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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  August 14, 2014 6:00am-7:01am EDT

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world news. our top stories. a rescue mission much less likely. u.s. forces on mount sinjar find many refugees found their own way to safety. the ceasefire is extended another five days as israeli and palestinians make for a another
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truce. and on his first tour of as asia, pope francis made it clear what will not be there. hello. very warm welcome to you. we start with the crisis in iraq. the u.s. now says it's unlikely to launch an evacuation mission to rescue those stranded on mount sinjar, having fled from islamic state fighters. advisors in the region say there are fewer stranded than originally thought n. a statement, the pentagon said those that remain are in better condition than previously believed and continue to have
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access to food and water we have already dropped. so far, the u.s. has delivered more than 114,000 meals and some 160,000 liters of drinking water. the many thousands that have escaped the mountain to kurdistan are putting pressure on aid organizations and kurdish authorities. u.n. declared it the highest level of emergency there is. meanwhile, islamic state militants are making a dramatic push through the country and massing near the down 2200 kilometers north of baghdad. the move suggests they're getting ready to tighten the front against kurdish fighters. we are joined now live from the kurdish capital irbil. >> reporter: alice, at the moment i'm surrounded. i don't know if you hear the
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helicopters supplying humanitarian aid to many of the refugees stranded up on that mountain and in other parts of this northern part of the country. it's been an extraordinary 24 hours here in iraq. just a day ago, the u.s. said it was considering military operations to get the refugees on mount sinjar rescued. it seems now they sent a small assessment team to the area with 20 special forces. they said the situation is not as dire as originally thought. it was going to be a risky operation. at the moment the u.s. is not moving on that situation. >> reporter: these pictures taken from an iraqi military helicopter her yesterday show there are clearly refugees still on mount sinjar. the question is how many?
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the american team numbering about 20 has flown to the area. they believe there are far fewer than previously thought. it's thought they number in the thousands not the tens of thousands. those that remain are getting aids and are in better condition than previously thought. some have been evacuated by held koptd continuer in scenes like this. hundreds more are in the mountain in the darkness. a rescue mission is far less likely. islamic militants remain around the mountain. the iraqi armed forces appear to be firing on them in these pictures to obvious delight of people on board. refugees continue to pour out of the area with terrifying stories of intimidation by the militants. >> do not change his ready john
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to muslim. they'll kill him by knife. >> with hundreds of thousands of refugees now in northern iraq, the united nations declared the highest level of emergency. local kurdish officials say the situation is critical. >> i am telling you on the ground, on the humanitarian side, it's not good. on the military side, it has been stopped where we were five days ago. those terrorists should go back. they should be withdrawn. people should come back to their homes. they're everywhere in open areas. it is a zpdisaster. >> a number of helicopters were to arrive overnight to bolster military presence in the region. they are said to be in iraq for a possible rescue mission. they're seen air lifting people
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to safety after disaster in the philippines. it's less likely now they'll be used in the rescue mission. >> reporter: it's 46 degrees here in irbil. we can only imagine refugees stuck on mount sinjar. here in the shade it's still extremely hot. no food, shade, water there. they're waiting to be rescued. some have been lucky enough to get out. the u.n. describes this as a category 3, highest level. many are here fleeing the isis take over. the hi the humanitarian situation remains quite dire.
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>> we apologize for the signal that clearly went down during that. it's obvious difficult with our correspondents in difficult to get to parts of the world. now let's move on because in a deal that really came down to the wire, israel and hamas have agreed to extend their ceasefire by five days. as news of an agreement was coming through, so too are reports of fresh fighting. israel launched air strikes in what it said was retaliation for rockets fired from gaza. now the bbc in gaza gave me details on how the ceasefire is holding. >> this extension of the truce period for five days got off to i a shaky start. israeli air strikes on several targets in gaza, mainly open land. israel said that was in response to eight palestinian rockets
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fired from here into southern israel including one before the expiring of the initial truce period. but now things have got much calmer. we can hear the israeli drones overhead. normal life at the moment has resumed in gaza city. i can hear lots of traffic on the road, people going about their business, taking advantage of this period of calm. of course this is also going to give the window that the egyptian negotiators need to try to secure a longer term ceasefire deal with the indirect talks they have been overseeing in cairo. over the past few days, we have heard the big gaps remain between the two sides. israel saying security has to be guaranteed. it wants disarming of groups here in gaza. palestinians say they need an end to the border restrictions imposed on gaza by israel and
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egypt and this has become more necessary because of the fighting over the past month. this huge amount of reconstruction that needs to take place in gaza is facing a humanitarian crisis. >> on that, just tell us about the humanitarian situation inside the gaza strip. >> well, this pause in fighting there's been has allowed us in the past few days like many of the aid agencies to drive more freely around gaza. you get an appreciation of the scale of the damage this fighting has done. there are thousands of homes that have been destroyed. more than 130 factories have been destroyed. this was a source of livelihood. several hospitals are closed after they were caught up in shelling. this is making it much more difficult to get medical treatment to the more than 9,000
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people who have been injured during this latest con -- conflict. now we have extreme measures to get those out of the gaza strip for medical treatment elsewhere. there's aid coming to gaza over the past few days. a big international relief effort to help people here. we heard from the disaster committee in the uk more than 7 million british pounds have been raise there had since they began appeal from the uk public. >> there live in gaza. now a convoy carries aid from moscow to rebel held areas of eastern ukraine has left the southern russian city. kiev says it must cross government control border and it must be coordinated with the red
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cross. >> reporter: the russian aid convoy is on the move again just before dawn. we spotted dozens and dozens of white trucks moving away from a military edge heading out of town. the russians say that on board the 260 lauries are 2,000 tons of humanitarian aid. things like sleeping bags, sugar, grain, rice, baby food for people suffering from the fighting in eastern ukraine. it's unclear what will happen when lorries reach the border. yesterday it was insisted the whole operation had to be
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cleared and coordinated by the red cross. they're suspicion and believe this could be used as a cover for some type of military operation. in eastern ukraine, senior politicians describe the convoy as a provocation. moscow says that's absurd and it's determined to get the aid through. >> the russian president is in crimea where he's meeting with the security council. daniel says several key russian politicians are there too. >> reporter: this is more than just a meeting of security council which is what happened last night. it's a meeting of many of the most senior politicians in russia and crimea. when president putin was last there on victory day may 9th, it was a short visit to celebrate russi russia's victory day in crimea and moscow.
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this is large chunks of the russian government, political establishment in crimea. we believe that much of the public discussion will be about developing crimea. we think about $20 billion worth of redevelopment will be announced today to do with trying to integrate crimea into the russian federations, transport structure, communication structure. just to give you an example, if you go to crimea at the moment and turn on your mobile phone, it hooks onto the ukrainian mobile phone operation. the integrated system is not rooted through russia at the moment. there's things they want to do to establish crimea as part of the russian federation, something few of the rest of the world accept. >> indeed. on this russian aid convoy, we understand it's on the move again after yesterday's
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disruption. do we know where it is now? >> yes. heading south or at least a large chunk is heading south. we expected it initially to head west from there and across the board her in kharkiv region of ukraine. that's a government controlled region of eastern ukraine. our colleagues traveling with the convoy say it's clearly going south at the moment down in the direction meaning it would be able to cross over to a rebel or controlled area of eastern ukraine near luhansk. whether it does that is far from clear. at least the threat for that convoy to drive across the boarder in an area that's controlled by the rebels is very definitely there now. >> daniel for us in moscomoscow. time to get an update. fortunately for us from aaron. >> i thought you said
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unfortunately. >> no, fortunately because you've got important numbers. >> not good numbers out of europe unfortunately. good to see you alice. hello. bad news for euro in your pocket. the region was stagnant in the three months ending in june, second quarter period. germany actually shrank in this period. it hit german firms as well as households. another problem for europe. france remains the sick man. wealth has been stagnant all year. no growth at all. the french finance minister expects very low growth for this year of just half of 1%. they've had to cut that. they were expecting about 1%. they've cut that indeed. more coming up on "gmt" on those
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rather dismal european numbers. the world's largest pc maker, lenovo reported a 23% jump in profits in the last three month period. it's an 18% increase on the year on year. lenovo maintained the must be three ranking in smart connected devices. it doesn't just make pcs. it makes tablets and smart phones and has been the largest maker more than a year now. well done. we'll keep across on that one. we're going to talk about thank you change of silver price. we'll talk about that on "gmt." lots going on. tweet me @bbc aaron. that's it for business now. >> i'm tweeting you as i speak. right. do stay with us on bbc world news. as well as aaron, still to come, russian retaliation for sanctions imposed by the west.
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welcome back. this is bbc world news. the latest headlines. a planned rescue in northern iraq may not be necessary. the u.s. says many of the refugees trapped on mount sinjar have found their own way to safety. in cairo, israel and palestinians agree to extend the ceasefire in gaza for an extra five days. pakistan's capital and other cities have been brought to a stand still by a huge security operation head of an antigovernment demonstration. the protest is led by two prominent leaders. they're calling on prime minister zarif to resign after failing to report fraud in last
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year's election. have the streets of the islamabad and other cities have been brought to a stand still by this? >> we've just been in the capital islamabad. all major exit and entry points are blocked with huge shipping containers. we saw lots of police, troops armed with antiriot gear. so far it seems they're determined not to allow protestors. we're getting reports from the eastern city where they have started the journey with thousands of supporters. other players in the antigovernment demonstrations will be leaving shortly for islamabad. we're getting reports that the government has allowed them to
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take this juourney. they will reach islamabad today. they'll stay as long as necessary and until the prime minister resigns. >> this story has a long way to run. many thanks are there from islamabad. now pope francis has arrived in south korea as his first visit it there as leader of the catholic church. he's expressed hope for peace and reconciliation in a speech to the president and other senior officials there. >> i think it is especially important for us to reflect on the need to give our young people the gift of peace.
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this has all the more reason here in south korea which has long suffered because of lack of peace. i can only express appreciation for efforts being made in favor of reconciliation and stability on the korean peninsula. they are the only sure part for lasting peace. >> pope francis in south korea. violence erupted again wednesday night in the st. louis where an unarmed black teen was shot last week. 300 protestors dispersed. it was the fourth night of protests since the shooting.
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now as we've been hearing, the situation in ukraine is putting a strain on relations between russia and the u.s. washington has imposed tough new sanctions. russia may have found the way to hit back. the space industry is the target. we've been looking at what it could mean if the long standing collaboration in space fell apart. >> when neil armstrong set foot on the moon in 1969 it was the pivotal point in the space race. americans beat the soviets to the moon. it was a moment of u.s. national pride. the two rivals realized they could achieve more by working together. today the americans don't just work with the russians, they depend on them. >> this is the discovery shuttle that took astronauts to space in nearly 30 years. it's in a museum. there's no replacement.
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americans have to pay the russians for a ride from the spacecraft at a cost of more than $60 million a seat. >> the international space station has long served as a symbol of unity in space. russians threatened to put a stop to space taxi rides granting americans travel by astronauts. >> america agreed to build all electronics and the electric power systems. russia agreed to build the fuel systems. so we're joined together in this common endeavor and both need each other critically. the rockets that launch americaameric america's satellites are powered by russia. americans need russian
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technology. now this is under threat. >> this has become a national security concern that we launch all of our satellites on this particular rocket. we can't put up satellites reliably by ourselves now. if russia says we're not giving you more, we would have to scramble for replacement. >> for now, these problems seem a long way away for astrothoughastrothoughnauts on the space station. >> it against russian interest, against american interest and against european interest. >> for many years the alliance in space has survived upheavals. if tensions grow, the space
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. hello. i'm alice with bbc world news. our top stories. a rescue mission now much less likely. u.s. special forces on mount sinjar find many refugees found their own way to safety. the gaza ceasefire is extended another five days as israeli and palestinian negotiators try more a more lasting truce. now this huge russian aid convoy nears ukraine, doubts remain over the final
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destination and what exactly is on those lorries. the world health organization has classified kenya as a high risk destination for ebola triggering one national airline to suspend flight flights. very warm welcome to you. we start with the crisis in iraq because the u.s. now says it's unlikely that it will launch an evacuation mission to rescue refugees stranded on mount sinjar having fled from islamic state fighters. u.s. military advisors in the region say there are fewer stranded than thought. in a statement the president said those that remain are in better condition than previously
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believed and continue to have access to food and water we've dropped. so far the u.s. has delivered more than 114,000 meals and some 160,000 liters of drinking water. many thousands that have escaped the mountain to iraqi kurdistan are putting huge pressure on aid organizations and the kurdish authorities. the u.n. declared the crisis a level three emergency, highest possible level. meanwhile, the news agency reports the islamist state militants are gathering near 2200 kilometers north of baghdad. we have the report from the bbc andy moore. very sadly we can't bring you that report right now. earlier i spoke to bbc in the kurdish capital and she gave me this update.
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>> reporter: extraordinary 24 hours. the situation remains fluid. the u.s. said they were considering military operations to rescue refugees stuck on mount sinjar. they sent a small team of 20 special forces that said the situation is not as desperate and dire as originally feared. there are just a few up there, not tens of thousands originally suspected. many of the refugees from the community are believed to have escaped the mountain in the dead of night. for the time being, united states said they're not condu conducting military which would have been risky any way. that doesn't take away from the major humanitarian crisis. u.n. raised the level to category 3 emergency, the highest level. 400,000 refugees have come to
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irbil in the region of kurdis n kurdistan. now, in a deal that came down to the wire, israel and hamas have agreed to extend their ceasefire by five days. the news of an agreement was coming to. so too were reports of fresh firing. israel launched air strikes in what it said was retaliation for a number of rockets fired from gaza. hamas denied launching rockets from the territory. we were joined earlier live from gaza. we can now talk to her. what is the situation on the ground in gaza? >> well, at moment, the situation remains relatively calm. certainly this extension of the truce period for further five days got off to a shaky start. the israeli military said there were eight palestinian rockets fired from gaza into southern israel including one before the
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original truce period expired. think responded to that with several air strikes in the gaza strip. it was mainly open areas that were targeted. we have not heard reports of injuries or damage to property on either side of the border. for the moment, this truce remains in place, and the hope is this are will give a much longer window to egyptian negotiators overseeing talks between israel and palestinians to secure a longer term ceasefire deal. >> of course these indirect peace talks in cairo are forging ahead, aren't they? >> we understand the israeli delegation is back at the moment consulting leadership. the delegation said they were leaving with the palestinian president. egypt is expected in the coming days to bring the two sides to get the same location again.
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what they do, negotiators go between the two rooms where the different delegations are sitting. this is because hamas does not recognize israel's right to exist. hamas makes up part of the palestinian delegation being the political dominant force from gaza. israelis see a hamas has a terrorist group. that explains why egypt has the key role. it's as well a neighbor to israel and gaza. it has a vested interest in calm being restored here. also, if you look at what's demanded on the palestinian side, they are asking for an easing of tight border restrictions imposed by israel and egypt. egypt will have a role perhaps in opening up the border crossing seen as gaza's gate way to the world. >> many thanks there live in gaza. just want to bring you breaking news this hour.
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artillery shells have hit close to the center of ukraine's separatist held city of donetsk for the first time. eyewitnesses reports are pouring in saying that people have been streaming out of their offices onto the stairwell of the city's main administrative building. that's after they heard loud explosions nearby. a triggering evacuation warning. just a short while later, there were apparently two further blasts from near the is city's center. we'll bring you more on this breaking news story coming out of donetsk as we get it here at bbc world news. meanwhile, a convoy carrying aid from moscow to those rebel held areas of eastern ukraine have left the southern russian city. kiev says it must cross via government controlled border and that any operation must be
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coordinated by the international red cross. bbc steve rosenburg is traveling with that convoy. >> reporter: well, the russian aid convoy is on the move again just before dawn. we spotted dozens and dozens of white lorries moving from the military airfield heading out of town. judging by the road science we've been seeing this morning, the convoy is heading to the region. on board the more than 260 lorries are 2,000 tons of humanitarian aid like sleeping bags, electricity generators, sugar, grain, rice, baby food for people suffering from fighting in eastern ukraine. it's unclear what will happen when these reach the border. yesterday ukrainian authorities
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refused permission to enter the territory insisting the whole operation had to be cleared and coordinated by the international red cross. they're deeply suspicion of this mission. they believe it could be used by russians as a cover for a military operation. senior politicians have described the convoy ads a provocation. moscow says that's absurd and it's determined to get the aid through. >> when while, the russian president vladimir putin said he'll do everything possible to stop the bloodshed in ukraine. he made comments in a visit to ukraine. daniel is in moscow and says several key russian politicians are there as well. >> reporter: this is more than just a meeting of security council which is what happened last night. it's a meeting of many of the most senior politicians in russia and crimea.
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when president putin was will there on victory day may 9th, it was a short visit to celebrate russia's victory day in crimea as well as in moscow where he had been earlier that morning. this is effectively large chunks of the russian government, of the russian political establishment in crimea. we believe that much of the discussion and much of the public discussion at least will be about developing crimea. we think there will be about $20 billion worth of redevelopment announced today. this is going to be with trying to integrate crimea into russian federations, transport structure, communications structure. if you go and turn on your mobile phone at the moment, it hooks to ukrainian mobile phone operators rather than russia. the internet system is not rooted through russia at the moment. there's a lot of work they want
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to do to establish that crimea is part of the russian federation, something which of course very, very few of the rest of the world accepts. >> indeed. daniel, on this russian aid convoy, we understand it's now on the move again after yesterday's disruptions. do we know where it is now? >> heading south or at least a large chunk is heading south. we expected initially it would head west across the border in kharkiv region of ukraine. that's a government controlled region of eastern ukraine. our colleagues that are traveling with the convoy say it's clearly going south at the moment down in the direction. it would be able to cross over into a rebel or controlled area of eastern ukraine near to luhansk. whether or not it does that is of course far from clear. at least the threat to drive
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across the border in an area controlled by rebels is definitely there now. >> daniel there in moscow. south korea's national carrier korean air will temporarily suspend all flights to the kenyan capital because of the ebola outbreak. this comes after the world health organization classified kenya as high risk because it was a major transport hub. ever continuing to stem the spread of the deadly virus in west africa. joining me is the bbc global health correspondent. you've been covering this story for us extensively for months now. why has korean air made this decision in. >> it says it's a precautionary measure to stop the spread of ebola. it sends three flights a week from seoul to nairobi. there are no cases in kenya.
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what's changed is the world health organization has come out and said kenya is an at risk country. this is purely because it's a big transport hub, a lot of flights from west africa to kenya. around 70 every week. neither the world health organization or kenya is saying there should be restrictions on flights. they should carry on as usual. what is happening in affected could be t countries, suggested by the world health organization is that people are screened on their way out of infected countries. in guinea, when i left, my temperature was taken. i was only allowed on the plane once i cleared questioning. that is going on. >> questions being asked as to whether we're seeing a panic over action, some cause. there's no denying severity of
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the spread of the virus. >> we now have more than 1,000 deaths and coming up to around 2,000 cases. what we've seen since that global public health announcement is more money has been asked for. we've heard about the new diagnostic lab set up probably in sierra leone where this has been an increasing problem. that's sort of action we're seeing. really, again, this is what i've been saying since the start of the outbreak when we first started covering it. what needs to happen is people infected need to be identified. whoever they've been in touch with needs to be followed up so health officials can make sure they're not infecting anybody else. we're seeing real resistance to that. a lot of international money now coming in. the world health organization is asking for more. what is still needed on the ground is for the community and
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community leaders to get on board with this so that people start taking the necessary precautions. we're also hearing about staff work in these hospital, still not having the basic protection kits that you need in order not to touch patients and body fluids which is how you catch the virus. that's still not happening in hospitals on the ground i'm hearing. until these basic things are sorted out, we're hearing things will get worse before they get better. >> there's more you've written on the bbc website for anyone wanting more information on this disease. many thanks. she's been covering this extensively. do stay with us on bbc world news. still to come. on his first tour of asia, pope francis warned south koreas that displays of force will not bring peace to the divided peninsula. thousands of families from
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very warm welcome. this is bbc world news. now a planned rescue in northern iraq may not be they. that is our top story. the u.s. says many of the refugees trapped on mount sinjar have found their own way to safety. discussions in cairo continue as israel and palestinians agree to extend the ceasefire in gaza another five days. now, saudi arabia has given the united nations $100 million to fight terrorism. the money goes to u.n. center set up in 2011 after the
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campaign set up by king abdullah funded half a billion for relief of iraqis fleeing the offensive in iraq. joining me many the studio, our security correspondent frank gardener. why have they done this? >> they've been pushing for some time for this center. nobody really took them up on that in saudi arabia. they are probably the most vulnerable or one of the most vulnerable countries in terms of backlash. if you look at jihads taking part in brutal fighting in islamic states, they're saudi arabia people. some of them -- the voices that you hear on tapes with people pronouncing things and people
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having their heads cut off, they're saudis. what did government fears is these people will come back to their own country. they have a vested interest in stopping the state. this sounds weird because people in shiite dominated countries accuse saudi arabia of funding and encouraging islamic state. they have categorically denied this. they have put out denials publicly in the newspapers. there's no denying private donors in saudi arabia and kuwait and other gulf countries have been funding and probably still are funding islamic state. it's not coming from the government. they've got everything to fear from these people. saudi arabia fought a long and bitter insurgent campaign.
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a lot of people died and got blown up. they don't want to see this come back again. $100 million is a drop in the ocean for saudi arabia. it's the world's biggest oil producer. they want to see islamic states stopped. >> always great to get your analysis. many thanks. well, pope francis has arrived. at the beginning of his five day visit, he expressed hope for peace and reconciliation on the korean peninsula. >> i think it is specially important for us to reflect on the need to give our young people the gift of peace.
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this has all the more reason in korea which has long suffered because of lack of peace. i can only express appreciation for efforts being made in favor of reconciliation and stability in the korean peninsula. and they are the only sure part for lasting peace. >> pope francis in south korea. cities in pakistan have been brought to a stand still by a huge security operation ahead of an antigovernment demonstration. the protest is led by two prominent opposition leaders. they're calling on the prime minister to resign failing to investigate fraud in last year's
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election. our correspondent is in islamabad where a protest led by kahn is expected later. >> this is one of the main entry points into islamabad where protestors are expected to arrive later today. the protestors led by the opposition. he wants the prime minister to resign over allegations of fraud in last year's election. the government is determined to prevent the protest. they've got huge shipping containers on roadblocks and armored gear. they have tear gas shells. there's uncertainty and anxiety about what might prevail on the streets of islamabad later today. >> on wednesday we brought you a report about a refugee family living and preparing to move to
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united states. we have their story how they're coping in their new home. 15,000 from the democratic community will make the similar journey to america. find out how that family is settling in. >> just a month into a new life, emmanuel and his family are slowly getting to grips with their fresh routine. for now, the overwhelming choice is a daunting prospect but one day really appreciated. >> translator: there are two clear differences in america, choice and money. here you have so much choice and money to buy things. i can even buy food i don't recognize. >> translator: kids in africa desire more than anyone. back there i had to say no, sorry. here i can give them what they want. >> and it's the prospects for children that motivate the
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families to succeed in their new life. e manuel has enrolled in a job club in hope of finding work. together with other refugees, they have basics of starting a career. for many refugees that come to united states of america, working in a factory is fastest opportunity for employment. the owner is hiring more of them because he finds they're harder working than many americans. >> despite being in the u.s. seven months, he managed to find a job and buy himself a car. >> when i looking back, i didn't have this opportunity. today i have to use it. >> the u.s. currently plans to resettle 15,000 from congo across the country.
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the number here in ss growing. they meet for football and express the change for new life. >> do you not see a difference in in the way we dressed back home and what we see here? are you not afraid your children will dress and behave as americans? >> i think when it comes to dressing, everyone dresses the way they want. if you want to dress the way you did back home, that's fine. no one will have a problem with you. >> the rapid pace of change is exciting and challenging. for many, this culture can be overwhelming. for those that learn the language, it quickly becomes home. >> bbc news spokane washington. the united states says it's unlikely to launch a mission to rescue iraqis trapped by islamist militants on a mountain in northern iraq. advisors in the region say fewer
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are stranded than originally thought. thousands ha s have escape ad escaped the mountain. you're watching bbc world news. thanks for being with us. i missed so many workouts,
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hello. you're watching "gmt" on bbc world news. i'm lucy hockings. our top stories. u.s. says there are fewer stranded in northern iraq than previously thought. it comes after the u.n. declares the highest level of humanitarian emergency saying 1.5 million people are displaced by fighting. hello. i'm live in irbil where helicopters are circling overhead to give aid to displaced

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