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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  July 28, 2014 6:00am-7:01am EDT

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i'm geeta guru-murthy with bbc world news. our top stories. israeli air strikes break the calm in gaza at the start of the muslim festival of eve. 1100 killed in three months of fighting in ukraine with both sides using heavy weapons. a blow to russia as a court rules it to pay billions of to a company yukos. a beach is struck by lightning in california.
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>> loudest clap of thunder i've heard in my life. i thought it was like a bomb almos almost. hello and welcome. the israeli military says its carried out three air strikes on gaza targeting hamas rocket launch hers and infrastructure. the air strikes were response to rockets fired into israel earlier in the morning. both sides have rejected the immediate and unconstitutional humanitarian cease fire. let's go live to bbc in jerusalem for us. bethany, bring us up to date on what's happened there. >> as you say, there's been three air strikes by the israeli
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army, also a rocket fired from gaza into israel this morning. there's been a lull in fighting overnight. it's been the quietest night in some time with no air strikes. ho hopes the lull can be sustained over the muslim festival beginning today. these strikes showing thousand fragile that situation is, how very delicate it is. it's easy for the fighting to start up again. >> obviously the u.n. security council, heard people speaking calling for humanitarian cease fire unresponsive by both sides. the israeli ambassador says not a day goes by we don't hear about al qaeda, boko haram
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saying they're tired of only democracy in the middle east. >> this is very much israel's argument. it says it's protecting its people with the operation in gaza. it says it points to rockets being fired from gaza and extremely concerned about the threat of cross border tunnels from gaza into israel which militants have been trying to enter in. it's got widespread support from the public to continue with its operations. now we're not sure exactly what will be happening in coming hours after the air strikes. if there will be a return of lull -- that's the international hope there's sustained period of quiet over the holiday. a fragile situation.
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>> indeed. thanks very much. our international correspondent panel in gaza has been speaking to hamas spokesman and put it to him if his organization didn't change its position, civilians would keep dying. >> maybe i'm going to get killed in the next hour. when we stand in front of this, the army with no ethics, just killing civilians, kids. the only thing i have is to continue standing in the front of it, continue resist in front of it. i'm looking for my freedom. i know the price of freedom would be high. nobody can make me give up or hold the white flag without my freed freedom. we are getting killed, but we won't give up. >> let's talk about the objectives. what are the key demands of hamas? you say you'll a bide by truce
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during eve. you'll resume conflict after that until you get what? >> the problem is they started this war. >> the objectives leaves to palestinian people saying enough. >> well, nobody will stop defend themselves. they continue to kill my people. i'm telling you -- >> i need to know what it is that you actually want. >> easy. we're talking about 2 million people living in a big jail 240 square miles with no borders, with no products, no electricity. eight years. what are we looking for? this is actually our right. we shouldn't give without all this blood. the problem in the international community keeping silence eight
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years. >> hamas spokesman there speaking to our correspondent. now let's move on to ukraine. the united nations says fighting in eastern ukraine has claimed the lives of 1129 people. that's more than 3400 that have been wounded. ukrainian government forces have made significant gains against pro russian rebels near the city of donetsk. there's been heavy shelling in the city where several civilians were killed. intense battles around the rebel held towns. fighting continues near the site of the malaysian airliner cras . nick childs says the figures are significant. >> the point that it's difficult to ascertain precise numbers, they say these are conservative estimates of casualties in last
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few months, since april. they suggest nearly 500 of those are civilians. you suggest one of the particular concerns of the u.n. human rights commissioner is what she describes as the alarming news of intense fighting now going on in eastern ukraine as the government forces in particular are trying to add to their retaking of territory from rebel hands. in particular she expresses concern about the use she says of heavy weapons by both sides in civilian areas. >> nick childs there. in moscow, russian foreign minister lavrov has been speaking about the situation in ukraine. he spoke about the investigate that happened. he said he hoped the investigation would be objective and retain presumption of
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innocence. >> we believe that the circumstances of the investigation should be based on u.n. and security of the investigation should be guaranteed by the u.n. the reason will prevail, and we'll prioritize finding out the truth, conducting an unbiassed investigation without any efforts to forsee results. >> lavrov there. our correspondent in moscow listening in to the full press conference earlier. she gave me her assessment. >> hello. very relaxed presentation by the foreign minister here. a robust defense so far. in terms of practical news coming out of it, the main information that mr. lavrov gave
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was that this decision to deploy monitors from the osce, european security organization. monitors to be deploy along the russian ukrainian border. he says there have been discussions with the osc for two weeks about that that russia made the offer two weeks ago to agree to being deployed. he talked about pointless discussions two weeks delaying deployment of monitors. he wants to know why discussions are taking place suggesting some weren't interested in transparency on the border between russia and ukraine. that's important because there's been strong statements particularly from the united states talking about russia sending fighters and heavy weaponry into ukraine to support the insurgents there in particular to downing of mh 17 malaysian airlines brought down
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last week. in practical terms talking about monitors there to have full transparency there on the boarder and as he would see it to prove russia's point it's not supplying the rebel fighters in eastern ukraine. that's the practical point, most important to to emerge from what he was saying. >> so quickly what we're getting. many have been killed since april. what's the overall tension now over this part of the world given the events of russia? >> i think it'sappoint. russia says it and all sides
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must provide all information they have, all evidence to aid with the investigation. certainly relations between russia and particularly united states are at a low point. at a moment when russia is expecting extra sanctions from the eu against moscow in response to what the west and european union sees as russia's involvement in the turmoil in ukraine. the war in syria has displaced millions of people both inside the country and across the border. one of the devastating impacts is on children, many of whom go to school or have conflicts at home. this is a documentary of children. bbc followed six children over six months. here's the clip of one revealing the lengths her family went to just to survive.
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just one brief horrifying story. she explains earlier to me how the war caused a huge collapse in childhood. many children swept up in violence suffering from trauma. >> children who live in areas under siege like she was. food was not allowed in. they were under constant bombardment. we decided in covering the conflict in syria, i realized children were not details. children were front and center on front lines. they had stories to tell. we decided to listen to children. they would give us insight into a complex and indeed
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consequential war. the kind of insights that they give us are of course about innocence lost, childhood shattered. some children themselves say they're like adults now. children at very young ages are drawn into the fighting. they say shocking things even at the age of nine about wanting to seek revenge, about talking to friends on the other side that are brainwashed. they give us a sense of what kind of damage this war is causing on the future on syria itself. >> children are the future of any country. if these children already divided, what hope is there. you have traveled so much in this region. it must have been heartbreaking. >> this is danger too. in listening to children, we focus on six children who live in different sides of the conflict and have different stories to tell. it's not just the presence in
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syria. children are the future. they give a glimpse into future and ways syria could go. if children have minds guard by hate and revenge, if they continue to grow up in these environments, the syria of tomorrow will go more towards war and not reconciliation. if children aren't able to go to school and become ambassadors for the right to be educated and right to safety the, if they're not able to have these things, syria itself will not develop. as we all know all too well from the war past four years, future of syria is future of the region and wider world. >> you can see her documentary later this week. syria of children. it's on bbc world news saturday and sunday. this week it's an extraordinary piece of viewings i think.
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stay with us here on bbc world news. much more to come on hepatitis day. a campaign to raise awareness of the viral illness that kills millions every year. review. and now angie's list is revolutionizing local service again. you can easily buy and schedule services from top-rated providers. conveniently stay up to date on progress. and effortlessly turn your photos into finished projects with our snapfix app. visit angieslist.com today. ♪
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planet earth's number one accomodation site booking.com booking.yeah! this is bbc world news. i'm geeta guru-murthy with the latest headlines. israeli military says it's carried out three air strikes on gaza. both sides reject the u.n. security council call for immediate cease fire. more than 1100 have been killed in three months of fighting in ukraine. both sides use heavy weapons in built up areas. aaron is here talking big, big decisions. >> indeed. just what you want when you come back from holiday. a court in the hague found shareholders in the now won a
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court battle against the russian government in one of the largest cases. moscow will have to pay $50 billion of comp skating. before he's arrested on a run way in 2003 he was the wealthiest man in russia with fortune of $15 billion. he ran the largest oil company many russia. it went pear shaped when he was arrested for fraud and tax evasion and he was sent to a russian camp where he spent ten years. money was seized by the government. the shareholders are fighting to retrieve the billions they lost. today they found out they won.
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moscow will have to pay $50 billion. getting the money might be a different story. how about this? up, up and away. ryan air reported profits for first three months ending in june. europe's largest carrier by passengers made 200 million euros. that's double the amount this time a year ago. it expects to make 650 million euros. this week, big week for argentina. it must pay up or default on money owed to a group of hedge fund investors. it's got to do that by wednesday. it goes back to 2001 when argentina found itself in turmoil. the majority of bond holders agreed to a debt swap deal. a small group have been fighting for payment in full. if argentina refuses it will default on debts again. wednesday is a big day.
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follow me on twitter. get me @bbc aaron. >> we can ask how many hours you did spend on the sun lounger wherever you were. now we move to a huge health story. one of the globe's biggest killers. united nations is hoping world hepatitis day will help raise awareness. the organization wants raise add wareness, better action by governments around the world. viral inflammation by the liver is caused by five types of hepatitis. all cause short term or after cute infection. hepatitis b, c, d can cause long term infection called chronic help tights. without treatment, help tights c can induce fatigue, fever,
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eventually liver kansaser and death. more than 150 million are infected. 1.5 million die from hepatitis every year. that's as many as hiv and aids. with me is bbc health correspondent. it doesn't get the attention that hiv aids gets. where is it worse hitting populations? >> the countries it's killing people to a large degree are in the asia pacific region. countries with a problem are china and india with hepatitis b also egypt. 70% of the hepatitis world related deaths happen in asia countries. the rest of the world isn't immune. it's an ignoreed neglected disease. the deaths were highlighted last week. hepatitis should have been in the millennium goals. >> in terms of prevention and
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cure, what research is going on and where are we on that? >> there's been really interesting break through treatments coming through for hepatitis c in the past year. the problem is cost. these are treatments with fewer side effects, 12 week course. in countries such as the u.s. they're looking at $1,000 per pill. a big cost even for a rich country. that reduces down to $300 for a month's course in countries such as egypt. still a significant cost. the real barrier with hepatitis in all forms is getting people to be screened. getting them to come forward and be tested. in some countries we've been talking about, two-thirds are unaware they're carrying it even though it leads to consequences that prove fatal. >> can they all be prevented? >> hepatitis a and b can be prevented by jabs. that's what travelers have when they're going to parts of the world, where forms of the virus
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can be. they're treatable. >> what does u.n. want to see from today achieved? if people are watching, i want to try and do something. the various campaigns are going on online. it's well worth looking those up and joining in if you wish to campaign and make yourself aware of symptoms and protect yourself particularly if going to one of the affected areas. really the whole thrust of what the world health organization wants to do is detect and improve awareness. >> thanks very much. a man in his 20s as died. at least eight others have been taken to hospitals after being struck by lightning during a storm in los angeles. the storms caused bush fires and power cuts. >> tourists and locals head for venice beach every weekend to
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stroll the famous board walk. the last thing they were expecting sunday was bad weather, but that's what they got. 15 minutes a fierce thunderstorm hit the beach and board walk where lightning hit several people. the fire department deployed rescue boats right away. more than a dozen lifeguards jumped in to look for victims forming a line and ch inning forward to make sure they didn't miss anyone. a number of people were in shock after the lightning strike. lifeguards swarmed the beach to keep everyone calm while paramedics attended to those injured. >> the loudest clap of thunder i've heard in my life. it was so close. i thought it was like a bomb. >> all of a sudden you heard a giant bolt up this the sky. i'm from the midwest and we see lots of lightning. then all of a sudden, the loudest thunder i've ever heard. it was like a scene of jaws.
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mothers grabbing kids. we saw commotion by the water line. another person was struck by the lightning. it was unconscious laying on the beach. >> lightning also struck nearby catalina island sparking two brush fires. a 57-year-old man playing golf on the island was also injured but said to be in stable condition. back in la, emergency helicopters continue to hover over the ocean just to make sure everyone is safe. bbc news. now a video of the turkish prime minister scoring a hat trick in a football match has gone viral. the prime minister once with the turkish club showed off skills during the exhibition match at the new football stadium. he will stand in next month's
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i'm geeta guru-murthy with bbc world news. our top stories. 1100 are said to have died in three months of fighting in ukraine as both sides use heavy weapons in urban areas. israeli air strikes break the start of the muslim festival of eve. new blow for russia. a court orders it to pay $50 billion to a former shareholder in the oil company. a death on venice beach. one dead and many others injured
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after being struck by i lightning. >> loudest thunder i've heard many my life. i thought it was like a bomb almos almost. hello. the united nations says fighting in eastern ukraine has now claimed the lives of 1129 people. more than 3400 have been wounded. ukrainian forces have made significant gains against rebels in the city of donetsk. there's heavy shelling in cities where several hundred have been killed. fighting continues near the site of the malaysian airliner crash. on these figures, they are
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extraordinary if you think about the fact this is happening in europe. it's a true tale of woe of human rights. it looks at a period from mid april until two days before the shooting down of the malaysian airliner. it's talking about a scene of devastation both socially, economically. yes the figures that leap out over 1,000 kill in a short period of time. that's a few months. thousands wounded as well. the u.n. human rights commissioner basically describes a picture of complete break down socially. >> do we have any break down of exactly which side of the divide there are? are they civilians, military? >> we don't have quite that level of detail. the report says a lot of civilians are in harm's way. the fighting has been in urban areas. it's fair to say the u.n. points blame at russian rebels more
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than anyone else accusing them of inflicting terror and intimidation on the civilian population of eastern ukraine, a population they claim to be protecting. >> we grew up during the cold war, and yet it's staggering to see this battle erupt again politically with human consequences. this really shows just how intense it becomes. >> absolutely. what you have is the u.n. commissioner of human rights urging both sides to exercise restraint, respect human rights. of course thrown into this mix and this happened after the period of the report, you have the u.n. commissioner for human rights says there may i have been a war crime committed in the shooting down of this plane. clearly depiction of horrendous scenes on the ground. a break down of things we take for granted as being normal life in a european country. >> amazing to see that. thanks very much indeed.
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just to let you know one news line we're getting on the malaysian crash. dutch investigators have turned back again because of explosions in the area. they returned in the direction of donetsk. they were warned by locals to keep clear of that crash site. still very difficult for people to investigate the scene. in moscow, russian foreign minister lavrov has been speaking about the situation many ukraine. he spoke of the investigation of what happened into the malaysian flight brought down in the east of the country and said he was hopeful the investigation would be objective and obtain innocence. >> we believe the circumstances of the investigation should be based on the u.n. the security of the investigation should be guaranteed by the u.n. the reason will prevail.
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we'll prioritize finding out the truth, conducting an unbiassed investigation without efforts to forsee its results. >> lavrov there. daniel was at that news conference earlier. it was interesting he did refer to ukraine as a sovereign country. >> yes, that's obviously something which western allies, american and western europe are listening to carefully in last few months. that has been the phrase used by most members of the russian government over the last few months. i think apart from what happened in crimea, people have been very careful to make the point that the russian government does regard that as a single ukrainian sovereign country which of course hasn't necessarily stopped them
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allowing the flow of weapon across the border from russia into eastern ukraine. >> how would you sum up the main direction of the news conference? what does lavrov want to get across here? >> it was striking how little we spoke about the casualties from the malaysian airliner being shot down over eastern ukraine. a lot of what lavrov was talking about was how he feels, promises have been broken, promises made way back in february by the kiev government and by western european governments have been broken. ignoring the fact what happened after that russia annexed crimea. there was a lot of discussion of sanctions. of course the next thing that's expected to happen in this is that the eu may as early as tomorrow announce sanctions in terms of preventing european banks from lending money to russian companies. there was a bit of discussion about that with lavrov who said that russia would not respond in
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a tit for tat way. they would make careful assessments. he believed many in the european union were going into the sanctions reluctantly knowing that it might harm their own interests. it's widely accepted now in moscow another round of sanctions are coming. >> do you get the sense they're worried about it, and will it have impact crucially? >> certainly it will have impact. there's no doubt about that. i think particularly if you get to the point where they're kind of sophisticated western european finance available to russian companies. russian companies operate in a modern sophisticated way. they need sophisticated enmmeanf finance. lavrov was talking about it would affect the russian economy but that the russian economy would adapt and try to change
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how it works, perhaps become a bit more internal xized. i think there's no getting away from the fact there's a major debate going on at the top of the russian government between the economic liberal group who believes russia's future is on being part of the global economy and that it needs in order to do that to have friends beyond beyond borders. the more hard line group in the russian government that believes the russia future is reasserting power and influence in this part of the world. they probably believe the sanctions is a price that have to be paid for russia reasserting itself on the world stage at least regionally. >> talks on sanctions against russia are moving as they say in the right direction. financial defense and high-tech energy sector are the areas they're looking at. more on that tomorrow.
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thanks for mnow. israeli military carried out three air strikes on gaza targeting rocket launchers. it says the air strikes were in response to a hamas rocket launched to israel early in the morning. both reject aid call from the security council for immediate and humanitarian cease fire. bethany bell is in jerusalem and says there's less fighting than in recent days as palestinians mark the eve festival. >> three air strikes by the israeli army also a rocket fired from gaza into israel earlier this morning. there are hopes -- there's been a lull in fighting overnight, been the quietest night over gaza for some time with no air strikes overnight. hopes that the relative lull can be sustained and over the muslim festival of eve which begins today. these strikes now just showing
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how fragile that situation is, how very delicate it is and that it's very easy for the fighting to start up again. >> and obviously the u.n. security council -- we've had people speaking earlier obviously calling for humanitarian cease fire with responses by both sides. the israeli ambassador saying not a day goes by we don't read about al qaeda, boko haram saying they are tired of the vilify occasion of only democracy many the middle east. >> yes, this is very much israel's argument. it says that it is protecting its people with this operation in gaza. it points to rockets being fired from gaza and also extremely concerned about the threat of cross border tunnels are from gaza into israel through which palestinian militants have been
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trying to enter in. it has got widespread support from the public to continue with its operations. we're not sure exactly what will be happening over the coming hours, whether after the air strikes there will be a return to lull. certainly that's the international hope that there can be sustained period of quiet over the eve holiday. a fragile situation. >> bethany bell in jerusalem for us. most border crossings in liberia are closed to halt the spread of ebola. testing centers will stay open at the international airport. new restrictions followed the meetings are set up to tackle the highly passable virus. >> when a disease is this
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contagio contagious, even medical professionals are at serious risk. the virus spreads through contact with bodily fluids and fatal in 90% of cases. two americans working at treatment centers in liberia have been infected. one is 33-year-old dr. cole brantley seen on the left. the world health organization told bbc in total around 100 health workers have been affected this year. half of them have died. >> this is the deadliest outbreak of ebola on record. the latest figures from the world health organization show 1,200 have been affected in liberia, sierra. 670 have died. 300 were in guinea. more than 100 in liberia. now the first death on nigerian
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soil, a man died after flying there. that highlights how difficult is to prevent infected people from traveling. >> screening systems in west africa are weak. initial symptoms including fever and sore throat resemble many other illnesses. so liberia has closed most border crossings and set up testing centers at few entry points that remain open including the international airport. in nigeria, all points of entry, air, sea, land are placed on red alert trying to halt the further spread of one of the world's most spreading diseases with no vaccine and no cure. a plan by the ethiopian government to expand the control to neighboring states has months of security proof tests. security forces are accused of
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cracking down on demonstrators. at least 17 were killed in the violence. human rights groups say that number could be higher. we have rare access to the town of ambo where the protests took place. >> the killings of students. hundreds of ethiopians are demonstrating what they claim to be human rights violations against the ethnic group. it was sparked by plans to integrate the towns. the government says the plan would allow them to better extend services to rural areas less well served. protestors fear once it's implemented they'll lose cultural identity. we traveled more than 100
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kilometers west. the violence is blamed on government forces. months after it happened here, it's not yet known. bbc has access. this is where it all happened. three months ago it was quite simple. protesting students were met outside the gate by agencies. some of them were shot along this road. it is not clear how many lost their lives. the government and local community have different numbers. many locals are afraid to speak to us in public. this young man that lost his brother in the protest agreed to speak. >> he was shot in the head. his head. i saw his body inside the coffin. i had them open it.
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all of his head was blackened and torn apart. the bullet had gone through his temple. the government has denied security officers shot and killed demonstrators. ethiopia minister also backed the plan saying it's vital for the country. >> we have development. also we have debt too. that has to be managed well. it has nothing to do with merger. it has all to do with synchronization of the plan. >> there's no doubt it's growing at a fast pace and changing. people in towns like ambo and other areas have a need to be
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part of this change. what happened here just a few months ago has yet to subside. bbc news eatithiopiethiopia. a high school girl is arrested in japan on suspicion of killing and dismembering a classmate. she was arrested in japan's southern prefecture. we are in tokyo for details of this. it's really horrific. >> absolutely. this is sort of really gruesome, very rare, but extremely gruesome crime. one child killing another child apparently. the this started apparently on saturday when the victim went to see a friend at her apartment in the city. when she didn't come home, her mother contacted the police. the following morning her body was found in the apartment of the accused on a bed.
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she had been apparently been strangled. her body had been partially dismembered. her head and one of her hands were cut off. extremely gruesome and distressing. the whole of japan is glued to the television watching th inin. the 16-year-old girl in custody has admitted to the crime. no motive is given. it's a crime difficult for anyone to understand how or why this happened. >> just to put in context the, japan is a safe country isn't it even with this particular girl accused that's showing no remorse? >> that's right. we have very little information from the police. they say the girl has so far shown no sign of remorse. she's apparently said she wanted to dissect someone, wanted to cut someone up. she had dissected animals before. if that is anything to go by,
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sounds like she's definitely mentally disturbed. as you say, this is a very, very safe country. japan has one of the lowest murder rates in the world and declining in recent years. occasionally horrific crimes happen here. ten years ago in the is city there was a stabbing by an 11-year-old girl in a classroom n. 1997 another gruesome child murder and beheading in the western city. these things do happen. it does appear from the evidence after these sorts of crimes there's a lot of undiagnosed child mental illness in japan. those seem to be mental illness behind these cases. that's the concern that's brought up when these sorts of crimes happen. much more to come. the global news agenda is very grim at the moment as you know. we're going to go to south
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korea. student survivors of the ferry disaster give evidence for the first time during the trial of the ship's captain and crew. beach goers are hit by a rare thunderstorm leaving one dead and several others injured. r sickness bag in time. another left his shoes on the plane... his shoes! and a third simply doesn't want to be here. ♪ until now... until right booking now. ♪ planet earth's number one accomodation site booking.com booking.yeah! the cadillac summer collection is here. ♪ ♪
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this is bbc world news. i'm geeta guru-murthy with top stories. more than 1,100 have been killed in three months of fighting in ukraine with both sides using heavy weapons in built up areas. the israeli military has carried out three air strikes on gaza as both sides reject the calls for an immediate cease fire. students who survived the sinking of a south korea ferry in april where 300 died are giving evidence in court for the
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first time. the captain and crew members are on trial for abandoning ship and negligence. >> six students have been giving evidence here at the courthouse today. they've been telling a story of no safety briefing when they first got on the ferry. how the coast guard rescuers were not able to get on board the ship once it had begun to sink. they had to get themselves out of that ship. one student was describing how they were told to stay in their places. they immediate did so until the water started coming in first as a trickle and then a gush that swept students off their feet. many high school students died in that disaster. one can only imagine this must have been a day for those in court giving evidence. also the families of those children that didn't survive the disaster listening in court to
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the evidence that the surviving classmates of their sons and daughters. the court itself had to make the process easier for students who were giving evidence today. they moved the trial temporarily here to the student's hometown so they wouldn't have to travel across the country to give testimony. they restricted closely who was allowed to be in court today to try and make them more comfortable. it's also thought that some students have been offered the chance to give their evidence via slid yovideo or by screen t it less traumatic. this case has gone to hearts of many south koreans. also there's a sense of growing anger several months on from this disaster about how the official regulations here in south korea have let people down. this is one part of a very wide investigation that's going to take many more months to provide answers. >> lucy there.
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the philippines military says 16 have been killed by militants in a road ambush. the attack happened is on the southern island of sulu. the former militia helping the military to fight insurgents. a man in his 20s has died and eight others taken to the hospital after being struck by lightning in a storm in los angeles. it also caused bush fires and power cuts. >> tourists and locals head for venice beach every weekend to stroll the famous board walk. the last thing they were expecting sunday was bad weather but that's exactly what they got. for 15 minutes, a fierce thunderstorm battered the beach. lightning struck the water and board walk hitting several people. the california fire department was quick off the mark deploying rescue boats right away. more than a dozen lifeguards
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jumped in the surf to look for victims forming a line inching forward to make sure they didn't miss anyone. a number of people were in shock after the lightning strike. lifeguards swarmed the beach to keep everyone calm while paramedics attended those injured. >> the loudest clap of thunder i've heard in my life because it was so close. i thought it was like a bomb almost zwlch almost. >> you heard a giant bolt in the sky. i'm from the west and we see a lot of lightning. then all of a sudden, the loudest thunder i've ever heard. it was like jaws, mothers grabbing kids. >> we saw commotion off the water line. we saw a person struck by lightning unconscious on the beach. >> lightning also struck catalina island sparking brush
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fires. a 57-year-old man playing golf on the island was injured but said to be stable. helicopters are hovering over head to make sure everyone is safe. that's it for me today. join us if you can. thanks for watching. you drop 40 grand on a new set of wheels, then... wham! a minivan t-bones you. guess what: your insurance company will only give you 37-thousand to replace it. "depreciation" they claim.
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did he just take a selfie? oh yeah. send photo. watch, he's gonna light it with an app. oh, gas... yeah kebob, one serving. get off your gas and grill with kingsford charcoal. hello. you're watching "gmt" on bbc world news. i'm lucy hockings. on today's program we focus on children of gaza and syria. the innocent victims of two brutal conflicts. thousands of young lives are lost. for those that remain, the daily horror of violence, fear, poverty leave them scarred forever. before the crisis i was a child that played and had fun. i never supported politics or war. the u.n. demands for immediate cease fire. the rocket

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