short term peace. >> i've been talking to correspondents in the region. in a moment we'll hear from gaza, then james reynolds. first in beirut. we have more details about southern rocket attacks. >> up until now, we don't know who fired the rockets according to the lebanese arnie from southern lebanon to northern israel.
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retaliation as you said. israel fired 25 tank shells into northern lebanon. there haven't been reports of injuries or damage yet. the lebanese army is patrolling the area in search of a group or party who would be doing this. as for the moment, no group has claimed responsibility. >> in term temperatures of the israeli air strikes on gaza overnight, what's the latest there? >> even in just the past few minutes we heard the rumble of israeli air strikes to gaza in the south and east. israel says it's hit more than 1,000 targets in gaza in the past four days. we hear palestinian groups have fired 500 rockets into i israel.
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many are loare longer range roc. no one is killed yet on the israeli side. in gaza those dead around the 100 mark. many are children and women. it's going after militants' homes. that's what led overnight to death of five people in southern gaza. there was an islamic leader who wasn't home at the time. five were killed including a child. we're hearing from local people sometimes the homes being destroyed have no militant talks at all. people complain israel usually gives a warning sending a rocket without explosive war head to make sure people get out of their house, sometimes making a phone call. often warnings aren't coming through. people don't get a chance to leave the property.
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that's why civilian casualties are rising. >> james, is there any suggestion the u.s. might be trying to get involved to broker a cease fire? >> yes because president obama spoke to israel's prime minister netanyahu. it may be the u.s. is not capable of mediating directly because in the past what we've seen when israel and gaza, when there's fighting there, egypt has mediated cease fires. it did so most recently in 2012 under the government of morsi. he was of course overtloechbhro. the new government may not be willing on able to. that we're aware of there are no talks to mediate a cease fire. here people are still under rocket warning. in this neighborhood we heard sirens.
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people were escorted to shelters and stood there five minutes. a colleague saw white plumes in the sky indicating the missile system had been fired to intercept rockets from gaza. graphic and compelling evidence of beatings and torture of journalists has emerged. flst no reliable figures on the number of abductions. the interior ministry reported 500 between april and june. abductions have taken place across the donetsk and ukraine region. i asked about the government response to that report. >> so far no official response tim. it should be said, yes it was a damming report that raised a lot of concerns on the side of amnesty international. they said there were kidnappings
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and abuses on both sides. the majority the, bulk of abuses and kidnappings were carried out by pro russian separatists, fighting against the government forces. as we know, bbc has seen a basement in the town of slovian sloviansk. in some cases the instances were stomach turning. >> to entrance the situation further do you think? >> difficult to say. there's been accusations and reports some time. the government is accusing the pro russian separatists of carrying out the campaign. the political reasons for the abduction, there were also reasons for intimidating the local population.
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obviously this does not help the situation, but it definitely points to the increasing and ongoing brutality of conflict in eastern ukraine. >> david stern in kiev. germany's foreign minister says the decision to expel the cia top official in berlin was inevitable following two cases of alleged spying by america in a week. the decision further strained relations between the two countries. germany came to discuss issues of trust this weekend. let's go to the bbc stephen evans who joins us from berlin. this is getting deeper and deeper isn't it? >> it's rumbling on. the two sides if you like -- the german foreign minister and john kerry, his equivalent in washington, will meet in vienna on the sides of a conference there. it's hard to see what can be
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achieved because german government ministers are going to washington now for a year since the revelations of angela merkel's phone saying why have you been doing this? can we come to some kind of agreement for you to stop spying on an ally. maybe mr. kerry will have new information over the weekend. it's hard to imagine in which case how you rebuild trust as the german government would see it is hard to imagine. >> but all governments do this steve. you know, is the german government completely clean on this issue as well? >> well, that's a question that's being asked here. clearly you don't know how much the activity of the secret service is because it's secret. people here say well you know our own people completely clear. they knew for example exactly who the head of the cia was in the embassy.
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now whether that was common knowledge, i do not know. they say the -- the german government does say listening to somebody's phone for example is a different order of spying. the second incident involved somebody preparing documents within the german secret service for a parliamentary committee investigating spying ironically enough. they say that's a breech of democracy. that's a non violent attack on the parliamentary system. they find that very offensive. >> have there been talks between merkel and president obama since the latest episode occurred? >> there's certainly been a telephone conversation, but the details of that conversation have not been released. she's trying to balance things really. she's clearly voicing extreme disquiet, anger really.
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at the same time, she wants to keep the relationship on track. while all around her, there are people saying why are we friendly with people that spy on us? they ask us for help -- edward snowden for example, over sanctions with russia. why are we cooperating? you're watching bbc world news. still to come. why this man accused of selling world cup illegally is described as a fugitive of justice from brazil.
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you're watching bbc world news. i'm tim willcox. the latest headlines. u.s. secretary of state john kerry is meeting afghanistan rival presidential candidates to try to resolve the disputed election outcome. now the number of those killed in gaza has reached 100.
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police in brazil say a man formally accused of illegally selling world cup tickets has fled arrest. ray whelan was accused earlier this week. ben brown is in rio. >> when police arrived at lavish cabana ho the tell to arrest him, they discovered he was gone. the television set in his room was on and his flip flops were there showing he left in a hurry. we saw the tv images, said chief police investigator. >> he left one hour ago through the back door. we're sure someone tipped him off. it's unusual to leave through the staff door. we have an arrest warrant for him. he's officially a fugitive. this shows he does not wanted to
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cooperate. >> ray whelan was arrested a few days ago and released after questioning. at the time his company said he was innocent and would be exonerated. match services is a partner firm of fifa and sells vip tickets. mr. whelan was detained as part of a wider investigation into the illegal trade of world cup tickets that inflated prices. the police already have 11 other men in custody. detectives alleged they're part of a gang that have been tenses of millions of not only at this world cup but previous tournaments too. >> police in rio allege they have phone tap evidence that points to an international criminal conspiracy to sell tickets that the world cup at vastly inflated prices. they're hoping he gives himself
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up as soon as possible. bbc news in rio. in other news, nearly 20 football supporters have asked for asylum after interesting the country as tourists to watch the world cup. they told local police they're muslims trying to escape religious conflict in their country. there will be nearly a thousand to apply after the world cup ends. 11 people died including children. the bus was taken the children home from school. the bus was overcrowded and there was no security barrier on the narrow road. the controversy auction of the statue is taking place in london with it fetching $27 million. the ambassador to britain has condemned the sale of the statue. the statue was gifted to the town in the 19th century. officials plan to redevelop the
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town's museum. now with some business. >> thank you. we start with portugal, central bank and country's prime minister have short investors. the problems at the country's largest bank will not compromise the financial system. markets were rattled thursday with fears the country could be facing new financial difficulties. portugal, greece were at the center of the crisis. it got a $1 billion rescue and exited the bailout less than two months ago with a clean bill of health. you think the problems are over. well, they're not. worries sent around this, the banco espirito santo that plunged 19% thursday. that's because of mounting
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concerns about the parent company which is interested in various other firms. it failed to pay debt that was due to be paid this week and it's been cited by regulators for accounting irregular lair the ties. all of this stirred up the the crisis that start aed with the banking system. it spread to wall street borrowing cost to portugal and neighbors. investors rushed to that safe haven of gold. european markets have been open a few hours. we'll have a look at those in a moment. first, i want to take you from the banking sector to the role of engines. that's what it's about when it comes to motorsports for fans out there. later they're going to be
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presented with a greener, quieter potential. we're going to have more on that and the rest of the day's business on world business report throughout the day. quick look at markets. last i looked and they're still there. all recovering some of the losses from yesterday. >> thank you very much. video game arcades used to be quite a common site in towns and cities around the world. in the last two decades, council growing at home has grown. arcades have closed. one veteran of the industry is on a one man application to save the arcade. mark has rebuilt from scratch one arcade in london often repairing old machines from arcades that are already closed down. he's building quite a fan base. >> it really is the last of its kind. probably the first and last arcade of the 21st century, here
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here in uk any way. i think the generation of kids growing up now, most started gaming after the arcade really pretty much gone. for them this was kind of a new experience. social gaming is something that everybody should experience. i think it offers a lot of things to players. you simply don't get this at home with your earphones in. >> instead of playing at home alone, you get to come down here and play with people incredibly passionate about the game and just a welcoming community. >> why did the arcades close down? rise of the consoles. another argument would be software piracy. what what happened was a lot of old timers that used to run the
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arcades in the 80s and 90s, they dissolved their idea of the arcade. [ inaudible ] >> mix and mingle different cultures. it. >> we get many more people coming through here all the time playing old classics, new games. we've had kids turn up with parents as young as seven or eight. and had people reaching 50s. a guy in his late 30s and 40s isn't going to want to play one of these energy dance games. by the same rational. maybe young kids aren't going to want to play donkey kong or
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batman. nostalgia just hits you. it's not something you immerse yourself the in. people can walk in and see and play games they haven't seen in years. >> that's it for now.
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our top stories. john kerry warns afghanistan's future hangs in the balance as he flies in on a mission to try and resolve the disputed presidential election. >> no one is declaring victory at this time. the results are yet to be finalized. hiv experts are forced to rethink after a young girl believed to have been cured as a baby is found to still have the virus. 100 palestinians are killed
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in gaza as the israel bombardment enters the fourth day. here today gone even before tomorrow. the san francisco beach artist who work is wash add way by the next tide. hello. welcome to the a program. the u.s. secretary of state john kerry has arrived in afghanistan where he'll meet both candidates of last month's disputed presidential election. he's warned the future of the country hangs in the balance. he's met one of the candidates who now says he supports an extensive order to the polls. the preliminary results show he won over 56% of the vote. here's a little of what he had to say a short time ago. >> our commitment is to insure
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that the election process enjoys integrity that we feel afghanistan in the world would believe. therefore we believe in the most intensive and extensive process possible to restore faith. simultaneously from day one when we set nomination, commitment has been inclusive government, a government to represent all and serve every citizen in the manner every afghan deserves according to the constitution. >> john kerry will meet mrmr.his rival who results show him second with over 43% of the vote. that tally might change when the full results come out. we are in kabul and explain what
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influence john kerry would try to have. >> americans have a lot of leverage. you have to remember they have 30,000 troops on the ground. the afghan national security forces are heavily funded by the americans as well as members of the international community. the afghan national security forces cost $4.1 billion, most fed by the americans. politicians in afghanistan realized the stability is very much tied in relationship and help from washington. there's no doubt about that. that being said, abdullah abdullah has made a number of fresh demands. for example, he's saying 8.1 million voters did not take part in the second round of elections. he believed no more than 5.1 million people so far. he warns mr. kerry as well as
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the united nations here to reininspect votes from 11,000 ballot boxes. that's more than half the vote. the u.n. envoy here said that his suggestion is that at least 8,000 ballot boxes should be respected with 3 million votes. there's still disputes to be resolved and more importantly mr. kerry would have to reach a climate of trust where the two could meet and work together. he's working on with another crucial personality in terms of finding a solution to this problem. as we speak, supporters of both candidates are putting up posters of both candidate across the country and calling them elected presidents of afgh
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afghanistan. this conflict has brought businesses to a stand still and caused confusion for people across the country. an american born child who was thought to be the first to be cured of hiv as a baby has now had the virus detected in her blood once again. tests last week on the 4-year-old from mississippi born with hiv indicate she is no longer in remission. she was aggressively treated hours after she was born. at 18 months she stopped being given medication to suppress the virus and remained free of hiv for two years. her case raised the hope for a cure for a quarter million babies born with aids each year. with me, robin at the faculty of medicine and imperial college london. obviously a setback. were you convinced this baby had been cured in the first place professor? >> the world was cautiously optimistic and interested in this case.
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it's a single case. while now seen as a setback, it's still an interesting case because the baby managed to suppress viral for two years without the medicine. >> longevity now with antivirals is good isn't it for hiv sufferers? >> had the mother been treated before birth, would that have made a significant difference? >> if you treat mothers before delivery it's the most effective way to prevent the child from becoming effective. that still remains the most important strategy for preventing hiv infection of babies. so early diagnosis and access to treatment is really key.
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>> for adults, there was that case that the american who had a bone marrow transplant. he seems to be free of the virus as well. is that unique so far? >> it's a unique situation. this is known as the berlin patient. this person had a bone marrow transplant with cells that made them resistant to hiv. it's a one-off study. >> has that been repeated with other patients to see if it had the same effect? >> it hasn't been repeated because it was such a unique situation. it is an operation and requires finding a match to the donor who has a mutation. >> people suffering now, how inconvenient is it in terms of taking all these antiretro
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virals. are there side effects or can people live a normal life? >> there's always side effects. it's gotten better and better. in some cases people can treat with a pill a day and have a healthy life span. it is treatment for life. it requires taking drugs for their natural life span. >> where are numbers now in terms of global figures on hiv? are those antivirals getting into africa where they are needed where cases are higher? now we have 35 million globally living with hiv. there's 13 million with antiviral treatments. it's lower death rates by 20% in the last three years. there's still a long way to go to make access to drugs universally available. it still requires an increasing
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financial support given that right now it's costing $20 billion. it could be predicted by 2035 to be up to $30 billion a year to treat everybody who requires treatment for hiv. >> okay. professor, thank you for coming in and joining us. >> thank you. the death of two palestinians an irali air raid has brought the total number killed to 100 in four days. overnight, another five were killed when a three story house in the southern town was flattened. militants have fired more rockets in the last couple hours no. israelis have been killed since the firing began. rockets were fired to lebanon for the first time in the conflict. the lebanese military is trying to figure out who was behind that attack. and several people have been injured, one seriously when
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rocket fire from gaza hit a petro station in the city. james reynolds reports from the scene. >> reporter: this is the petro station here in the city. as you can see, this is the damage caused by a palestinian rocket strike this morning that struck about 7:30 or 8:00 in the morning. a look at fire that started at these pumps here. they're almost entirely destroyed. the fire spread up to the ceiling. have a look on the roof there. that black soot. if you look down there, here's the damage to the rest of the station. two more pumps knocked out. glass has been shattered. a paramedic says six people were injured, one seriously. that person was taken to a hospital. this may be one of the most serious strikes from gaza to israel in recent days.
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palestinian militants have fire 5d 500 rockets. rockets this morning were not intercepted. despite israel's air strikes and intention to stop rockets, it continues to other fall here in israel. the middle east envoy tony blair says he's worried about what's happening in garza. >> we've all been trying to call for restraint and de-escalation. the reality now is the situation is escalating and not de-escalating. i think we need as a matter of urgency, short term arrangements and agreements that do allow us generally to de-escalate and restore a form of calm. i don't think that will work unless results are in place some way of resolving the longer term questions at heart of this
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violence and conflict. and without that long term solution in place, it's going to be difficult to create any short term peace. >> in the previous conflict, egypt had a key role under president morsi to help bring the fighting to an end. will egypt's new presidency al-sisi get solved? interesting statement in the last hour or so from the egyptian authorities about what's happening in gaza. >> yes. this was a much tougher statement from the foreign ministry than we have had so far. until now, egypt has been proportioning blame in both directions by israel and palestinians. today we have had a much stronger statement against israel. let me quote you from that. it accuses israel of an irresponsible escalation in palestinian lands. it says israel is using
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excessive military force leading to deaths of innocent civilians. it says israel continues a repressive policy of punishment. the major question as you say is whether or not egypt is going to play the role it has in the past, that of a mediator between the two sides. it is one of two arab countries that has a peace treaty with israel. at the last cease fire between israel and palestinians, november 2012. that was brokered by egypt. that was under the deposed president and mohamed morsi. we have a different government in place. >> that changed the relationship between egypt and hamas gaza in particular who they link with the muslim brother hood. >> i think it's changed the dynamics entirely. the government of ale sisi, the former army chief views hamas as a direct threat and enemy.
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it has taken action to ban hamas. i think it's happy to see hamas under pressure orvel not happy about the civilian casualties going along side that. israel says it's involved in extensive contact with all sides. israeli, palestinians, international players. it said this morning those contacts have been met. i think there's a feeling among analysts this time around egypt is not going to rush in to broker a truce that might throw a lifeline to hamas. in 2012 the deal brokered was favorable to hamas, offshoot of brother hood. this time around there's a different relationship between cairo and hamas. there's a sense in a way israel and egypt are in fact on the same page, both want og to see
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hamas brought to its knees. egypt insists it's doing all it can diplomatically and continuing every contact it can engage in. nobody is expecting it to deliver a truce quickly in this case if at all. >> in many cairo there, thank you. so to bring you breaking news just in the last couple of moments. iraqi oil ministry says kurdish forces have taken control of two oil fields expelling arab workers and replacing them with kurdish personnel. the oil ministry says that the kurds took over facilities and oil fields early on friday. the iraq oil ministry called on the wise man to understand the seriousness of the situation and instructs forces to leave
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the oil field to avoid serious consequences. we'll try to get more where our correspondents in the region. pictures just in from cambodia. the remain of the former king have been paraded through the streets of the capital. thousands lined the streets to pay final respect. the king led the country through decades of conflict and drama followed by peace. there will be three days of ceremonies. he's seen by many cambodians as the father of the nation. he died in 2012 at the age of 89. stay with us here on bbc world news. still to come, evidence of savage beatings and torture during the conflict in ukraine. we'll have the latest from kiev. .
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you're watching bbc world news. i'm tim willcox. the latest headlines secretary of state john kerry is meeting to try and resolve the disputed outcome. 100 palestinians are trortd have been killed in four days in gaza. graphic and compelling evidence of savage beatings and other torture of activists, protestors and journalists has emerged. there are no comprehensive or reliable numbers on number of abductions but the ukrainian interior ministry reported 500 cases between april and june. abductions have taken place across eastern ukraine in the donetsk region.
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i asked about the ukrainian government's response to this report. >> so far no official response. it was a damming report that raised a lot of concerns on the part of am necessaamnesty international. the bulk was carried out by insurgents and russians fights against the government forces. we know bbc has seen a basement in the town of sloviansk where they held hostages in grim conditions. amnesty were concerned of torture and beatings. they said some instances were stomach-turning. >> is this going to entrench the situation further senator.
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>> difficult to say. the government is accusing the pro russian separatists of carrying out a terror campaign. it should be said amnesty in addition to saying the political reasons for the abductions, there were also reasons for intimidating the local population. obviously this does not help the situation, but it definitely points to the increasing, on-going and increasing brutality of conflict in eastern ukraine. >> david stern in kiev. germany's foreign minister says the decision to expel the top cia official in berlin was inevitable following two cases of spying in a week. the this has strained relations between the two countries. there were talks in vienna this weekend. >> the two sides, the german foreign minister and john kerry his equivalent in washington
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will will meet in vienna on the side of a conference there. it's hard to see a what can be achieved because german government ministers have been going to washington now for a year since the revelations of angela merkel's phone and saying why have you been doing this? can we come to some kind of agreement for you to stop spying on an ally? maybe mr. kerry will have new conversation over the weekend. it's hard to imagine. in which can case you rebuild trust with the german government is hard to imagine. >> but all governments do this steve. is the german government completely clean on this issue as well? >> well that's a question that's asked here. clearly you don't know how much the activity of the secret services is because it's secret. people here say well, you know,
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our own people completely clear. they knew for example exactly who the head of the cia was in the embassy. whether that was common knowledge i do not know. but they say, the german government does say, listening to somebody's phone for example is a different order of spying. the the second incident involved somebody preparing documents within the german secret service for a parliamentary committee investigating spying ironically enough. they say that's a breach of democracy. that's a non violent attack on the parliamentary system. they find that very offensive. >> have there been talks between angela merkel and president obama since the latest episode occurred? >> there's certainly been a telephone conversation, but the details of that conversation
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have not been released. she's trying to balance things really. she's clearly voicing extreme disquiet, anger really. at the same time, she wants to keep the relationship on track. while all around her, there are people saying why are we being friendly with people that spy on us? they ask us for help over edward snowden for example, sanctions with russia. why are we cooperating? >> steve in berlin. now to art with a difference. you can't see it in the studio, can't own it. it doesn't last long either. fair san francisco artist, the beach is his studio and sand his canvas. it takes hours to complete each art work. that doesn't stop people traveling from miles to see his creations. >> it's barely daylight when he goes to work. he's an earth scape artist.
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he spends days on the beach raking the sand. he lets his imagination run wild creating geometric patterns. sometimes they're huge, sometimes not. they're all different. >> i've seen the biggest since ration is nature and patterns around me. i'm trying to translate the world i see and understand it. it feels like a scientific pursuit on some level. >> he rakes it to bring different colors of sand to the surface. by broad and narrow strokes he creates patterns that are stunning. it's difficult for him to see if his designs are working from the ground. he puts a camera that hovers above and takes pictures. beach goers love his work and travel miles to see it. some visitors might not be quite so welcome. he used to be an environmental scientist, but he gave it up to
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follow his dream. he still can't quite believe his luck. >> it's opened more doors and made more possible than i ever dreamed of before. i never would have thought i could make a living raking in the sand. >> his work may disappear before when the tide comes in. that doesn't worry him. it just means he has a blank canvas to rake over in the morning. >> absolutely beautiful aren't they? >> now let's show you a very rare outsider literally flying home in a photo finish racehorse. this sea gull didn't make it first past the post but was caught on camera soaring into second place there. the bird caused a flap on tuesday. it's thought to be the first
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bird to be featured in the photo finish print of a horse race. a quick reminder of our top news. the oil ministry has accused kurdish fighters of taking control of two oil fields. more on that throughout the day. from me and the team, good-bye. . asian debt that recognizes the shift in the global economy. you know, the kind that capitalizes on diversity across the credit spectrum and gets exposure to frontier and emerging markets. if you convert 4-quarter p/e of the s&p 500, its yield is doing a lot better... if you've had to become your own investment expert, maybe it's time for bny mellon, a different kind of wealth manager ...and black swans are unpredictable.
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♪ f provokes lust. ♪ it elicits pride... ...incites envy... ♪ ...and unleashes wrath. ♪ temptation comes in many heart-pounding forms. but only one letter. "f". the performance marque from lexus.
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. welcome to "gmt" on bbc world news. our top stories. the rocket fire from palestinian militants and the death toll rises. israeli strikes have killed 100 palestinians with no sign of a cease fire. rocket fire hits lebanon as well as gaza. the u.s. secretary of state flies to warn the dispute over

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