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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  July 30, 2014 6:00am-7:01am EDT

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-- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com hello. i'm gavin gray with "bbc world news." our top stories. israel says it is investigating after tank shells hit a crowded gaza school, killing at least 15 palestinian refugees sheltering there. >> these are people who were instructed to leave their homes by the israeli army. last night children were killed as they slept next to their parents on the floor of a classroom in a u.n. designated shelter in gaza. the israeli air force dropped leaflets on gaza city asking for information on the location of hamas cross border
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tunnels and weapons stores. doctors warn the ebola epidemic in west africa could last until the end of the year. and good day for a dip on sunset boulevard after a water main burst flooding much of the university of california. >> i saw what looked like just a rapid, like a river rapid coming out of the putting range. i walked into it an it was about up to my thigh, my thigh level. the united nations has condemned an israeli attack on a school in gaza, which was sheltering more than 3,000 people. the u.n. says at least 19 people were killed in the attack on the school, which was struck without any warning. it is called the attack a
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disgraceful act. israel is investigating the incident and nick charles has this report. >> reporter: the wreckage of the classroom, this u.n. school had become a sanctuary for some 3,000 people who fled their homes. but it was struck in the early morning, with devastating effect, leaving an aftermath of shock and anger. what happens this woman asks, we were sleeping under god's protection, under the u.n.'s protection. everyone was returning home from the mosque when they were struck. a desperate rush to the nearby hospital. okay at ic sceo chaotic scenes and more signs of suffering. a school was hit by tank barrage in the area. israel says it is investigating. it was another heavy night of bombardment, according to the israeli military, it is striking mosques because they're being used by militants. it says it hit more than 70 targets during the night and struck more than 4,000 in the
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campaign so far, aimed, it insists at the ability of hamas to strike israel. but more than 2,000 people have died now in the onslaught. the images of bombardment continue to stir unease and alarm internationally with more calls on humanitarian grounds. but both sides are still so far aparts in their positions that the prospects still seem bleak indeed. more leaflets rain down on gaza, from a clear sky. israel used these before as a warning to gazans to leave their homes. so no letup, it seems, in a confrontation whose costs and consequences remain unpredictable and troubling. nick charles, bbc news. israel has yet to respond to the u.n. about this attack and we have tried to get them on bbc world and hope to be speaking to them in the next few hours. meanwhile, chris guinness is from the relief agency. it runs schools including the
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one hit this morning. he says at tack the attack is violation of international law. >> the fact it was housing thousands of displaced people was communicated to the israeli army 17 times to ensure its protection. the last time being at 10 to 9:00 last night, just hours before the fatal attack. we visited site and gathered evidence. we analyzed fragments. our initial assessment is it was israeli artillery that hit our school in which 3,300 people sought refuge, there were at least three impacts. it is too early to give a confirmed death toll, but we know there were multiple civilian deaths and injuries including women and children and the unregard who was trying to protect the site. let it not be forgotten these are people instructed to leave their homes by the israeli army. last night, children were killed as they slept next to their
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parents on the floor of a classroom in a u.n. designated shelter in gaza. children killed in their sleep. what a horrific symbol of inhumanity. this is an affront to all of us. it is a thought of universal shame. today the world stands disgraced. >> chris gonesse there. the ebola outbreak in africa continues to spread with some warning it could last until the end of the year. some halted flights into liberia and sierra leone as concerns grow. it spreads through direct contact with blood or bodily fluids of an infected person and its symptoms include bleeding, diarrhea and vomiting. it was first reported in guinea in march and since claimed least 310 lives there. in neighboring liberia, there have been at least 120 deaths, and at least 220 in sierra leone. concern is growing since the
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virus spread to lagos killing an american man on friday. patrick sawyer's widow has spoken about how he contracted the disease. >> i know how now he got it from his sister, who also died from ebola weeks earlier without them knowing she had ebola. because it has symptoms of other illnesses like malaria. and so he helped to care for his sister and that's how he contracted it. and didn't know that she had it, not until after she died. and her body was tested positive for ebola. >> his widow. the bbc health correspondent has been to southeast guinea where the outbreak started in march and spoke to a 41-year-old who had ebola and survived. >> translator: when i was sick
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and given the rumors that were flying about that ebola had no cure, i was terribly afraid. i was asking myself all the time, am i going to survive this? am i going to come out of this alive? i went on my own accord to the treatment center. i went to the center where i was well received, and i was tested and i was put into a room where other ebola suspects were. the next day i was told clearly that i had tested positive for ebola. while i was at the center, i had diarrhea for four days. dysentery for three days and fever that var aried between 39.6 and 38 degrees. and that gave me a lot of doubt as to what was happening to me. i was being given three types of medication, but the only one i
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can remember now is the process. right now i'm feeling very much at ease. when i had the disease, i was weighing 60 kilos. by the time i was released, i was weighing only 51 kilos. but now as i'm speaking to you, i'm weighing 61 kilos. this shows how well i am now. >> one of the survivors there. >> this has been going on for almost five months now. and i'm just very recently back from guinea from the town of gekadu where the ebola virus just -- the outbreak first started. what the situation is getting slightly better there in neighboring sierra leone and liberia, it is out of control still, similar picture in guinea, but cases are coming
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down. i spent 48 hours at the center of the outbreak. there are were five deaths there. we went into villages which have been very resistant to help. we went into one village and until that day, bearing in mind we're almost five months on, they haven't allowed medics into their village and nobody has been checked over. it emerged there were seven deaths from ebola in that village. >> why is that? why weren't doctors being allowed in? >> there is a lot of fear around the virus and a lot of unknown. this is the first time it has come to west africa. these are very remote tribal areas. and they're used to dealing with traditional healers more than with international doctors coming in in four by fours. and the community in many areas haven't been on board, they have not understood the virus, it is very frightening, up to 90% death rate, so a lot of people have died. so when they see people coming in, there have been fears, are these doctors bringing the virus to our village.
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or if i'm going to die, i want to die at home. what should be happening is they should be being taken to treatment centers, which i visited while i was there, and get supportive treatment so they have the best chance of surviving. people are surviving this virus. at the moment, it is a high death rate, it is about 60% during this outbreak. but some people can recover. >> officials in india say more than 150 people are feared buried under a landslide that hit a village in the west of the country. around 40 houses are thought to have been buried. rescue workers are on their way to the remote village, 100 kilometers from the city of puma. landslides are common in the monsoon season in india. we learn why it takes time for rescue workers to reach the village. >> one reason they have been taking so long to reach this area is because it is a hilly area. this village in particular lies at the foothills of one of the
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big mountain ranges in western india. it is the monsoon season and has been raining very heavily in this part of the last few days. it is about 200 kilometers east of mumbai where i'm in right now. and, yes, the estimate is that there were about 150 people in this village. what we don't have clarity on right now is when exactly this occurred. some people are saying it was possibly very early in the morning, while others put the time at about 8:00 a.m. local time. difficult right now to find out whether people were out and about or whether they were in their homes sleeping. >> the landslides as we mentioned quite common in that area. has the weather been extraordinary or has it pretty much been an average year and this is a very unfortunate tragic accident? >> well, it has been raining as normal. it is expected to rain heavily during this particular month and for the next month as well. you know, having said that, why landslides, small landslides are quite common. we haven't seen something which, you know, seems to be off this
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scale, where there seems to be about 40 houses trapped underneath the debris, under the rubble of the mountain that came down. >> now, stay with us on "bbc world news." still to come, a president's extramarital affair laid bear. we read the 100-year-old love letters of an american leader. ♪ the last four hours have seen... one child fail to get to the air sickness bag in time. another left his shoes on the plane... his shoes! and a third simply doesn't want to be here. ♪
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this is "bbc world news." i'm gavin gray. the latest headlines. israel says it is investigating after tank shells hit a crowded gaza school being used as an u.n. shelter for refugees. 19 palestinians are reported killed. doctors warn the ebola epidemic in west africa could last until at least the end of the year. now, we have all the business news. and in argentina, they're looking towards a deadline of 18 hours time. >> you've done your numbers, absolutely. they're looking at their clocks
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or watches very closely, gavin. good to see you. hello there. argentina will find itself in its second default on the 2000 unless a last minute deal is reached. let me explain. there is a long running battle between the government and those -- these investors. these investors are called holdouts and it comes to a head tonight, midnight, wednesday, in new york, when this 30-day grace period expires. if no agreement, well, the choice for argentina would be to pay the investors $1.3 billion, or default, which means basically almost declaring bankruptcy. if they defaulted, huge implications on argentina, its economy, and, of course, its consumers. big problems. let's talk about this. that's the bank of england. it announced a wide ranging review of banker pay levels. in particular, a bonus callback plan. what does that mean? it means some bankers may have to return their bonuses up to seven years after receiving
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them. repayment could be ordered in cases of, like, misdemeanors, big losses at particular bank or just bad risk management. so that certainly is pleasing some. not pleasing the bankers, i'm sure. okay. first there was google self-driving car, already being tested on roads in the united states. then we have the chinese search engine, baidu, it too is working on a self-driving car. they're announcing new measures for driverless cars to be on british roads from next january. just around the corner. many are asking is our transport really about to be transformed or is this just a fashionable idea that will never make it out of the garage? we're going to have more on this story on "gmt" in a little over an hour's time. lots going on. follow me on twitter. tweet me. i'll tweet you back. gavin. >> thanks so much indeed.
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the united states and the european union have agreed to impose their toughest sanctions yet on russia. the latest measures target russia's energy defense and finance sectors, coming in response to renewed allegations that moscow is arming the rebels in eastern ukraine. and international outcry after the downing of flight mh-17 killing all 298 on board. meanwhile, the investigators are finding it difficult to get access to the crash site. for more on this, i spoke to our correspondent in the region, tom birth, in kharkiv and david sanford. i asked how close the international investigators would be able to get. >> we had word from the bbc team traveling with them this morning in that part, heading out of donetsk, the main city in that area, east towards that large country side and on one of the main roads, the ukrainian military said it is not safe enough to go further. intense fighting continues and that prevented the team of
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international observers for reaching the crash site for the fourth day running. >> that will enflame tensions further. to moscow, daniel, let's concentrate on the sanctions. what has been the reaction of the russian government to these sanctions? >> well, first of all, the russians stock market has risen slightly this morning. i think there was a feeling the sanctions might have been worse. for example, russia's main banks, spare bank, escaped the sanctions and its share prices are up. the share price of vtb bank, the main bank that did get sanctions, are sharply down this morning. certainly the ruble is well down on what it was just a couple of weeks ago. and there are definitely signs that sanctions are starting to bite. the sanctions already in place before the announced yesterday are starting to bite. interest rates went up last week. that is squeezing borrowers, for example, a number of new cars being purchased is sharply down. but no sign at the moment of any political reaction to those sanctions. i think that the kremlin has
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made a decision about what its policy is, in eastern ukraine. there is not much sign at the moment that the kind of sanctions being imposed on russia are going to change that policy. certainly no sign of russia trying to tighten up that border between russia and eastern ukraine over which the heavy weaponry and fighters are flowing. i think there are people who think there is a risk that russia may react in the other direction, that they may ignore what america and western europe are saying, and actually as it were double the stakes, maybe increase the flow of weapons across that border and see how the west reacts. >> daniel, the americans described it as turning the screw. are some of vladimir putin's friends, business associates, colleagues likely to be able to impress upon him that their reputations, their businesses, their wealth being hit or will they shrug off their complaints? >> i don't think he'll shrug the complaints off. there is a debate going on
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between those who were on the economic side who say that we need to make russia strong, but through economic means, and they're certainly making the case that russia's economy is getting squeezed at the moment. >> daniel sandford there and tom burridge earlier. back to our main news story, and the united nations condemned an israeli attack on a school in gaza, which was sheltering more than 3,000 people. the u.n. says at least 19 people were killed. chris gametz runs schools which have become shelters for many palestinians seeking shelter from the conflict including the one hit this morning and he joins us via web cam. the latest reaction and the latest on the ground that you have there, conditions must be very, very difficult. >> last night children were killed as they slept next to their parents on the floor of a u.n. -- a classroom in a u.n. designated shelter.
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children killed in their sleep. this is surely an affront to all of us, a source of universal shame. today, the world stands disgraced. we have been to the site, we gathered evidence, we analyzed fragments, we looked at craters and other damage. our initial assessment is it was artillery that hit the school in which 3,300 people have sought refuge. we believe there were at least three impacts. too early to give a confirmed official death toll, but we know there were multiple civilian deaths and injuries including women and children and the unrwa guard, our guard trying to protect the site. these were people instructed to leave the homes by the israeli army, so we condemn in the strongest possible terms the serious violation of international law by israeli forces. >> to be clear, there was no warning? >> we gave the precise location of the jabaliya elementary girls school and it was holding thousands of internally displaced people, this was
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communicated to the israeli army 17 times. 1-7. this, of course, to ensure its protection. the last of those calls was at 10 minutes to 9:00 last night, just hours before the fatal shelling. draw your own conclusions. >> we're waiting to get a reaction from somebody representing the israeli government. i'm sure they would find out, according to the u.n. itself, the u.n. revealed a cache of rockets was found at one of the schools in gaza and that is the third case of its kind. so rockets were being used, it would appear, deliberately in areas that you're trying to protect. >> well, several points, first of all, we have on three separate occasions found rockets in schools which were -- for the summer and were empty. they were discovered as a direct result of our inspections. we immediately notified all the relevant parties, strongly condemned the groups that did this as a flagrant violation of our neutrality, point number one. point number two, there is
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absolutely no evidence that we can find so far of militants launching rockets from that school, that was hit. and, thirdly, i hope when you speak to the israeli army representative and ask them where even if there had been rockets in that school, was that a justification for a direct hit? i mean, what you would be accusing them of, and i'm certainly not, is of directly targeting a school where there were 3,300 people. let me make it clear, we're not saying this was direct shelling. we're simply condemning it. we have identified who had done this, we said artillery, israeli artillery, but these are points you need to put to the israeli army. >> indeed we will. you said the world stands disgraced. according to a poll, 600 israeli jews, 97% of israeli jews polled support the current military operation. >> okay. and i said the world stands
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condemned. i'm talking about the world. people around the world have looked on at the carnage in gaza, in gaza, the pictures of children being brought in to morgues, the appalling scenes, and this has engendered international revulsion, and quite rightly so. >> the israelis have dropped leaflets down, haven't they, today, on gaza, asking people to inform basically if they know of any hamas activities. is your opinion, is your general sense that the people of gaza are as determined as ever? >> well, look, you need to speak to the speak of gaza. for the last three weeks now, entering the further week, you have seen what they have been subjected to. but, of course, 6 million israeli civilians also have been terrorized by barrages of rockets flying out of gaza.
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so, you know, i'm not suggesting that necessarily any symmetry here but it is clear both sides found themselves in a completely unsustainable situation. it is unacceptable, and unsustainable that every couple of years, which is what it has been, there has been an upturn in violence such that millions of civilians across israel are terrorized and that 2 million people in gaza are subjected to the barrages that they have been subjected to. when the last drop of blood has been spilled and the last gun has fallen silent and i pray that happens now, there has to be engagement to address the underlying causes of the gaza conflict. and, of course, that must involve looking and lifting and dealing with the issues around the blockade. >> chris gunness from the united nations, we appreciate your time, thank you. israeli army said earlier,
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in response, ibf soldiers responded by firing towards the origin of the fire, the incident, however, is still being reviewed. this is "bbc world news." hey pal? you ready? can you pick me up at 6:30? ah... (boy) i'm here! i'm here!
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israel says it is investigating after tank shells hit a crowded school killing 19 palestinian refugees who were sheltering there. this was a classroom. it is a classroom where people were sleeping and there were deaths and injuries. fighting in eastern ukraine forces international observe ers to turn back from another attempt to reach mh-17's crash site. we'll talk live to our correspondent in kharkiv.
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doctors warn the ebola epidemic in west africa could last until at least the end of the year. and gearing up for a driverless future. the british government considers allowing hands free vehicles on public roads from next year. hello. the united nations has condemned an israeli attack on a school in gaza which was sheltering more than 3,000 people. the u.n. says at least 19 people were killed in the attack on the school, which was struck without any warning. it is called the attack a disgraceful act. israel is investigating the incident. the bbc's chris morris has been to the school and had this report. >> reporter: so i'm close to the
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gates of the jabaliya elementary schools girl, where according to the united nations multiple explosion projectiles hit at 5:00 this morning. you can see the damage on this side. this was a toilet block. it certainly took a hit. but over here, this was a classroom. it is a classroom where people were sleeping and there were deaths and injuries. now, the united nations says more than 3,000 people were taking shelter in this school, displaced from other areas of gaza, particularly areas in the north. and you can see scattered around here on the ground there are bits of bedding, there are shoes, and for the second time in a week, a u.n. school has been hit by incoming fire. the israeli defense forces say they are investigating. this classroom is one of the places that took a direct hit. there are blood stains on the
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floor. there are bits of human remains here still, scattered around evidence of what parts of what a normal family life is like, a pink football, plastic bottles. this is a terrible scene. >> well, israel has yet to respond fully to the united nations about this attack. and we have tried to get them on bbc world here and hope to speak to them in the next few hours. chris gunness is from the united nations relief and works agency and it runs the schools that have become shelter for many palestinians including the one hit this morning. and he told me the attack is a violation of international law. >> last night children were killed as they slept next to their parents on the floor of a u.n. -- of a classroom in a u.n. designated shelter. children killed in their sleep. this is surely an affront to all of us, a source of universal shame. today, the world stands disgraced. we have been to the site, we
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have gathered evidence, we have analyzed fragments, examined craters and other damage. our initial assessment is that it was israeli artillery that hit the school in which 3,300 people had sought refuge. we believe there were at least three impacts. it is too early to give a confirmed official death toll, but we know there were multiple civilian deaths and injuries including women and children and the unrwa guard, our guard, trying to protect the site. these are the people who were instructed to leave their homes by the israeli army so we condemn in the strongest possible terms this serious violation of international law by israel yi forces. >> and to be clear, there was no warning? >> we gave the precise location of the jabaliya elementary girls school and the fact it was holding thousands of internally displaced people, this was communicated to the israeli army 17 times. 1-7. this, of course, to ensure its protection. the last of those calls was at 10 minutes to 9:00 last night,
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just hours before the fatal shelling. draw your own conclusions. >> we're waiting to get a reaction from somebody representing the israeli government. i'm sure they would point out, according to the u.n. itself, the u.n. revealed a cache of rockets was found at one of its schools in gaza and that is the third case of its kind. so rockets were being used, it would appear, deliberately in areas that you're trying to protect. >> well, several points. first of all, we have on three separate occasions found rockets in schools which were -- for the summer and were empty. they were discovered as a direct result of our inspections. we immediately notified all the relevant parties, strongly condemned the groups that did this as a flagrant violation of our neutrality. point number one. point number two, there is absolutely no evidence that we can find so far of militants launching rockets from that school that was hit. and thirdly, i hope when you speak to the israeli army
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representative and spoke to the people you're going to speak to ask them where even if there had been rockets in that school, was that a justification for a direct hit? i mean, what you would be accusing them of and i'm certainly not is of directly targeting the school where there was 3,300 people. but let me make it clear, we're not saying this was direct shelling. we're simply condemned it. we identified who had done this, we said artillery, israeli artillery, but these are points you need to put to the israeli army. >> chris gunness from the united nations. bethany bell is in jerusalem. bethany, very strong words there from the united nations. and still really not much coming from the israeli army or the israeli government. do we know why they're taking so long to respond? >> we heard just a few minutes ago from the israeli army, they say that mortar shells were fired at israeli troops from the
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vicinity of the school, and the israeli troops returned fire. and they say the incident is still under investigation. so that brief comment so far that we had from the israeli army we do expect to -- an israeli army spokesperson to be issuing a longer statement soon. >> indeed. it is very brief and very vague, isn't it? i just want to -- when other schools have been hit or other areas, they have responded much faster, haven't they? >> it depends. sometimes they respond more quickly than others. and certainly, though, i think that these -- there has been several incidents recently and the israeli army has tended in other incidents to blame hamas. but as you see, we will wait to find out exactly had they say with this one. >> and, bethany, a poll of some 600 israeli jews found that 97% still supported the current military operations. so obviously the support is
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still with the action. >> people here are very much behind what is going on in gaza. i think the big -- the game changer, if you like, in this particular offensive is that people are very upset here, very frightened about these cross border tunnels through which palestinian militants have tried to get into israel. on monday, five israeli soldiers when militants came through one such tunnel and this is what the prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, says the troops are focusing on. one of the main objectives in the continued offensive. and, yes, it is fair to say that people are very strongly in support. there is concern about the rising numbers, much smaller, of the israeli soldiers, that's a much smaller number than the palestinians dying, there is concern among some people with every new death, attitudes are hardening. people here want the threat of
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the cross border tunnels to be removed. >> bethany bell, thank you very much, indeed. international monitors from the osce who are trying to reach the crash site of the malaysian plane in eastern ukraine have once again had to turn back. monitors in two vehicles escort by rebel forces were trying to find a clear route ahead, but were halted at a checkpoint controlled by pro-russian separatists. they have now returned to donetsk. in separate developments, ukraine's army says it is continuing to make advances against positions held by pro-russian separatists. now, these pictures are from social media, but they seem to show government forces close to the main rubble stronghold of donetsk. the army has reclaimed a string of key towns in the past few weeks as they attempt to cut the alleged supply routes from russia. however, civilian casualties continue to mount. local authorities in the second rebel stronghold of luhansk says one civilian was killed and ten
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injured in the fighting in the past 24 hours. tom burridge joins us now from kharkiv. let's talk about the attempt to get to the mh-17 crash site, another attempt and another failure. >> sure, clear frustration, i think, for all the international monitors going with those dutch forensic experts, trying to reach the crash site, that large area of country side to the east of donetsk for the fourth day running and being turned back. we believe they were turned back at the rebel controlled checkpoint. the fighting between ukrainian government force and the rebels in that area continue. we believe the ukrainian army gained some ground around the crash site, about up still not clear who controls it. >> with regard to this recent upsurge in violence again, it seems to be getting, if anything, considerably worse. >> yes. i mean, not unexpected if you
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like, because for a long time now, ever since the ukrainian army took another city to the north of donetsk, not far from kharkiv here, when they took that city, everyone thinking that the next target would be donetsk and they have over the last 24, 48 hours gained significant areas around the city. so, for example, a town to the north of donetsk, that is very close to donetsk airport, very close to the main railway station, main road there, so once again, the ukrainian army seems to be tightening the grip of the supply lines what it believes the supply lines are inside donetsk. but the rubbebels control that city. though we have seen gains in last couple of days, taking the city of donetsk will be a much harder process and they'll probably be a much greater human cost for any civilians left in the city when or if that comes. >> will the tactic, do you think, to be to attack or will the tactic to be to surround it
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and strangle the city? >> well, difficult to say. i mean, certainly the tactic at the moment is to surround the city and the ukrainian army seems to have achieved that to a certain extent. they seem to control the roads running east. of course, further east than that part of the you jaukraine t to russia. they seem to be controlling vital supply lines in and out of the city. we expect -- we predict some kind of offensive on the city at some point, the time is very difficult to predict. you would expect they would try to take the city and they have been shelling some positions in the city, but unfortunately some apartment buildings have been hit and civilians have died. so you would think that if there was an offensive on that city of donetsk, it is the regional capital, it has been capital for those pro-russian rebels for the past few months, of their self-proclaimed people's republic of donetsk, if the ukrainian army were to launch an
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offensive it would be at great cost and if they were to achieve it, it would be a big propaganda coup and could be a decisive moment in the war. >> tom burridge, thank you for that analysis live from kharkiv. officials in india say more than 150 people are feared buried under are a landslide that hit a village in the west of the country. around 40 houses are thought to have been buried. rescue workers were on their way to the remote village, which lies about 100 kilometers away from the city of pune. landslides are common during the monsoon season in india. we find out why it is taking time for rescue workers to reach the village. >> one reason it takes so long to reach the area is because it is a hilly area. this lies at the foothills of one of the big mountain ranges in western india, so the roads are quite tricky. it is a monsoon season and has been raining very heavily in this part of the last few days. it is about 200 kilometers east of mumbai, where i'm in right now. and, yes, the estimate is that
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there were about 150 people in this village. what we don't have clarity on right now is when exactly this occurred. some people are saying that it was possibly very early in the morning, while others put the time at about 8:00 a.m. local time. so it is difficult right now to find out whether people were out and about, or whether they were in their homes sleeping. >> the landslides, as we mentioned, quite common in that area. has the weather been extraordinary or has it pretty much been an average year and this is just a very unfortunate tragic accident? >> well, it has been raining as normal. it is expected to rain heavily during this particular month. and for the next month as well. you know, having said that, you know, while landslides, small landslides are quite common, we haven't seen something which, you know, seems to be off this scale, 40 houses trapped underneath the debris, the rubble of the mountain that came down. >> speaking to us from mumbai. stay with us on "bbc world
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news." because still to come, a good day for students on sunset boulevard because of a water main burst flooding much of the university of california. e post for paying on time. and then one day you tap the bumper of a station wagon. no big deal... until your insurance company jacks up your rates. you freak out. what good is having insurance if you get punished for using it? hey insurance companies, news flash. nobody's perfect. for drivers with accident forgiveness, liberty mutual won't raise your rates due to your first accident. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance. you love this game. but does the game love you?
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this is "bbc world news." i'm gavin gray. the latest headlines this hour. israel says it is investigating after tank shells hit a crowded gaza school, being used as a u.n. shelter for refugees. 19 palestinians are reported killed. doctors warn the ebola epidemic in west africa could last until at least the end of the year. driverless cars were once the stuff of science fiction films. but they soon could be coming to a street near you. because here in the uk, the government will be announcing measures to pave the way for them to become a reality from
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next year. our technology correspondent has the details. >> reporter: the motor industry tests a car being put through its paces. the engineer in the driver's seat has taken his hands off the wheel and put on the accelerator. the car is driving itself with a very sophisticated gps system guiding it around the track. this is one of a number of driverless car experiments under way in the uk. but before this research can move forward, legal and insurance issues need addressing. today the government plans to remove some of the hurdles. this car is being tested in a very controlled environment, but from next year, more advanced vehicles with lots of sensors on board will be allowed out on to the open road. and then we'll see how the great british public reacts to the idea of driverless cars. britain is playing catch-up here. google's driverless car has been tested on california's roads for a while.
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and always with a driver ready to take over. there is caution about how fast the vision of a driverless future will be realized. >> we're not going to suddenly see all the vehicles coming on to the road driverless. you will see high levels of automation, and a small number of cars that can be driven safely without a driver. >> reporter: a lot more research is needed. this project is looking at how groups of self-driving cars might learn to interact. the ebola outbreak in west africa continues to spread. with medical charities warning it likely lasts until the end of the year. some airlines have halted flights into liberia and sierra leone as concerns grow about the virus, which can have a 90% fatality rate. it spread through direct contact with blood or bodily fluids of an infected person. and its symptoms include bleeding, diarrhea, and
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vomiting. it was first reported in guinea in march, and has since claimed at least 310 lives there. in neighboring liberia, there have been at least 120 deaths. and at least 220 in sierra leone. but concern has grown since the virus spread to lagos and nigeria, killing an american man there on friday. patrick sawyer's widow has spoken about how he contracted the disease. >> i know how now he got it from his sister, who also died from ebola weeks earlier without them knowing she had ebola. because it has symptoms of other illnesses like malaria, and so he had helped to care for his sister, and that's how he contracted it and didn't know that she had it. not until after she died and her body was tested positive for ebola. >> patrick's widow there.
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we have more about the spread of the virus in west africa. it does seem to be a very worrying picture as the virus is spotted further and further afield. >> it is a worrying picture indeed and medical agencies as you said have warned that it might take another six months before we can contain this outbreak. the problem is that the health workers on the ground where as it is in guinea, in liberia or sierra leone, are facing huge challenges to which the villages where infected people are. a lot of people in those remote areas are reluctant to go to treatment centers, very defiant towards the authorities because it is never really provided health care to the population, and this ebola outbreak is scaring people off. and so people think that the health workers are trying to
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recount to them and are spreading the virus, the complete opposite of what they want to do exactly because they want to help them and want to take them to isolation wards which people think is a death sentence. huge challenge there. the fear is that a lot more cases are still to be discovered in remote areas, and rural areas in sierra leone, liberia, guinea. >> and this warning that effectively this will carry on until the end of the year suggests they are fearing many more deaths. >> yes, exactly. because you have an incubation period between 2 and 21 days. so you need to prepare for the time for potential more cases and then see whether these cases are concerned, whether these cases are treatable, whether they will unfortunately die. there is some people who do make it back from the isolation ward, some people do survive ebola,
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but so far it is about 60% of those infected have died. and the virus can kill up to 90% of those infected. that gives you a picture of how worrying it can be, especially if the virus is spread by airline companies like we have seen with these men traveling to lagos and nigeria there. we're waiting to see whether anybody who had been in contact with these passengers got infected in the meantime. >> tom fessy, thank you very much indeed. uganda activists and politicians are challenging in the constitutional court a draconian anti-gay law passed earlier this year. they argue it subjects people to cruel and unusual punishment and has led to many people facing violence and retaliation. the law imposes life in prisonment on people it called repeat offenders. it led to strong international criticism and some countries cut aid to uganda. the local authorities defended
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the law. the bbc's catherine hunger has been following the event for us and joins us now. this challenge in the law, catherine, is it likely to succeed? >> the key thing the activists are trying to do, the petitioners are trying to do is get an injunction against the -- also looking for an actual repeal of the act by the constitutional courts. it is very difficult to see whether this is going to happen or not. at the moment, they have been able to stop a petition by the government asking for more time. the presiding judge said the government had ample time to tell its case and the hearing could proceed. today the hearing actually began in court. >> and there has been a lot of international pressure on the government. there has been a lot of people within the country trying to pressure the government. you think that will make any
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difference? >> well, one thing we're seeing is a response by the government to western governments. what it calls this development partners. it released a statement earlier this month saying that the government did not intend to discriminate any particular group, especially homosexuals and that they would do everything in its power to make sure that individuals, organizations, they're working with minorities, and would not be discriminated against, would not be pursued by the law. >> and, catherine, had there been in documented cases of violence or extreme violence in the face of some of these suggestions and activists and politicians? >> well, what we got is cases brought forward by activists. we have an incident where homosexual couple or homosexual man was attacked, which is something we saw in the first few days after the bill was
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signed. but it is the very hard to find a police case in itself where somebody has reported and therefore been attacked. so what you do is on the one side, activists saying the cases happen, but the government saying we don't have any recorded cases of such incidents. >> thank you very much indeed. now, take a look at these pictures from the united states of america because an old water main underneath the street near the university of california, well, los angeles campus that is, that burst and then flooded the area. now, authorities say more than 340,000 liters of water escaped every minute. and it took them more than three hours to close off all the right valves. so more than 70 million liters of water in total escaped. no injuries have been reported so far. and there has been no word on what might have caused the break. just time to remind you of our top store ary this hour.
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the united nations has condemned an israeli attack on a school in gaza which was sheltering more than 3,000 people. the united nations says at least 19 were killed in the attack on a school, which was struck without any warning. will you help us find a new house for you and your brother?
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you're watching "gmt." i'm lucy hockings. a deadly dawn strike on another school in gaza. the building was packed with refugees sheltering from israeli shelling, at least 19 people have been killed. the u.n. says they told israel 17 times they were civilians there, and call it a disgraceful act. >> this is surely an affront to all of us, an assault of universal shame. today, the world stands disgraced.

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