Skip to main content

tv   BBC World News  BBC America  July 25, 2014 6:00am-7:01am EDT

6:00 am
this is bbc world news. our top stories. more than 800 palestinians, most civilians, now known to have died during israel's offensive in gaza. palestinian leaders call for a day of anger as the death toll continues to rise sparking deadly crashes in the west bank. a week after flight mh 17 crashed in ukraine, remains of more victims are flown out of the country. the wreckage of an al jeer yan plane caring 116 is found in mali. the french president said there
6:01 am
were no survivors. a day of anger. that's what palestinian leaders called for over the rising number of those killed and injured in the israeli offensive in gagaza. the fighting shows no sign of slowing. around 30 houses have been destroyed in south of gaza. there's a lot of action taking place in the center of the strip. this is the scene in the west bank as palestinian demonstrators clashed with israeli soldiers. 10,000 marched towards east jerusalem. two palestinians died and 200 were wounded. yesterday followed the attack on a u.n. school where 13 died
6:02 am
including women, children and u.n. staff. hah mass blames israel. it's investigating who's responsible. this takes the death toll of palestinians to at least 815 as of today. 32 israelis, 32 soldiers and two civilians have been killed since the offensive began 18 days ago. we can cross now to our correspondent john who is near east jerusalem. a lot of security there after night's clashes. >> reporter: that's right. we're at the damascus gate at the edge of jerusalem's old city. reasonably relaxed so far. we could be in for a potentially difficult day. if you look behind me, hundreds of israeli police lined up here. a very large security operation a. just behind them you probably can't make them out. there's a number gathering. what israelis have said here
6:03 am
today, any men 50 and under who are palestinian won't be able to attend friday prayers in jerusalem. you mentioned clash overnight, pretty bad. 10,000 people demonstrating marched towards the check point which separates them from east jerusalem. two palestinians killed, 250 injured, 29 israeli police officers also injured. as you say, a day of anger called for. it could be a difficult day. >> at the same time, attempts to reach a cease fire. americans at the forefront of that. the israeli cabinet due to meet and discuss that. what do we know about how that's going? >> so far no progress. there's not much optimism. some say could there be a humanitarian truce over the holiday coming at the end in a few days time? in previous conflicts and wars
6:04 am
between israel and hamas, there have been better chances of mediation particularly when you had a different government in charge in egypt. we don't have that anymore. certainly that doesn't really seem to be too much appetite for a cease fire at the moment on the israeli side. the palestinians, hamas, have said they would wish for a cease fire if their terms were met. the israelis aren't prepared to meet terms just yet. >> john in jerusalem, thanks very much. let's cross to our correspondent in gaza for us. not much hopes of a cease fire where you are, that is shared? >> reporter: that's right. at the moment the only ray of hope would be for some kind of humanitarian truce. the hamas leader has come out in the last few days saying he could accept something of these lineses. you can see the humanitarian
6:05 am
situation is dire. in u.n. buildings there's 150,000 people staying in temporary shelters because so many have fled their homes or had their homes destroyed in the past 18 days of fighting. what you also see is a lot of people just living on the streets simply because they don't have anymore to go. there's no family friends to take them in. we've had 800 killed, more than 5200 wounded. numbers keep rising all the time. of course medical staff and aid agencies here in gaza are all struggling to scope with the scale of the problem. >> bring us up to date on the air strikes in the south of gaza. >> reporter: that's right. just here in gaza city, we've heard a lot of shelling coming from eastern neighborhoods. once again we had air strikes close by including one along our street in gaza city.
6:06 am
israeli air strikes to the north as well. a lot of action has been focussed in the center where there's fighting between israeli troops and militants and south of the gaza strip. islamic jihad military spokesman was killed in his home with three members of his family in the israeli air strike. we've continued to see palestinian rockets fired from here into israeli territory. >> thanks very much. the u.n. secretary general has told israel and hamas they're morally wrong to kill their own people and they must end hostilities and end to dialogue. the leader of hamas told bbc the palestinian group wants a truce as soon as possible. the bbc has been speaking exclusively to him. >> when would it take for a
6:07 am
hamas to sign onto a cease fire now? >> translator: we want a cease fire as soon as possible. that's parallel with lifting of siege on gaza. this is the demand of the gaza people. i call on u.n., uk and u.s. to go to gaza people and ask what they want. i can guarantee that will be the answer of the gaza people. >> what the americans seem to be working on is a two stage deal where there will be a truce. guns and rockets will stop firing. then there will be a serious negotiation about how to boost the gaza economy, ease the blockade on gaza and give the people a better life. are you prepared to accept the two stage solution to? >> regardless of mechanisms, what is important is the siege to lift on gaza.
6:08 am
these have been made in the past, but nothing was done. gaza is part of palestinian land. we have 1.8 million people. we want an airport, a port. we want to open up to the world. we don't want to be controlled by a border crossing that makes gaza the biggest prison in the world. people come and go for medical treatment or to work. why are the people of gaza being punished with the slow death many the world's biggest prison? this is a crime. we want a halt in the aggression and end of siege. we are eager that the bloodshed should end in gaza. >> you talk of resistance. how can any idea of resistance justify putting rockets in a school building? >> translator: frankly speaking, this is a lie. let israel show where the rocket launchers are in gaza. >> you can watch the full interview with the hamas leader
6:09 am
on friday's edition of hard talk at 2030 and 23:30 here on "gmt" news. the dutch prime minister announced 40 unarmed military police are sent to eastern ukraine to recover the remaining victims of flight mh 17. it's been eight days since the plane crashed over eastern ukraine. access to the site is in hazard. normally police would secure the area before the official investigators arrive. with the crash site under rebel control and fighting still taking place in the area, this hasn't happen. international investigators have managed to get limited access and progress is being made just slowly. forensic work has begun outside of ukraine. many bodies have been returned to mether la netherlands to be .
6:10 am
the next challenge will be to promptly secure the crash site so that investigators can carry out proper forensic a that will sis. to get more information about how and what -- how the plane was brought down. that investigation is led by netherlands that lost 193 citizens when the plane crashed. we have been speaking to the dutch prime minister about his reaction to the tragedy. >> the dutch are taking a lead in this investigation now. later on today, more coffins arrive. two more military planes. those coffins we understand 70 will be brought to the military facility nearby where the forensic investigations are taking place. now mark has told us he has had conversations with president obama in the last few days and they agreed that russia's response so far has not gone far enough. i was speaking to mark and he also said in the days after the
6:11 am
crash he had conversations with the russian president. >> i was on the phone with putin on friday which was relatively polite conversation. at that stage it was still difficult to assess how quickly the recovery would take place. saturday it was totally clear people are still laying there in the open field in 35 degrees celsius. that's unacceptable. we put more pressure on saturday. we documented this unacceptable. monday night the train with the bodies was driving from the insurgent held territory to ukrainian held territory. i was very happy for all people. >> somewhere there's someone who
6:12 am
put their finger on a button and fire had the missile. what's your message to that person? >> that he can be assured that i am extremely motivated to find him, her, them and that as soon as we knew that they won't escape justice. >> speaking in the last few minutes, the dutch prime minister says he supports tough sanctions against russia for its role in the crisis. the australian foreign minister was at airport to oversee the retrieval of victims from the crash. >> what a we focus on is bringing our people home. there are families in australia, in countries around the world, grieving over the fact they can't have their loved ones back in their home country. our entire reason of being here
6:13 am
is to insure we can secure that site, have access to it, that a proper investigation can be carried out, and that we can bring people home. that's our focus. >> australian foreign minister there. now to business news. good news for uk economy today. it's finally bigger than it was before the financial crisis struck six years ago. gross domestic product, everything nation's produce, expanded between april and june. the prime minister said it was a major milestone in the long term economic plan. the service sector is the only part of the economy that has passed previous 2008 peak. that accounts for the live share, 80% of the entire economy. now the company is to pay 9 billion. it's expanding to europe. it creates a media powerhouse with 20 million customers.
6:14 am
83 mur dock is expected to use the sales to fuel time warner. this is the largest shareholder. now you might not know who this this man is, but he's known as wall street's toughest cop. his name is benjamin. he's behind a series of record break fines against the world's biggest banks. most recently the french bank hit by $9 billion fines of breaking sanctions against iran and others. credit suisse also fell foul on his crack down. we'll hear from him throughout the day on bbc business reports. >> a quick look at the markets before i go. it's a mixed picture for the london market and rest of europe. for example, as you see, ftse keeping its head above water.
6:15 am
stronger economic figures. disappointing out of france. currently down two-thirds a %. german figures disappointing. that's it for me. back to you james. thanks very much. now do stay with us on bbc world news. still to come, from st. helena to scotland. the epic journey of athletes representing their nation in the common wealth games. ut? foreign markets. asian debt that recognizes the shift in the global economy. you know, the kind that capitalizes on diversity across the credit spectrum and gets exposure to frontier and emerging markets. if you convert 4-quarter p/e of the s&p 500, its yield is doing a lot better... if you've had to become your own investment expert, maybe it's time for bny mellon, a different kind of wealth manager ...and black swans are unpredictable.
6:16 am
the summer that summers from here on will be compared to. so get out there, and get the best price guaranteed. find it for less and we'll match it and give you $50 toward your next trip. expedia. find yours. so, what'd you think of the house? did you see the school rating? oh, you're right. hey, babe, i got to go.
6:17 am
bye, daddy. have a good day at school, okay? ♪ [ man ] but what about when my parents visit? okay. just love this one. it's next to a park. [ man ] i love it. i love it, too. here's your new house. ♪ daddy! [ male announcer ] you're not just looking for a house. you're looking for a place for your life to happen. zillow. this is bbc world news. the latest headlines. more than 800 palestinians, most civilians now known to have died in the israeli offensive this month. more bodies are victims of mh 17 depart for forensic tests and identification many the netherlands. the french president
6:18 am
francois hollande says one flight recorder has been recover ed from the algerie passenger plane that crashed in mali. poor weather is thought to be the cause. french officials say there's no survivors of 116 on board. half of them were french nationals. smith is in the capital. i asked her about the challenges facing the french troops trying to secure the crash site. i understand the french army have dispatched 30 vehicles 200 kilometers east of the crash site. soldiers may have arrived after a search operation that included a drone, two jets and attack helicopters provided by the french and united nations operation here in mali. the challenges facing them are largely that it's raining, still
6:19 am
raining. storms that may have been the cause of the flight's demise has continued with heavy rain in the area which isn't desert but semi, gets muddy and difficult to get through this time of year. >> the french interior minister saying they haven't ruled out a terrorist attack although most consensus say it was the weather that caused the crash. >> what we know is the pilot shortly after takeoff had applied to the air traffic control to change his flight path because he was flying into a storm. it's also clear now that the plane was barely into mali when it went down. at there was a heavy storm. this is also a part of mali where there are fewer armed groups present than might be the case further north.
6:20 am
>> in other news, torrential rain has been blamed for a plane crash that killed 48 people in taiwan on wednesday. the transasia air ways plane crash into village homes as it tried to land the second time in heavy rain off taiwan's western coast. it was taiwan's first deadly civil aviation accident since 2002. the jailed al-jazeera journalist will appeal his seven year sentence over terror charged in egypt. he and his colleagues were arrested in december as part of a crack down of islamist supporters and ousted president morsi. militants have shot 17 people including a woman and child in the province. gunman stopped two vehicles and ordered the passengers to stand in a line on the side of the road before shooting them one by
6:21 am
one. some were from the community that faced prosecution from the taliban before. fighters from the sunni islamist group formally known as isis have blown up a well known shrine in mosul. local officials say they have damaged 30 shrines around mosul. last month militants claimed spanning part os of iraq and syria but say they have now taken over a large syrian army base on the outskirts of the city. let's find out more about that. let's talk to bbc following the event from beirut. i think isis have been controlling or had free reign for some time, haven't they? what's the significance of this development? >> well they've had control of the city, provincial capital of the province.
6:22 am
however there was this large army base, one of the most significant in north eastern syria on the outskirts of the city still controlled by the syrian army. that development appears in the last few hours, they say they've taken the entire base. what we hear from the syrian government on the other hand is that they have, quote, successfully redeployed, according to the government, in order to start a congress act. that implies in fact there has been a prompt coordinate add tac -- coordinated attack. >> what would the significance of that be for isis and for movement across the region? >> well, the significance of what's been happening in the past few weeks in syria, i think
6:23 am
is a big transformation perhaps a turning point because in the past month, years as well, we haven't seen many direct clashes. we have seen some but not large scale confrontations between isis now the islamic state and syrian regime. that spread a lot of conspiracy theories especially on the part of syrian opposition groups which used to say -- not sure how they explain the current events -- that isis and regime collaborate and have common goals. this now is narrative, falling apart in many parts of syria. last week isis took over a gas field from the syrian regime. now they're clashing heavily between them and the regime around the base of division 17 as well as as others. it's basically a full out
6:24 am
confrontation between isis and regime. >> thanks very much. now out there can't be athletes with a more grueling journey to common wealth games than those on the team representing the tiny nation in the south atlantic ocean. six athletes and two officials took two flights to travel 13,000 kilometers to scotland. >> getting from st. helena no glassglow isn't simple. a royal mail ship, two flight, 8500 miles and ten days of travel ago. an incredible journey and not one for faint of heart. it's the only way to fulfill the
6:25 am
team's common weather game's dream. the air force base won't be completed two years. >> two previous games and a few -- >> the past year, the eight did did all they could to save the border doing a documentary playing games and having a night out, or should that be night in? not the best preparation for a major sporting event, but they have little choice. >> we have seen glassglow in couple day's time. >> finally on dry land, typical scottish welcome for weary islanders. it's horrible to think it, but in less than two weeks time they start that lengthy journey all over again. the team is now safely inside
6:26 am
the athlete's village. it's the sixth time the st. helena have been to the common wealth games and haven't yet won a medal. surely everyone agrees after their epic journey they definitely deserve one now. bbc news in glassglow. >> we're all cheering them on here. do stay with us here on bbc world news. hello once again -- happen ♪
6:27 am
the last four hours have seen... one child fail to get to the air sickness bag in time. another left his shoes on the plane... his shoes! and a third simply doesn't want to be here. ♪ until now... until right booking now. ♪ planet earth's number one accomodation site booking.com booking.yeah!
6:28 am
nineteen years ago, we thought, "wow, how is there no way to tell the good from the bad?" so we gave people the power of the review.
6:29 am
and now angie's list is revolutionizing local service again. you can easily buy and schedule services from top-rated providers. conveniently stay up to date on progress. and effortlessly turn your photos into finished projects with our snapfix app. visit angieslist.com today. ♪
6:30 am
6:31 am
6:32 am
6:33 am
6:34 am
. 800 palestinians, most civilians now known to have died in fighting. palestinian leaders call for a day of anger as the death toll continues to rise sparking crashes in the west bank. a week after mh 17 sh kcras more victims are carried out. the algeria plane crashed leaving no survivors. a day of anger. that's what palestinian leaders called for over the rising number of those killed and injured in the israeli offensive in gaza. the fighting shows no sign of stopping with air strikes in the south of the gaza strip. 30 houses have been destroyed. this was the scene in the west bank overnight as palestinian demonstrators clashed with israeli soldiers.
6:35 am
the israeli authorities say men under the age of 50 will not be allowed to pray today. this strong security presence on streets in east jerusalem. >> thanks very much. the u.n. secretary general told israel and hamas they're morally wrong to kill their own people. they must end hostilities and enter into dialogues. they tell bbc the group wants a truce as soon as possible. stephen has been speaking exclusively. >> what would it take for hamas to sign on to a cease fire now? >> translator: we want a cease fire as soon as possible. that's parallel with the lifting of siege on gaza. this is demand of the gaza people. i call on u.n., uk and u.s. to go to gaza people and ask what
6:36 am
they want. i guarantee that will be the answer of the gaza people. >> what the americans seem to be working on is a two stage deal where there will be a truce, where the guns and rockets will stop firing. then there will be a serious negotiation about how to boost the gaza economy, how to ease the blockade on gaza, and to give the people of gaza a better life. are you prepared to accept a two stage solution to this? >> translator: regardless of the mechanic nisms mechanisms, what is important is there have should be a guarantee to lift the siege on gaza. promises have been made in the past, but nothing was done. gaza is part of the palestinian land. we have 1.8 million people. they need to leave without blockade. we have an airport, a port. we want to open up to the world. we don't want to be controlled by a border crossing making us
6:37 am
the biggest prison in the world. people come for medical treatment or work. why are people of gaza being punished with slow death of biggest prison. this is a crime. we want halt in the siege. >> you talk of resistance. how can any idea of resistance justify putting rockets in a school building? >> translator: frankly speaking this is a lie. let israel show where the rocket launchers are in gaza. >> you can watch the full interview with the hamas leader on friday's edition of hard talk at 2030 and 23:30 on "gmt" on bbc world news. now the continuing conflict in gaza is having impact on families on both sides. yesterday we brought you a report from a palestinian
6:38 am
family. today we hear from the israeli family living there. we talked to bethany bell a short time ago what life is like under the constant threat of rocket attacks. >> from this point it's behind. from here you can see the view. today this is the city of gaza. today you can see the smoke and dust of this war. actually it's a war. you can hear the bombs and shooting and missiles. both sides. >> you've had to live with missile fire from gaza for 14 years now. but there's a new threat emerging at the tunnels used by militants to try to get to israel? >> yes. >> how concerned are you about that? >> the main problem of the tunnels is that you don't know
6:39 am
where it is. if you see a missile, you see it flying. the problem with the tunnels, you don't know. maybe they're digging. we're talking about the border. they can dig this length with the tunnel. suddenly they could appear here on the ground and surprise us. that's the problem. >> it brings them to us face to face, and we have to face this threat here in our ground. so it's scary, but we know that our government, our army are doing everything. that's why they make this war now to make us safe from this. >> reporter: the terrace is where the family usually sits to relax. these days, their 11-year-old daughter spends most time indoors, inside their bomb
6:40 am
shelter. >> this is her room. actually she's not sleeping here now because she's sleeping in the safe room which is here. they built for us three years ago before we had anything to shelter ourselves. this is where we stay during the night, most of the day now. she's here watching tv and read books. >> now the dutch prime minister announced 40 unarmed military police are sent to eastern ukraine to recover the remaining victims of flight mh 17. there's been eight days since the plane crashed over eastern ukraine and still access to the site has been of hazard. normally within hours of a plane crash you expect police to secure the area before official investigators arrive. but with the crash site under rebel control and with fighting still continuing, this hasn't
6:41 am
happened. however, international investigators have managed to get limited access and progress is being made al beit slowly. forensic work has begun outside of ukraine. many bodies have been returned to netherlands to be identified. two black box recorders are examined in the uk. the next challenge is properly secure the crash site so investigators can carry out proper forensic analysis at the day break to get more information about how the plane was brought down. that investigation is being led by the netherlands which lost 193 citizens when the plane came down. anna has been speaking to the dutch prime minister about his reaction to the tragedy. >> reporter: well the dutch are taking a lead in this investigation now. later on today more coffins will arrive, two more military planes. those coffinses -- coffins, 70
6:42 am
we understand will be brought to where the investigations are taking place. mark has had conversations with president obama in the last few days and they agree had russia's response so far has not gone far enough. i was speaking to mark and he also said in the days after the crash, he had conversations with the russian president. >> i was on the phone with putin on friday which was relatively polite conversation because at that stage it was still difficult to assess how quickly the recovery would take place. on saturday it was totally clear that people are still laying there in the open field in 35 degrees celsius. that's unacceptable. we put more pressure on it from saturday. saturday we talked and said it was sun acceptable.
6:43 am
i remember monday night i heard the train with bodies was driving away from the insurgent held territory to ukrainian held territory. i was happy for all people. >> somewhere there's someone who put their finger on a button and fire had the missile. what's your message to that person? >> that he can be assured that i am extremely motivated to find him, her, them, and that as soon as we do, that they won't escape justice. >> dutch prime minister speaking to anna there. torrential rain is blamed for a plane crash a that killed 48 in taiwan wednesday. it crashed into village homes as it tried to land in heavy rain on taiwan's western coast.
6:44 am
it was taiwan's most deadly civil accident since 2002 >> the jailed al-jazeera journalist is to appeal his seven year sentence in egypt. he and his colleagues were arrested in december as part of a crack down on islamist sport supporters of morsi. 15 people including women and a child were shot. the passengers of the car were ordered to stand at the side of the road before they were shot one by one. they are from the community that's faced prosecution from the taliban ft. stay with us here on bbc world news. dinosaurs may have more in common with birds than beasts. fossils suggest they had feathers. you feel totally knocked out. eat activia. twice a day for four weeks.
6:45 am
activia may reduce the frequency of minor digestive issues like bloating, gas, discomfort and rumbling. activia, feeling good starts from the inside. go on a first date. my passion is puppetry. here? i think we're done here. hate drama? go to cars.com research, price, find. only cars.com helps you get the right car without all the drama. ♪ ♪ ♪ woooooah. ♪ [ male announcer ] you're not just looking for a house. you're looking for a place for your life to happen. zillow.
6:46 am
6:47 am
this is bbc world news. i'm james. the latest headlines. more than 800 palestinians, most civilians, now known to have died in the israeli offensive this month. more bodies of the victims from flight mh 17 have left ukraine for forensic tests and identification in the netherlands. more now on that investigation into the mh 17 crash because it is hampered by the ongoing unrest in eastern ukraine. overnight, heavy shelling was heard in the city of donetsk, the last major strong hold of the pro russian separatists. we went into the city to meet some of those that so far at least have decided to stay despite the fighting. >> reporter: we've come to this market in the center of donetsk. everywhere in the city you constantly here bangs, shelling,
6:48 am
artillery fire. at the same time, some normal life goes on as well. here, not all -- this shop is closed -- some are open. let's go see what people here thin think. i asked her about the mh 17 crash, and she said i don't know. we only have russian television here, and we're not getting the other side.
6:49 am
>> opinions are very divided here. across the divide, one thing everyone shares no matter where the support the government in kiev or accept rseparatist forc everyone is preparing for war. the french president francois hollande has been giving details about the plane that crashed in mali thursday. weather is thought to be the most likely cause of the crash. half of the passengers were french nationals. speaking in paris, the president said there would be a thorough investigation. >> translator: french soldiers already at the scene have secured the crash site and have started preliminary
6:50 am
investigations. unfortunately there are no survivors. the investigation is underway into the cause of this tragedy. one black box has been found, and it's on its way to be examined as soon as possible. the accident investigation bureau under the transport minister has sent experts to the site and can also lead the necessary investigations. what we know already is that the debris from the plane is concentrated in a limited area. it is still too early to draw any conclusions, but they will come. there are theories, notably about a the weather. we are not ruling anything out because we want to know everything about what happened. at this moment, at this hour, all my thoughts are with the victims and their families. >> now immigration is one of the big global issues, and nowhere more so than the united states. today president obama will meet
6:51 am
the presidents of honduras, guatemala and el salvador to stem the flow of child migrants. >> reporter: navigating the climbing frame, 6-year-old daniel completed a far tougher journey. he arrived in america earlier this month from el salvador. he's reunited with his mom that made the journey two years ago. she's asked not to be identified. >> it's riskier traveling as a family. people take hr interest in you. it's less dangerous for children to come on their own. >> daniel made the 5,000 kilometer trip with two young cousins to escape gang violence and poverty backh home. >> what did daniel tell you about the journey? >> the only thing he said he was scared when he got to the
6:52 am
border. when he crossed the river with water up to his neck. when he was doubt by immigration officials and when he arrived at detention center with clothes soaking wet. >> detention centers are where child migrants are brought when they arrive. it's their first taste of the american dream. conditions are cramped. in the last eight months, 60,000 children crossed the border illegally. many make the journey across the glistening waters of the rio grande. it separates america from mexico and has been a focus for agents patrolling the border. >> you see how deep the river is here. >> this sergeant polices this crossing. >> if a parent puts their children through half of what these illegal aliens do in texas, the parent would have been charged with child endangerment.
6:53 am
you know -- i mean, they're putting their children at risk when they do this. >> reporter: here in washington, solving problems at the border remains a huge challenge. president obama described the flow of child migrants as a humanitarian crisis and says he's looking at ways to deal with cases faster. his critics wonder how he'll speed deportations when there's a huge backlog in the courts. as for daniel, it could take years for a judge to decide his fate. his mom is scared he'll get sent back. she wants him to stay in america, a country she believes will give him a better chance in life. bbc news washington. now can you imagine doing the same thing every day for 84 years? that is exactly what richard hendrixson has been doing. he's 101 years old. since 1930 he's been recording the weather from his garden in
6:54 am
long island. we have the story. >> more than 80 years, richard hendrixson has been recording the weather, monitoring the the highs and lows from the thermometer shelter in his backyard on long island. >> it's exactly 80. >> his method hasn't changed. he's been doing it since 1930. as well as checking rainfall, he monitors the wind from his dining room window. >> it's clear. not a cloud in the sky. >> he is one of 8500 observers that the national weather service rely on. >> the sky is clear. the winds are out of the southwest. >> now 101 it's estimated he's tallied more than 150,000 weather observations, most documented in journals. >> in 1933, january, clear and
6:55 am
warm. >> it all started when he became a livestock farmer. he felt understanding the weather was important in agriculture. even though richard is now retired, both he and the weather service staff enjoy the daily call. richard hopes the title of the nation's long serving volunteer weather observer, the data he provides helps meteorologists analyze storms and track long term climate change. sunday the weather service will honor him with an 80 year service award at a special ceremony on long island. scientists believe this scary looking animal was the first creature to bridge the dinosaur and bird species. a fossil shows feathers may have been more widespread than previously thought. some dinosaurs were dig and scary. it's thought they had scaly
6:56 am
skin. after a while, some of them developed feathers. this creature is thought to have been the transition from dinosaur to bird. the current theory is that feathers as we see here, rose at the bmiddle of the age of the dinosaurs, 4500 years again. new data shows they rose earlier, at the beginning of when they first emerged. >> the discovery of this dinosaur in siberia suggests they developed small, fluffy chick like feathers tens of millions of years earlier than previously thought. some experts have doubts. paul here studying dinosaur skin says the supposed feathers could be something else. >> there's a number of features of feathers that look completely unlike other feathered animals
6:57 am
that ever existed. i suppose it's a experimentation of the skin structure and maybe unusual scales that have feather like attributes. others feel it shows dinosaurs had feather there is the beginning and were widespread. >> that's all for now. good-bye.
6:58 am
hey, razor. check this out. listen up, thunder dragons, it's time to get a hotel. we can save big with priceline express deals. you know what man, these guys aint no dragons. they're cool. these deals are legit. yeah, we're cool. she's cool. we're cool. priceline express deals really are legit. thousands of people book them everyday. perhaps it's because there are thousands of four star hotels to choose from. or maybe people just like saving up to 55%. look - saving you money makes us happy. [ music and whistling ]
6:59 am
when you go the extra mile to help business owners
7:00 am
save on commercial auto insurance, you tend to draw a following. [ brakes screech ] flo: unh... [ tires squeal, brakes screech, horn honks ] ooh, ooh! [ back-up beeping, honking ] a truckload of discounts for your business -- now, that's progressive. hello. you're watching "gmt" on bbc world news with me. our top stories. palestinian leaders call for a day of anger as israel continues the offensive in gaza. well there's been further bombardment in the past few hours. palestinians are expected to take to the streets in process. we'll be live in east jerusalem as friday prayers end. one week on, the dutch prime minister announces a 40 unarmed military police are sent to eastern ukraine to recover the remaining victims of

50 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on